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Full text of "Collections of the Maine Historical Society"

ffiffitt^ 



F 

l(o 

>1 2. 3 



INDEX 



TO THE 



COLLECTIONS 



OF THE 



Maine Historical society 



VOLS. I -IX 



PORTIAND, MAINB 

BROWN THUESTON COMPANY, PRINTERS 

1891 



F 

(6 

.M23 



PREFACE. 

The Gothic numerals refer to the volumes ; the Roman numerals 
to the prefatory pages ; the Arabic numerals refer to the pages, and 
when the latter is followed by an a the reference is either to Mr. Fol- 
som's disc6urse, which is paged separately in the first part of the 
second volume, or to the note printed before page one hundred and 
eleven in volume eight. The French prefixes De, La, etc., I have 
entered under the letters L and D when they are a part of the name ; 
when they are not a part of the name they will be found under the 
first letter of the name, thus Du Monts and La Tour are under the D's 
and L's, while Jean Vincent, Baron de St. Castine will be found under 
the S's. To find geographical names the reader will look under the 
proper name and also under the geographical term, as it is often 
customary to use the prefix as a part of the name ; thus we have 
Hudson river and Delaware bay, also River St. Lawrence and Bay of 
F'undy. In the spelling of surnames and the names of the Indians, I 
have generally followed the orthography of the author of each article, 
but in nearly all cases I have referred to another spelling. In many 
cases no Christian names are given in the articles. These I have added 
when I have been able to find them. Very often, however, I have not 
succeeded in my search, therefore I have followed the name with a 
dash, giving any title, such as Capt., Rev., etc., that may belong to 
them. 



COLLECTIONS OF THE 

MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

INDEX — VOLS. I-IX SERIES I. 



Abagadasset, 2. 191; 4. 103. 

Abanaquis, a spelling of Abnaki,6. 214. 

Abbacadusset point, 3. 313. 

Abbamocoko, Abbowocko, the In- 
dian devil, 3. 19w, 96n. 

Abbotsham, Munjoy born in, i. 152, 
258; mentioned, 4. 281, 393. 

Abbott, Jacob, married Miss Yaughan, 
7. 286. 
Prof. John, 5. xxiii; 6. 401, 402; 8. 

176. 
the Eev. John S. C, 5. 292n; criti- 
cised, 7. 305. 
Lydia, daughter of Aaron, 4. 281. 
Moses, 4. 359. 
Philip, 4. 339. 

Samuel, son of Aaron, 4. 281. 
Waldo, 4. 292n. 

William, corporate member of the 
Maine Hist. Soc, i. 11. 

, Squire, of Concord, 4. 342. 

Eev. , of Beverly, 5. lii. 

, of Kingston, 4. 313. 

Abbott's History of Belfast, cited, 5. 
xixn. 

Abenakis, Abenaquis, the, a general 
name for the Indians of Maine, i. 
405 ; generic name not properly used 
4. 97-98 ; other nations of the con- 
federacy, I. 414; divided into four 
tribes, 4. 96; different ways of 
spelling the name, i. 412>i; 6. 204, 
209, 210, 214; means of communica- 
tion not exclusively oral, i. 419-420; 
language of, i. 412, 418; 4. 95-117, 
185-193 ; 9. 259-294, 261 ; compared to 
the Sanscrit, i. 418; a dialect of the 
Algonquin, i. 412; two dialects re- 
main, I. 414; did not use, i. 416; 
their favorite country, i. 454; 4. 98; 
extent of country, 4. 96; 6. 207; 
friends of the Micmacs, i. 413, 422; 
to be protected from the Iroquois, 
I. 433; never conquered by the Iro- 
quois, 1.433; influenced by priests, 
I. 433, 434, 443^44; Vincent Bigot 
among, r. 435; Rdle among, i. 437; 
expedition against ^N^ew England, i. 
434; Rule's influence prevented 
English settlements among, i. 443- 
444; sold canoes to Montressor, i. 
449 ; Montressor in an old camp of, 
I. 453, 459; settled on the St. Law- 
rence, I. 449; jealous of their 



knowledge of the country, i. 451, 
454, 461; friendly to Arnold, i. 515- 
516; lived in Acadia, 7. lOln; called 
Tarentines or Tarran tines, 7. 100; 
mentioned, 4. 96, 97; 5-289; 6. 209; 
7. 44, 46, 59, 61, 76, 82, 83; 8. 332; 
9. 212, 261, 263w. See also Abnaki. 

Abenaquid, 5. 292; 7. 63. 

Abenaquind, 3. 412. 

Abercrombie, General, 8. 263. 
the Rev. ,6.13,31, 36. 

Aberemet, 2. 21. 

Abilie, Henry, i. 133. 

Abington, 2. 146. 

Abinnaway, Pierre, signum of, 6. 258. 

Abissanehraw, 6. 260. 

Abnaki, the, extent of their territory, 
6. 207, 240, 280-281 ; left their name 
impressed on the soil of Maine, 6. 
207, 208; but little known of their 
dialect, 6. 208 ; called Tarentines, 6. 
208; called Owenagungas, 6. 209; 
211-212; different ways of spelling 
the name, 6. 209, 214; meaning of 
name, 6. 209, 213-215; difficult to 
determine the number of tribes of, 
6. 209-210; a generic word, 6. 210; 
different ideas of their country, 6. 
210 ; one of five New England nati ons, 
6. 211; same as Canibas, 6. 212; had 
five villages, 6. 213; an original peo- 
ple, 6. 213; same as the Lenni-Lena- 
pie, 6. 216; like the Hurons, 6. 217; 
acknowledged no ancestral tribe, 6. 
217-218; characteristics of, 6. 218- 
222; had fixed villages, 6. 218; prac- 
tised agriculture, 6. 219; manners of, 
6. 219-220; valor of, 6. 220; friends of 
the French, 6. 221 ; their language 
superior, 6. 222; the head of the 
tribes, 6. 222-223, 225; had a regular 
method of writing, 6. 223, 225 ; books 
in their language, 6. 224; libraries 
of, 6. 224, should be called Wanban- 
akkie, 6. 232; induced to settle in 
Canada, 6. 239; demanded that the 
English should rebuild the church 
at Norridgewock, 6. 240; other de- 
mands, 6. 240-241 ; denied having sold 
land to the English, 6. 241 ; hover- 
ing on the frontiers, 6. 241; Capt. 
Stevens sent to confer with, 6. 241 ; 
condition of in 1858, 6. 243; spell- 
ing book of, 6. 243, 245; vocabulary 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Abnaki, the — continued. 

of, 6. 24:^, 245-249; division of time 
amoni:?, 6. 268-269; names of the 
months, 6. 269; distinct from Hud- 
son's Bay Indians, 6. 271-272; on the 
Kennebec, 6. 281; used to protect 
Acadia, 6. 281; prevented the Iro- 
quois from reaching Canada, 6. 281 ; 
mentioned, 6. 236, 239, 240, 356, 362. 
See also Abenakis. 

Abnaki, Tlie, by Eugene Yetromile, 
6. 203-227. 
grammatical sketch of the language 
of, by the Rev. M, C. O'Brien, 9. 
259-294. 

Abnaquois, a spelling of Abnaki, 6. 214. 

Abnaquotii, see Abnaki. 

Abonnekee, see Abenikis. 

Aborigines, The, Jesuits sent to, i. 
26; contrast between those visited 
by Columbus and Gosnold, 5. 143; 
those on the Kennebec early visited, 
6. 208; had no manner of writing, 
6. 223; their hieroglyphics, 6. 223. 
See Indians. 

Abousett river, boundary of grant 
to Oldham and Dorr el, 2. 47^. 

Abraham, The, at Pemaquid, 5. 169. 

Abuses committed in New England, i. 
35. 

Academies chartered, 1808, 8. 171-172, 
175 ; number of in 1820, 8. 179. 

Academy of Bath, 2. 204; of Science; 
6. 276, 398. 

Acadia, granted to Bu Mont, i. 25; 5. 
325; boundary of, i. 25?i, 27, 28; Du 
Mont's attention drawn from, i. 26; 
supposed origin of the name, i. 27; 
4. 191; 5. 177; name given by the 
French, 2. 16a; extensive country 
covered by, 2. 76a; 5. xxi. 177-178, 
200, 215, 325; 6. 3n; 7. 136; names 
similar, 2. 16n; on De Laet's map, 2. 
17a; ceded to the English, i. 28; 
Sir Thomas Temple governor of, i. 
398^2; 5. 232; the conquest of changed 
the boundary of New England, i. 
435; settled by Poutrincourt, i. 428; 
attempt to settle the boundary of, 

6. 3n; limits of settled, 2. 272, 5. 177, 
330, 7. lOln; 8. 263; the shore of the 
Bay of Funiy, 4. 191; first known 
resident of, 5. 178; conveyed to 
France by Charles I, 5. 200, 215, 251; 

7. 33, 55, New England alarmed by 
the conveyance, 5. 215; became Eng- 
lish territory, 5. 231; 6. 335; 7.83; 
the people secured in their property 
and religion, 5. 231-232; boundary 
established by Enghsh diplomacy, 
5. 330; the French never held undis- 
puted possession of, 6. 3; Razillai 
governor of, 6. 109; 7. 33, 66; La 
Tour claimed the right to govern, 
6. 110; Indians of, in 1724, 6. 240; land 
in granted to Cadillac, 6. 275; the 
Abnakis to be used to protect, 6. 



281 ; many good harbors in, 6. 282 ; 
people of expelled, 1755, 6. 341; 
Dongan laid claim to part of, 7. 47- 
48; Perrot governor of, 7. 48; James 
II laid claim to, 7. 50; de Menneval 
governor of, 7. 51 ; at the mercy of 
the English, 7. 81 ; Indians to be re- 
tained under the French influence, 

7. 82; the boundary as claimed by 
the French, 7. 136; Gov. Shirley a 
commissioner to settle boundary 
dispute, 8. 263; conveyed to de 
Guercheville, 8. 323; considered to 
be a part of Virginia, 8. 326 ; granted 
to Sir William Alexander, 9. 100; 
called Nova Scotia, 9. 100; men- 
tioned, 2. 271; 3. 380, 395, 397, 410, 
412, 419, 421; 5. 256ii, 265n, 293, 295; 
6. Ill, 208, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 224, 
225, 273, 286, 360, 362, 363; 7. 4, 5, 
26, 28, 37, 43, 49, 55n, 59, 6J, 62, 92, 
lOln, 348; 8. 188, 192n, 317, 318, 320, 
331, 319; 9. 35, 97, 102, 103, 108, 109, 
110, 112. History of, see Whipple. 

Acadia and its aborigines, by the Kev. 

Eugene Vetromile, 7. 337-349. 
Acadian peninsula, the, 7. 256 
Acadians, the, expelled from their 
country, 6. 341, 343w; 8. 149-150, 
245}2, 2Sin, 282n; distributed in the 
colonies, 6. 343n; families separated, 
6. 343/i; suffering among, 6. 343n; 
denied their priests, 6. 343n; their 
property destroyed, 6. 343w; sup- 
plied the French fleet, 8. 126; peo- 
pled Nova Scotia, 8. 126, 143; plan 
to secure their allegiance, 8. 126; 
on good terms with the Indians, 8. 
143, 144; permitted to return to 
Nova Scotia, 8. 143; not treacherous, 

8. 144; notoriously honest, 8. 144; 
mentioned, 8. 149. See also French 
Neutrals. 

Acadie, see Acadia. 
Accomenticus, see Agamenticus. 
Account of the Catholic Missions in 
Maine, 1.428-446. 
of New Gloucester, by Isaac Par- 
sons, 2. 151-164. 
of the German setttlement in Wal- 
doborough, by the Kev. John W. 
Starman, 5. 401-406. 
Achmet Kioup rough, 7. 41, 42. 
Acosisco, Indian name of Saco, 4. 103. 
Acteon, 3. 380, 440. 
Act of Incorporation of Maine His- 
torical Society, i. 10. 
Adams, Abraham, received bequest of 
land from Mrs. Mac worth, i. 70h, 
128; moved to Boston, i. 128, 129; 
married Sarah Macworth, i. 128. 
the Rev. Amos, 5. 272. 
and More, land granted to, 9. 378. 

Capt. , of Farmington, 4. 365 

Dr. Clement J., married Abigail Os- 
good, 4. 279n. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



Ebenezer, preceptor of Portland 
academy, 8. 165. 

George, signed petition to Governor 
Bradstreet, i. 2SSn; lived at Fal- 
mouth, I. 319. 

the Rev. George E., 8. 454; Bio- 
graphical notice of the Hon. Rob- 
ert P. DunHp, 7. 3()7-3T0. 

James, fined for inhumanity, i.3S0; 
to be sent out of town for break- 
ing the peace, i. 381. 

John (President), Washington ex- 
pressed pleasure at the number of 
votes he received, 4. 59; on the 
Northeastern Boundary, 8. 11; 
mentioned, 4. 15; 5. 149; 6. 355; 8. 
12, 47, 210n, 219n. 

the Rev. Jojm, a Harvard graduate, 
I. 328; preached in Limerick, i. 
328; lived at Durham and New- 
field, 1.328. 

John Quincy, 5. xxvii ; 6, 421 ,460, 462 ; 
8.847, 350, 352, 414; his journal 
cited, 8. 31. 

Jonathan, married Rebecca An- 
drews, I. 305. 

the Rev. Jonathan, preached at 
Woolwich, 2. 222. 

NTath'aniel, of New Gloucester, 2. 
115. 

the Rev. Nathaniel, his annals of 
Portsmouth cited, i. 35, 59 ; 9. Z06n. 

party vote in Minot, 2. 128, 129. 

Philip, gave a bond for his son, i. 
381 ; amount of land granted to, 
9. 378. 

Pond, 9. 131. 

the Rev. , of Durham, 4. 265, 

267. 

the Rev. , of Newington, 5. Iv. 

Samuel, Governor of Massachusetts, 

8. 176. 

Samuel, amount of land granted to, 

9. 378. 

Simeon, magnesia on his farm, i. 
326. 

Solomon, surveyor, 7. 411. 

the Rev. Solomon, preceptor of 
Washington academy, 8. 165. 

Will and Francis, 7. 296, 

Zabdial, 2. 223. 

Zabdial, B., 8. 414. 

Adderly, , 9. 16, 17, 18, 19. 

Addington, Isaac, 2. 260; 9. 42n, 67n. 

Addison, 7. 202. 

Address of the Rev. George Burgess, 

4.63-91; of William Willis, 5. xvii- 

Ixviii. 
Adeawando, 3. •'^62; 7. 259, 261. 
Administration of the Colonies, cited, 

5, 193n. 
Adventurer, the, 5. 336. 
^gina, 6. 147. 
-^neas, 7. 133. 
-ffiolic dialect, the, 6. 205. 
Africa, 7. 212, 214. 



African trading company formed, 7. 
139n. 

Agaraenticus, Indian name of York, 
4. 104; settlement commenced at, i. 
46, 2. 49n, 80; saw mills at, i. 47n; 
9. 'SOSn; Edward Godfrey in, i. 47n, 
84)1 ; called York, i. 47?i; 2. 49?i, 80, 
85; 4. 104; 8. 391, definition of the 
w^ord, I. 47n; land granted to God- 
frey, 1 . 80 ; land granted to Gorges, 
I. 80; William Hooke lived in, i. 
88^; home of George Burdett. i. 
89, 365 ; home of Abraham Preble, 
I. 94?2; incorporated, i. 94n; 2. 59a; 
8. 391; called Gorgeana i. 94n; 
Thomas Gorges a resident and ma- 
yor of, I. 94:11; 2. 59a; taxed, i. 94n; 
communication with Saco, i. 354; 
settlements east of, i. 354; John 
Baker fled to, i. 3-56; Ruth Gouch 
to stand before the congregation in, 

1. 366; the people of, protest against 
losing grants and privileges, i. 367; 
deputies for, i. 367; home of Capt. 
Walter Norton, 2. 50; fairs to be 
held at, 2. 59a; chartered, 8. 391; to 
be a metropolis, 9. 313, 3l3ii; created 
a borough, 9. 3l3n; division of land 
at, 9. 374; mentioned, i. 120; 2. 35a; 
4. 71; 8. 39J; 9. 304, 307, 310, 314, 
314^1, 317, 318, 336. 

Agamenticus river, visited by Levett, 

2. 80; bouniary of grant to Cam- 
mock, 3. 12; mientioned, 9. 307, 334, 
366. 

Agassiz, Prof. Louis J. R., 6. 347. 

Agawam, 9. 366. 

Age of adventure, 9. 10. 

of reason, 4. 352, 361. 
Aggamoggin, Indian name of Strait of 

Deer Isle, 4. 104. 
Agguncia, the supposed Norumbeara, 

7.99^1; 8.331. 
Agnes, The, employed at Richmond's 

Island, I. 56; 6. 138. 
AgraMan law in Maine, i. 143. 
Agry, David, 7. 284. 

John, 7. 284. 

Thomas, 7. 284. 
Ahaz, 4. 11. 

Ahiamihewintuhangun, 6. 205. 
Ah-me-lah-cog-netur-cook, name of 

the country around the Pejepscot 

river, 3. 319. 
Aiken, Lucy, her Memoirs of the 

Court of Charles I, cited, 2. 61a, n. 
Ainsworth, the Rev. Laban, 5. Iv. 
Aisaidoo, 4. 147. 
Alabama, 8. 80, 361. 
Alarm signals used during the Indian 

wars, 8. 276, 276^. 
Albany, prisoners taken by Indians at, 

4. 156; price of beaver high at, 4. 

175, 179; mentioned, 3. 203; 4. ISO, 

131, 154, 271, 282; 5. Ixxi, 2n, 4w, 134 

201, 257, 258, 265, 276; 6. 238; 7. 

132n, 153m; 8. 139; 9. 30, 31, 183. 



8 



MAINE HISTORICAX. SOCIETY, 



Albany papers, cited, 5. 247, 260. 
the, commanded by Mowat, 7. 123 ; 

off Falmouth, 7. 123. 
river, 4. 97. 
Alber, Leonard, signed petition to 

Massachusetts, 5. 241. 
Albemarle, the Dake of, his present 
to Lady Phipps, 8. 230n; 9. 18; in- 
terested in Sir William Phipps' 
treasure hunting, 9. 14; at Jamaica, 
9. 21. 
Albert, Francis, 7. 61. 
Albion, 8. 390. 

Alcock, John, elected military officer 
for York, i. 373; signed petition, 
to Cromwell, i. 394; 9. 381; sued 
by Godfrey, 9. 316n; amount of 
land granted to, 9. 378. 
Joseph, military officer for Kittery, 

1. 373. 
Alcot, Job, 9. 34. 
Alcuin, 7. 449. 

Alden, Dr. Abiather, suspected of be- 
ing a tory, 2. 1.50; 3. 189, 190, 
199n; attacked by a mob, 2. 149; 
3. 189-190, 191; forced to make 
confession, 2. 149-150; a patriot, 

2. 150; moved to Saco, 3. 191. 
John, in New York, 5. 29; vessel 

seized, 5-29; the same returned, 
5. 30; traded with the French at 
Castine, 7. 66; mentioned, 5. 27. 
Peter O,, 5. xxxiv. 
the Kev. Timothy, i. 155. 

Aids, Mrs. , 4. 324. 

Aldworth family, one of enterprise, 5. 
149 ; connected with the first step 
toward England's colonial great- 
ness, 5. 153. 
John, son of Thomas, 5. 153; death 

of, 5. 153. 
Robert, empowered Shurt to pur- 
chase Monhegan, i. 36; 2. 50a; 5. 
171 ; sent patent to Shurt, i . 36-37 ; 
patent granted to, i. 80; 7. 135; 
9. 367 ; remembered for his public 
spirit, 2. 50a-51a; his patent con- 
flicted with that of John Brown, 2. 
87n; a friend of Hakluyt, 5. 152, 
171; his name given to a moun- 
tain, 5. 153; sent out Pring, 5. 177, 
195; patent given in full, 5. 207- 
214; date of his birth and death, 
3.51a; 5. 153-154, 226; Giles El- 
bridge his heir, 2. 51a; 5. 154; 
mentioned, i. 39; 5. 196, 197, 214. 
Thomas, mayor of Bristol, 5. 150; 
friend of Hakluyt, 5. 150-151 ; let- 
ters to Walsingham, 5. 150, 151- 
152; death of, 5. 152, 153; his mon- 
ument, 5. 153. 

Alewives abundant, 8. 299. 

Alexander of Macedon, 6. 147, 148. 

Alexander, James, taken prisoner at 
Falmouth, i. 302; went to Boston, 
I. 302. 



Alexander — continued, 
family settle in Warren, 6. 21. 
Sir William, James I gave a grant 

to, I. 34; 4. 221; 6. 336; 7. 27; 9. 

100; extent of grant, i. 34, 34w, 79; 

4. 221; 7. 27; 9. 101; an associate 
with Capt. John Mason, i. 34; 2. 
47-48; carried French settlers to 
Yirginia, i. 34; created Earl Ster- 
ling and Viscount of Canada, i. 
67n; received grant from the Ply- 
mouth Company, i. 79, 81; 8. 184; 

* the territory assigned to, 2. 48; 
called to New Scotland, 2. 48; 
date of his ISTova Scotia grant, 5. 
In; 6. 336; grant confirmed, 5. In; 
his patent violated by the king, 

5. 231 ; made only feeble attempts 
to colonize, 9. 100;* released part 
of the grant to the king, 9. 101 ; 
his roll of baronets slow in grow- 
ing, 9. 101 ; sent Sir David Kirk to 
rapture New France, 9. 101-102; 
his plans disclosed to La Tour, g. 
103 ; interested with La Tour,9. 103 ; 
enrolled La Tour a knight, 9. 104; 
surrendered land to the king's 
commissioners, 9. Ill; sold his 
right to La Tour, 9. 111. See 
Sterling, Earl of. 

Sir William jr., governor of Port 
Boyal, 9. 102. 
Alexandria, 4. 295, 296; 7. 413. 
Alford, James, signed treaty of 1713, 

6. 254; autograph of, 6. 254. 
John,proprietor at Pemaquid, 5. 302. 

Alfred, king of England, 2. 59a. 

Alfred, the Rev. Nathan Douglass a 
pastor in, i. 326n; mentioned, 4. 
411; €.366; 8. 301^1, 391, 397. 

Alfric, 7. 449. 

Alger, Andrew, his daughter married 
Elias Oakman, 1.209; 3. 82; set- 
tled at Scarborough, i. 2l3n, 256^1, 
319; killed by the Indians, i. 213, 
29571, 3. 104, 104/1, 105; his chil- 
dren, 1. 213n, 256n, 319; his widow 
married Samuel Walker, i. 214n; 
a daughter married John Palmer, 
I. 256m; 3. 82; signed petition to 
Governor Bradstreet, i. 283^; 
lived at Dunstan, 3. 26-27 ; engaged 
in fishing at Stratton's Island, 3. 
27; moved to Saco, 3. 27; pur- 
chased land of Indians, 3. 27; 
deed to, given in full, 3. 27-28; 
site of his house, 3. 28; his name 
forged by Cleeves, 3. 40; guardian 
of Giles Robert's children, 3.77; 
a daughter married John Ashton, 
3. 82; his house unsuccessfully 
attacked by Indians, 3. 104; owned 
land on the Neck, 3. 105; men- 
tioned, 1.319,382; 3-73,74. 
Andrew jr., son of Andrew, i.213n, 
319; moved to Boston, i, 214n; a 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



master mariner, i. 214n; lived at 
Falmouth, i. 319; his daughter 
married Matthew Collins, 3. 105; 
killed, I. 2Un; 3. 105, 135; chil- 
dren of, I. 214n. 
Arthur, brother of Andrew, settled 
at Dunstan, 3. 26-27; purchased 
land of the Indians, 3. 27; deed 
in full, 3. 27-28; site of his house, 
3. 28; submitted to jurisdiction of 
Massachusetts, 3. 46-47 ; a grand- 
juryman, 3. 49; guardian for the 
Koberts children, 3. 77; killed, 3. 
104, 104n, 105; his widow moved 
to Marblehead, 3. 105; had no 
children, 3. 105; mentioned, 3. 53, 
54, 76, 154. 
Arthur, son of Andrew, settled in 
Scarbororough, i. 213n; killed by 
Indians, i. 213; had no children, 
3. 213>i; acknowledged the gov- 
ernment of Massachusetts, i. 386; 
a commissioner, 1. 197; wounded, 
I. 295; mentioned, i. 91, 171, 383. 
Mrs. Arthur, moved to Marblehead, 

3. 105. 
Elizabeth, daughter of Andrew, i. 
213; 3. 82; married John Palmer, 
i.213n, 256n;3. 82. 
Elizabeth, daughter of John, mar- 
ried John Milliken, i. 214; 3. 105, 
218. 
Estate, owned by John Milliken, 3. 

105, 218. 
falls, 3. 167. 
family, 3. 101. 

Joana, daughter of Andrew, i. 209, 
3. 82 ; married first Elias Oakman, 
I. 209; 3. 82; second John Mills, 
I. 209, 21Sn. 
John, son of Andrew, i. 213^; 3. 82, 
105 ; married Mary Wilmot, 3. 105 ; 
his children, i.214n; 3. 105; site of 
his house, 3. 82 ; his daughter mar- 
ried John Milliken, i. 214; 3. 105, 
218; mentioned, 3. 28. 
Matthew, son of Andrew, 3. 105; 
moved to Boston, i. 214n; master 
mariner, i. 214n; accompanied 
Phipps to Canada, 3. 105; died of 
ship fever, 3. 105-106. 
* Thomas, signed petition, 1672, to 
Massachusetts, 5. 241. 
Tristram, settled at Blue Point, 3. 
24. 
Algic family, the, 6. 210, 218, 220; 9. 

268. 
Algier Eose, the, 9. 11, 12, 13. 
Algonkins, see Algonquins. 
Algonquins, the, the Abnaki, a dia- 
lect of, I. 412; called the Chippeway 
and Lenni-Lenape, i.412; 4. 97, had 
a village near Quebec, i. 441; as- 
sisted by the French in the war 
with the Iroquois, 2. 67; their lan- 
guage the fiAest and most universal, 



I. 413; 6. 222; origin unknown, i. 

427; mentioned, 4. 97; 6. 212, 263; 

9. 268, 273, 274, 274n, 278, 290. 
Alleghany, meaning of, 4. 115. 

mountains, 4. 114; 9. 246. 
Allemants, L', 7. 58. 
Allen, Arnold, i. 535. 

Betsey, died, i. 333. 

Bozoun, purchased property of Har- 
wood, I. 270. 

Charles, 8. 89. 

David, 4. 231. 

Edward, received land from his 
father, i. 157; sold part of it to 
George Bramhall, i. 127, 241; 
lived at Dover, i. 241. 

Elijah, died, i. 333. 

Col. Ethan, i. 489. 

Francis, 4. 231. 

Frederick, 7. 415, 458; 8. 363. 

Mrs. Frederick, 7. 405. 

Hon. Frederick, lived in Gardiner, 

6. 41 ; a member of the Maine 
His. Soc.,'6. 41 ; admittted to the 
bar, 6. 41; mentioned, 6. 359; The 
Early Lawyers of Lincoln and 
Kennebec Counties, by, 6. 39-81. 

Hope, purchased land of Cleeves, i. 
126, 241; 6. 132; extent of pur- 
chase, I. 126-127; bequeathed the 
same to his son Edward, i. 127; 
took possession of the Bramhall 
farm, i. 154. 

Isaac, I. 119. 

John, commissioned justice of the 
peace, 5. 69, 102; a sheriff, 5. 73; 

7. 158; 8. 194n; signed petition of 
1672 to Mass., 5. 241; assaulted by 
John Sellman, 8. 194-195; men- 
tioned, 4. 230; 5. 57, 64, 65, 88, 94. 

Joshua, Mortality in Augusta, by, 5. 

431-435. 
Margaret, died, i. 333. 
Mary, 2. 235; her land claim at 

Sheepscot, 2. 234; 4. 231. 
Moses, 2. 125. 
Thomas, 4. 231, 363. 
the Rev. Thomas, first minister of 
Pittsfield, 5. xlvi; married Eliza- 
beth Lee, 5. xlvi; at Harvard col- 
lege, 5. xlvi; death of, 5. xlvi. 
William, married the daughter of 
Stephen Titcomb, 4. 38; Sandy 
River Settlement, by, 4. 29-40. 
the Rev. William, corporate mem- 
ber of the Maine Hist. Soc, i. 11 ; 
president of the same, i. 498n; 5. 
xlv ; son of the Rev. Thomas, 5. xlvi ; 
birth of, 5. xlvi; graduated from 
Harvard college, 5. xlvi; licensed 
to preach, 5. xlvi ; regent of Har- 
vard, 5. xlvi; engaged in literary 
pursuits, 5. xlvii; stationed at 
Pittsfield, 5. xlvii; married M. M. 
Wheelock, 5. xlvii; president of 
Dartmouth college, 5. xlviii ; presi- 



10 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Allen, the Rev. William — continued, 
dent of Bowdoin college, 5. xlix- 
li; assisted Webster and Worces- 
ter in preparing their dictionaries, 
5. xlix-1; various works pub- 
lished by, 5. 1; moved to North 
Hampton, 5. 1-li; diit'erent edi- 
tions of his American historical 
and biographical dictioniries 
published, 5. xlvii-li; mentioned, 
4. 9; 5. xvii, li; 6. 358; his bio- 
graphical dictionary cifced, 3. 
324; 6. G6n; Hoosatunnuk cited, 5. 
xlvii-xlviii, li ; Junius Unmasked, 
cited, 5. li; Memoir of John Cod- 
man, cited, 5. li ; Memoir of Eleazer 
Wheelock, cited, 5. 1; articles 
by viz. : Bingham Land, 7. 351-360; 
now and then, 7. 267-287; Settle- 
ments on the Sandy River, 4. 29- 
41); Statistics of Norridgewock, 7. 
288-289. 

Capt. , of New Yineyard, 4. 

310, 333, 342. 

Col. , 6. 103. 

the Rev. , of Falmouth^ 3. 160n; 

7. 221. 

, pretended to own land in New 

Dartmouth, 5. 98-99. 
Allenstown, 4. 298. 
AUerger, 6. 325. 

Allerton, Isaac, visited Pemaquid, 5. 
198-199; first to meet the Arbella, 5, 
199; a renegade from Plymouth, 5. 
204 ; set up a company of traders, 
5. 201; 7. 31; agent for The Under- 
takers, 7. 30; mide voyages to Eng- 
land, 7. 30; 8. 203 ; induced to employ 
Ashley, 7. 30; dishonest tow.ird 
the Pilgrims, 7. 31; joined in trade 
with Vines, 7, 31 ; obtained a grant 
on the Kennebec, 8. 205 ; mentioned, 
3.2171. 
Alliance, tlie, 7. 335. 
Allin, Arnold, juryman, i. 535. 
Alline, Elizabeth, i, 378. 
Alliset, John, deposition concerning 

Cleeves' house, i. ij-^n. 

Allison, Ralph, received deed from 

Henry Watts, 3. 22-23; lived at Blue 

Point, 3. 83, 120; mentioned, 3. lOQn. 

All Saints' church, Maiden, 3, xvi. 

AUston, Washington, 3. 251, 252, 5. 

xlvii; 7. 408. 
AUyen, see Allen. 
Almanac for Indians, introduced by 

Vetromile, 7. 344, 346. 
Almouchiquois, the, 7. 257. 
Alna, 4. 211; 6.j56, 57; 9. l-^-^J, 135, 136. 
Alnambay Uli Awickhigan, 6. 205, 269. 
Alnwick, 6. 167. 
Alogny, Marquis D', 7.82. 
Alpine, the Clan, to be exterminated, 
6. 6; see McGregors. 

Alsop, , killed at Falmouth, i.302. 

Alva, 2. 229. 



Alwington, 4. 239. 

Amalingans, the, settle near Norridge- 
wock, I. 420; an unconverted peo- 
ple, I. 438; addressed by Rale, i. 
438; their answer, I. 439-440; mes- 
sage to from Rale, i. 440; the reply, 
I. 440; visited by Rale, i. 440. 
Araacongan river, land near deeded 

to Munjoy, i. 553. 
Amariscoggin, Indian name for An- 
droscoggin, 4. 104. 
Amasacontoog, 6. 250. 
Amasaguanteg, the, 3. 357. 
Ambergris, found in Maine, 5. 360. 
Ambrosecoggan, same as Androscog- 
gin, 4. 95. 
Amalecites, the, 6. 236. 
Amenquin, visited the colonists, 3. 307. 
Ameradeath, John, signed petition to 

Charles II, 1.402. 
America, the coast not settled before 
1603, I. 25; English residents in 
Leyden determined to go to, i . 33 ; 
the Belgium or Flanders of, i. 
403; material for the early history 
of deficient, 2. la; England had 
little interest in, 2. 18a-19a; place 
first visited by Weymouth, 2. 22a; 
reasons for and means of renew- 
ing the plantations in, 2. 16-17; 
Popham interested others in, 2. 
20; French power in destroyed, 3. 
176 ; geographical discovery in due 
to the fisheries, 5. 144-145; first 
English possession in, 5. 145; 
ships sent to discover the north 
part of, 5. 152; colonies in influ- 
enced by European politics, 5. 201 ; 
England was excited over the 
marvelous discoveries in, 5. 343- 
344; annual emigration to from Ul- 
ster county, 6. 10 ; first state paper 
written in, 7. 303; mentioned, 2. 
8, 13, 15, 44, 76, 138, 239, 257, 258, 
261,262,265,274,284; 3.38, 172, 
230, 287; 4. 10, 67, 85, 240, 257, 
304, 313, 316; 5. 6, 7, 10, 59, 70, 
81, 95, 125, 126, 147, 175, 177, 251, 
256^i, 282n; 6. 150, 157, 205; 7. 66, 
134, 211, 212, 234, 249, 364, 380, 
404, 409, 432; 8. 114, 125, 184, 
242n, 264, 320, 403, 412, 445; 9. 
105, 255, 334, 338, 342, 346, 347; 
349, 356, 357, 358, 367, 374. See 
North America. 
Painted to the Life, see Gorges, 

Ferdinando. 
Pars Quarta, see De Bry, Theodore. 
American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences published Rale's Dic- 
tionary, 4. 95, 97; mentioned, 5. 
Ivi; 6.374. 
Advocate, the, 7. 284. 
Almanac, cited, 6. 304n. 
Antiquarian Society, publications 
of cited, 3. 114; 5. 142, 214; 6. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



11 



212, 214, 214n, 215, 216; g. 119n, 
120^. 
Bible Society, 7. 368. 
Biography, see Belknap, Jeremy. 
Board of Foreign Missions, 7. 378. 
coinage, 6. 135-137. 
colonies, i. 486; declared indepen- 
dent, 6. 335. 
continent, primitive inhabitants 

dwindling away, i. 8. 
Historical Record, cited, 9. I69n. 
loyalists to be settled in New Ire- 
land, 7, 201. 
manufactures, Washington dressed 
in when inaugurated, 4. 54; re- 
marks on by, A. G. Bobbins, 4. 
49-61. 
Marathon, 3. 244. 

Philosophical Society, publications 
of, cited, 6. 211, 214, 216, 217, 222, 
22371. 
Quarterly Register, cited, 5. 403. 
Seamen's Friend Society, i. 352n. 
Ameriscoggin river, 3. 323. 
Ames, Benjamin, corporate member 
of tlie Maine Hist. Soc, i. 11, 12; 
mentioned, 4. 7; 6. 369. 
John, 4. 3G1, 362, 390. 
Moses, 4. 278. 

^, of Sharon, 4. 366. 

Amesbury, 4. 242^, 267. 
Am3riscoggin, Indian name of the 

Androscoggin, 4. 95. 
Amherst, Mass., 4. 264. 

N. H., formerly Narraganset Town- 
ship No. 2, 2. 144; incorporated, 
2. 144; population of, 2. 144; men- 
tioned, 2. 131, 150. 
Gen. Jeffrey, sent Major Rogers to 
fight the Abnakis, 4. 242, 278n. 
Amiens, Sir Ferdinardo Gorges at, i. 

545. 
Amityonpontook, Indian name of 
Levviston falls, 3. 322, 323, 333; 4. 
103. 
Am nirascoggin Indians, 3. 357; 6.261. 
Am n3guaticic lake, i. 50S, 513. 
Ammon3oggan,Amm3scoggin,land at, 
cleared by Indians, 1. 119; tract at, 
purchased by Munjoy, i. 129, 257; 
land granted to Mary Man joy; i. 
255; Miiajoy's house destroyed, i. 
258 now Congin, i. 258^2; definition 
of, i.258?i; mjntioned, 1. 153; an In- 
dian name for Androscoggin, 4. 95, 
104. 
AmniDscoggin falls, 3. 333; the larg- 
est in the river, 3. 323. 
river, 3. 323, 362, 434. 
Amonascoggans, the, 5. 253. 
Amoriscoggin, derivation and defi- 
nition of, 4. 189. 
Amory, Jonathan, married a daughter 

of James Sullivan, 6. 48n. 
Amory, Thomas C, Life of James 
Sullivan, cited, 6. 48^1. 



Amoscogon river, 6. 250, 250; a name 

of the Androscoggin, 4. 95. 
Amoskeag, 2. 145. 
canal lottery, 8. 164. 
falls, 6. 236. 
Amours, Charlotte d', daughter of 
Louis, 7. Ihi^ 78; married Anselm 
de St. Castine, 7. 71 ?i, 78. 
D\ de Choufours, 7. 7bi, 78. 
Amphil Church, 5. In. 
Amsterdam, 6. 322, 332. 
Amunition, law concerning, 5. 53, 78. 
Ana-Baptists in Boston, 6. 285 ; former 

name of Baptists, 7. 223. 
Anangoit, an Indian sagamore, 4. 229. 
Anasagunticooks, the, 4. 96; 9. 212. 
Ancient charters, cited, 3. 131?i. 
Dominions of Maine, see SewalL 

Rufus K. 
Pemaquid, An Historical Review, 
by J. Wingate Thornton, 5. 139- 
304. 
Penobscot, by the Hon. J. E. God- 
frey, 7. 1-22, 103-104. 
Settlement of Sheepscot, by the Rev. 
David Cushman, 4. 207-228. 
Anders, see Andrews. 
Anderson, Adam, his Historical and 
Chronological Deduction of Trade 
and Commerce, cited, 6. 183n. 
Bartholomew, 5. 57. 
family, of Scotch origin, 6. 14; set- 
tled in Sterling, 6. 23. 
Hugh J., 9. 175. 
Thomas, 5. 57. 

, of Phillips' Gore, 4. 387. 

Andover, Mass., 2. 144, 165, 240, 281; 
3. 114, 225; 4. 265, 280n, 284?2; 5. 
Ixii; 7.235, 372, 407; 9. 43. 
N. H., Scotch-Irish settled in, 6. 11 ; 
mentioned, 4. 273, 287, 297, 386; 6. 
36; 8. 481, 485, 486, 493, 508, 509. 
Institution, 4. 253. 
records, 3. 114. 

Theological Seminary, 7. 372; 8. 481, 
485, 486, 508. 
Andre, Major John, 8. 59. 
Andrew, Gov. John A., 7. 274; 8. 440. 
Andrews, Amos, of Scarborough, 3. 
207. 
Lieut. Amos, i. 501n. 
brothers, the, 4, 360. 
David, 4. 360, 387, 389. 
Dorcas, married Ebenezer Daven- 
port, I. 305, 308; birth of, i. 305n; 
death of, I. 306w. 
Lieut. Elisha, consulted with Major 
Church, I. 296; a son of James i. 
305, 319; lived at New Casco, i. 
319; in command at Sagadahoc, 5.. 
277. 
Ephraim, 3. 173, 180. 
Andrew's island, former name of 
Bangs' island, i. 146n; origin of 
name, i. 146n; colonists fled to, i. 
220; mentioned, i. 149. 



12 



MAIKE HISTOEICAIi SOCIETY. 



Andrews, James, lived at Falmouth, 
I. 69, 112, 180n, 215, 305, 319; 
received grant from Cleeves, i, 
lit; received a tract of land 
from Mrs. Mac worth, i. 128; 
moved to Boston, i. 128-129, 
217, 305, 319; consented to the 
agreement between Tucker and 
Jordan, i. 131; signed the pe- 
tition to the General Court, i.l44; 
owner of Bangs' island, i. 146^, 
149; his title confirmed by Dan- 
forth, I. 149; conveyed land to 
John Rouse, 1. 150; married Sarah 
Mitton, I. 157, 305; born in Saco, 
I. 305; lived near the Presump- 
scot, I. 305, 308; death of, i. 305, 
319; children of, i. 305-306; men- 
tioned, 1.126; 5. 63, 64. 
Jane, married Robert Davis, i. 305, 

306; mentioned, i. 70, 370. 
Jane, widow of Samuel, married 

Arthur Macworth, i. 69. 
Jane, wife of John, guilty of sell- 
ing by false weight, i, 370; her 
punishment, i. 370. 
the Rev. Jedediah, 6. 30. 
Joane, admonished not to entertain 

Ann Billing, i. 377. 
John, surety for his wife, i. 370. 
Jonathan, served in the Revolution, 

3. 203. 
Jonathan, of Scarborough, bio- 
graphical notice of, 3. 207. 
Joshua, son of James, i. 306. 
Josiah, son of James, i. 306. 
Ralph, signed petition of 1672, 5. 

240. 
Rebecca, married Jonathan Adams, 

I. 305; mentioned, i. 128. 
Samuel, died at Saco, i. 69, 305; 
widow of, married Arthur Mac- 
worth, I. 69, 112, 305; father of 
James, i. 69, 305; ascertained the 
latitude of the Merrimac river, i. 
101; mentioned, i. 117, 202. 
Samuel, endowed Bridgton acade- 
my, 8. 173. 

, Archdeacon, 3. 184. 

Andries, Lucas, master of The Elias, 

5. 136. 
Androscoggin, meaning of, 4. 115. 
county, 4. 45. 
dialect, 6. 243. 
falls, 3. 323, 330. 

Indians, at war with the English, i. 
215; commanded by Robinhood, 
I. 215; last of the tribe- 2. 112; 
mentioned, 2. 147, 205; 3. 320, 
327; 7- '^05. 
river, part of it called the Pejep- 
scot, X. ^On; 5. 323; a boundary 
of Way's grant, i. 40n, 80n; the 
Yorks purchased land on, i. 318; 
a roadway for the Indians, i. 333; 
supposed to have been visited by 



Waymouth, 3. 281; 5. 323; ac- 
count of the settlements on, 3. 
311-324; probably ascended by 
Popham, 3. 311; the Indian name 
of, 3. 323?i, 324; 4. 95, 104; the 
name belonged to only a part of 
the river, 3. 324; 4. 95, 108; bound- 
ary of Wharton's grant, 3. 325- 
326 ; the banks of flourished under 
the house of Brunswick, 4. 74; 
formerly the Pejepscot, 5. 323; 
mentioned, i. 502, 513; 2. 35a; 3. 
273, 321, 323, 329, 331, 332, 333, 
359; 4. 76, 79, 104, 110, 304, 305, 
338, 346; 5. 283, 327, 330n; 6, 15, 
210, 213, 243, 314; 7. 273, 277, 283, 
299, 304; 8. 25, 226n, 266; 9. 209, 
212. 
valley, 8. 368. 
Androscoggin and Kennebec railroad, 

6. 69; 8. 369,370. 
Andros, Sir Edmund, people of Maine 
petition to for a confirmation of 
their titles, i. 113, 116n, 190n, 
210n, 317; letter to Ensign Sharp, 
I. 199n; a friend of Jocelyn, i. 
199n ; sent a force to preserve the 
interests of the Duke of York, i. 
230; appointed Jordan a justice, 
I. 235n; John Palmer his council- 
or, I. 256w; before his arrival mill 
rents supported Fort Loyal, i. 
270r; people petition that quit- 
rents be abated, i. 272; his arrival, 
I. 274; 7. 53; governor of Kew 
England and New York, i. 274; 5. 
255, 264, 265; 6. 112; 7. 53, 54, 158; 
8. 191; mode of government, i. 
274; tyranny of, i. 274, 282, 283; 
required landholders to obtain 
new patents, i. 274; 9. 25, 26; 
Edward Tyng a councilor of, i. 
274, 282, 316; Davis a councilor, 
I. 282; favored Davis and Tyng, 
I. 282, 285; ordered Lawrence to 
give up property, i. 282n; his 
downfall a joy to Massachusetts, 
I. 282; his arbitrary power sup- 
ported by Davis and Tyng, i. 285; 
in New York, i. 289, 290; 5. 10, 
394; 7. 156; released Indian pris- 
oners, I. 290; issued a proclama- 
tion to raise a force to march to 
Pemaquid, i. 290; 3. 114; 5. 394; 
a fruitless expedition, i. 290; his 
authority subverted, i, 291; his 
report on the distribution of 
forces, I. 291: seized and sent to 
England, i. 297; 3. 136; 5. 273; 7. 
159; 8. 191, 192n; 9. 26; date of 
his death, i. 297n; survey made 
for, I. 316; petition of Mary Web- 
ber to, I. 317; Jesuits guard 
against his influence, i. 434; 
autograph, i. 275; sent help to 
Pemaquid, 3. 114; 5. 394; plun- 



mBEX TO <;OLLECTIOI!^S 



13 



dered the house of Castine, 3. 134; 
5. 268, 268n; 5. 394, 395; 6. 112, 
191; 7. 54, 55n; built a fort at 
Pejepscot, 3, 320n; attempted to 
establish the government of the 
Duke of York, 5. 3, 255; on the 
mode of obtaining Indian lands, 
5. 168-169; commissioned gov- 
ernor of Maine, 5. 250, 255; in- 
efficient, 5. 255; his character, 5. 
255, 259, 265, 268-269, 269n, 274, 
275, 275?i, 279w, 393; 7. 160; de- 
sired fugitives from Maine to go 
to New York, 5. 255; opposed by 
Massachusetts, 5. 255-256; labored 
to criminate Massachusetts, 5. 257- 
258, 260, 268, 269; winked at the 
beginning of King Phillip's war, 
5. 258, 268; a Munchausen, 5. 259; 
tried to create a fishing monopoly, 
5. 259; sent colonists to Pema- 
quid, 5. 264; enlarged the county 
of Cornwall, 5. 266; visited Pema- 
quid, 5. 267; quarreled with Don- 
gan, 5. 267; provoked a war by 
plundering Castine' s house, 5. 268, 
268^^; 7. 56, 56n; villainy at Pem- 
aquid, 5. 268; a friend to the In- 
dians, a traitor to the English, 5. 
268-269, 269n; ordered the people 
of Maine not to fortify their 
houses, 5. 269; placed papist 
officers over English soldiers, 5. 
269; his treachery ill concealed, 5. 
271; hastened back to Boston, 5. 
271; a liar, 5. 274, 275, 275w, 393; 
deposition of, 5. 275; import of 
his letter of 1688, 5. 273-274, 
274n; left public affairs in an 
alarming condition, 5. 275-276; 
played the tyrant in Virginia, 5. 
275n; probably built a sloop at 
Pemaquid, 5. 279; a secret friend 
of the French, 5. 278; did not 
build forts, 5. 393; sent people to 
Boston, 5. 395; arrested Capt. 
Floyd for asking for provisions for 
the garrison, 5. 395-396; weak- 
ened the frontiers by drawing off 
the garrisons, 5. 396; did not pay 
the people for their services, 5. 
396; number of forces he brought 
to America, 5. 390-397; he alone 
can tell what became of the 
forces, 5. 397; asked St. Castine 
to render allegiance to the Eng- 
lish, 6. 112; hated in New Eng- 
land, 7. 53-54; paid a visit to 
Maine, 7. 54; sent a notice of his 
coming to St. Castine, 7. 54; con- 
ditions he gave for returning St. 
Castine' s property, 7. 55; held a 
conference with Indians at Pemar 
quid, 7. 55, 55n; disaster the re- 
sult of his visit, 7. 56, 567i; Math- 
er's opinion of, 7. 56; enmity to 
increased, 7. 56w, 57w,; made a 



good governor of Kew York, 7. 
159; his father a master of cere- 
monies, 7. 159; attached to roy- 
alty, 7. 160; in Virginia, 7. 160; 
over zealous but not bad, 7. 160; 
engaged in founding a college, 7. 
160; mentioned, i. 95n; 2. 65n; 3. 
S2n; 5. 23, 33, 38, 70, 86, 95, 105, 
127, 131, 283, 395; 6. 189n; 7. 58, 
68; 8. 187, 190; 9- 21, 23/1, 56n; his 
report of the expedition to Pema- 
quid, cited, 5. 269?i; answer of the 
agents of Massachusetts to his 
complaints, 5. 389-399. 
Lady Marie, 9. 56n. 
a spelling of Andrews, i. 149. 
Tracts, the, cited, 7. 55n, 57n, 75n, 
308n, 31071 ; 8. 189n, 191n. 
Androus, Andross, see Andros. 
Aneda, 7. 259. 
Angel, a coin, 6. 149. 
Angel Gabriel, The, loaded for Pemar 
quid, 5. 216; visited by Gorges, 5. 
216; welcomed by Shurt, 5. 217; 
wrecked, 5. 217, 218; pictured on 
the seal of Pemaquid, 5. 218; one 
of Frobisher's ships, 5. 218n; de- 
scribed, 5. 218n, 219n. 
Angell, John, in the expedition of 

Pring, 5. 153. 
Anger, Sampson, signed petition to 
Oliver Cromwell, i. 394; signed 
petition to Charles II, i. 402. 
Anghemak-ti-koos, Indian name of 

Agamenticus, i. 47n. 
Anglican church in Boston, 6. 285. 
Anglo-American settlements a coun- 
terpoise to the French, i. 404. 
Anglo-Saxon love of extending terri- 
tory, 9. 246. 
Anmessukkantti, 6. 213; definition of, 

6. 213. 

Ann, a servant of Richard Bonighton, 

I. 84. 
Annabasook pond, 4. 104, 113, 114; 

7. 205n. 

Annah, Hanna, Mr. , i. 515n. 

Annals of America, see Holmes, Abiel. 
of Bakerstown, Poland and Minot, 

2. 111-130. 
of Portsmouth, see Adams, Nathan- 
iel, 
of Salem, see Felt, Joseph B. 
of Warren, see Eaton, Cyrus. 
Annals, Rerum Aug., see Camden^ 

William. 
Annan, the Rev. Robert, 6. 12-13, 31. 
Annapolis, formerly Port Royal, i. 26; 
8. 27; settled, i. 26; Edward Tyng 
commissioned governor of, i, 316; 
Poutrincourt at, 5. 178 ; Indians and 
French prepared to attack, 7. 92; 
8. 125; French troops sent to cap- 
ture, 8. 125, 126 ; mentioned, 4. 155 ; 
7. 250; 8. 125, 126, 128, 181, 132, 
140, 147, 245^1, 279; 9. 29. 



14 



MAIKE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Arnipolis — continued. 
Basin, 8. 128, 129; 9. 108. 
Royal, surrendered to the English, 
7. 83; mentioned, 3. 214,397,402, 
403; 8. 130, 131, 135, 137, 138, 139, 
141, 220, 301. 
vall3y, 8. 129, 130. 
Anne of Austria, 6. 117n. 

Queen, 5. 4, 8, 9; 6. 250, 251, 257; 

7, 143,233; 9. 111. 
street, i. 124; 6. 133. 
Anse dos Meres, i. 522. 
Anson, 4. 344n, 367, 397, 398, 399. 
Answer of the agent of Massachu- 
setts to the complaints of Andros, 

5. 389-399. 

Anthers, John, signed the petition of 
1672 to Massachusetts, 5. 240. 

Anthology Society, the, 5. Ixii; 7. 414. 

Anthoule, Capt., 5. 61. 

Anticosti, island of, one of Phipps' 
ships wrecked at, g. 32; sufferings 
of the men at, 9. 32, 32n. 

Antigua, i. 290n; 7. 213. 

Antrim, county of, 6. 5, 6, 33, 34, 157 ; 
7. 367. 
presbytery of, 6. 27. 

Aiits, a shower of, 3. 92. 

Anville, K. de la Rochefoucauld, Due 
d', in command of the French fleet, 
8. 125; his orders, 8. 125; fleet dis- 
abled, 8. 125; died, 8. 125. 

Apananawapeske river, 5. 156?2. 

Ap Hughes, the original of Hughes, 

6. 7. 
Apistama, 2. 62. 
Aponeg river, 5. lo6n. 

Apples, scarce, 4, 388; picked in 1873 

from trees of 1687, 7. 53. 
Appleton, 9. 81. 

Daniel, 4. 373. 

the Rev. Jesse, president of Bow- 
doin college, 5. xlix, 177; death 
of, 5. xlix; mentioned, 4. 258; 7. 
372; 8. 180. 

John, 4. 360, 373. 

Kathan D., 8. 397, 474. 

the Rev. , 4. 143. 

Major Samuel, 2. 133, 134, 141. 

Coi. , 7. 76. 

Dr. , 4. 373. 

Appowick river, 5. 156^, 157yi. 
Ap Rice, the original of Price, 6. 7. 
Apsley, Sir Allen, 3. 285. 
Apthorp, Charles, 8. 214n, 222; an ex- 
ecutor of the will of Col. Noble, 8. 
150; a prominent man, 8. 151. 

John T., 7. 278, 410. 

Miss — , married Charles Vaughan, 
7. 278. 
Aquavitae, Winter's dealings in, i. 71; 

former name of brandy, i. 7ln. 
Aquamenticus, see Agamenticus. 
Aquedahtan, 6. 185. 
Aquinas, Thomas, 7. 449. 
Aquoddie, Indian original of Acadia, 

4. 191. 



Arabian scholars taken by Columbus 
on his voyages, 2. 14a, 76a. 

Aramasoga, an Indian chief, 5. 156n. 

Arambeag, same as Norumbega, 2. 
16a n. 

Arambeck, Arampec, supposed to be 
JS^orumbega, 7. 99w; 8. 331. 

Aransoak, Indian name of the Kenne- 
bec river, 4. 103. 

Arbella, The, at Cape Ann, 5. 199. 

Arcadia, see Acadia. 

Archseologia Cantiana, 9. 298n. 

Archseologia Americana, cited, 6. 215 ; 
9. 324?i, 332n. 

Archangel, The, commanded by Way- 
mouth, 5. 311; 6. 294, 310; set out 
for America, 5. 311; anchored off 
Monhegan, 5. 311, 313; mentioned, 
7. 263, 293. 

Aichdale, John, agent for Gorges, i. 
173; arrived in Boston, i. 173; 
governor of North Carolina, i. 173n; 
a relative of Gorges, i. 173n; in the 
Province of Maine, i. 175; granted 
commissions, i. 175; no notice taken 
of his government, i. 184. 

Archer, Capt. Samuel, 9. 187. 

Arctic ocean, the, 5. 309. 
straits, 5. 145. 

Ardennes, 9. 99. 

Arexis, 3. 380, 412, 413, 416, 422, 426; 
his mark, 3. 420. 
jr., 3. 380, 413. 

Argal, Capt. Samuel, destroyed the 
French settlements, i. 27, 431; 5. 
178, 179; 7. 319; 8. 327-328; at 
Mount Desert, i. 43; 7. 28, 319; 
carried the people as captives to 
France and Jamestown, i. 431; 5. 
179; 7. 28; 8. 329; committed rava- 
ges at Port Royal, i. 431; 8. 329; 
wrecked at Penobscot, 5. 178; heard 
of the French on tbe coast, 5. 178; 
8. 326; had command of three ves- 
sels, 5. 179; set up a cross at St. 
Saviour, 5. 179; 7. 28; interview 
with La Saussaye, 7. 28; treachery 
toward La Saussaye, 8. 329; carried 
Biard to Virginia, 7. 28; in the har- 
bor of Pemaquid, 7. 319; a relative 
of Sir Thomas Smith, 8. 326; came 
to America to fish, 8. 326 ; an illicit 
business, 8. 326; became influential 
by bribery, 8. 326; ordered to expel 
the French, 8. 326; gave his men 
liberty to pillage, 8. 329; made a 
second expedition to the north, 8. 
329-330: mentioned, 9. 302. 
Argos, 6. 147. 
Argyle, 8. 454. 

the Duke of, 6. 6 
Arians, the, 6. 30. 
Arichat, Bishop of, 6. 224. 
Aristarchus, 7. 343. 
Arizona, 7. 491; 9. 249. 
Armada, The, 7. 295. 
Armagh, the Archbishop of, 6. 10. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



15 



Armenianism, 5. liii. 

Armenians in Bath, 2. 223. 

Arminius, 6. 24. 

Armorer employed to repair tlie In- 
dian's guns, 8. 21 In. See Gunsmith. 

Armouchiquois, the, i. 420; 7. 805. 

Arms of Edward Godfrey, 9. 297, 335. 

Armstrong family, 6. II. 

Armstrong, James, 6. 12. 

John, settled in Falmouth, 6. 12; 
his daughter married Robert 
Means, 6. 12; children of, 6. 12. 
Lawrence, 3. 380, 410, 412, 419. 
the Hon. S. T., 3. 364. 
Thomas, 6. 12. 

Arnold, Benedict, Letters on his Expe- 
dition to Canada, i. 447-498; 
designated to lead the troops to 
capture Quebec, i. 447, 494, 499, 
500; Montresor's journal sug- 
gested the expedition, i. 447; 8. 
273; his papers confiscated, i. 
447-448; on the way to Quebec, i. 
469, 470, 478; to co-operate with 
Schuyler, i. 469, 499; hazardous 
march to the Kennebec, i. 470; 
sent messenger to Quebec, i. 470, 
511 ; desired advice from Schuyler, 
I. 470-471; hoped to reach the 
Chaudiere, i. 471, 476; cause of 
his delay in marching, i. 471-472, 
474-475, 480, 481; wanted oxen, 
I. 472, 473; at Dead river, i. 473, 
495 ; at the Great Carrying place, 
I. 475; reports from Schuyler, i. 
476; orders to officers, i. 477, 478; 
desired news from Canada, i. 479, 
493; hoped to meet Schuyler, i. 
480 ; unfavorable reports did not 
change his determination, i. 481, 
491, 494; news from Montgomery, 
I. 482, 483; awaited the arrival of 
Montgomery, i. 483, 485, 497; 
received report of the capture of 
St. Johns and Montreal, i. 484, 
485, 519; letter from Sorrell, i. 
484; crossed the St. Lawrence, i. 
484, 487, 490; informed of an in- 
tended attack, I. 484, 488; flag of 
truce attacked, i. 486, 518-519; 
accused the British of inhumani- 
ty, I. 486; demanded the surren- 
der of Quebec, i. 486, 487; ex- 
amined the condition of his army, 
I. 487-488, 490, 493, 494, 513, 514; 
short of cash, i. 489, 491; reason 
for not attacking Quebec, i. 490; 
sent to Montreal for clothing, i. 
490-492; still confident, i. 491 
494; batteaux intercepted, i. 492; 
sent dispatches to Montgomery, i. 
493, 517; a general want in the 
army, i. 494; cattle ordered to, 
I. 495, 515; his account of the 
route, I. 494-496; date of leaving 
Cambridge, 1.494,601-502; ammu- 



nition ordered, i. 496; prepared 
to attack Quebec, i. 498, 519; 
joined by Montgomery, i. 498, 
519; officers who were in his ex- 
pedition, I. 500-501; sent out an 
exploring party, i. 503; Natanis 
to be killed or captured, i. 506; 
name of his pilot, i. 507n, 515; 
joined by Meigs, i. 510; army en- 
tered Canada, i. 513; batteaux to 
cross the river, i. 513; his army 
starving, i. 514, 514n; his ap- 
proach know^n to the British, i. 
516; his folly defeated the expe- 
dition, I. 516-518; landed at 
Point Levi, i. 518; plan of attack, 
I. 520-521; attack at St. Eoch, i. 
623; wounded, i. 523; his report 
of the battle, i. 525; prisoners 
attempted to let him into the city, 
I. 525-526; at Fort Halifax, 8. 277, 
278; his character, i. 519; death 
of, I. 529; mentioned, 4. 78; 5. 
xix; 7. 259; 8. 59. 

Benjamin, 4. 312, 313, 366, 367. 

Bildad, visited by Dr. Coffin, 4. 355; 
married widow of Jordan, 4. 355. 

John, 7. 284. 
Arnold's river, i. 464; Col. Montresor 
at, I. 464. 

road, 4. 312. 
Arnold, The, 9. 170, 178, 179. 
Aroostook county, 8. 317. 

river, 4. 103; 8. 21, 29, 43, 69, 70, 
75, 77, 78, 84. 

valley, 9. 171. 

war, 8. 73, 75, 77-78, 81-82, 87, 458, 
459. 
Arragon, 6. 120^1. 
Arransoak falls, i. 459. 

river, name of the upper part of the 
Kennebec, i. 456; mentioned, i. 
457, 458, 459, 460, 461, 462. 
Arresaguntoocook, 4. 157. 

Indians, 3. 386, 387, 390, 401, 404, 

407, 411-415, 426, 427, 433, 438, 

445,446; 4. 155, 163, 164; 8. 220, 

see Assagunticooks. 

Arrockaumecook river, derivation of 

the name, 3. 323n. 
Arroseag, 4. 103. 
Arrowheads, place for finding them, i. 

504; tipped with the tails of the 

horseshoe, 3. 99; as a token of war, 

8. 279. 
Arrowscag, see Arrowsic. 
Arrowsic, now Georgetown, i. 224; 

fort at captured, i. 224; 2. 192; 

attacked by Indians, i. 253; 2. 197, 

199 ; 4. 73, 103, 223 ; Sylvanus Davis in 

command at, i. 253; owned by Clark 

and Lake, 2. 191; home of John 

Bichards, 2. 192; town laid out, 2. 

192; number of families at, in 1670, 

2. 193 ; John Watts moved to, 2. 201 ; 

home of Samuel Denny, 2. 201 ; Sul- 



16 



MAliSTE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Arrowsic — continued, 
livan practiced law at, 2. 201 ; 4. 5; 
origin of the title to, 2. 202; Gutch 
officiated at, 2. 205; Presbyterians 
at, 2. 205; preaching at, 2. 221; 
commission of John West to, 5. 125- 
129; Indian conference held at, 7. 
83, 84; St. Castine at, 7. 84, 85; 
bricks brought from, 8. 212n; home 
of Sylvanus Davis, 9. 34; men- 
tioned, 2. 207, 222; 3. 300rt, 351, 361, 
373, 388, 408, 409, 410; 5. 126; 6. 
260; 7. 182, 275; 8. 109, 117, 151, 
250, 251 ; 9. 132, 133. 
Arrowsic Indians, 3. 384. 

river, 9. 132. 
Arrowsmith, Edmund, swore allegi- 
ance to the Duke of York, 5. 237. 
Arsenal established at Augusta, 9. 170. 
Artel, , destroyed Salmon Falls vil- 
lage, I. 297. 
Articles of association for the settle- 
ment of a town on the Sheepscot 
river, 5. 48-57. 
Artillery Garden, the Company of, i. 

53/1. 
Arundel, Joseph Denecore sent to, 3. 
176n ; great fire in, 4. 273 ; French 
neutrals in, 6. 342; slaves in, 7. 
214; mentioned, 3. 225; 4. 202; 
7. 111. 
the Earl of, one of the Plymouth 
company, i.33; 2.40a; employed 
Capt. Waymouth, 2. 17; 5. 311; 
disposed of his interests to Pop- 
ham and others, 5. 331-332; men- 
tioned, 2. 33, 46, 77, 77a; 3. 287, 
288; 5. 338, 344. 
Asbury, Francis, joint superintendent 
of the Methodists, 7. 227 ; ordained 
bishop, 7. 227. 
Ascham, Roger, 9. 332. 
Ash, prevalent in Limerick, i, 327. 
Ashamahaga river, 5. 156. 
Ashburton, Lord, 8. 87, 94, 100. 

treaty, 7. 464, 465; 8. 3, 5, 32, 102. 
Ashden, John, 3. 110; in the gari'ison 
at Black point, i. 227. 

Ashfield, , 5. Ivn. 

Ashford, 2. 145. 

Ashley, Edward, forced upon the 
Pilgrims, 7. 30; little trusted, 7. 
30; his ability and character, 7. 
30; in charge of the affairs, 7. 30; 
Willet to keep him within bounds, 
7. 30; well supplied with goods, 
7. 30; sent large quantities of 
beaver to England, 7. 30-31 ; im- 
prisoned, 7. 31; married an In- 
dian, 7. 46; established a trading 
post on the Georges river, 9. 78. 
( Francis, 3. 330. 
the Rev. Jonathan, 4. 148, 262. 
Thomas, meeting of landholders at 
his house, 3. 317; acknowledged 



the jurisdiction of Massachusetts, 
3. 317; mentioned, 2. 194, 195. 
Ashmolean MSS., 3. 284, 285. 
Ashmun, the Rev. Jehudi, 8. 168, 177. 
Ashpo, Indian teacher, 4. 271. 

Ashtofell, , 2. 173. 

Ashtonhill, i. 109; 2. 66a. 
Ashton, John, lived at the Landing, 3. 
82; married first Susannah Fox- 
well, 3. 21w, 82; second, Mary 
Edgecomb, 3-25; third, a daugh- 
ter of Andrew Alger, 3. 82; moved 
to Blue Point, 3. 82; then to Great 
island, and died at Marblehead, 3. 
82. 
Major Joseph, i. 501, 525. 
Ashton-Phillips, Sir Ferdinando Gor- 
ges born at, 1. 108??, 354n; his home 
at, I. 109, 543, 545; 2. 66a, 257; now 
in ruins, 2. 67a. 
Ashurst, Sir Henry, 5. 276n, 277n; 9. 
26, 34, 54. 

Ash worth, , of London, 9. 351. 

Asia, mentioned, 4. 85; 6. 147, 222, 223. 
Asiatic cholera, 6. 90. 
Asquam, Jeremy, 4. 189-190. 
Assacumbuit knighted, 3. 99; 9. 212; 
a bloodthirsty Indian, 3. 99-100; 
number of people killed by, 3. 100; 
a boaster, 9. 212. 
Assacumet, an Indian sent by Way- 
mouth, 2. 26; sent with Hobson, 2, 
27; given to Gorges, 5. 332. 
Assagunticooks, joined by the Wawa- 
nocks, 6. 234; location of, 6. 235; 
bitter against the whites, 6. 235; 
joined the St. Francis Indians, 6. 
235; mentioned, 6. 232; 7. 186, see 
Arresagunticooks. 
Assinee-Poetuc Indians, 6. 270. 
Associates, the, i. 163, 164, 174, 197. 
Assoquad, 3. 357. 

Asticou, encouraged by the Jesuits, i. 
430n; successor to Bessabes, 7. 102; 
Biard urged to visit, 8. 324; men- 
tioned, 7. 97.^ 
Astoria, 6. 96n. 

Astronomy partially known to the In- 
dians, 7. 343. 
Asylum for indigent boys, 9. 68. 
Atewaneto, chief of the Abnakis, 6. 
241; speech of, 6. 241-242; assisted 
the missionaries, 7. 100-101; men- 
tioned, 6. 208n. 
Athenaeum hall, i. 15n. 
Athenaeum Society, the, 8. 406. 
Athenian culture, 4. 77. 
Athens, Greece, 3. 260; 6. 148; 8. 335. 
Maine, 8. 162. 
of America, the, 5. Ixii. 
Atherton, Major Humphrey, 7. 153n. 
Atironta, see Atewaneto. 
Atkins' bay, 3. 286; Popham's expe- 
dition at, 2. 189. 
Atkins, Thomas, 2. 193, 194. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



17 



Atkinson, Rebecca, 2. 141. 

Theodore, signed treaty of 1717, 6. 
262; autograph of, 6. 262; men- 
tioned, 4. 146, 163, 165, 166. 
Thomas, 4. 244, 397. 
the Rev. John, teacher in Limerick 
academy, 8. 173. 
Atlantic & St. Lawrence railroad, 7. 
484; 8. 369. 
Monthly, cited, 7. 45m. 
ocean, i. 28, 404; 3. 30; 4. 10, 114: 
5. 185, 26ln, 333, 365^; 6. 175, 207 
210,216,315,327; 7-212,277,286 
389, 406; 8. 5-7, 17, 21-23, 25, 99 
101,320,349,366; 9. 129,225. 
Attamont, the Earl of, 7. 405. 
Atterbury, Francis, 7. 448. 
Attleboro, 2. 145; 4. 268, 317. 
Atwell, Benjamin, his widow married 
Richard Martin, i. 75, 114w, 121, 
207 ; received a grant from Cleeves 
and Tucker, 1. 114 ; signed the peti- 
tion to the king, i. 180; lived at 
Falmouth, i. 215; killed, i. 219, 
221; wife taken prisoner, i. 221. 
Benjamin 2d, a legatee of Richard 
Martin, i. 208; a son of Mrs. Mar- 
tin, I. 208; unfavorable impres- 
sion of his character, i. 208. 
John, purchased land of Richard 

Bray, i. 318. 
Joseph, son of Benjamin, i. 208; 
legatee of Richard Martin, i. 207- 
208. 
Mary, widow of Benjamin, married 
Richard Martin, i. 75, 114n, 207; 
her death, i. 207n; mentioned, i. 
76, 121. 
Atwell's creek, saw mill at, 2. 181. 
Atwood, Samuel, 4. 362. 
Aube, 9. 99. 
Aubery, P., his Abnaki vocabulary 

cited, 9. 263n. 
Aubrey, John, his Lives of Eminent 

Men, cited, 2. 25a n, Tia n. 
Auchmutey family, 6. 23. 
Aucocisco, definition and pronuncia- 
tion of, I. 31 ; a name given to the 
early tribes of Maine, i. 118. 
bay, now Casco bay, i. 30, 31. 
Auconganunticook, Indian name of 

the Androscoggin, 4. 95. 
Auger, Aulger, see Alger, 3. 27n. 
Augsburg, 6. 325. 

Augusta, Governor Lincoln died at, i. 
410; the site of Fort Western, i. 
602; 2. 152,279,282; 4.39; 5. Ix, 
417; garrison at, 2. 199; formerly 
Cushnoc, 2. 275; 4. 105; part of 
Hallo well, 2. 285; 7. 383-384; 
priest at, 3. 273; why the fort was 
built at, 3. 274; John Jones died 
at, 4. 43, 45; first plastered room 
in, 4. 422; mortality from 1852 to 
1855, 5. 433-435; James Bridge 
practiced in, 6. 59, 60; Solomon 



Yose settled in, 6. 63; incorpo- 
rated under the name of Hamng- 
ton, 7. 384>i; trial of the murder- 
ers of Paul Chadwick in, 7. 387* 
banks in, 7. 393-394; home of Job 
Lewis, 8. 124; the Plymouth trad- 
ing-house in, 8. 203; state capital, 
8. 345; arsenal established at, 9. 
170; jail burnt, 9. 202; men- 
tioned, 2. 289; 3. 304; 4. 10, 14, 
16,32,51,107,306/1,374, 375,377 
402, 403; 5. Ixiii, 17, 52, 66, 67, 
194, 195, 354, 415, 418, 419n, 421, 
422, 423; 6. 358, 359, 360, 364, 373 
377^ 378, 379; 7. 160, 209, 284, 283, 
349, 363, 405, 411, 415, 458, 459 
469, 470; 8. 60, 81, 87, 208, 252n 
281, 283, 287, 338, 339, 340, 341 
342, 345, 368, 369, 370, 372, 390 
473, 480; 9. 176; the history of 
see North, 
bridge, 8. 339. 
dam, the, 8. 241, 377. 
Augustin, John, see Gustin, John. 

Seauseen, 3. .380. 
Aumaughcongen, Indian name of An- 
droscoggin, 4. 104. 
Auountauresaunkee, 4. 124, 130 131 
137. • ' ' 

Aurconganuntacook, Indian name for 
, Androscoggin, 3. 323?i. 
Aussaado, 4. 155, 163. 
Austin, Charles, 4. 364. 
the Rev. David, 2. 225. 
James T., 5. li. 

John, married a daughter of An- 
drew Alger, I. 214w. 
Matthew, r. 373. 

Samuel, one of the first settlers of 
Wells, I. 362; his wife assaulted, 
I, 372; signed the petition to 
Cromwell, i. 394. 

, of Farmington, 4. 364. 

, of Holmanton, 4. 340. 

a spelling of Ashton, 3. 82. 
Austrian empire, 9. 245, 246. 
Ausummowett, 3. 411. 
Auteuil, 8. IL 
Authority of John West to act as 

deputy-secretary, 5. 110-111. 
Autmoin, an Indian prophet, i. 431. 
Autobiography of Robert Gallatin, 6. 

93-103. ' 

Autographs, of James Alford, 6. 254- 
Sir Edmund Andros, i. 276; Theo- 
dore Atkinson, 6. 262; Thomas Ban- 
ister, 6. 257; John Barnard, 6. 256* 
Richard Bell, 6. 258; M. Birchfield' 
6. 258; Edward Blacketh, 6. 258* 
Francis Borland, 6. 261; Peter Bow- 
doin, I. 307; Anthony Brackett, i. 
284; Perez Bradford, 6. 262; George 
Bramhall, i. 307; M. Buckfield, 6. 
258; Robert Carver, 6. 255; George 
Cleeves, i. 125, 126, 544; Joan 
Cleeves, i. 125; William Cooper, 6. 



18 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Autographs — continued. 
259; Sylvanus Davis, i. 284n; John 
Denison, 6. 258, 262; W. Dudley, 6. 
258, 261; G. Dyer, 6. 261; Stephen 
Eastwick, 6. 255 ; Thomas Elbridge, 

5. 226; Jabez Fitch, 6. 256; Henry 
Flynt, 6. 255; Charles Frost, 6. 259; 
Timothy Gerrish, 6.255; John Gill- 
man, 6. 254; Edward Godfrey, i. 
544; g. 300, 335; Sir Ferdinando 
Gorges, i. 544; Thomas Gorges, i. 
544; John Gray, 6. 262; Estes Hatch, 

6. 259; Joseph Hiller, 6. 254,262; 
John Holmes, i . 307 ; Eobert How- 
ard, I. 127; George Huntington, 6. 
256; George Jeffrey, 6. 255; James 
Jeferey, 6. 256; John Jekyll, 6. 258; 
Thomas Jenner, i. 544; H. Jocelyn, 
I. 199n; Robert Jordan, i. 142, 233; 
Samuel Jordan, 6. 262; Jonathan 
King, 6. 255; John Lambton, 6. 258; 
Thomas Lechmere, 6. 254; Thomas 
Legard, 6. 259; John Leighton, 6. 
255; William Little, 6. 261; James 
Lloyd, 6. 254; James Lusmore, 6. 
256; Samuel S. Lynde, 6. 254; J. 
March, 6. 258; Peter Martin, 6. 
255; Richard Martin, i. 125; P. 
Mascarene, 6, 258; Samuel Maver- 
ick, 5- 233; John Minot, 6. 262; 
Stephen Minot, 6. 255; Samuel 
Moody, 6. 254, 256; George Munjoy, 
I. 125, 126; Capt. Walter Neale, i. 
53; 5. 214; John Newman, 6. 256; 
John Newmarch, 6. 255; James 
Parsons, 6. 262 ; John Penhallow, 6. 
256, 262; Spencer Phips, 6. 254; 
Samuel Plaisted, 6. 256; Thomas 
Plaisted, 6. 258; Jonathan Pollard, 
6- 255; Edmund Quincey, 6. 253; J. 
Redknap, 6. 253 ; Jonathan Reming- 
ton, 6, 254; Edward Rishworth, i. 
127; John Rogers, 6. 258; Nathan- 
iel Rogers, 6, 255; Richard Salton- 
stall, 6. 254; Habijah Savage, 6.257; 
Nicholas Sever, 6. 256; Thomas 
Sheppard, 6. 256; Henry Somerby, 
6. 254; Charles Story, 6.256; Rich- 
ard Tucker, i. 127; Ralph Turner, 
1. 125; Samuel Tuttle, 6. 256; George 
Vaughan, 6. 253; Richard Vines, i- 
544; Richard W^aldron, 6. 256; Shad. 
Walton, 6. 253; Henry Watts, 1. 159; 
Benning Wentworth, 6. 258; John 
West, I. 276; John White, 6. 257; 
J. Wiberg, 6. 255; J. P. Widger, 6. 
254, 257; Josiah Willard, 6. 254; 
Joshua Winslow, 6. 262 ; John Win- 
ter, 1. 57, 125; 5. 224; Jeremiah Wise, 
6. 256; John Veo, 6. 255; see also 
Marks and Signums. 

Auyaummowett, 3, 412, 414, 415, 421, 

426, 427, 441. 
Avery, John, 3. 359, 360. 

, 8. 148. 



Avon river, the, 2. 66a. 

Award in case of Cleeves vs. Winter, 

I. 74. 
Awenemwet, 3. 357. 
Awohaway, 6. 261. 
Axstane, the hundred of, 9. 297n. 
Ayers, John, early settler of Gorham, 

2. 148. 

Capt. , I. 512. 

Ayles, , 2. 209. 

Ayling, , 8. 268m. 

Aymalle, L', 7. 82. 
Ayr, the river, 6. 19. 
Babb, John, biographical notice of, 3, 
207. 

Nathaniel, biographical notice of, 

3. 207. 

Babson, J. J., his History of Glouces- 
ter, cited, I. 209u. 

Baccalaos, a general name given to the 
continent, 2. 15a, 76a; origin of the 
name, 2. 15a-16a, 76a. 

Bachillor, Stephen, called to preach at 
Casco, I. 549 >i. 

Backbaunumbawmett, 3. 412. 

Back Cove, land at granted to George 
Lewis, 1.75, 113-115,121,260,361; 
first land grant at, i . 75 ; grant to 
John Lewis, 1. 117; home of John 
Smith, I. 120, 322; land sold by 
Richard Tucker, i. 122; a line of 
communication formed around, i. 
123; settlers' advantages at, i. 
123 ; land purchased by Humphrey 
Durham at, i. 129; boundary 
of Cleeves' land at, i. 145; home 
of the Wakeleys, 1. 153, 212; home 
of Matthew Coe, i. 153; land at, 
granted to Ann Mitton, 1. 154; 
early settlers of, i. 156; home of 
John Ross, I. 119, 314; home of 
Skillings, i. 195, 314; list of fami- 
lies there, I. 215, 216, 286; home 
of Nathaniel Wallis, i. 220/1, 260n, 
261, 316, 323; Indians at, i. 226; 
land at granted to John Skillings, 
I. 245; bridge at, i. 259; home of 
George Lewis, i. 260,321; road 
laid out, I. 279; ammunition at, i. 
294; home of John Ross jr., i. 
314, 322 ; home of Anthony Brack- 
ett, I. 319; home of Thomas 
Baker, i. 319; home of Joshua 
Lane, i. 321; home of Philip 
Lewis, I. 321; home of Thomas 
Peck, I. 322; home of John Rider, 
I. 322; home of Richard Sea- 
comb, I. 322; slaves held at, 7. 
214; mentioned, i. 60ri, 76, 114, 
120, 124, 205, 294, 295: 2. 162; 6. 131. 
creek, battle at, 6. 133. 
street, Wiscasset, 4. 330. 

Backus, Elder Isaac, his History of 
the Baptist Church, cited, 5. 182n, 
199w; 7. 224. 
Mrs. , 4. 396. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIOlSrS. 



19 



Bacon, Br. Alvan, biographical' notice 
of, 3. 207. 
Capt. Daniel, 8. 121n. 
Sir Francis, letter from Capt. John 
Smith, I. 30; his opinion of Cab- 
ot's disco very, >. 14a n; Strachey's 
account dedicated to, 3. 284; men- 
tioned, 4. 68; his essays, cited, 5. 
173n; Henry vii, cited, 2. 14a n. 
Francis, of Scarborough, 3. xix. 
James, 8. 30, 41,42, 60. 
Will, deposition of, 5. 63-64. 

Badger, Sir , 4. 273. 

Badouin, Pere, 7. 65. 
Bagaduce, trading-house established 
at, I. 39; the French robbed the 
trading-house, i. 40; St. Castine 
erected a fort at, i. 39-40; 2. 240; 
former name of Castine, 2. 215* 6. 
107; 7. 201, 208; disastrous attack 
at, a, 215; 3. 204; 8. 283n; the 
name a contraction of Major Big- 
uyduce, 6. 107, 109n; definition 
not known, 6. 107; Eaton's ex- 
planation, 6. 108; to be the capi- 
tal of New Ireland, 7. 201; capt- 
ured by the British, 7. 202; peo- 
ple loyal, 7. 203, 204; loyalists 
assemble at, 7. 203, 205; Gen. 
Wadsworth carried to, 7. 328* 
mentioned, 2. 239; 5. 313; 7.25; see 
Biguyduce. 
expedition, 2. 215; 3. 204; 8. 283n: 
9. 160. ' 

neck, 6. 107. 
peninsula, 7. 4; see Biguyduce. 

point, 6. 107. 
river, coins found near, 6. 114. 
Bagby, Hon. Arthur P., 8. 361. 
Baggaduce, see Bagaduce. 
Bagley, David, 4. 352. 

Col. , 4, 350. 

Bagnall, Walter, called Great Walt, i. 
41; 3. 11^; settled at Richmond's 
island, i. 41, 80^; 6. 137; accumu- 
lated property, i. 41, 51; 6. 137: 
killed, I. 41, 42, 51, 54, 118; 3. 10; 
6. 137, 145, 146; patent to, i. 41n: 
his plantation the first in the pres- 
ent boundary of Falmouth, i. 42; 
his murderers killed, i. 43; his ob- 
ject in settling, i. 51, 202; had no 
title to Richmond's island, i. 52, 52n; 
his trade on the island, i. 202; 3. 10; 

Bahama banks, the, Gov. Phipps' 
voyage to, 2. 230, 231. 
islands, Shirley governor of, 8. 264; 
Phipps' voyage to, 9. 9, 10, 16; 
mentioned, 9. 57n. 

Bailey, Edward, married Mary Pen- 
ley, I. 314; left a widow, who 
lived at Stoughton, i, 314. 
Eleanor, widow of Jonas, 3. 74, 82 • 
a large landholder, 3. 74; culti- 
vated her land, 3. 74, 74m; married 



Gyles Barge, 3. 82; deeded her 
land to her husband, 3. 82. 

Henry, lived at Purpooduck, i. 319; 
signed the petition to Gov. Brad- 
street, I. 283n. 

Hilkiah, settled at Blue point 3. 24, 
26, 74, 76; but httle known of 
him, 3. 26; probably father of 
Jonathan, 3. 26; no relative of 
Jonas, 3. 74. 

the Rev. Jacob, preached at Frank- 
fort and Georgetown, 3. 275-277; 
6. 196; 8. 112w; at Harpswell, 3. 
276; established at Dresden; 5. 
Ixi, 439; officiated at Falmouth, 5. 
439; driven away as a Tory, 5. 
440; 8. 2\0n; his description of 
the destruction of Falmouth ex- 
aggerated, 5. 25071 ; a Harvard 
graduate, 6. 196; ordained in Eng- 
land, 6. 196; moved to Fort Rich- 
mond, 6. 197; 8. 268n; preached 
in'Gardiner, 6. 197; character and 
labor of, 6. 196-199; site of his 
house, 8. 210^1 ; mentioned, 7. 215; 
8. 113n; his letter describing the 
destruction of Falmouth, 5. 437- 
450; journal cited, 4. 15; 8. 268rt. 

the Hon. Jeremiah, commenced his 
practice in Wiscasset, 6. 55 ; gradu- 
ated from Brown University, 6. 55 ; 
judge of probate and member of 
Congress, 6. 55; collector, 6. 55-56; 
his characteristics, 6. 56; date of 
birth and death, 6. 56n; men- 
tioned, 6. 41. 

John, purchased brandy of Win- 
ter, I. 71. 

Jonas, lived at Black Point, i. lOOn,, 
200n; submitted to the jurisdic- 
tion of Massachusetts, i. lOOw, 
386; his will mentioned, i. 200n; 
date of his death, 3. 26, 74; at 
Blue Point, 3-73; a witness 
against Phippen, 3. 73; sent over 
by Trelawny. 3. 74; married first 
Mrs. Dearing, and second, Eleanor 
Jackson, 3. 74; his widow a large 
landholder, 3. 74; his widow mar- 
ried Gyles Barge, 3. 82; men- 
tioned, I. 99. 

the Rev. Kiah, 8. 180. 

Nathaniel, first settler of Bakers- 
town, 2. 111. 

Nicholas, of Saco, 3. 74. 

Robert, schoolmaster at Scarbo^ 
rough, 3. 168. 
Baker, Asahel, 8. 42, 43. 

Frances, married Gov. Shirley, 8^ 
263; children of, 8, 263; death of. 
8, 263. 

James, 2. 175. 

John, his name given to Baker's 
spring, I. SS6n; active in bring- 
ing Charles I to the block, i. 336n; 
fled to Maine, i. 336?i: accepted the 



20 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Baker, Jolm— continued. 

Kigby grant, i. 355-356; character 
of, I. 356; obliged to flee, i. 356; 
went to Agamenticus, Boston and 
Wells, I. 356; deputy for Agamen- 
ticus, I. 367; imprisoned, i. 410; a 
juryman, i. 535 ; mentioned, 2. Ill ; 
9. 352, 359. 
Gen. John, 8. 30, 38, 39, 41-43, 45, 

52, 60. 
John K., 7. 2^. 
Nathan, 8, 30. 
Nicholas, married Elizabeth Bart- 

lett, I. 209. 
Robert, signed petition of 1672, to 

Massachusetts, 5. 240. 
Samuel, his daaghter married Mc- 

Clough, 2. 178. 
Thomas, signed the petition to Brad- 
street, I. 283n; taken prisoner at 
Falmouth, i. 302, 319; lived at 
Back cove, i. 319. 
William, signed petition of 1672 to 
Massachusetts, 5. 240. 

Mrs. , of Dorchester, 5. 423.' 

Baker's spring marked the boundary 
between Wells and York, i, 336; 
origin of the name, i . 336n. 
Bakerstown, divided into Minot and 

Poland, 2. Ill; granted to 

Baker, 2. Ill; limits of, 2. Ill; first 
settlers of, 2. Ill, 113; fir^t children 
born in, 2. Ill; Indians in, 2, 112; 
first public worship in, 2. 113 ; freshet 
in, 2. 113; revival in, 2. 113; first 
church in, 2. 113, 114; incorporated 
as Poland, 2. 115; annals of, 2. Ill- 
ISO. 
Balch, Horatio G., corporate member 
of the Maine Hist. Soc, i. 11. 

the Rev. Dr. , 4. 252, 256, 258. 

^ moved to Machias, 3. 179. 

Bald, , of Carritunk, 4. 369, 399. 

mQuntain, i- 466; same as Onegula, 
1.. 452w. 
Baldwin, i. S26n. 
Loammi, 3. 251, 251w, 252. 
the Rev. Samuel, 4. 272. 

CoL , 3. 319n. 

:Baliol college, 2. 11a. 
.Ballard, the Rev. Edward, his defini- 
nition of Agamenticus, i. 41n; 
his note on the meaning of Machi- 
gonne, i. 59-60; definition of 
Capisic, I. 205n; definition of 
Papooduck, i. 207n; furnished 
annotations for Gov. Lincoln's 
papers on the Indians, i. 412; his 
explanation of the route of Mon- 
tresor, i. 465-466; mentioned, 
6. 356, 360, 362, 363; 7. 3, 102, 
104; 8. 331; The Early History of 
the Protestant Church in Maine, 
by, 6. 171-202; Memoir of the Rev. 
Eugene Yetromile, by, 6. 205. 
Capt , 4. 893. 



Ballstown, 4. 353, 354. 

Ballycarry, 6. 6; first Presbyterian 

church in, 6. 27. 
Ballymena Presbytery, 6. 167. 
Balsam fir, abundant, i. 506; proper- 
ties of, I. 506. 
Baltic sea, the, 9. 356. 
Baltimore Association, formed to 
promote American manufactures, 4, 
58; mentioned, 2. 74a; 4. 26; 7. 355, 
356. 
Bancroft, George, gave a copy of 
Popham's letter to the Maine Hist. 
Soc, 5. 343; letter to the Society, 5. 
355; mentioned, 5. 348; 6. 109, 187n; 
7. 212, 255n. 
Bane, Capt. Joseph, interpreter, 3. 
^81, 420, 434; captured by Indians, 
4. 114; to watch the movements of 
the French, 7. 177; 8. 220; see also 
Beane. 
Bangor, Ireland, 6. 6. 
Maine, formerly Kadesquit, i. 4S0n 
7. 27; manufactures in, 4. 27 
place of Pownal's landing, 7. 6, 
first settled, 7. 7 ; conference with 
Indians held at, 7. 7, 20; second 
conference, 7. 8; called Condus- 
keag, 7. 8; Freemason's celebra- 
tion in, 7. 20; treaty at, 7. 20, 21; 
the western point of Du Mont's 
voyage, 7.- 27; Elder Jesse Lee 
preached in, 7. 227; only strang- 
ers paid toll in, 8. 451 ; became a 
city, 8. 455 ; first mayor of, 8* 455 ; 
Buswell first settler of, 9. 223; 
site of the ancient Norumbega, g. 
223; governmental right in dis- 
puted, 9. 223; claimed as British 
territory, 9. 224; leaden plate 
buried at, g. 224; first item in 
the history of, 9. 224-226 ; a part of 
Township No. 1, 9. 280; received 
a distinctive land title, 9. 230-231 ; 
reason for the unusual form of, 9. 
281; owned, 9. 232; incorporated, 
9. 232; squatters given title to 
their lands, 9. 232-233; lands in 
sold, 9. 233-234; mentioned, 2. 
126; 4. 32, 108; 5. 381, 403; 6. 41, 
50, 108, 358, 401; 7. 92n, 98, 254; 
8. 76, 81, 168, 177, 323, 363, 368- 
371, 377, 431, 433, 449, 452, 453, 
459, 460, 462, 487, 488, 492; 9. 88, 
162, 171. 
centennial, 7. 75n, 78n. 
Democrat, The, 7. 469; 8. 359. 
district, 8. 453, 454, 456. 
News, The, 8. 467. 
railroad, 9. 171. 
Territorial History of, by A. W. 

Paine, 9. 221-234. 
Theological Seminary opened, 8. 
168, 177; teachers, 8. 177; dona- 
tions to, 8. 177; chartered, 8. 177- 
178; mentioned, 7. 375. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



21 



Wliig and Courier, 9, 165. 
Young Ladies' academy, 8, 175. 

Bangs' island, within the present 
limits of Falmouth, i. 145; called 
Portland island, i. 145-146; An- 
drews' island, i. 146m, 220w; origin 
of the name, i. 146n; owned by 
James Andrews, i. 149; described, 
1 . 149-150 ; sold to John Rouse, i . 150 ; 
conveyed to John Brown, 1. 150; fort 
built on, I. 150; owned by Joshua 
Bangs, 1. 150n; property of Jedediah 
Preble, i. 150n; called Fort island, i. 
150; a place of refuge, i. 220; home 
of Felt and Wallis, i. 221; men- 
tioned, I. 42, 149w; 2. 85; 8. 224, 237. 

Bangs, Joshua, owner of Bangs' island, 
I. 146w, 160n; came from Cape Cod, 
1. 146n; death of, i. 146n; mortgaged 
property to Jedediah Preble, i. 150. 

Banister, Thomas, signed treaty of 
1714, 6. 257; autograph, 6.257. 

Bankhead, Mr. , 8. 55, 56, 65. 

Bank of the United States, 8. 425. 

Banks, Charles Edward, Life, Letters 
and Public Services of Edward 
Godfrey, by, 9. 295-384; his Dixy 
Bull, cited, 9. 308n; New Eng- 
land's Vindication, cited, 9. 329n; 
Eoger Garde, cited, 9. 314n. 
Capt. Elias, 3. 206, 208, 236. 
Sir John, 9. 311. 

Moses, served in the Revolution, 3. 
203,208; biographical notice, 3. 208. 
Richard, signed petition to Charles 
II, I. 402; signed petition to 
Cromwell, i. 395; amount of land 
granted to, 9^ 378; signed petition 
to Massachusetts, 9. 382. 

Bank, the, now Portsmouth, 8. 295. 

Baptiste, Jean, 4. 191, 192. 

Baptizing of children ordered, i. 354, 
366 ; Robert Jordan indicted for, 8. 
294n. 

Baptismal font of Robert Jordan, 8. 
294n. 

Baptists in Bath, 2. 227; in Bowdoin- 
ham, 7. 222; in Boston, 7. 223; in 
Canaan, 4. 349; in Clinton, 4. 348, 
349; in Farmington, 4. 308; in 
Green, 4. 355; in Hebron, 4. 303, 
388; in Kittery, 7. 221, 224; in Law- 
rence, 4. 340, 391, 362; in Liver- 
more, 4. 362; in Little Falls, 4. 330; 
in L^man, 7. 222; in Minot, 2. 123, 
127; in New Gloucester, 2. 158; in 
New Vineyard, 4. 311; in Readfleld, 
4. 306; Salisbury, 4. 297; in Sanford, 
7. 222; in Shapleigh, 7. 222; in 
Sheepscot, 4. 320, 321; in Thomas- 
ton, 7. 222; in Turner, 4. 304; in 
Paris^ 4. 303, 308; in Providence, 4. 
268; in Wells, 7. 222; believed that 
a thief can at once be converted, 4. 
316; do not approve of written ser- 



mons, 4. 301; 7. 226; the Rev. Paul 
Coffin's opinion of, 4. 316, 382-384; 
their doctrine confuted, 4. 353 ; called 
Anabaptists, 7. 223; penal law 
against, 7. 223 ; a few of the elders 
had a collegiate education, 7. 226; 
mentioned, 4. 361, 366, 385, 400, 401, 
403; 5. Iv; see Freewill Baptists. 

Baptist Church, The History of, see 
Backus, Elder Isaac. 

Baquabarat, alias Nathaniel, 3. 412. 

Baraga, Bishop Frederic, 9. 275,278,290. 

Barbadoes, Richard Vines died in, i. 
44, 95n; fish sent to, i. 551; Vines 
moved to, 2. 73a; 9. 317; men- 
tioned, I. 371; 2. 8; 6. 285. 
strong water, a drink, 3. 98. 

Barbary, 7. lS9n. 

creek, mills erected at, i. 119, 243n, 
269; land at conveyed to John and 
Richard Seacomb, i. 259; land at 
owned by Peter Bowdoin, i. 276. 

Barber, the Rev. , 6. 205. 

Barbour family, 6. 13. 
John S., 5. xxxvii. 

Barclay's dictionary, cited, 3. 48n. 

Barclay, Thomas, 8. 12, 16, 20. 

Bardge, see Barge. 

Barefoot, Capt. , claimed land 

owned by Bridget Phillips, 4. 413. 

Barge, Gyles, early settler at Blue 
Point, 3. 81; became a landholder 
through his wife, 3. 82; married 
Eleanor Bailey, 3. 82; held office, 
3. 82; moved to Dorchester, 3-82; 
mentioned, 3. 74, 126. 

Barger, Philip, died, i. 277. 
Philip 2d, son of Philip,, i. 277; 
death of, 277. 

Bar Harbor, 8. 324. 

Barillon, 5. 266; 7. 51. 

Baring, Alexander, 7. 355, 358. 
Henry, 7. 355. 
, a British merchant, 4. 24. 

Barker, Ebenezer, died, i. 333. 

Barkhead, . Christopher, witnessed 
delivery of grant to Shurt, 5. 214. 

Barks, see The EUzabeth and Rich- 
mond. 

Barlow, George, lived at Blue Point, 3. 
83. 
Joel', 6. 355. 

Barnard, 9. 298, 302, 369,, 373. 
Benjamin, 3. 235. 
John, signed treaty of 1713, 6. 256; 

autograph, 256. 
Dr. ^ of Salem, 5. lii. 

Barnes, Bartholomew, deputy for Ag- 
amenticus, i. 367. 
Hon. Phinehas, 6. 361. 

Barnstable, England, 3; 21n; 5. 168,. 

186. 

Mass., home of Nathaniel OtilB, tl 

314; mentioned, 2. 146, 148, 149; 

4. 270, 271; 5. xxiii, xxiv; g. 30. 

county, 8. 234n. 



22 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Barnstead, 4. 294. 
Barnwell, Kobert W., 8. 451. 
Baronies of Xova Scotia, 9. 100. 
Barony of La Tour, 9. 104; of St. 

Etienne, 104. 
Barrett, John, had a saw mill at Cape 
Porpus, I. 269; accused of abuse, 
I. .378; signed petition to Crom- 
well, I. 394; signed petition to 
Charles ir, i. 402. 
John jr., one of the first settlers of 
Wells, I. 362. 
Barrett's town, 4. 327, 328. 

Barrin, , in Arnold's expedition, 

I. 478. 
Barrington, 2. 145. 
Barron, Elias, 4. 287. 
Barrow, the Eev. Isaac, 8. 484. 
Barrows, William, preceptor in Frye- 
burg academy, 8. 163 ; mentioned, 
5. xli, 8. 169. 
William jr., son of William, 8. 169; 
preceptor at Hebron academy, 6. 
371; 8. 169, 170; graduated from 
Dartmouth college, 8. 169; salary 
of, 8. 170. 
Judge, 8. 421, 422. 
Barrows' Chronological History, cited, 

5. 145n. 
Barry, James, master of the Happy 
Return, 5. 135. 
John S., his History of Framing- 
ham, cited, 5. 194n, 199n; History 
of Massachusetts, cited, 6. 119n. 
Barter's island, 9. 131. 
Bartho, an Indian, 3. 444. 
Bartholomew, an Indian guide, 3. 
380; 7. 179. 
Henry, 2. 236. 
Bartlett, 9. 218. 
Almira, 4. 361. 
Elizabeth, married Nicholas Baker, 

I. 209. 
George, lived at Spurwink, i. 209, 
319; death of, i. 209; his estate, 
I. 209; his daughter married 
Nicholas Baker, i. 209; at Black 
point, 3. 83; lease from Jocelyn, 
3. 231-232. 
the Rev. Joseph, 4. 235. 
Mai., 4. 361. 
Kathan, 4. 205. 

Nicholas, received land from Cleeves, 
I. 116, 127, 248; lived at Scar- 
iborough, I. 116; in King Charles' 
army, i. lXQn\ fled from England, 
I. ]16n; lived at Salem, i. 11 6n; 
(Conveyed land to Jolin Higginson 
jr., I. 117; did not occupy his 
land, I. 317; mentioned, i. 248. 
Sarah, married Joshua Coffin, 4. 

241. 
Sarah, of Kittery, married first Dr. 
Jordan, and second, Bildad 
Arnold, 4. 355. 
Thomas, 8. 75. 



the Rev. William S., Contribution to 
the History of Bath, by, 3. 273-277 ; 
mentioned, 7. 455; Biography of 
the Rev. Jacob Bailey, 5. 439; In- 
troduction to Strachey's Historie 
of Travail, 3. 283-286; his Frontier 
Missionary, cited, 6. 199; 8. 210n. 

Deacon , of Bethel, 4. 339. 

, of Hartford, 4. 390, 391. 

, of Patricktown, 4. 355. 

Barton, Benjamin, signed petition to 
Massachusetts, 5. 240. 
Edward, signed petition to Massa- 
chusetts, 5. 240. 
Elijah, tried for the murder of Paul 

Chadwick, 7. 387; 9- 204. 
, of Sidney, 4. 402. 

Base, the game of, 3. 148-149. 

Basford, Jonathan, 4. 352. 

Bashaba, Indian ruler over the pres- 
ent state of Maine, 2. 18a, 21 ; 3. 
288; 5. 156n, 350; his capital, 2. 
18a; 7. 98, 100; dead, 2. 24, 62; 
7. 102; chief potentate among the 
Indians, 2. 18a; sent his son to 
visit the English, 2. 21, 28a; 5. 
319-321; lived on the Penobscot, 
2. 28a; 7. 95, 96; extent of his 
sway, 2. 61; 5. 156/i; 7. 99, lOln; 
name of his country, 2. 62 ; his 
home near Pemaquid, 2. 62 ; slain 
by the Tarentines, 2'. &2; 7. 100; 
his kingdom destroyed, 2. 62; 7. 
S20n ; Gilbert paid him a visit, 5. 
350; early noticed by the his- 
torians, 7. 95 ; Waymouth sup- 
posed he was a king, 7. 95 ; the 
name only a title, 7. 95, 96, 98; 
had a monarchial government, 7. 
95-96; supposed to be a chief, 7. 
96, 99, 101, 102, 304; called Batse- 
bas, 7. 96, 97; called Bessabes, 7. 
95, 96, 97, 102 ; met Champlain, 7. 
96-98, 252, 254; a sagamore of 
Kadresquit, 7-97; met the Jesuits, 
7. 97, 98; the name of his tribe 
uncertain,' 7. 98; extent of his 
dominions unknown, 7. 99, lOln; 
Gorges' opinion of, 7. 99 ; at war 
with the Tarentines, 7. 100; had 
many enemies, 7. 100; his sway 
acknowledged as far as Massa- 
chusetts bay, 7. 100; had many 
under-captains, 7. 102; his tribe 
scattered, 7. 320/1; mentioned, 3. 
102, 301, 303, 307, 308; 5. 157ri, 
328; 7. 96, 304. 

Bashaba and the Tarratines, by John 
E. Godfrey, 7. 93-102. 

Basin of Minas, 8. 129, 282n; described, 
'134. 

Basque, the language of, 9. 266n. 

Bassaba, see Bashaba. 

Bassen, Richard, 3. 110; in the garri- 
son at Black Point, i. 227n. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS 



23 



Bassett, Bassitt, Francis, commander 
of The Lewis, 5. 135. 
Capt. William, 3. 136; consulted 
with Major Church, i. 296. 
Bass, Peter, deposition concerning 
Gendall, 3. 135r}, 235. 

, of Hebron, 4. 303, 304. 

rock, 9. 141. 
Bastable, see Barnstable. 
Bastile, the, John Nelson imprisoned 

in, 7. 62. 
Bastine's island owned by George 

Munjoy, i. 257. 
Batchelder, Mary, guilty of adultery, 

1. 370; her punishment, i. 370. 
Nathan, 7. 284. 

Stephen, umpire in case of Cleeves 
vs. Winter, i. 74; minister at Lynn 
and Hampton, i. 74?i; his wife ac- 
cused of adultery, i. 370; see 
Bachillor. 
Bateman, Edward, 9. 5; Nequasset 
conveyed to, by Robinhood, 4. 232 ; 
5. 224. 
Bateman' s gut, 5. 96. 
Bates, Solomon, 4. 392. 
Bath, England, i. 355?i; 7. 355; 9. 68. 
Maine, land at purchased by Robert 
Gutch, 2. 193; first settlers of, 2. 
204-205, 222 ; other early settlers, 

2. 205-206; incorporated as Long 
Reach, 2. 206-207, 210, 222; church 
built, 2. 207, 220; 3. 277; engaged 
in ship building, 2. 208-209; other 
business at, 2. 209-210; made a 
port of entry, 2. 210; 5. 331; ton- 
nage of, 2. 210; business trans- 
acted in the town meetings, 2. 
210; how the schools were sup- 
ported, 2. 210; pools in, 2. 211; 
first schoolhouse, 2. 211; number 
of dwelling-houses in, 2. 212, 279; 
the effect of the Declaration of 
Independence in, 2. 212-213; to 
have a representative in the pro- 
vincial Congress, 2. 213; commit- 
tee of safety and military in, 2. 
213; prevented an attack by the 

, British, 2. 213; sent troops to 
Cambridge, 2. 214; people of, who 
served in the Revolution, 2. 214; 
effect of the battle of Lexington 
in, 2. 215-216; incorporated, 2. 
217-218; a cold winter in, 2. 218; 
first town meeting in, 2. 218; 
town officers, 2. 218, 219; first 
mail service to, 2. 219 ; representa- 
tives to the General Court, 2. 219; 
population of at different years. 
2. 220; smaJl-pox in, 2. 220; cler- 
gymen of, 2. 223-228; 3. 274-276; 
religious controversy in, 2. 223- 
225; North church organized, 2. 
225-226; a part of the Kennebec 
purchase, 2. 277 ; only one family 
there in 1728, 2. 279; destitute of 



preaching, 1752, 3. 273; improved 
her advantages, 4. 48; in trouble 
with their minister, 4. 331 ; Metho- 
dists in, 4. 331; Scotch-Irish at, 6. 
15; Ebenezer Clapp settled* at, 6. 
76; Joseph Sewall practiced in, 

6. 77; the Rev. J. W. EUingwood 
ordained at, 7. 372; mentioned, 2. 
278; 3. 273, 285, 301n; 4. 15, 25, 
46, 47, 227, 308, 331; 5. hx, 418, 
423; 6. 291, 312, 313, 355, 356, 360, 
367, 369, 370, 373; 7. 220, 274, 363; 

8. llln, 114, 151, 180,287,368,403; 

9. 5. See also Long Reach. 
Contributions to the History of, by 

William S. Bartlett, 3. 273-277. 
the History of, by Gen. Joseph 

Sewall, 2. 189-228. 
academy, chartered, 8. 170; received 

aland grant, 8/ 171; merged into 

a high school, 8. 171. 
Female academy, chartered, 8. 170 

received a land grant, 8. 171 

merged into a high school, 8. 171 

incorporated, 8. 174. 
ferry, 2. 199. 
high school, 8. 171. 
Society for Suppressing Yice, 7. 377. 
Batson, John, had a saw mill at Cape 

Porpus, I. 269; signed the peti- 
tion to Charles 11, i, 402. 
Stephen, witnessed the deed to 

John Wadleigh, i. 358. 
Batt, Christopher, signed the petition 

to Charles 11, i. 401. 
Batten, William, published for com- 
plaining, 3. 58; lived at Black Point, 
3. 83. 
Battle, first on the Penobscot waters, 

7. 36. 

of Falmouth, i. 294. 
Baudoin, see Bowdoin. 
Baxter, Major Gervis, 5. 130. 
James Phinney, 8. 111. 
Richard, 7. 212, 448. 

, 3. 364, 365. 

Baye Francois, 8. 319; same as Bay of 

Fundy, 6. 276, 282. 
Bayleis, Francis, his Memoir of Ply- 
mouth Colony, cited, i. 164n. 
Bayley, Joseph, 4. 164, 166. 

Col. , 7. 237. 

Bay, of Chaleurs, a boundary of the 
Plymouth company's charter, i. 
33; mentioned, 8. 21, 22, 25, 26, 
72, 106. 
of Biscay, 8. 24. 

of Fundy, a colony established on 
the shore of, i. 26; Acadia on the 
shore of, 4. 191; same as the 
Baye Francois, 6. 276, 281 ; Champ- 
lain at, 7. 250; inclemency of the 
weather at, 8. 127-128; mentioned, 
I. 50; 7. 33, 261; 8. 6, 7, 13, 21- 
24, 129, 134, 142, 221, 223, 246, 263, 
281n, 319, 323. 



24 



MAINE HISTOEICAL SOCIETr. 



Bay — continued, 
of Minas, 8. 187. 
of Mothers, i. 522. 
of ]Sraples, 8. 24. 
Yerte, 8. 135. 
Beach Plain road, 2. 140. 

ridge, 3. 167. 
Beaman, the Rev. Dr. Nathaniel S. S., 
teacher in Lincoln academy, 8. 
166; ordained at Portland, 8. 167; 
lived in Troy, 8. 167. 
Smith, 8. 166. 
Bean, Daniel, 8. 52. 
Capt. David, 5- 367, 370, 374, 375, 

377-379. 
Capt. James, 7. 195. 
Capt. Joseph, taken prisoner, 3. 
323??; to act as an interpreter, 3. 
413; 4. 119, 169, 176; 8. 211n; men- 
tioned, 3. 171n; see also Bane, 
the Rev. Joseph, 4. 268. 
Bearce, Asa, of Hehron, 4. 303, 304, 

360. 
Beard, Aaron, signed petition to Mas- 
sachusetts, 5. 240. 
Thomas, received deed from Joce- 

lyn, 3. 67. 
Lieut. — — , 4. 388. 
Bears, plenty, i. 459; 3- 91; reward 
offered for killing them, 3. 142; 
troublesome on Sandy river, 4. 334. 
Beast, Ellis, 3- 303. 
Beath, John, 6. 158. 
Beattie, James, 4. 324. 
Beaubassin, 8. 139, 142. . 
Beaubasin, Sieur de, in command of 

the French and Indians, 3. 141. 
Beauchamp, John, Muscongus patent 
granted to, i. 45, 79; 6. 321; 9. 77, 
225; death of, 6. 321; 9. 78, 226; 
extent of the grant, 9. 77, 225, 
226; Gen. Knox in possession of 
his grant, 9. 227. 
Beauchamps, the, 5. 304. 
Beaufort, 9. 198. 

Beauharnois,. Charles, Marquis de, 
governor of New France, 7. 92, 92n; 
letters of, cited, 7. 92 ; supplied the 
Indians with belts and hatchets, 7. 
92; a natural son of Louis xiv, 7. 
92w. 
Beausejour, 8. 221. 
Beauties of England and Wales, see 

Nightingale, the Rev. John. 
Beauvais, 8. 329. 
Beaver, dams, 9. 187 
island, 2.240: 9. 43. 
river, 8. 20. 

skins, a circulating medium, i. 
55-56; sent to England, i. 57; 4- 
23; 8.30; prices of, i. 72; trade 
in, profitable, 2. 34a, 68w; price 
for, high at Albany, 4. 175, 179; 
purchased by Capt. John Smith, 
5. 162. 



story, a, 4. 379. 
the, 5. 48, 

trade profitable, i. 55, 64n, 71; 2. 
34a ; hindered by the French war, 
5. 132. 
Beavers abundant at Scarborough, 3. 

142; at Carritunk, 4. 379. 
Beawando, 3. 412. 

Becancour, 7. 83; land at granted to 
Indians, 6. 238-240; condition of 
the Indians at, 6. 243. 

Beckes , 9. 353. 

Beckf ord, William, signed the petition 

to Massachusetts, 5. 240. 
Bedabedec, early name for Owl's 
Head, 4. 104. 
mountains, 7. 253, 254. 
promontory, 7. 253. 
Bedford, formerly part of Narragan- 
sett township, 2. 145 ; population 
of, 2. 145 ; mentioned, 2. 150; 6. 58n. 
basin, 8. 126. 

Nathan, 3. 16yi; bondsman for James 
Robinson, 3. 71 ; kept the ordinary 
at Scarborough, 3. 78, 79; con- 
stable, 3. 79; presented for selling 
liquor, 3. 79; location of his inn, 
3, 79; purchased the farm of 
Boaden, 3. 79; farm in Cauley's 
hands, 3-79; his widow married 
Cauley, 3. 79; death of, 3. 79; 
probably was murdered, 3. 79-80; 
signed the petition to Charles 11, 
3. 129n. 
Mrs. Nathan, married Cauley, 3- "79. 
Bef fordshire, i. 113; 5. In. 
Bedwell, John, signed petition to 

Massachusetts, 5. 241. 
Beech, prevalent in Limerick, i. 327. 
Beer, Nathan Bedford, presented for 

selling, 3. 79. 
Bejepscot, i. 548. 
Belcher, Andrew, 3. 361. 

Capt. Andrew, 9. 62«, 64, 67n. 
Hiram, practiced in Farmington, 6. 
74; member of Congress, 6. 74; 
death of, 6. 74. 
Gov. Jonathan, petition of Richard 
Fay to, 3. 335; biographical noi^ 
tice of, 3. 335/1 ; mentioned, 4. 
123, 127, 128, 130, 133, 136, 137, 
140, 144; 6. 15; 8. 212n, 295, 298; 
9. 81. 
Mary, married George Yaughan, 8. 
295. 

, of Farmington, 4. 342, 365, 395. 

Belding, the Rev. , of Winthrop, 

4. 403. 

, of Sheepscot Ponds, 4. 320. 

Bele, Samuel, 4. 225. 
Belfast, Ireland, 6. 6, 10, 27. 

Maine, 4. 323-327, 351; 5. 363, 375n; 

6. 299, 304, 821, 323, 336, 354, 364; 

7. 334; history of, see Abbott, 
White and Williamson. 

academy, incorporated, 8. 172; land 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



25 



granted to, 8. 172 : endowed, 8. 172 ; 
opened, 8. 172; preceptors of, 8. 
172; given up, 8. 172. 
bay, probably visited by Way- 
moutli, 5. 313; mentioned, 4. 324; 
6. 316. 
harbor, 5. 374n. 
river, Indian name of, 4. 109. 
Belgic coins found at Castine, 6. 122; 

at Portland, 134. 
Belgium, 8. 49. 

of America, the, i. 403. 
Belgrade, 2. 285; 4. 374; 7. 283. 
Belknap, Jeremy, principal founder of 
the Massachusetts Hist. Soc, 2. 11a; 
4. 5; his opinion of the site of 
Popham's colony, 3. SOOn; assisted 
by Capt. Williams, 5. 310, 345; a 
lover of the truth, 5. 345; had an 
erroneous idea of the harbor visited 
by Waymouth, 5. 311, 312, 345; his 
theory examined, 6. 298-300; the 
chief authority upon the siege of 
Louisburgh, 8. 302, 303; had un- 
common facilities, 8. 302; educated 
under Thomas Prince, 8. 302-303; 
his account of the siege, 8. 303-305; 
mentioned, 4. 256; 5. xlvii; 6. 13, 
174n; 8. 116; his American Biogra- 
phy, cited, I. 27; 2. 18a, 49n; 3. 
285, 300m; 5. 153n. 311n, 328n, 334/*, 
337; 6. 173ri, 179n, 180m; 7. 95n; 
History of 'New Hampshire, cited, 
I. 35,83, 100; 2. 11a, n, 51a, 52a, 
50?i, 68w; 3. 34n; 5. I76n, 204m, 247n, 
268m, 295m; 6. 112m, 181m; letter of , 
cited, 7. 213; sermon of, cited, 4. 
360, 362, 363, 367. 
Bell, a Scotch family name, 6. 14. 

the Rev. , of Farmington, 4. 

392, 400, 404. 

, of London, 9. 351. 

Belleisle, Sieur Alexander le Borgne 
de, married Anastatia St. Castine, 7. 
70, 71m, 75, 89; mentioned, 7. 6. 71m. 
Bellingham, 2. 145. 
Bellingham, Richard, Cleeves' letter 
to, I. 167-170; his summary way of 
ending religious disputes, i. 345; 
councilor, i. 369; letter from God- 
frey, 9. 337; mentioned, 3. 73; 9. 377. 
Bellomont, the Earl of, 5. 295, 296; 6. 

252; 9. 3. 
Bell's edition of Garneau's History of 

Canada, cited, 7. 43n, 59m. 
Belsham, Thomas, 7. 382. 
Belts, symbolic, i. 425; value of among 
the Indians, i. 425-426; as tokens, 
3. 400; Beauharnois supplied the 
Indians with, 7. 92. 
Belyea family, 9. 10. 
Beman, John, 7. o85. 

Settils, , of Livermore, 4. 392. 

B«fiibow, Henry C, 5. 358. 
Bendall, Philip, signed petition of 
Massachusetts, 5. 240. 



Bend, the, 7. 19. 

Bene, Capt. John, to watch the 

French, 7. 177. 
Bengal, 4. 24. 
Benjamites, the, 3. 353. 
Bennett, David, changed his name to 
Spencer Phips, 8. 269. 
Dr. David, married Rebecca Spencer, 
9. 7, 67 ; his son adopted by Gov. 
Phips, 9. 7, 67. 
Edward, 3. 132. 

Melshare, owner of the Eagle, 5. 
168 ; licensed to fish, 5. 186m ; price 
paid for the license, 5. 186m. 
Spencer, son of Dr. David, 9. 7, 67; 
adopted by Gov. Phips, 9. 7, 63m, 
67 ; changed his name to Spencer 
Phips, 8. 269; 9. 67. 
Benson, Egbert, one of the founders 
of the New York Hist. Soc, 2. 
11a; mentioned, 8. 12. 
S. P., 8. 174; his Literature of the 
Constitution of Maine cited, 8. 
239-242. 
Bentley, William, his History of 

Salem cited, i. 264m. 
Benton, Hon. Thomas H., 8. 92, 93, 

97-100, 102, 366, 424, 443. 
Berger, Margaret, widow of Philip, i. 
277. 
Phihp, arrived at Falmouth, i. 276, 
319; death of, i. 277; son of, i. 277. 
Philip jr., son of Philip, i. 277; 
death of, i. 277. 
Berjon, Jean, published a chart of the 

coast of Maine, 7. 247-249. 
Berkley, Sir William, 5. 224. 
Berks county, 2. 257, 263, 264. 
Berkshire Association, 5. xlvi. 
Berlin, 4. 17; 7. 432. 
Bermudans, the, 9. 18. 
Bermudas, the, 7. 201 ; settled by the 
English, I. 33; Strachey wrecked 
at, 3. 284. 
Bern, district of, 7. 41. 
Bernard, Gov. Sir Francis, 7. 233; 8. 

9, 10, 22Sm, 278. ♦ 
Bernardston, 4. 314. 

hill, 4. 314. 
Berrien, John M., 8. 353. 
Berry, Elisha, 3. 208. 

George, 3. 173; 4. 164, 166. 

Capt. George, 8. 258. 

John, 2. 212; 3C 180, 208. 

Jonathan, 3. 180. 

Joseph, of Georgetown, land deeded 

to, 8. 151. 
Joseph, of Scarborough, 3. 166, 208. 
Lieut. Joseph, of Bath, 2. 208, 211, 

218. 
Thomas, killed at the battle of Fal- 
mouth, I. 295n. 
Westbrook,3. 180 ; moved to MacMas, 

3. 178. 
Major , 5. 381. 



26 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Berwick, England, i. 355n. 

Maine, formerly a part of Piscata- 
qua, I. 94; Koger Plaisted, asso- 
ciate for, I. 170; formerly a part 
of Kittery, i. 269; 4. 202; settlers 
move to Limerick, i. 327 ; tlie Kev. 
Jeremiah Wise lived in, i. 348; 5. 
liv; the Rev. Nathaniel Lord 
moved to, i. 350; formerly New- 
ichwannock, 2. 64a; Peter White 
moved to, 3. 176n; Governor Sul- 
livan born in, 4-5; 6. 48»; de- 
fended at the sacrifice e of one 
family, 4. 73; destroyed by In- 
dians, 4. 73; the tax of in 1734, 

4. 197; tax in 1743, 4. 197; Warren 
kept a tavern in, 4. 276 ; first 
chnrch in, 5. liv; French neutrals 
in, 6. 342 ; Baptist church formed 
in, 7. 222; mentioned, i. 336,337; 
2. 138; 3. 35, 160n, 212, 225; 4. 
104, 107, 155, 242n, 265, 267, 299, 
317; 5. xxiv; 7. 220, 225, 385. 

academy, established, 8. 159, 162; 
preceptors of, 8. 162-163; land 
grant to, 8. 162; closed for want 
of funds, 8. 162; bequest from 
Hon. John Lord, 8, 162; aid from 
the state, 8. 163; graduate from, 
8. 163. 
Berzelius, Johann Jacob, Baron, 6. 411. 
Bessabes, see Bashaba. 
Best, Elias, 7. 302. 

Martin, 9. 371. 
Betham's Baronetage, cited, 5. 253n. 
Bethel, formerly Sudbury, Canada, 4. 
803n, 339; Rev. Paul Coffin in, 4. 
339; Indian raid upon, 9. 213; men- 
tioned, 4. 284n, 337, 386; 7. 378; 8. 
89, 368. 

Bethune, Father , 8. 276. 

Betsabes, see Bashaba. 
Betsebes, see Bashaba. 
Betterment Act and Laws, 6. 56; 9. 
205. 

Betts, , 8. 370. 

Beveridge, William, 7. 448. 

Beverly, Peter Morrell's family moved 

to, I. 313; Nathaniel Wallis died 

in, I. 317n; mentioned, 2. 144; 6. 

358, 364; 7. 19, 369, 371, 372. 

Lenox, testified against Andros, 5. 

268. 
Robert, History of Virginia cited, 

5. 275n. 

Biancourt, Charles de, sent to Europe 
for supplies, i. 26; 8. 322; returned 
to Port Royal and assumed control, 
I. 26; 8. 322; first sent to America, 
I. 428; accused Biard of assisting 
Capt. Argall, i. 431; a son of Pou- 
trincourt, 8. 322 ; his age in 1610, 8. 
322; opposed the meddling of the 
Jesuits, 8. 322, 323; married an In- 
dian, 7. 46; followed by Jesuits, 9. 
98; became a wanderer, 9. 98; death 



of, 9. 98; left La Tour as his lieu- 
tenant, 9. 98-99. 

Biand, Father, see Biard, Pere, Pierre. 

Biard, Pere, Pierre, sent to Port Royal 
by Madam Guercheville, i. 26, 26n, 
428; 8. 322; returned to France, i. 
26n; visited the Cannibas, i. 429; 

6. 208; met by Quantin and Du Thet, 
I. 429; landed on the Penobscot, i. 
430; 7. 58; near the Etchemins, i. 
430; accused of assisting Argal, i. 
431 ; caused Membertou to be taken 
to Port Royal, i. 431-432; left an 
influence among the Indians, i. 433; 
at Mount Desert, 6. 208; at Castine, 

7. 25; carried to Virginia, 7. 28; 8. 
329; at Sagadahoc, 7. 305, 305n; 
conceived the idea of planting a 
colony at Port Royal, 8. 322; set 
out for Kadesquit, 8. 325; urged to 
visit Asticou, 8. 324; gave up his 
plan to visit Kadcsquit, 8. 325; place 
he settled at, 8. 325 ; with Argal on 
his second visit north, 8. 329-330; 
his Relation cited, i. 288, 430; 7. 
2997Z. 

Bickford, George, signed petition to 
Massachusetts, 5. 241. 

Thomas, 3. 110; in the garrison at 
Black Point, i. 227/i; signed peti- 
tion to Charles 11, i. 402. 
Bickham, William, a referee in R. 

Jordan's will, i. 553. 
Bickton, Waymouth, signed the peti- 
tion to Charles 11, i. 402. 
Biddeford, England, birthplace of 
John Parker, i. 302; mentioned, 
I. 355n; 3. 90; 4. 239. 

Maine, John Parker died at, i. 302; 
home of Isaac Davis, i. 309; peo- 
ple from settled in Limerick, i. 
327; Gov. James Sullivan lived 
in, I. 327/1 ; 2. 20l7i; 4. 5; 5. xxv; 
6. 48n; the Rev. Samuel Emery 
died in, i. 348; formerly the 
property of Vines and Oldham, 2. 
73a, 48n; in the Plough patent, 3. 
32; Whitfield preached in, 3. 160w; 
French neutrals sent to, 3. 176m; 6. 
242 ; manufactures in, 4. 27 ; com- 
pared to Kittery, 4, 202 ; the Rev. 
Paul Cofiin taught school in, 4. 
242; court held at, 5. xxiv; men- 
tioned, I. 44; 2. 24n, 138, 139 
141, 146; 3. 163, 216; 4. 243, 249n 
270, 273, 293; 5. xxiv; 6. 54; 7. 
220; 8. 4.50; History of, see Fol- 
som, George. 
Biddle, Richard, Memoir of the Cab- 

ots cited, 5. 145n, 148», 162?i; 7. 

130^, 133«. 
Bigelow, Abijah, 6. 70n. 

Jacob, 3. 252. 

Thomas, 8. 389, 441. 

Timothy, of Groton, 6. 62n. 

Major Timothy, to accompany Ar- 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS, 



27 



nold, I. 500; to bring up pro- 
visions, I. 473, 474; Arnold's let- 
ter to, I. 474; mentioned, i. 510, 
524. 

tlie Kev. , preached in Bath, 2. 

223. 
Big island, 8. 317. 

Bigot, Jaques, missionary at Kenne- 
bec, I. 434; in the expedition 
against New England, i. 434; his 
family, i. 434; his home and man- 
ner of life, I. 435. 
Vincent, at Penobscot, i. 434. 
Bigots, the, i. 435; 7. 58; scanty in- 
formation concerning, i. 434; letters 
of, cited, 6. 213n. 
Biguatus, see Bagaduce. 
Biguyduce, Major, said to have lived 
at Castine, 6. 107-108; only au- 
thority for the statement, 6. 108. 
peninsula, 5. 385n; meaning of, un- 
known, 6. 107, 109w; home of 
Castine, 6. Ill; passage from to 
Mount Desert, 7. 114, 115; coins 
found near, 6. 114; see Baga- 
duce. 
Bilboa, fish sent to, i. 538. 
Billerica, 2. 146 ; 4. 265, 342. 
Billing, Ann, admonished to live with 
her husband, i. 377-378. 
John, lived unpleasantly with his 
wife, I. 377. 
Billings, the Rev. Oliver, 4. 392. 
Billingsgate, 7. 460. 
Bill of credit, 9. 33. 
Bill of rights, the. 7. 163. 
Bill, Richard, signed treaty of 1714, 

6. 258; autograph of, 6. 258. 
Bingham, 4. 398. 
the Hon, James H., 8. 450. 
land, by William Allen, 7. 351-360. 
purchase, i. 505. 

William, a wealthy patriot, 7. 354, 
356; his purchase of Gen. Knox, 
7. 354; considerations of the 
same, 7. 354-355 ; a few settlers 
obtained, 7. 355; other large es- 
tates, 7. 355; children of, 7. 355; 
died in Bath, England, 7. 355; his 
payment unknown, 7.365; settlers 
obtained deeds, 7. 355; his claims 
forfeited, 7. 355; did pay his pur- 
chase money, 7. 356; did not 
receive full payment from the 
settlers, 7. 356 ; his agents to sell 
to others, 7. 357; the affair ami- 
cably settled, 7. 358; sent John 
Black as his agent, 7. 358-359; a 
good investment, 7. 359-360. 
Birch abundant at Moosehead lake, i. 

455. 
Birckfield, M., signed treaty of 1714, 

6. 258; autograph of, 6. 258. 
Birdseye, the Rev. Nathan, 5. Ivn. 
Biscaie rugs at Monhegan, 5. 172. 



Bishop, George, 2. 76a. 
Reuben, murdered McCormic, i. 467. 
Mrs, , of Bristol, 7. 409. 

Bishop's Bible, 4. QS. 
college, 7. 433. 

Bishopscotte river, now the Pejep- 
scot, I. 40n. 

Bitteford, see Biddeford. 

Bixby, Solomon, 4. ^^9, 400. 
Mrs. Solomon, 4. 375. 

Blacey, , married Abigail Inger- 

soll, I. 311. 

Blackberry Hill, Baptist church 
formed at, 7. 222. 

Blacketh, Edward, signed treaty of 
1714, 6. 258; autograph of, 6. 258. 

Black island, 7. 10. 

Black John, nickname for John Libby 
2d, 3, 14072. 

Black, John, sent to Maine as clerk 
for Bingham, 7. 358-359; married 

Cobb, 7. 359-360; second 

marriage, 7. 359; death of, 7. 359, 
300 ; had a sub-agent, 7. 360. 
Mary, daughter of Samuel, 3. 214; 
married Richard King, 3. 214; 
children of, 3. 214-215; death of, 
3. 215. 
Point, granted to Thomas Cam- 
mock, I. 47, 80, son, 120, 533; 3. 
12; home of Henry Jocelyn, i. 50, 
62, 76, 77, 84n, 159n, 173-175, 177, 
220; 2. 64a, 78a, 79a; 3- 13, 30, 35, 
322n; 9. 209; John Wilkinson, 
constable of, i. 88; 3- 37; the 
people of in favor of Vines, i. 
92; home of Giles Roberts, i. 95; 
a part of Lygonia, i. 97; 3- 23)i; 
courtheldat, i.98; 3- 41,78; home 
of Jonas Bailey, i. lOln; submit- 
ted to the jurisdiction of Massa- 
chusetts, I. 106; 2. 63a, 64a; 3-23, 
47; presented for not attending 
the order of the court, i. 184, 
185; home of James Robinson, i, 
187; Jocelyn' s property mort- 
gaged at, I. 198; home of Joshua 
Scottow, I. 119, 201, 270; a resort 
for fishermen, i. 201; described 
by John Jocelyn, i. 203, 550; 
3. 29m; home of John Mills, i. 
209; home of Elias Oakman, i. 
209; 3. 76; Anthony Brackett 
escaped to, i. 224; attacked by 
Indians, i. 226, 229; 3- '^S, 112, 
138, 140, 141; 4. 290; people of, i. 
226n, 227n; miUtia in, i. 228*, be- 
sieged by Mugg, I. 229; people 
killed, I. 229; saw mills at, l. 
269; burned, i. 303n; 3- 138 ; home 
of Henry Watts, i. 383; home of 
Geo. Dearing, i. 384; H. Jocelyn 
a magistrate for, 2. 63a; a former 
name for Cammock's settlement, 
3. 10, 11; early settlers of, 3. 15, 
16, 67, 70, 84; the only part of 



28 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Black, Point— continued, 

Scarborough settled, 3. 16 ; some- 
times called Blue Point, 3. 17, 
18; origin of the name, 3. 18; 
settlers engaged in fishing, 3. 26, 
126: settlement increased rapidly, 
3. 29, 30, 38, 133, 169; Jocelyn, the 
principal man in, 3. 30, 35, 36; 
number of families there in 1640, 
3. 38, SSn; John Jocelyn at, 3. 
36, 85, 87, 90, 91; denied the 
jurisdiction of Massachusetts, 3. 
44; number of inhabitants in 
1671; 3. 67; people of scattered 
by the Indians, 3. 67; Quakers 
punished, 3. 70, 71; Joshua Scot- 
tow early purchased land at, 3. 
72, 132 ; Michael Maddiver settled 
at, 3. 74; home of Walter Gen- 
dall, 3. 75; home of Arthur 
Brown,' 3. 76; home of God- 
frey Sheldon, 3. 76; John Bur- 
rage moved to, 3. 80, 81 ; num- 
ber of residents prior to 1675, 
3.83; different kinds of fish at, 
3. 91, 92; extraordinary story con- 
cerning, 3. 92, 93; to give a yearly 
tribute to the Indians, 3. 102; en- 
tirely abandoned by the English, 
3. 110; return of the inhabitants, 
3. Ill, 112; fort at commanded by 
Lieut. Tippen, 3-112; flight of the 
Indians, 3. 112, J 13; friendly In- 
dians at, 3. 113; objected to pay 
the expenses of Scottow's sol- 
diers, 3. 125; Scottow engaged in 
fishing at, 3. 126; presented for 
not having a ferry, 3. 128; clay- 
pits at granted to Matthew Libby, 
3. 130; fortification commenced 
at,' 3. 131, 132; in a flourishing 
condition, 3. 133; Major Church 
held a council of war at, 3. 136, 
137; the destruction of reported, 
3. 138; buried relics of the past 
at, 3. 139n; Indians attack, 3. 140, 
141 ; defended by Capt. Larrabee, 
3. 141; Indians retire, 3, 141, 142; 
need a clergyman, 3. 153, 159; 
first preacher at, 3. 153, 154; 
George Burroughs preached at. 
3. 156; site of the first meeting 
house, 3. 157; controversy con- 
cerning the meeting house, 3. 157, 
158; meetings held, 3. 159; preach- 
ers in, 3. 158-162; school at, 3. 
168; the center of prosperity, 3. 
169; suffered by two Indian wars, 
3. 176; only one newspaper taken 
in, 3. 205; mentioned, i. 104; 2. 
84n; 3. 15, 16n, 26, 57, 58, 77, 98, 
lOOn, 104, 104n, 106, 107, 114, 117, 
120, 121, 122, 151, 166, 212, 216, 
219, 221, 222, 231; 5. 32, 198, 233, 
234, 260; 6. 138; 9. 3l2w, 313n, 



367; Kow Prout's Neck, 9. 209, 
210. 
Point bay, 3. 139. 
Point church, 3. 205, 208, 210, 212, 

223 227. 
Point ferry, 3. 166, 218. 
Point fight, 4. 73. 

Point garrison, surrender of, 3. 109, 
348; Jocelyn only in temporary 
command, 3, 109; occupants of, 
3. 110; Indians soon left after the 
surrender, 3. 11^; soldiers with- 
drew, 3. 138; men recruited for, 
3. 150; attacked, 3. 150; Thomas 
Larrabee killed, 3. 150. 
Point graveyard, 3. 159. 
Point harbor, 3. 92. 
Point neck, a place for drying fish, 

3.9. 
Point patent, 3. 13, 229; deed in 

full, 3. 230. 
Point river, boundary of Cam- 
mock's grant, i. 47; 3. 229, 230; 
no ferry at, 3. 128. 
Prince, The, built at Bath, 2. 209. 
Samuel, his daughter married Eich- 

ard King, 3-214. 
Will, hung, I- 42, 43; 6. 146. 
Blackman, the Kev. Adam, early set- 
tler of Stratford, 3-155; death of, 
3- 155. 
the Rev. Benjamin, a trustee, i. 
267; had a saw-mill at Black 
Point, I. 269; 3. 167; land con- 
veyed to by Scottow, 3. 155; 
preached at Scarborough 3. 155; 
a deputy, 3. 155; Scottow' s son- 
in-law, 3. 155; large land-holder, 
3. 155; moved to Saco and then 
to Boston, 3. 155; the son of the 
Rev. Adam, 3- 155; a Harvard 
graduate, 3. 155; lived at Maldeil, 
3. 155. 
Blacksmith, one wanted by the In- 
dians, 4. 182; see also Gunsmith. 
Blackstone, William, 2. 47, 48; 9. 308. 
Sir William, his Commentaries the 
only law book of the early law- 
yers, 4. 16; published in Portland, 
8. 180; cited, 6. 54. 
the Misses, g. 69. 
Blackstrap, Will., 2. 162. 
Blair family, in Worcester, 6. 13; in 
Warren, 6. 21. 
Robert, 6. 26. 
Blake, the Hon. George, 3. 245-247, 
252. 
Gen. John, 7. 20, 
the Hon. S. H., 8. 472. 

, of Carrytunk Falls, 4. 346. 

Blanchard, Capt. Andrew, 2. 182. 
Benjamin, 2. 121. 
Daniel, 3. 114. 
Blandford, i. 234n. 

Blarney, John, married Elizabeth 
Purchase, i. 40; 3. 320n. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



29 



Blashfield, Thomas, 2. 171, 173. 
Blathwayt, William, 3. 328. 
Blaxton, see Blackstone. 
Blessing, the, 7. 320. 
Blew Point, see Blue Point. 
Bliss, Porter, on the definition of 
Acadia, i. 27n; on the definition of 
Machigonne, i. 60ri. 
Block houses at Annapolis, 8. 279 ; at 
Merrymeeting bay, 5-71, 104; at 
Sheepscot, 4. 213, 220; at Thom- 
aston, 7. .']25; 9. 79; at St. G-eorges, 
7. 325; erected by the Plymouth 
company, 8. 207n. 
island, John Oldham killed near, i. 
4471. 
Blodget, Seth, 8. 210n. 
Blood, the Rev. Caleb, 8. 178. 

, moved to Scarborough, 3. 140, 

UOn. 
Bloody Point, 3. 18n. 
Point ferry, 4. 265. 
Bloomfield, i. 504; separated from 
Canaan, 8. 171. 
academy, preceptors of, 8. 171; 
merged into a high school, 8. 171. 
the Rev. Francis, his Norfolk cited, 

5. 170n. 
high school, 8. 171. 
Gen. Joseph, 9. 183, 184. 
Blossom, The, commanded by Stephen 

Heacock, 5. 135, 136. 
Blount, Sir Christopher, executed for 

high treason, 2. 71a. 
Blue. Hill, 4. 324; called Kollege- 
widgewock, 4, 105. 
Hill academy incorporated, 8. 167; 
land granted to, 8, 167 ; funds of, 
and building, 8. 167; preceptors 
of, 8. 167; cost of tuition, 8. 167. 
Hillbay, 6. 115. 

mountains, probably seen by Way- 
mouth, 5. 313, 314. 
Point, home of Richard Foxwell, i. 
64n,, 175n; 3- 14; included in Ly- 
gonia, I. 97; submitted to Massa- 
chusetts, I. 105, 385; 3. 46; to be 
called Scarborough, i. 106, 387; 
3. 47; home of Henry Watts, i. 
159n ; depredations of the Indians 
at, I. 213; home of James Robin- 
son, 3. 20w, 80; home of John 
Ashton, 3, 21n, 25, 82; Jona. 
Bailey lived and died at, 3. 26, 73; 
people of engaged in agriculture, 
3.26; number of families at, 3. 
38n; home of Joseph Phippen, 3. 
72, T2n, 73; home of Hilkiah 
Bailey, 3. 74; Geo. Bearing set- 
tled at, 3. 74; John Jackson set- 
tled at, 3. 74; an ordinary at, 3. 
79; Gyles Barge settled at, 3. 81, 
82; residents of before 1675, 3. 
83; Gen. Church at, 3. 136; garri- 
son at, 3. 188; mentioned, 3. 27, 
38, 76, 79, 100^, 101, 104, 105, 137, 



142, 146, 151, 164n, 169, 182, 206n, 
209, 219, 223, 225, 226; 7. 364. 
Point bridge, 3. 16971. 
Point ferry, 3. 79. 
Point neck, 3. 68. 
Bluff head, 2. 213. 

island, 3. 10. 
Blunt, John, gave land to Hallowell 

academy, 8. 160. 
Boad, see Bode. 

Boaden, Capt. Ambrose (sen.), signed 
petition to the king, i. 80; took 
an inventory of George Bartlett's 
estate, i. 209; killed, i. 214; sub- 
mitted to the jurisdiction of Mas- 
sachusetts, I. 386; 3. 46; resided 
at Scarborough or Black Point, i. 
180n; 3. 15, 16; captain of the 
ship that brought Cammock to 
America, 3. 15, 16; appointed fer- 
ryman, 3. 16, 127; juryman, 3. 16; 
became blind, 3. 16; later owners 
of his farm, 3. 16n; received 
grant from Cammock, 3. 79; trus- 
tee for Scarborough, 3. 130, 233; 
death of, 3. IQn; mentioned, 3. 
38^1, 212. 
Ambrose jr., submitted to Massa- 
chusetts, 3. 47; sold land to John 
Tenney, 3. 74, 75; sold his farm to 
Nathan Bedford, 3, 79; men- 
tioned, 3. IQn. 
Henry, signed petition to Charles 11, 
1.402. 
Boaden' s Point, 3. 167. 
Boardman, George Dana, 8. 171, 179. 
Herbert, 4. 310, 311. 
the Rev. Sylvanus, 4. 35 ; 8. 178. 
Walter, 4. 363. 
Board of commissioners for the 

United Colonies, 9. 29. 
Bode, Henry, appointed commis- 
sioner, 1.91; refused to act, i . 91 ; 
to survey Wells, i. 342; conveyed 
land to John Wheelwright, i. 344, 
352; accepted the title of Thomas 
Gorges, i. 355; commissioner for 
Wells, I. 360; selectman, i. 361; one 
of the first settlers of Wells, i. 362; 
assistant, i. 368; signed the petition 
to Cromwell, i. 395. 
Bodfish, Betsey, daughter of Nym- 

phas, married Chase, 4. 404. 

Mercy, daughter of Nymphas, 4.315. 
Nymphas, visited by Paul Coffin, 4. 
315; married the daughter of 
Major Goodwin, 4. 315; men- 
tioned, 4. 316, 349, 371, 372, 401,404. 
Mrs. Nymphas, 4. 315. 
Bogwell, George, killed at Falmouth, 

I. 302. 
Bohannow, John, 3. 180. 
Bohun, 5. xlv. 

Boies, Antipas, purchased title of the 
Plymouth Colony, i. 44; one of the 
Kennebec purchasers, 2. 203, 276.^ 



30 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETT. 



Boilers, the, 9. 15. 
Boirdly, 3. 318. 
Boles, Samuel, 5. 65. 

Wi., 2. 46. 
Bolla, John, 4. 56. 

Bolles, Joseph, copied deeds for Rob- 
ert Booth, I. 353; commissioner, 
1.358; clerk of writs, i. 361; an 
early settler of Wells, i. 361. 
Nathan, 4. 56. 
Bolster, Capt. Abraham, 4. 303,|338, 

360, 388. 
Bomazeen, told of the French hatred 
of the English, i. 281; his wife 
captured, 2. 197; killed, 2. 198; ex- 
plained the religion taught to him, 
5. 176n; before the walls of Pema- 
quid, 5. 284; seized, 5. 284, 285, 288; 
in prison, 5.288; signed the treaty 
of 1713, 6. 244, 253; signum of, 6. 
254; mentioned, 3. 362; 5. 298; 6. 
253, 261. 
Bonaparte, Napoleon, 7. 410. 
Bonaventure, the, 2. 68n; 7. 78. 

island, 7. 49. 
Bond, Elias, 7. 285. 
Ensign Francis, son of Thomas, 6. 

64n. 
Nicholas, his wife assaulted, i. 369; 
to receive damages, i. 370; signed 
the petition to Massachusetts, 5. 
240. 
Thomas, corporate member of the 
Maine Historical Society, i. 11; 
birth of, 6. Qin; graduated from 
Harvard college, 6. 64n; held 
public office, 6. 64?i; married 
Lucretia Page, 6. 64?i; children 
of, 6. 6471 ; commenced practice in 
Hallowell, 6. 63; character and 
ability of, 6. 63, 64; death of, 6. 
64, 64J^; children of, 6. 64n; men- 
tioned, 6. 41; 7. 284, 458, 459. 

Bonfere, Ensign , 8. 327. 

Bonighton, Elinor, guilty of bastardy, 
I. 190; punished, i. 377. 
John, sued by Gibson, i. 59; a noto- 
rious character, i. 84, 190, 191; 3. 
18, 19; fined, i. 84?i; 3. 18; hved in 
Saco, I. 105, 143, 185, 368; entered 
a complaint against the town, i. 
142; the controversy, 1. 142; price 
set on his head, i. 181w, 368; 3. 
19; action against, i. 185; paid 
his daughter's tine, *i. 190, 377; 
son of Richard, i. 190n; 3. 18; his 
house burned, i. 213; outlawed, 
I. 368; 3. 18, 19; to be taken to 
Boston, I. 368; disturbed Foxwell, 
3. 18; obliged to pay the costs, 3. 
18; declared a rebel, 3. 18, 19; 
opposed the jurisdiction of Mas- 
sachusetts, 3. 44/1, 64; mentioned, 
1.396, 397; 3- 61. 
patent, a divison of recommended, 
I. 143. 



Richard, received a grant on the 
Saco river, i. 44, 79, 175n; 3. 17; 
died, I. 44; on the case of Cleeves 
vs. Winter; i. 54; councilor, i. 
73/1,342,364, 366-368, 5.33; court 
held at his house, i. 84, 541; g. 
309; a commissioner for Gorges, 
I. 88; 3. 36; daughter married 
Foxwell, i.l75n; original patentee 
of Saco, I. 190; house destroyed 
by Indians, i. 213; submitted to 
Massachusetts, i. 386; inclined to 
the Church of England, i. 547; 
sent Foxwell to Blue Point, 3. 17; 
father of John, 1. 190; 3. 18; men- 
tioned, I. 94, 342, 545; 3. 18, 19, 
40; 5. 198. 

Bonn, 7. 432. 

Bonney, Joel, millwright, moved to 
Machias, 3. 178 ; land granted to, 3. 
179. 

Bonnybeag pond, 4. 104. 

Bonny Eagle pond, 2.141. 

Bonython, see Bonighton. 

Bonyton, Amos, 3. 180. 

Booking, Henry, lived at Black Point, 
3.83. 

Boomazeen, see Bomazeen. 

Boone, Richard, signed petition to 
Massachusetts, 5. 241. 

Boothbay, part of Capeanawhagen, 2. 
86n; people of ordered to relin- 
quish their rights to the states, 2. 
292; formerly Townsand or Pen- 
tecost harbor, 5. 314, 338; 6. 18, 
156, 156/1, 161, 310; visited by 
Townsend, 5. 314; ceded to Mc- 
Cobb, 6. 18; the McCobbs the 
leaders of the emigration to, 6. 
19; Presbyterians in, 6. 19; church 
established at, 6. 34, 155, 159; the 
principal plantation in Devon- 
shire, 6. 155 ; overrun by savages, 
6. 1.55 ; reservation for the church, 
6. 1.55; the Rev. Robert Dunlap 
resided in, 6. 155; made applica- 
tion for a minister, 6. 156; origin 
of the name, 6. 156w; the Rev. 
John Murray arrived at, 6. 156, 
157; left without a minister, 6. 
157; the Rev. John Murray re- 
turned to 6. 158; revival at, 6. 
159; the people of distressed dur- 
ing the Revolution, 6. 161; sent 
delegates to the Provincial Con- 
gress, 6. 161, 162; Gen. Lithgow 
had much property at, 6. 164; op- 
posed the leaving of Murray, 6. 
165, 166; he left, 4. 166; church 
people at, 6. 1997i; Germans settle 
at, 8. 213; g. 85; mentioned, 4. 
330; 5. 292n, 348; 6. 168; 7. 378; 8. 
287; g. 131. 
harbor, not Pentecost harbor, 6. 
298; how formed, 6. 310, 311; 
direction Weymouth would have 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS, 



31 



' taken from, 6. 311; probably 
visited by Weymouth, g. 132n; 
mentioned, 5. 250ri; 6. 304, 306, 
312; 9. 137. 
Boothby, Henry, 3. 159, 208. 

Joseph, biographical notice of, 3. 

208. 
Samuel, biographical notice of, 3. 
208. 
Booth, J. Wilkes, 7. 270. 

Mary L., her translation of Martin's 

History of France cited, 7. 42n. 
Robert, member of the Ligonia 
assembly, i. 99; lived at Saco, 
I. lOOn; submitted to Massachu- 
setts, I . lOOn ; his records attested, 
I. 353; signed the petition to 
Cromwell, i. 394. 
Simon, attested Robert Booth's 

records, i. 353. 
Thomas, fined for profanity and 
slander, i. 374. 
Boot, Jesse, 4. 55. 
Jesse jr., 4. 55. 
Bordeaux, fish sent to, i. 551; Pop- 
ham's colonists arrived at, 3. 291 ; 
mentioned, 2. 37a; 3- 287; 5- 320; 
7. 410. 
river, 3. 287. 
Bordeneau, Ant., 7. 71n. 
Borland, Frans, signed treaty of 1717, 

6. 261; autograph of, 6. 261. 
Borowes, 3. 21n. 
Boscowen, 4. 297, 298. 
Bossuet, Jacques B^nignQ, 7. 448. 
Boston, a slave who served in the 
Revolution, 3. 204; 7. 236, 236^. 
England, i. 45, 35.5n; 6. 321. 
Mass., Greenleafs Statistical Views 
pubhshed at, i. 5; Sullivan's His- 
tory published at, i. 5; settlers 
from Winter Harbor went to, i. 
45; John Jocelyn at, i. 50; 3-87, 
90, 91, 98; Alliset's deposition 
given in, i. 63n; Mrs. Macworth 
moved to, i. 70, 128, 129, 217, 250; 
George Cleeves in, i. 91, 95, 102; 
Jordan imprisoned in, i. 102; 3. 
44; 6. 185, 186; people of Maine 
summoned to court in, i. 104; 
Joseph Phippen came from, i. 
113; home of John PhilUps, i. 
121, 153, 258; home of Robert Cor- 
bin, I. 121; Geo. Munjoy moved 
to, I. 124, 255, 256; James An- 
drews moved to, i. 128, 129, 217, 
305, 319 ; Abraham Adams moved 
to, 1. 129 ; Walter Merry resided at, 
I. 140; Josiah Willes resided at, i. 
146n; the First Church of became 
part owner of Great Chebeag, i. 
147, 153; Geo. Jewell drowned in 
the harbor of, i. 148; home of 
Hannah Hallom, i. 149; home 
of Edward Tyng, i. 150, 316; 
Mary Munjoy baptized in, l. 153n; 



home of Farnum, i. 154; home 
of Richard Callicot, i. 163; Cols. 
Cartwright and Nichols in, i . 173 ; 
the Rev. John Wheelwright in, i. 
182n; Samuel Maverick in, i. 
182n; Geo. Pearson in, i. 190n; 
Joshua Scottow in, 1. 198; and his 
death in, 2. 237n; home of Samuel 
Powsland, i. 205n; Mary Martin 
died in, i. 207n; home of Henry 
Crown, I. 208; home of John 
Mills, I. 209, 214n; the Algers 
moved to, i. 214n; home of John 
Milliken, i. 214n; sent provisions 
to Falmouth, i. 222^1 ; Mugg held 
as a hostage in, i. 228; Gendall 
tried for treason in, i. 231; home 
of John Endicott, i. 248; home of 
James English, i. 248; Mrs. Mac- 
worth died in, i. 250; home of 
Ingles, I. 252n; Burroughs im- 
prisoned in, I. 264; Henry Har- 
wood moved to, i. 270; home of 
Bozoun Allen, i. 270; Peter Bow- 
doin moved to, i. 276; Stephen 
Bowdoin moved to, i. 277; Philip 
Bretton moved to, i. 277; home 
of John Young, i. 277; a line of 
packets between there and Fal- 
mouth, I. 278; 4. 46; Stoughton 
at, 1.289; officers from the forts 
sent to, I. 291 ; prisoners taken to, 
1.302; home of Richard Pullin, 
1.306; home of Joseph Mayhew, 
I. 306; home of the widow 
Harvey, i. .308; Thomas Cloice 
died in, i. 308; the widow Clarke 
died in, i. -308; Sylvanus Davis 
died in, i. -309; home of Joseph 
Calef, I. 312; home of Stephen 
Cross, I. 313; of John Orris, i. 
314; of Isaac Pierce, i. 314; of 
William Walter, i. 317; James 
York died in, i. 318; the Rev. 
John Wheelwright banished from, 
I. 341; the Hutchinsons in, i. 
342^; the Rev. Jonathan Green- 
leaf moved to, i. 352; John Baker 
a resident of, i. 356 ; John Bonigh- 
ton to be sent to, i. 368; Geo. Gar- 
land and the widow Hitchcock to 
be tried in, i. 373; home of Robert 
Nash, I. 383, 384; all cases of ap- 
peal tried in to be paid for, i. 
386 ; invaded the rights of Maine, 
I. 400; Dreuillett made two jour- 
neys to, I. 433; deputation of In- 
dians to, I. 440, 441; ship arrived 
at from Quebec, i. 481 ; David 
Thompson lived on an island in 
the harbor of, 2. 48a n; Thomas 
Gorges arrived at, 2. 59a; Capt. 
Walter Norton sold oxen in, 2. 
50n; survivors of the Narragan- 
sett war to meet at, 2. 136, 137; 
Sir William Phipps moved tp, 2. 



32 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Boston, Mass. — continued. 

230, 231; g. 6; Abraham Jocelyn 
moved to, 3. 6S; home of Bebecca 
Scarlet, 3. 78; John Palmer moved 
to, 3. 82; Indian treaty of 1725 
executed at, 3. 152; first troops 
to enter during the Revolution, 3. 
196; evacuated by Howe, 3. 197; 
home of Samuel Waldo, 3. 335, 
336; John Jones imprisoned in, 

4. 43; coasters to and from the 
Kennebec, 4. 46; Sheepscot rec- 
ordit; lost in the fire at, 4. 210, 
228, 229; New York to send a 
sloop to, 5. 9; Anthony Brock- 
hoUs' letter to, 5. 11-14; first fort 
built at, 5. 197 ; windmill at used 
by people of Pemaquid, 5. 204; 
9. 308; Jocelyn' s opinion of, 5. 
233; home of Capt. Thomas Lake, 

5. 253; the annexation of Pema- 
quid to advised, 5. 265; the num- 
ber of Maine refugees in to be 
ascertained, 5. 278; the great guns 
of Pemaquid brought to, 5. 278; 
Bomazeen sent to, 5. 285 ; Indians 
in prison at, 5. 287, 288; Sheep- 
scot John sent as mediator at, 5. 
287, 288; Indian prisoners to be 
beheaded, 5. 291; Capt. Brock- 
holls taken a prisoner at, 5. 294; 
lumber sent to, 5. 299; a company 
of Scotch-Irish arrive at, 6. 11, 
12; first Presbyterian society at, 

6. 12, 13, 31, 32; spinning wheel 
contest in, 6. 14; lime shipped to, 
6. 20,21 ; Albert Gallatin arrived at, 
6. 95, 102 ; Cadillac on the capture 
of, 6. 284,287; Cadillac's account 
of, 6. 285, 286; the principal city of 
New England in 1753, 6. 328; 7. 
213; separatists in, 6. 384; James 
II proclaimed king in, 7. 53; 
alarmed by the depredations of 
Andross at Pemaquid, 7. 56; war 
with Canada declared at, 7. 59; 
D'Iberville planned an expedition 
against, 7, 67; St. Castine in 
prison at, 7. 84 ; Samuel Maverick 
very useful at, 7. 145 ; exasperated 
by Andross, 7. 159; slaves in, 7. 
210; opposed the slave trade, 7. 
211; slave trade lucrative in, 7. 
212, 213; Baptist church estab- 
lished in, 7. 223; French fleet 
sent to capture, 7. 125; defenses 
strengthened, 7. 125; German set- 
tlers arrived at, 8. 213 ; Gen. Wins- 
low embarked at, 8. 224 ; a place 
of culture in the 18tli century, 9. 
75, 76; corn carried to for grind- 
ing, 9, 308; no tavern in, g. 308; 
site of the windmill in, 9. 30S?i; 
alarmed by the movements of 
Godfrey, 9.323, 326; circulated a 
petition in Maine to ask Massa- 



chusetts to govern them, 9. 326; 
meager reports sent to by Lever- 
ett, 9. 329, S^On. 

Association formed to promote 
American manufactures, 4. 57, 
58 ; duck manufactured by, 4. 58. 
Athenaeum, 5. Ixii ; 6. 12Sn, 
bay, 2. 44a. 

circuit, 7. 227. 

Common, 4. 351. 

Courier cited, 5. 229n. 
fire, 4. 395. 

Gazette, 7. 213; 8. 230, 233. 

harbor, Cadillac's account of, 6. 
284-286; mentioned, 2. 68^; 8. 
229n, 

Journal cited, 5. 230n. 

News Letter cited, 5. 384n, 385; 7. 
212; 8. 118; 9. 62n, 91. . 

Patriot cited, 3. 244. 

Post boy cited, 8. 131, 135, 139. 

Presbytery, 4. I06; formed, 4. 36; 
members of, 4. 36. 

records cited, i. 207n. 

siege of, 2. 149. 

Traveler, 5. 303. 
Bostonians, 7. 341 ; 9. 355. 
Botany bay, 6. 89. 
Bouchette, Col. Joseph, 8. 20. 
Bouden, Ambrose, 3. 110, 119; in the 

garrison at Black Point, i. 227n. 
Boudrin, Claud, 6. 342. 

John, 6. 342. 

Joseph, 6. 342. 

Margaret, 6. 342. 

Boularderie, De La, 7. 71n, 77, 78. 
Boudrix, Claude, French neutral sent 
to Biddeford, 3. llQn; children 
of, 3. 176w. 

John, sent to Scarborough, 3. 176n. 

Margaret, French neutral, sent to 
Scarborough, 3. 116n. 

Mary, French neutral sent to Scar- 
borough, 3. 176n. 
Boulter, the Rev. Hugh, 5. 10. 
Bounty offered for Indian scalps, 3. 

170n. 
Bourbons, the, 8. 285. 
Bourdaloue, Louis, 7. 448. 

Bourn, Col. , 8. 226, 227. 

Bourne, the Hon. Edward E., fur- 
nished notes for the History of 
Wells, I. .352; ancestry of, 8. 389; 
birth, 8. 3S7; boyhood, 8. 388, 
389; at the South Berwick acade- 
my, 8. 389; entered college, 8. 
389; studied law, 8. 389; admitted 
to the bar, 8. 389; opened an 
office in Fairfax, 8. 390; moved 
to Wells, 8. 390, 391; moved to 
York, 8. 391; back to Wells, 8. 
392; took the business of Mr. 
Dane, 8. 392; married Mary H. 
Gilpatrick, 8.392; children of, 8. 
393; active in town affairs, 8. 
393; in the state legislature, 8. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



33 



393, 397; his advice in the dead- 
lock in the Senate, 8. 395, 396; 
prosperous, 8. 396; cases of, 8. 
396, 397; as a lawyer, 8. 397, 
398; state's attorney, 8. 398; 
students of, 8. 398, 399; judge of 
probate, 8. 399-401 ; interested in 
church affairs, 8. 402, 403; his 
historical works, 8. 403, 404; presi- 
dent of the Maine Hist. Soc, 8. 
404, 406; his exertions for the 
Society, 8. 404, 405; member of 
other societies, 8. 405 ; trustee of 
Bowdoin college, 8. 405 ; married 
Mrs. S. H. Lord, 8. 405; his death, 
8. 307, 407; his character, 8. 406, 
408; mentioned, 6. 361; articles 
contributed by: Garrison Houses 
of York County, 7. 107-120; Mem- 
oir of, by Hon. Edwin B. Smith, 
8. 386-408; his History of Wells 
and Kennebunk cited, 8. 275, 306. 

Edward E., jr., 8. 393. 

George W., 8. 388, 402. 

Israel W., 8. 387. 

John, married Elizabeth Wildes, 8. 
387; children of, 8. 387. 

Julia, daughter of John, 8. 338; 
married Henry Kingsbury 8. 338. 

Julia Maria, daughter of the Hon. 
Edward E., 8. 393. 

Lizzie Greene, daughter of the Hon. 
Edward E., 8. 393; died, 8. 393. 

Mary Oliver^ daughter of the Hon. 
Edward Ev, 8. 393. 

Oliver, daughter of John, 8. 388; 
married Capt. Ivory Lord, 8. 388. 

Shearjashub, 5. xxiii, xxv. 

Thomas, 8. 388. 

Capt. , headed a company to 

exterminate the Indians, 2. 197. 
Boutelle, John, 8. 174. 

Rachel, 6. 69n. 

Col. Timothy, father of the Hon. 
Timothy, 6. 69n. 

the Hon. Timothy, son of Col. 
Timothy, 6. 69^; birth of, 6. 
69;^; graduated from college, 6. 
69n; a school teacher, 6. 70n; 
studied law, 6. 70n; practiced at 
Waterville, 6. 69w.; held public 
offices, 6. 69n, lOn; death of, 6. 
69n; mentioned, 6, 41; 7. 458. 
Boutineau, Stephen, arrived at Fal- 
mouth, I. 276, 277; lived in Boston, 

I, 277; married Mary Bowdoin, i. 

277; lived on the Neck, i. 319; men- 
tioned, 6. 135. 
Bowdish, see Bowditch, 
Bowditch, Nathaniel, 5. 260; his M^- 
canique Celeste cited, 5. 260n. 

N. IngersoU, Memoir of Nathaniel 
Bowditch cited, 5. 2Q0n. 

William, bearer of letter to New 
York, 5. 9; part owner in the 
ketches at Pemaquid, 5. 9, 23; 



catch to be delivered to, 5. 10, 
11, 23, 24; petition to Capt. 
BrockhoUs, 5. 15, 16; collector at 
Salem, 5. 260; property of his 
seized by the natives restored to, 
5. 260; ancestor of Nathaniel, 5. 
260; mentioned, 5. 25. 
Bowdoin, first appearance of the 
name, 4. 78. 
college, conferred a degree on Gov. 
Lincoln, i. 409; the Rev. Dr. 
Jenks a professor in, 2. 227; 
medical school founded, 5. xviii; 
8. 179; the Rev. William Allen 
made president of, 5. xlix; Isaac 
Reid overseer, 6. 77 ; founded by 
♦ Governor Bowdoin, 6. 132; 8. 176; 
Dr. Nichols president of, 6. 374; 
Parker Cleaveland appointed pres- 
ident of, 6. 401 ; resolutions after 
the death of, 6. 433-435; Dr. 
McKeen president of, 7. 372; 8. 
162; first commencement of, 7. 
385; ,8. 176; why so called, 8. 
176; donation from Gov. Bow- 
doin, 8. 176; land grant to, 8. 
1 76 ; first hall built, 8. 176 ; opened, 
8. 176; officers of, 8. 176, 177; 
Ether Shapley a trustee of, 8. 
420: Prof. Woods president of, 8. 
488; graduates of: E. E. Bourne, 
8. 399; J. Cilley, 6. 79; R. P. 
Dunlap, 7. 367; Geo. Evans, 7. 
458; W. J. Farley, 6. 78; William 
Pitt Fessenden, 7. 474; Charles 
Freeman, i.325?i; Nathaniel Grb- 
ton, 6, 369; Samuel Morrill, i. 
340; John Otis, 6. 73; Joseph 
Sewell, 6. 77; J. R. Shepley, 8. 
420; Solomon Thayer, 6. 371; 
Henry Willis, 7. 474, 475; men- 
tioned, I, 277; 3. 161; 5, xvii, 
xxii, xxvii, xxix, xxxviii, xl, li, 8 
258, 353; 6. 12, 61, 64?*, 92, 345, 
347, 355, 358, 361, 375, 378, 425; 
7. 372, 375, 376, 397, 422, 457, 
484, 492; 8. 163, 344, 345, 389, 
405, 420, 450, 481, 504, 509; 9. 
174. 

Elizabeth, contributed to Hallowell 
academy, 8, 160, 161. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Peter, mar- 
ried Robbins, i. 277. 

Elizabeth, wife of Peter, i. 276; 
children of, i, 276, 277; her will, 
1.277. 

family, extinct in Massachusetts, i. 
277 ; became allied with the Win- 
throps, I. 277; 6. 17; mentioned, 
6. 384. 

Gov. James, son of Peter, i. 277; 
his daughter married Sir John 
Temple, 6. 17; his donation to 
Bowdoin college, 6. 132; 8. 176; 
mentioned, 2. 250, 254; 8. 209w, 
219, 283, 495. 



34 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Bowdoin — continued. 
John, I. 277. 

Mary, daughter of Peter, i. 277; 
married Stephen Boutineau, i . 277. 
Peter, purchased land of Anthony 
Brackett, i. 248, 276; purchased 
iand of Burroughs, i. 248; arrived 
at Falmouth, i. 276; 6. 17; driven 
from France, i. 276; his land titles 
confirmed, i. 276; purchased land 
at the Neck and on Barberry 
creek, i. 276, 319; his letter to 
Winthrop, i. 277; his family, i. 
276, 277; moved to Boston, i. 277; 
his death, i. 277; of a distin- 
guished name, i. 277; his descend- 
ants, I. 277; 6. 182; petition of, to 
Andross, i. 277; dropped the arti- 
cle from his name, i. 307; v^^it- 
nessed the signature of George 
Bramhall, i. 307, 556; autograph 
of, 1.307; a Hugueiiot. 6. 132; 
ancestor of Gov. Bov^doin and the 
Winthrops, 6. 132; mentioned, 6. 
133. 
William, 8. 214, 214n, 219. 

, married Sir John Temple, 6. 

17. 
Bowdoinham, to he represented in the 
Provincial Congress, 2. 213; Bap- 
tist church formed at, 7. 222 ; Elder 
Macomber preached in, 7. 222, 226. 
Association, 4. 353; 8. 178. 
Bowen, Francis, criticised Mather's 
.Life of Phipps, 9. 2, 28; himself 
criticised, 9. 28, 55ii; cited, 9. 20, 
47, 55n. 
Bowers, Ann, teacher in Blue Hill 
academy, 8. 167. 
Caroline, teacher in Blue Hill 
academy, 8, 167. 
Bowles, Samuel, 8. 445, 448. 
Thomas, signed the petition to Mas- 
sachusetts, 5- 240. 
see Bolles. 
Bowman family, the, 4. 78. 
Jonathan, 8. 207ji. 
Mary, daughter of Thomas, 5. 422, 
423; married L. W. Lithgow, 5. 
422, 423. 
Thomas, married Sarah Howard, 5. 
422, 423. 

Judge , 6. 53. 

the Rev. , 4. 272. 

Boxford, 2. 144; 6. 390. 

Boyd, the Rev. Alexander, preached 

at Georgetown, 2. 221 ; 6. 33 ; moved 

to Newcastle ; 6. 33 ; dismissed, 6. 

33 ; settled in Boothbay, 6. 156. 

James, married Susanna Coffin, 4. 

241 ; his descendants, 4. 241w. 
Gen. John Parker, 9. 185. 
Robert, 5. lii. 
Thomas, i. 503, 525; biographical 

notice of, 631, 532. 
the Rev. William, 6. 11. 



, of Portsmouth, 4. 273. 

Boyes, Antipas, 8. 208n. 

Boylston, Nicholas, name assumed by 

Ward Hallowell, 7. 404. 
Brackett, Ann, wife of Anthony, es- 
cape of, I. 224, 235; 3. Ill; ap- 
proximate date of her death, i. 
235; her children, i. 235. 
Ann, daughter of Anthony, i. 236n, 

306. 
Anthony, of Fiscataqua, probably 
father of Anthony of Falmouth, 
and Thomas, i. 155n. 
Anthony of Falmouth, married Ann 
Mitton, I. 117, 154, 1.57, 205, 235; 
purchased land, i. 122; had nu- 
merous descendants, i . 127 ; moved 
to Falmouth, i. 154; enlarged his 
farm, i. 154; witness against R. 
Jordan, i. 172; constable, i. 175; 
a resident of Falmouth, i. 180n, 
185, 216, 218, 219, 230n, 241, 306, 
319; action brought against, i. 
185; a juror, i. 188; commis- 
sioner, I. 197, 261, 283, 284; land 
granted to, i. 204; sold land to 
Munjoy, i. 204, 205, 255; his 
cattle killed by Indians, i. 218; 
taken prisoner, i. 219, 221, 230; 
3. Ill; escape of his family, i. 
224; 3. Ill; at Back cove, i. 219, 
319; his marriage to Susannah 
Drake, i. 235, 236, 241; children 
of, I. 235, 22671, 306; dispute con- 
cerning the disposal of his prop- 
erty, I. 237; appointed a lieuten- 
ant, I. 241; selectman, i. 245; sold 
land to Peter Bowdoin, i. 248, 
276; purchased land of Moroiigh, 
I. 249; appraised Geo. Munjoy's 
estate, i. 256, 257; as a trustee, or 
representative, i. 267, 271, 283, 
284, 554; in command at Fort 
Loyall, I. 268, 270; pay for his 
services, i. 268; to have command 
of all the soldiers in Casco, i. 
270; signed petition to Gov. Brad- 
street, I. 283; autograph of, i. 
284; defended the character of 
Capt. Lockhart, i. 291; urged the 
government to send assistance to 
Casco, I. 292; his farm the scene 
of battle, I. 294-296; alarm given 
by his sons, i. 294; horses left in 
his orchard, i. 304; return to Fal- 
mouth, I. 306; killed, i. 306; a 
man of influence, i. 306; a rela- 
tive of Anthony Libby, i. 321; 
paid part of Burroughes' passage 
money, 1.323; selectman, i. 324; 
signed the petition to the king, i. 
402; mentioned, i. 192, 206, 253, 
556; 4. 132. 
Anthony jr., i. 235; owned a farm 
at Back cove, i. 230n; died at 
Falmouth, 1. 230%; taken prisoner, 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



35 



1. 30^, 306; escaped, u 306; of 
great service during the war, i. 
306; moved to Boston, i. 306; mar- 
ried Sarah Knight, 3. 216. 
Anthony, son of Anthony jr., a rope 
maker, 1,306; his posterity sold 
his land rights, i. 306. 
Elinor, daughter of Anthony, i. 
235, 306; married Richard Pullin, 
I. 306. 
family, first appearance of, 1. 122, 
155n; early m New England, i. 
154n; a common name in Boston, 
1. 155n; mentioned, i. 124; 6. 
133. 

Jane, daughter of Anthony, i. 236^, 
306. 

Joshua, sold Peak's island to Trott, 
u 149, 150; son of Thomas, i. 230n, 
•306^ his property in Maine, i. 
230n; died in Greenland, i. 230n; 
his children, i. 230w; signed the 
petition to Gov. Bradstreet, i. 
283; date of his birth, i. 306; 
lived at Falmouth, i. 320. 

Joshua jr., son of Joshua, i. 230n; 
died in Falmouth, i. 230w. 

Kezia, daughter of Anthony, i. 
23571. 306; married Joseph May- 
lem, I. 306. 

Mary, daughter of Anthony, i. 235n, 
3U6; married Nathaniel Whittier, 
I. 306. 

Mary, daughter of Thomas, i. 230n, 
306; married Christopher Mitch- 
ell, I. 306; children of, i. 300. 

Mary, wife of Thomas, i. 230. 

Richard, biographical notice of, i. 
154n, 155n. 

Sarah, daughter of Thomas, mar- 
ried John Hill, I. 230n, 306. 

Seth, son of Anthony, i. 235, 302, 
306; killed at Falmouth, i. 302, 
306. 

street, 6. 134. 

Susannah, daughter of Anthony, i. 
236/^, 306; married Samuel Proc- 
tor, I. 236n, 306. 

Susannah, wife of Anthony, her 
children, i. 236^. 

Thomas, numerous descendants of, 
I. 127; moved to Falmouth, i. 
154; married Mary Mitton, 1. 154, 
157, 230n, 260, 306; lived at Clark's 
point, I. 154, 220; to support his 
mother-in-law, 1. 154; shot, i. 220, 
221; wife and children prisoners, 
I. 220, 221; wife killed, i. 230; 
children of, i. 230, 306; conveyed 
land to Geo. Munjoy, i. 257; mar- 
ried a daughter of Thaddeus 
Clarke, 6. 132; mentioned, i. 204, 
206, 216. 

William, lived in New Hampshire, 
I. 165n; sent by Capt. Mason, i. 
155*1. 



Zachariah, son of Anthony, i.236n, 
306. 

Zipporah, daughter of Anthony, i. 
236n, 306. 
Brackley, William, 4. 365. 
Bradbury, the Hon. Bion, graduated 
from Berwick academy, 8. 163; 
mentioned, 8. 421. 

Daniel, 4. 314, 399. 

family, 4. 255. 

George, i. 11 ; 5. lii. 

Capt. Jabez, deposition of, 4. 113, 
114; in command of St. George's 
fort, 4. 146, 147, 168; 7. 178; letter 
sent to, 4. 146, 147 ; refused to sell 
rum to the Indians, 4. 180; in com- 
mand of the fort at Thomaston, 

7. .325; ordered the Tarrantines to 
depart, 7. 325, 326; mentioned, 4. 
169, 170, 181 ; 5. 374. 

Jacob, 2. 140; 4. 244. 

the Hon. James W., 6. 355, 361, 378; 

8. iii ; Memoir of the Hon. Nathan 
Clifford, 9. 235-257. 

Jeremiah, 8. 391. 

Job, 4. 314, 399. 

John, 4. 322, 323, 336. 

Joseph, 2. 125. 

Moses, 2. 114, 119. 

Theophilus, 3. 184. 

Capt. Thomas, in command of the 
fort atAollis, 2. 140; mentioned, 
4. 147, 164, 166, 244. 

Deacon Thomas, 2. 138. 

Theophilus, read the letter of Capt. 
Mowatt to the people of Fal- 
mouth, 5. 443; moved to New- 
buryport, 5. 443n; judge of the 
supreme court, 5. 443 w. 

William, married the widow of 
Samuel Maverick, i..l82n. 

Wyman, 4. 331. 
Braddock, Gen. Edward, 8'. 223, 239, 
263. 

, of Great Britain, 4. 323. 

Bradford, 2. 139, 144; 4. 252, 273, 366. 

the Rev. Alden, one of the found- 
ers of the Mass. Hist. Soc, 2. 11a; 
mentioned, 4. 330, 330n, 331; 6. 
85; 8.„161, 180. 

Jonathan, 2. 113. 

Joshua, 4. 364. 

Nathan, signed the petition to^ 
Charles 11, I..402. 

Perez, found the Plymouth charter, , 
i.39n;.gv 122; signed the treaty 
of 1717, 6. 262; autograph of, 6.. 
262. 

S., 3. 330. 

Governor, William, received grant . 
on the Kennebec river, i. 79; 2.. 
42n, 202, 203, 275; 8. 203; trans- 
ferred the same to the Plymouth 
colony, I. 79; 2. 275; 8. 206; extent, 
of the grant, i. 79; 2. 42n; coun- 
sellor tot Robert Gorges, a, 43^;; 



36 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Bradford, Governor, William-— cont'd, 
letter to Sir Ferdinando Gorges, 

2. 55a n; 8. 205; traded at Mon- 
hegan, 5. 171, 172; complained of 
the Massachusetts Bay colony, 5. 
215; mentioned, i. 8871; 2. 74a, 
194; 5. xlvi, 242; 8. 200, 341; 9. 
319; his History of the Plymouth 
Plantation cited, i. 39; 2. 43a, 
47a; 5. 144n, 170, 171, 171n, 184, 
I84n, 185, 186^, 1«7, 197n, 198n, 
204%, 215n, 2Wn; 6. 109n; 7. 31-33, 
36, 37, Sin; 8. 201-203; 9. 305%. 

Major William, 2. 133, 134; land 
granted to, 2. 285. 
Bradley, the Kev. Caleb, 8. 180. 

the Hon. Samuel A., 4. 279n. 

Col. , 9. 184. 

Bradshaw, Eichard, received a patent, 

I. 48n, 80n, 533; sold his claim to 

Cleeves and Tucker, i. 48n, 53, 55, 

533, 534; did not long occupy his 

land, I. 55; date of his patent, i. 

533n. 
Bradstreet, Andrew, 4. 306, 355. 

John, 4.321,322. 

Simon, governor of Massachusetts, 
I, 282; resumed the government 
of Maine, 5. 275; brought the 
guns from Pemaquid to Boston, 
5. 278, 279n; letter of, cited, 5. 
281n, 272n; mentioned, 3. 333; 5. 
89, 199; 9. 28, 29, 357, 363, 364. 
Brady, Squire , of Buxton, 4. 341. 

Squire , of New^buryport, 4. 298. 

Bragdon, Arthur, grand juryman, i. 
371; livfd at Kittery, i. 315; mar- 
ried Elizabeth Tucker, i. 315; 
meetings held at his house, 3. 159; 
site of his house, 3. 159; wounded 
at Castine, 3. 204, 205 ; biographi- 
cal notice of, 3. 208; mentioned, 
9. 382. 

Elijah, 3. 173. 

Gideon, 3. 209. 

Isabella, married Richard King, 3. 
214; children of, 3. 214; death of, 

3. 214. 

Thomas, grand juryman, i. 376; 
assaulted Richard White, i. 376; 
signed the petition to Charles 11, 
I. 402. 
Solomon, 3. 198, 208, 209; bonfire at 
his house, 3. 206. 

Capt. , 8. 268. 

Bragett, aee Brackett. 
Braidstone, the Laird of, 6. 6. 
Bralnerd, David, expelled from col- 
lege, 6. 383. 
Braintree, home of John Saunders, i. 
153, 256, 258; home of Richard 
Brackett, i. 155n; Geo. Munjoy jr. 
died at, i. 256; home of Experience 
Otis, I. 314; mentioned, 2. 145, 187; 
3. 160n; 4. 272. 
Bramhall farm, i. 154; 6. 132. 



Bramhall, George, purchased land of 
Edward Allen, i. 127, 141; title of 
his land conveyed to William 
Vaughan, i . 127 ; a hill named for 
him, I. 127; lived at Portsmouth, 
I. 241, 556; moved to Falmouth, 
I. 241; had a large farm, i. 248; 
trustee for Falmouth, i. 271, 554; 
killed, I. 296n; his children, i. 
296n, 307, 308; moved from Dover, 
1 . 306 ; a tanner and a farmer, i . 
306, 307; his family moved to 
Plymouth, i. 307; autograph of, 
I. 307; lived on the Neck, i. 319; 
papers relating to, i. 555, 556; 
letter and goods from Moore, i. 
556, 557; assurety for Libby, i. 
556; received an apprentice, i. 556. 
Geo. jr., son of George, i. 2967i; lived 

at Hingham, i. 307, 308. 
Hannah, daughter of George, i. 308; 

married Jonathan Aall, i. 308. 
Joseph, son of George, i. 296n; 
lived in Boston, i. 308; died with- 
out issue, I. 308. 
Joshua, son of George, i. 296n; re- 
turned to Falmouth, i. 308; moved 
to Plymouth, i. 308. 
Bramhall' s hill, named for George 
Bramhall, 1. 127; boundary between 
Sanford and Wells, i. 336. 
Brande, Selin, 7. 320. 
William Thomas, 6. 410. 

Brandon, , 3. 336. 

Brandy, Winter's dealings in, i. 71, 
72; called aqua vitae, i. 71n; reason 
for the large use of, 3. 37, 98. 
Branford, John, signed the petition 
to Bradstreet, i. 283?i; lived at Fal- 
mouth, 1.319. 
Brattle, Thomas, one of the Kenne- 
bec purchasers, i. 44; 2. 203, 276; 
mentioned, 8. 208n; 9. 62n. 

Brawnde, Capt. , master of the 

Nacheen; 7. 320; obliged to build 
new fishing boats, 7. 320; his opin- 
ion of the fur trade and fishery, 7. 
320. 
Bray, John, signed petition to Charles 
II, I. 402; a son of Richard, i. 
236n; lived at Casco bay, i. 236n. 
Richard, lived at Main's point, i. 
114; a juror, i. 185, 188; lived at 
Oasco bay, i. 236n; sold land to 
Atwell, I. 318; signed petition to 
Charles 11, i . 402 ; owned half of 
Ooiisin's island, 2. 171. 
the Rev- Sullivan, preached at Bath, 
2- 228- 
Brazil, 2- .59; 8- 332. 
Bream, Benjamin, married Elizabeth 

Ingles, I- 252n- 
Brebeuf Jean de, 6. 219. 
Breda, treaty of, 5. 243; 6. 110; 7. 52, 

136- 
Breedon, Capt. Thomas, 7. 149. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



37 



Breme, John, purchased one-quarter 
of House island, i. 151; witnessed 
the deed of Geo. Munjoy, i. 553. 
Bremen, Grermany, 8, 507. 

Maine, g. 123. 
Brente island, granted to Brereton, 2. 

46n. 
Brenton, Jahleel, son of Gov. Wil- 
liam, 9. 46; appointed collector of 
customs, 9. 46, 47; opposed Gov. 
Phips, 9. 46, 48, 53; why he was 
given a commission, 9. 47; at- 
tempted to set up a custom-house, 
9. 47, 48; caused ill feeling among 
the merchants, i. 49; ordered to 
stop his interference, 9. 49 ; com- 
plained of Phips, 9. 49, 54; went 
to England, 9. 54; charged Phips 
with corruption, 9. 54. 
Governor William, 9. 46. 
Brereton, Susanna, married Edmund 
Lenthall,-2. 46n. 
Sir William, purchased grant from 
John Gorges, i. 109; 2. 46n; he- 
came possessed of property in 
Massachusetts, 2. 47a; sent over 
settlers, 2. 47a; his land grant 
conflicted with the grant to Mas- 
sachusetts, 2. 47n; did not contest 
his case. 2. 47n. 
Bressani, Pere Joseph, 6. 211, 212; his 

Eelation cited, 6. 213^, 214w, 218n. 
Brest, 8. 125. 
Breton, 2. 76a. 
Bretton, Ann, i. 277. 
David, I. 277. 
Elizabeth, married John Young, i. 

277. 
Jane, 1.277. 
Mary, i. 277- 
Peter, 1.277. 

Philip, arrived at Falmouth, i. 276; 
purchased land, i. 276; dropped 
the French article, i. 277; a rig- 
ger, I. 277; moved to Boston, i. 
277; death of, i. 277; mentioned, 
6. 133. 
Rachel, i. 277. 
Sarah, i. 277. 
Brevoort, Henry, his assistance ac- 
knowledged, 2. 79a. 
Brewer, formerly Segeundedunk, 7, 
18 ; mentioned, 4. 110 ; 5. 382n ; 7. 20, 
98. 
Lieut. J., I. 501n. 
the Eev. Josiah, 7. 103, 104. 

Col. , 7. 13, 18. 

, married Mary Gyles, 3. 314n. 

Brewerton, see Brereton. 
Brewery built at Hallowell, 4. 46. 
Brewster, Sir David, 6. 411. 
Edward, 2. 75. 

Br. Royal, married Dorcas Coffin, 4. 
249ti. 
Brewster's island, called Brosseillant, 
6. 284. 



Brice, the Rev. Edward, 6. 27. 
Brick island, 2. 204. 
Bricks made at Clay cove, i. 244w; 
scarcity of, 2. 284; made at Hallow- 
ell, 4. 355; brought from Arrowsic, 
8. 212n. 
Brickyard cove, 9. 148. 

point, 9. 148. 
Bridge, Scarborough presented for 
not having one, 3. 78; desired by the 
Indians, 4. 181. / 
Bridge and Williams, 6. 59. 
Bridge, Edmund, his daughter mar- 
ried Arthur Lithgow, 5. 418, 422; 
mentioned, 8. 288. 
family, 4. 78. 

the Hon. James, judge of probate, 
6. 59; graduated from Harvard 
college, 6. 59; practiced in Au- 
gusta, 6. 59; agent for the Ken- 
nebec proprietors, 6. 59; retired 
from the bar, 6. 59, 60; bank 
president, 6. 60; death of, 6. 60; 
one of the Kennebec proprietors, 
8. 208n; mentioned, 4. 7, 16; 5. 
xliii; 6. 41, 67, 68; 8. 339, 341, 343, 
344. 
Martha, daughter of Edmund, mar- 
ried Arthur Lithgow, 5. 418, 422; 
8. 288. 
Nathan, a native of Dresden, 6. 
67; practiced at Gardiner, 6. 67; 
in North Carolina, 6. 67 ; returned 
to Dresden, 6. 67 ; character of, 6. 
67, 68. 

Sheriff , 4. 16. 

Samuel I., 9. 70. 

, of Yassalboro, 4. 377. 

Bridger, John, surveyor-general, 2. 
265. 

Bridges, Elder , i. eS28. 

Bridgewater, England, i. 355n. 
Mass., 2. 145, 187; 5. xxiv, xxix; 6. 
371. 
Bridgman's Copp's Hill Epitaphs 

cited, 5. 253n; 9. 93. 
Bridgton, 4. 339, 386. 
Maine, 4. 289n. 

academy, incorporated, 8. 173; en- 
dowed, 8. 173; teachers in, 8. 173. 
Brief Narration, The, original title 
page described, 2. 8; original pre- 
face, 2. 8, 9; see Gorges, Sir Ferdi- 
nando. 
Brigadier's island, 4. 324; 7. 79?i. 
Briggs, the Rev. Avery, 8. 178, 179. 
Daniel, 2. 128. 

Rebecca, married Benjamin Hal- 
lowell, 7. 403. 
the Rev. Otis, teacher at Hampden 
academy, 8. 168 ; teacher in Wis- 
casset, 8. 173; mentioned, 8. 178. 
William, 2. 115. 
Brigham, Elijah, 2. 291. 

, 4. 327. 

Mrs. , 4- 327. 



38 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Brighton, England, 7. 409. 
Mass., 6. 89; 7.882. 

Brimfield, 6. 57. 

Brimhall, see Bramhall. 

Brimmer flats, the supposed head- 
quarters of Bashaba, 7. 98. 

Brimmer,|^the Hon. Martin, 8. 492n. 

Brindley, Francis, proprietor at Pema- 
quid, 5. 303, 304. 

Brinks, Brian, patentee of Lygonia, 
I. 45w. 

Bristol, England, Sir Ferdinando 
Gorges taken prisoner at the siege 
of, I. 96; 3. 38; home of Cabot, 
2. 14a n, 15; the merchants of 
fitted out an expedition to Amer- 
ica, 2. 18a, 21a, 50a; 5. 148; 7. 
309n; interested in fishing, 2. 20a; 
7. 133, 321; Popham's expedition 
sailed from, 2. 19a, 23a; Sir Fer- 
dinando Gorges lived near, 2. 25a, 
26a, 54a ; Capt. Norton sailed from, 
2. 49; the merchants of sent Shurt 
to take possession of Monhegan, 
2. 50a; obtained a charter for 
lands at Pemaquid, 2. 50a; per- 
petuates the memory of Eobert 
Aldworth, 2. 50a, 51a; captured 
by Gorges, 2. 72a; captured by 
Cromwell, 2. 72a; united to Pema- 
quid, 5. 147; early interested in 
American discovery, 5. 148; 7. 133, 
321 ; did not look for government 
aid, 5. 148; Thomas Aldworth 
mayor of, 5. 150; Waymouth ar- 
rived at, 5. 332; mentioned, i. 36, 
109, 355w; 2. ma, 29; 3. 21n, 289, 
290, 318w; 5. Ixi, 147, 153, 154, 171, 
195, 207, 214, 216, 222, 223; 7. 135, 
294, 406, 409; History of, see Cor- 
ry, Joseph; and Evans. 
Maine, people of ordered to relin- 
quish their rights to the state, 2. 
292; formerly Pemaquid, 5. 294, 
302; records destroyed, 5. 302; 
ceded to Montgomery, 5. 18 ; called 
Harrington, 6. 18; a seat of Pres- 
byterianism, 6. 35; McLean 
preached at, 6. 35; Presbyterian 
church organized at, 6. 160; men- 
tioned, 2. 232; 4. 329, 330; 5. 147, 
303,370; 9.33, 122, 366; History 
of, see Johnston, John. 
N. H., named for Bristol, England, 

2. 51a. 
R. L, 4. 269. 

Bristow, see Bristol. 

Britannia, 3. 289. 
the, Arnold's troops on, i. 502. 

British archives, 5. 257. 

channel, i. 112; 2. 15a; 8. 128. 
Coffee House, Boston, 8. 211n; 9. 55. 
empire, the, 7. 227. 
empire in America, 5. 282w. 
government, munificent spirit of, 2. 
9a. 



Infirmary, 5. 154. 

Museum, 3. 284, 294ri; g. 322n, 360. 

navigation increased with the 

growth of the fisheries, 5. 146. 
parliament, i. 486. 
Provinces, the, similarity of the 

Indian dialects in, i. 413/1. 
settlements in North America, see 
Douglas, William, 
Brittany, 7. 248. 
Britton cape, see Cape Breton. 
Brixham, i. 352n. 

Broad bay, John Pierce settled at, i. 
38n, 39; 5. 183; boundary of Wal- 
do's patent, i. 45; home of John 
Phillips, I. 119; now Waldoboro, 
4. 329; 5. 404; 8. 21 3n; possible 
date of Pierce's settling at, 5. 184; 
Germans settled at, 5. 404; 6. 322, 
323; 9. 86; Gen. Samuel Waldo 
hereditary lord of , 6. 325, 326; 
description of the province of, 6. 
327, 328; inducements held out to 
Germans, 6. 328-331; mentioned, 
2. 85n; 4. 218; 5. 188ri, 303, 409; 6. 
327; 7.326. 
cove, saw-mill built at, 2. 181 ; men- 
tioned, 1.156; 6.300, 316. 
Broadbay, the sch., Reuben Bishop 
killed on board the, i. 467; the 
sick to be placed on, i. 468, 469. 
farm, 8. Ilia n. 
Broadhead, John Romeyn, 6. 276. 
Broadbridge, Richard, i.249; lived on 

the Neck, i. 319. 
Broadstairs, 3. 68. 
Broad street, i. 244; now India street, 

I. 243n, 279. 
Broadway, 7. 1557i. 
Brochant, A. J. F. M., 6. 409. 
Brockholls, Capt. Anthony, letter to 
Francis Skinner, i. 199/i; 5. 67, 68; 
in command at Pemaquid, i. 290; 
5. 259, 394; 7. 157; letter to the 
governor of Boston, 5. 11-14; Bow- 
ditch's petition to, 5. 15, 16; letters 
to Knapton, 5. 24-28, 31, 32; letters 
to Sharp, 5.47, 48; letter to Jocelyn, 
5. 58, 59; letter to Lawrence Dennis, 
5, 67, 68; suspected of plotting, 5. 
394; a prisoner in Boston, 5. 394; 
mentioned, 5. 8, 17, 69, 70, 75, 130. 
Brock, the Rev. John, sent as a 
preacher among the Indians, 9. 327, 
327n; biographical notice of, i. 
327w; mentioned, 376, 377, 379, 382. 

Brocklebanks, , of Rowley, 4. 322. 

Brockwell, the Rev. Charles, attended 
Gov. Shirley to Norridgewock, 6. 
192; 8.225, 225n, 241; preached at 
Falmouth, 6. 192; his doctrine of- 
fensive, 8. 228. 

Broens, , his cattle destroyed, 8. 

116n. 
Bromfield, Abigail, married William 
Phillips, 7. 234. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



39 



Betsey, 7. 235, 236. 
Mrs. E., 7. 236n. 
John, 7.231,235,236. 
Mary, married W. D. Powell, 7. 234. 
Sarah, married Jeremiah D. Powell, 
7. 234, 238; death of, 7- 238. 
Brongniart, Alexandre, 6. 409, 411. 
Brook farm, 8. 442. 
Brookfield, 2. 145; 4. 249n, 261, 344. 
Brookin, Henry, 3. 110; in the garri- 
son at Black Point, i. 226n. 
Brookline, 2. 145; 5. xlv, Iv; 6. 363. 
Brooklyn, i. 352/1. 
Brook, Nathan, 2. 8, 10, 11. 
Brooks, the Rev. Edward, preached in 
North Yarmouth, 2. 187. 
Gov. John, 3. 346. 
Lord, 9. 360. 

Thomas, commander of the Adven- 
turer, 5. 136. 

, 8. 190. 

Brookson, William, 7. 2S7. 
Brooksville, 4. 105; 5. 384n. 
Brosseilant island, same as Brewster' s 

island, 6. 284. 
Br OSS river, i. 449. 
Brother's islands, the, i. 152. 
Brouage, 7. 248. 
Brouillan, M. de, governor of Acadia, 

7.66. 
Brown, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 19. 
Alexander, killed, 2. 278. 
Amos, died, i. 333. 
Capt. Andrew, in the garrison at 
Black Point, i. 227n; submitted to 
Massachusetts, i. 386; 3. 46, 75, 
76; a witness against Phippen, 3. 
75; lived at Black Point, 3. 76; 
site of his farm, 3. 76; children 
of, 3. 76; his house guarded by 
Capt. WincoU, 3. 106; trustee for 
Scarborough, 3. 130, 233; led a 
company to break up the settle- 
ment at Norridgewock, 3. 153; 
mentioned, 3. 110, 124, 155. 
Andrew jr., 3. 110; in the garrison 
at Black Point, i. 227n; son of 
Capt. Andrew, 3. 76. 
Arthur, i. 85; witness against 
Cleeves, i. 73; declaration of, i. 
ISn; referee in the case of Cleeves 
vs. Winter, i, 74. 
Benjamin, 7. 283 ; 8. 356. 
Betsey, 4. 284. 

Charles, 3. 110; in the garrison at 
Black Point, i. 227n; son of An- 
drew, 3. 76. 
claim at Pemaquid, 2, 87n; settled, 

. 233. 
Dorothy, 9. 299n, 301, 370. 
Eliza, married Augustin John, 1.244. 
Elizabeth, daughter of Ezekiel, 4. 

an. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Capt. H. Y. 
4, 280n, 284; married Col. J. B. 
[ Osgood, 4. 280n. 



Ezekiel, 4. 317. 

the Rev. Thomas, 7. 433. 

the Rev. Francis, taught divinity to 
Jonathan Greenleaf, i. 352; presi- 
dent of Dartmouth college, 5. 
xlviii; mentioned, 2. 121; 7. 372; 
8. 175, 180. 

Capt. Henry Y., owner of the pres- 
ent Brownfield, 4.279, 2S0n; had 
a fine house for that time, 4. 279, 
280; biographical notice of, 4. 
280n; daughter of, 4- 2807i, 284; 
site of his house, 4. 281^, 286; 
controversy about his boundary 
hne, 4. 281 n; owner of West In- 
dia plantation, 4. 282; numbered 
the people of Fryeburg, 4. 283; 
planted a large tract. 4. 286 ; men- 
tioned, 4. 281, 283, 283n, 284, 286, 
288. 

Lieut. Jacob, 6. 338. 

John, of Bristol, England, 7-135; 
acquired a title to Pemaquid, 7. 
135; title set aside, 7. 135. 

John, of New Harbor, purchased 
land on the Pemaquid river and 
Muscongus island, i. 36; 5. 185, 
186; 9. 122; in the garrison at 
Black Point, i. 227n; signed the 
petition to Gov.' Bradstreet, i. 
I. 283n; lived at Purpooduck, i. 
319, 320; lived at New Harbor, 2. 
50a, 87n; Pemaquid point granted 
to, 2. 50a; deed executed by Som- 
erset to, 2. 87n, 237; 5- 1^1, 192; 
his deed conflicted with that of 
Aid worth and Eldridge, 2. 87n; 
the cause of many controversies, 

4. 233; claims compromised, 4. 
2.33; united with John Pierce, 5. 
185, 186; deposition of, 5. 188n; 
sent to New England by Pierce 
and Jenness, 5. 191; called "of 
New Harbor," 4. 2e33; 5. 191; his 
deed from Samoset a boundary 
between barbarism and civility, 5. 
193; his family, 5. 194n; not a 
hermit, 5. 194; completed the for- 
mality of Samoset' s sale, 5. 195, 
197 ; moved to the Kennebec River, 

5. 224; purchased land of Robin- 
hood, 5. 224; signed petition to 
Mass., 5. 240; his purchase from 
the Indians, 9. 122, 123; his 
daughter married Richard Pierce, 
9, 122; probably came over with 
John Pierce, 9. 122; mentioned, 
1.247; 4.229,230; 5-57. 

John, of Bath, purchased land and 
settled at Nequasset, 2, 190; 4. 
232; site of his house, 4. 231, 232; 
lived at Pemaquid, 4. 232; men- 
tioned, 2, 194, 

John, of Sheepscot, 2. 235. 

John, of Watertown, his daughter 
married Avigustin John, i. 244. 



40 



MAIKE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Brown — continued 

Lieut. John, i. 501n, 521. 
John jr., signed petition to Brad- 
street, I. 2SSn. 
John, son of Andrew, 3. 76. 
John Carter, 5. 440. 
John M., 6. 347, 361. 
Gen. John Marshall, 8. iii ; his coast- 
ing voyage of Champlain to Maine, 
8. 243, 266. 
Joseph, son of Andrew, 3. 76, 110; 
in the garrison at Black Point, i. 
221 n ; settled at Sandy River, 4. 37. 
Mary, wife of Ezekiel, 4. 317. 
Capt. Moses, 9. 178, 180. 
Kathaniel, a baker, 7. 285. 
Nathaniel, of Charlestown, 4. 373. 
Samuel, 2. 208, 211. 
Sara, 9. 299n, 301, 370, 371. 
Thomas, signed the petition to Gov. 
Bradstreet, i. 28Sn; wounded, i. 
296n; lived in Falmouth, i. 320. 
the Rev. Thomas, of Falmouth, 4. 

332. 
the Rev. Thomas, of Westbrook, 7. 

219. 
University, the Rev. Geo. Burgess 
graduated from, 7. 430; Burgess 
a tutor in, 7. 432; Thomas Bur- 
gess, graduated from, 7. 430; 
Lemuel Paine, graduated from, 
6. 70 ; Ezekiel William, graduated 
from, 7. 475; mentioned, 7. 433, 
437; 8.450. 
William, 9. 372, 373; served in the 

Continental Army, 2. 214. 
the Hon. Col., married Sylves- 
ter, 7. 405. 

Lieut. , 5. 381. 

Mrs., 7. 409. 

, married the daughter of John 

Ingersoll, i. 312. 

, married Elizabeth Godfrey, 9. 

301. 
Brownfield, visited by the Rev- Paul 
Cofan, 4. 250 ; owned by Capt H. 
J. Brown, 4. 279, 280n; named, 4. 
280n; how to be settled, 4. 280n; 
first minister in, 4. 280n; called 
the Plantation, 4. 283n; first offi- 
cers of, 282/1 ; embraced a part of 
Fryeburg, 2S2n ; old and new line 
of, 4. 282n; Daniel Webster taught 
school in, 4. 282w; incorporated, 
4. 2S2n; mentioned, 4. 116, 277n; 
289n. 
Brown's Ferry, 2. 219. 

Island, 2. 284. 
Brows and Butts, meaning of, 2. 281, 

281n. 
Brudenell, E., 2, 11. 
Bruges, 7. 141n. 
Brumhall, see Bramhall. 
Brunswick, Germany, 9. 85. 
Maine, Thomas Purchase settled 
in, I. 40; 84n, 236n; formerly Pe- 



jepscot, I. 211; French I^eutrals 
in, 3. 176n; 6. 342; burned by the 
Indians, 2. 197; 3- 313; 6. 16; 
people massacred, 3. 313; reason 
for the destruction, 3. 3137i; sent 
a deputation to meet Ralle, 3. 314; 
Fort George built at, 3. 314, 315, 
355 ; the site of probably visited by 
Weymouth, 5. 323; Rutherford 
preached in, 6. 33; Bunlap 
preached in, 6. 33, 155; 7. 367; 
mentioned, i. 59/*; 2* 122, 151, 
162, 180, 208, 219, 223, 242; 3. 
197, 208, 2v5, 241, 311, 320, 
373; 4. 51, 36, 104, 106, 305, 331, 
332; 5. XX, xxiv, 214rj, 314n, 327, 
335, 355; 6.4, 58, 160, 161, 171, 201, 
203, 356, 358, 359, .360, 362, 365, 
379, 402, 404, 405, 4.85; 7. 182, 183, 
193, 220, 370, 371, 397; 8. 178, 180, 
21 In, 238, 251, 252n, 256, 256ri, 260, 
266, 266n, 267, 268, 284, 369, 492, 
508. 
Records, cited, 3. 314/1. 
the House of, 4, 74. 
Bryant, Bartholomew, 3. 180. 
family killed by Indians, 2. 147. 
John, died, 1.3.33. 
the Rev. Solomon, 4. 271. 
William Cullen, his Thanatopsis, 
cited, 8, 449. 

, settled at Buxton, 2. 138. 

Dr. , of Anson, 4. 397. 

Buchanan, James, 5. xxxvii ; 8. 24, 26, 
71, 92 93, 97, 366, 424; 9. 243, 247. 
Buck, Abijah, 4. 389, 390. 
Mrs. Abijah, 4. 390. 
George, 4. 304. 
John, 4. 360. 

Capt. Thomas, commander of a 

coaster, 3. 178; moved to Machias, 

3. 178. 

Buckfield, 2. 117; 4. 304, 336, 339, 360, 

361, 388, 389,390. 

M., signed the treaty of 1714, 6. 258; 

autograph of, 6. 258. 
Mills, 4. 360. 
Buckingham, the Duke of, a member 
of the Plymouth Company, i. 33; 
2. 40a; mentioned, 2. 72a, 77; 9- 
101. 
J. T. 3. 264. 
Buckland, George, swore allegiance 

to the Duke of York, 5. 237. 
Buckman, Nathan, 5. Ivw. 

, early settler of Bakerstown, 2. 

113. 
Buckminster, the Rev. Joseph, 5. Iii, 
Ixii. 
the Rev. Joseph Stevens, 7. 408, 414. 
Buckmore, George W., 8. 73. 

Bucknam, , of Norway, 4. 360. 

Bucksport, 4. 103; 7. 202; 8. 168, 331. 
Bucktown, 4. 304. 

Budizert, John, lived at Black Point, 
3.83. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



41 



Buell, Lieut., , i. 494. 

Buffalo, 5. xlvi. 

Historical Soc, 7. 484. 
Buggin, Butler, 2. 264. 
Bulfinch, Henry, teacher in Belfast 

Academy, 8. 172. 
Bulger, Richard, purchased land of 

John Smith, i. 120. 
Bulkley, Peter, 2. 264; agent for Mass. 

3, 65 M- 
BulC Caleb, 4- ^^■ 
Caleb jr., 4. 55. 

Dixy, his shallop and cargo cap- 
tured, 5. 204, 205; started on a 
piracy, 5. 205; expedition fitted 
out to capture, 6. 146; ravaged 
the coast, 9. 308n. 
George, 4. 55. 
Hezekiah, 4. 55. 
James, 4. 55. 

Jirah, his garrison attacked, 2. 132. 
Mick'l, 4. 56. 
Thomas, 4. 55, 56. 
Bullard, Benjamin, merchant at An- 
tiqua, 7. 213; dealer in slaves 7. 
213 
Bullock, John, 8. 190. 
Bullock's Inn, 4. 296. 
Bully, Nicholas, signed petition to 

Cromwell, i. 395. 
Bunch of Grapes Tavern, 8. 211^i. 
Bungomungomug river, 2. 167, 180. 
Bunker Hill, 4. 79. 

Battle of, Jeremiah Hill, and Sam- 
uel Merrill at the, 2. 139. 
Lodge, 3. 253, 254. 
Monument, name of the projectors 
unknown, 3. 243; small sum given 
by the State of Mass. to, 3- .243; 
reared by voluntary contributions, 
3.243; Wilham Tudor conceived 
the idea of, 3. 244; public atten- 
tion called to, 3. 244; land pur- 
chased, 3. 245, 249; circulars pub- 
lished, 3. 245; association organ- 
ized, 3. 245, 246; corner stone laid, 
3. 249; 250; La Fayette present, 
3. 250; design offered, 3. 251 ; style 
of adopted, 3. 252; new founda- 
tion, 3. 252, 255 ; Solomon Willard 
architect and superintendent, 3. 
253, 254; J. S. Savage the builder 
3. 254; transportation of stone for, 
3. 254; foundation finished, 3. 255 ; 
work suspended and resumed, 3. 
255, 266; proposals to shorten 
its height, 3. 265; to be built ac- 
cording to the original plan, 3. 
268; finished, 3. 269; celebration, 
3. 269; notes upon, 3. 269n. 
Monument Association, organized, 
3. 245; purchased Bunker Hill, 
3. 255, 249; members of, 3. 246; 
Gov. Brooks president of, 3. 246; 
preliminary work, 3. 246, 247; 
money called for, 3. 248, 249; 



mean action of a landholder, 3. 
249 ; Daniel Webster president of, 
3. 250; received designs for the 
monument, 3. 251 ; design adopted, 
3. 252,-256; purchased a quarry 
and built a railroad, 3. 254; siis- 
pended the work, 3. 255; out of 
money, 8. 255; embarrassments, 
3. 256, 264; amount raised, 3. 257; 
lottery proposed, 3.^58; propo- 
sition of Mrs. S. J. tiale, 3. 258; 
proposal of Amos Lawrence, 3. 
262, 263; speech of Edward Ev- 
erett, 3. 264; land sold, 3. 265; 
work resumed, 3. 266; new pro- 
posal by Amos Lawrence, 3. 266, 
267; fears that the monument 
would not be completed for a 
long time, 3. 267; fairs held in 
aid of, 3. 268;^ finished, 3. 268. 
Bunsen, C K. J. Baron, 8. 493 
Burbank, Eleazer, served in the Rev- 
olution, 3. 204. 
Capt. Silas, served in the Revolution, 
3. 203. 

, of Fryeburg, 4. 281. 

Burbeck, , engineer of the fort on 

the Penobscot, 5. 384. 
Burdett, George, indicted for slander, 
I. 88, 365, minister at Agamenti- 
cus, 1.365, 547; Mary Puddington 
accused of keeping his company, 
I. 364, 365, 366; fined, 1.366; to 
pay John Puddington ten pounds, 
1.365,366; biographical notice of, 
I. 89n. 
Buren, George, signed the petition to 

Charles II, i. 402. 
Burgess, the Rev. A., Memoir of the 
Rev. George Burgess, 7. 447n. 
Ebenezer, son of Jacob, 7. 429, 
moved to Wareham, 429; father 
of Ebenezer 2d, 7. 429. 
Ebenezer 2d, son of Ebenezer, 7. 

429; father of Prince, 7. 429. 
the Rev. Dr. Ebenezer, his Burgess 

genealogy cited, 7. 429. 
family Congregationalists, 7. 431; 

became Episcopalians, 7. 431. 
the Rev. Dr. George, ancestry of, 7. 
429; parents of, 7. 430; birth, 7. 
429; an intellectual boy, 7. 429, 
430; early fitted for college, 7. 
430; taken from school, 7. 430; 
graduated from Brown Univer- 
sity, 7. 430; communicant at St. 
John's Church, 7. 431; studied 
law, 7. 432 ; tutor, 7. 432 ; studied 
theology, 7. 432 ; spent three years 
in Europe, 7. 432; ordained, 7. 
432; preached in various places, 
7. 432, 433 ; married Sophia Kipp, 
7. 433 ; had one daughter, 7. 433. 
degrees conferred upon, 7. 433; 
his life in Hartford, 7. 433, 436; 
Bishop of Maine, 7. 436, 440, 441; 



42 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Burgess, the Rev. Dr. George — cont'd 
interested both in the past and 
present, 7. 437, 442, 448 ; his poet- 
ical ability, 7. 437, 438; had great 
interest in Trinity College, 7. 438, 
439; his studies, 7. 445^ 449; his 
style, 7. 449; sympathized with 
the Muhlenburgh Memorial, 7. 453 ; 
visited Hayti, 7.456; publications 
of, 7. 436, 438, 439, 440, 454, 455; 
characteristics of, 7. 435, 437, 443- 
447, 450, 451, 456; his influence, 
7.452, 453, death of, 7. 456; wrote 
pages for the Ecclesiastical His- 
tory of ISTew England, 7. 431 ; men- 
tioned, 3. 312n; address before 
the Maine Hist. Soc, 4. 63, 91; 
biographical notice of Robert 
Hallowell Gardiner, 7. 403, 428. 

Jacob, son of Thomas, 7. 429; father 
of Ebenezer, 7. 429. 

Josiah, 4. 349, 372. 

Prince, son of Ebenezer, 7. 429; 
grandfather of the Rev. Dr. Geo., 
7-429; religious and patriotic, 7. 
429, 430; father of Thomas, 7. 
430. 

Richard, amount of land granted to, 
9. 378. 

Thomas of Cape Cod, 4. 372. 

Thomas, arrived at Salem, 8. 429; 
moved to Sandwich, 8. 429; chief 
man among the settlers, 8. 429; 
death of, 8. 429; father of Jacob, 
8. 429. 

Thomas, son of Prince, 7. 430; grad- 
uated from College, 7. 430; set- 
tled in Providence, 7. 430; mar- 
ried Mary Mackie, 7. 430; became 
a judge, 7. 430; character of, 7. 
430 ; father of Thomas M. and the 
Rev. George, 7. 430. 

Thomas Mackie, son of Thomas, 7. 
430; mayor of Providence, 7. 430. 

, of Fairfield, 4. 401. 

Burgoyne, Gen. Sir John, followed by 
the Abenakis, 6.242; mentioned, 
I. 517; 3. 203; 8.287. 
Burial, modes among the Indians, 3. 

95, 96, lOOn; 5. 189n. 
Burke, Edmund, 6. 88. 

Sir John Bernard, his Peerages, 
cited, 7. 143n, 447. 

Burleigh, Dr. , 5. xviii. 

Burlington, 9. 184. 

bay, 9- 188, 198. 

heights, 9. 187, 188, 190, 194, 195. 
Burmingham, of Maine, the, 4. 215. 
Burnam, Daniel, son of Job, 3. 209; 
children of, 3. 209. 

Daniel jr., 3. 209. 

Job, 3. 151, 166, 180,; biographical 
notice of, 3. 208. 

Job jr., 3. 209. 

Job 3d, 3. 209. 

Bebecca, 3. 209. 



Samuel, 3. 180, 209. 
Thomas, 3. 209. 

Burnett, the Rev. Gilbert, 6. 25. 

Burnham, 9. 226. 
Edward P. 8. 399. 

Burniffe, Mons., i. 301, 

Burns, Anthony, 5. 422. 

Col. , 9. 186, 187, 190, 195, 196. 

Burnt islands, the, 4. 231 ; 9. 133. 
Meadow brook, 4. 276, 277, 289. 

Burpey, , of Rowley, 4. 322. 

Burr, Col. Aaron, in the expedition 
under Arnold, i. 447, 500; ob- 
tained the journal of Montressor, 
I. 447; messenger for Arnold, i. 
497, 498; at Fort Halifax, 8. 277, 
278; admired Sarah Lithgow, 8. 
277; used poor rhymes, 8. 277; 
mentioned, i. 501, 515; 7. 270; 
8. 264. 

Burrage, Benjamin, 3. 81. 

John, moved to Black Point, 3. 80, 
81 ; leased the farm of Jocelyn, 3. 
81 ; father of William, 3. 81 ; died, 
3. 81 ; his widow married Thomas 
Hannuct, 3. 81. 
Mrs. John, 3. 81. 

William, in the garrison at Black 
Point, I. 227n; a son of John, 3. 
81; held town offices, 3. 81; had a 
valuable farm, 3. 81; sent to ob- 
tain a minister, 3. 81w, 155 ; trustee 
for Scarborough, 3. 129, 233; made 
a townsman, 3-130; mentioned, 3. 
110. 

Burras, see Burroughs. 

Burrell, Bela, 4. 401, 404. 

Burridge, a spelling of Burrage, 3. 80n. 

Burrish, Onslow, 6. 327. 

Burroughs, Charles, a son of the Rev. 
George, i. 263. 
Elizabeth, daughter of the Rev. 
George, i. 263; married Peter 
Thomas, i. 263, 264; baptised at 
Danvers, i. 264. 
the Rev. George, minister at Fal- 
mouth, I. 216, 217, 261, 263; 3. 
156; 6. 189w; land given to, i. 
216, 217; educated at Harvard 
College, 1.217, 264?i; 3.156; asked 
Henry Jocelyn for assistance, i. 
220 ; sold land to Peter Bowdoin, 
I. 248, 276; land confirmed to, i. 
248; exchanged land with John 
Skillings, i.248, 249, 315; site of 
his house, i. 249, 320; relinquished 
the land which the town had 
granted to him, i. 261, 262; a 
man of pure character, i. 262, 263; 
3. 156; his long pastorate, i. 262; 
preached at Salem, i. 262; tried 
and executed for witchcraft, i. 
263, 264, 317, 347; 3. 156; 7. 115; 
his great strength, i. 263, 317; 
had three wives, i. 263; his chil- 
dren, I. 263 J his descendants, i. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



43 



263; his estate sold, i. 264; 
doubts concerning his age, i. 264n; 
his mother, i. 264; a member of 
John Eliot's church, 1.264; lived 
on the Neck, i. 320; money paid 
to, I. 323; preaching at Wells 
during the witchcraft excitement, 
I. 347; 7. 155; driven from Fal- 
mouth, 3. 156; preached at Black 
Point, 3. 156; labored to protect 
the distressed, 7. 115; mentioned, 
I. 2l1n, 222. 
George jr., son of the Rev. George, 
I. 2G3; lived at Ipswich, i. 263; 
baptized at Roxbury, i. 264; con- 
veyed land to N. Winslow, i. 263, 
264. 

Hannah, married Fox, i. 263; 

baptized at Sahsbury, i. 264. 
Jeremiah, son of the Rev. George, 

1.263; insane, 1.263. 

Mary, daughter of the Rev. George, 

married in Attleborough, i. 263. 

Rebecca, mother of the Rev. George, 

I. 264; joined John Eliot's church, 

I. 264. 

Rebecca, daughter of the Rev. Geo., 

married Tolman, i. 263; 

baptised at Roxbury, i. 264. 
Richard, in the garrison at Black 

Point, i.227n; 3- HO. 
Thomas, of Newburyport, conveyed 
land to N. Winslow, i. 263, 264. 
Burt, the Rev. John, 4. 269. 
Burton, Barth., 2. 264. 
Benjamin, a native of Wales, 7. 323; 
in Cromwell's army, 7. 323; came 
to America, 7. 325; died at sea, 7. 
325. 
Benjamin 2d, erected a blockhouse 
on Georges' river, 5. 367n; 7. 327; 
Indians lurking around his gar- 
rison, 5-368; surprised by Indians, 
7.327; escaped, 7. 327; a son of 
Benjamin, 7. 325; came to Amer- 
ica, 7, 325 ; at the seige of Louis- 
burgh, 7. 325; in command at St. 
Georges, 7. 325; killed Captain 
Morris, 7. 326; opposed Smith's 
returning home, 7. 326; settled at 
Gushing, 7. 327; death of, 7. 327. 
Col. Benjamin 3d, birth of, 7. 325; 
ancestry of, 7. 325, 327; lived in 
Gushing and Warren, 7. 325; an 
orphan, 7. 327; at the Boston tea 
party, 7. 327, 328; commissioned 
a lieutenant and captain, 7. 328; 
served in Rhode Island, 7. 328; 
served as major, 7. 328; a mes- 
senger for Gen. Wadsworth, 7. 
328; captured by the English, 7. 
328; carried to England, 7. 328, 
^29; prepared to escape, 7. 329- 
332; escaped, 7. 332-334; went to 
Boston, 7. 334; captain of marines, 
7- 334; captured Qff Cape Clear, 



7. 334; released, 7. 834; went to 
France, 7. 335 ; in New London, 
7.335; iWached his home, 7-335; 
held civil and political offices, 7. 
335; married, 7. 335; physique, 
character and tastes, 7. 335 ; death 
of, 7.335; Memoir of, by Joseph 
Williamson, 7. 323, 335. 
Richard, 3. 76, 77. 
Thomas, of Boston, 7. 146ri. 
Thomas, killed at Falmouth, i. 295n. 
Burton's fort, 5. 367n, 327. 

point, I. 263. 
Bush, Grace, married Richard Palmer, 
1.198; 6.186. 
John, received a grant of land at 
Cape Porpus, i. 97; one of the 
first settlers of Wells, i. 362; a 
grand juryman, i. 371. 
the Rev. Dr. John, preached at 
Wells, I. 346; his salary, i, 346; 
moved to Oyster river, i. 346; 
died at a great age, i. 347. 
Bussey, Benjamin, purchased land of 
Gen. Knox, 9. 233; his land for 
sale, 9. 233. 
Buswell, Henry C married Elizabeth 
Osgood, 4- 279w. 
Jacob, settled at Bangor, 9- 223. 
Buterman, Edward, purchased land 
and settled at Nequasset, 2. 190. 
Butler, Benjamin F., 8. 416. 
M. M., 8. 398. 
the Misses, 4. 396. 
Butler's battery, 7. 124. 
cove, 2. 201; 3- ^13. 
parish, 4. 239. 
point, 2. 213. 
Butter produced in Franklin county, 

4. 32, 33. 
Butterfield, the Rev. Paul Coffin in, 4. 
361; now Sumner, 4. 361; men- 
tioned, 4- 304, 339. 
the Rev. 4. 366, 383, 400, 404. 
Betterment Act, the, 5. Ixiv. 
Butternuts, i. 510. 
Battery, John, 5. 106. 
Butt Falls, 2. 236. 
Button, Wavaad, sold land to the 

whites, I. 129. 
Butts and Brows, 2. 281, 281n. 
Buxton, England, 2. 141 ; 4. 239. 
Maine, formerly Narragansett town- 
ship No. 1, 2. 138; 4. 242, 242n, 
243; settled, 2. 138, 139; first news- 
paper in, 2. 139; topography of, 2. 
140, 141 ; manufacturing in, 2. 140, 
141; incorporated, 2. 141; 4.245; 
origin of the name, 4. 141, 245; 
first child born in, 4. 141; clergy- 
men of, 4. 141 ; first schoolmaster 
in, 4. 142; unmolested by Indians, 
4. 143; patriotic, 4. 143; sent many- 
soldiers to the Continental Army, 
4. 143; part of annexed to Stan- 
dish, 4. 143; Methodists in, 3. 165; 



44 



MAINE HISTOKIOAL SOCIETY. 



Buxton, Maine — continued- 
granted to people who fought in 
King Phillip's war*4. 242, 242n; 
assignees for, 4. 242?i; the Kev. 
Paul Coffin preached in, 4. 242 : 7. 
219, 272; first and second meeting 
house in, 4. 244; named by Paul 
Coffin, 4. 245 ; town meeting held 
to obtain the minister's salary, 4. 
245; first window glass in, 4. 280n; 
common schools in, 8. 158; men- 
tioned 2. 146, 147, 148 149, 150; 4. 
235, 243, 24971, 250n, 257, 258n, 
314, 330, 332, 333. 341, 343, 344, 
351, 357, 360, 471, 373, 383, 388, 
397; 8.180. 

church records, cited, 4. 243n, 244n. 

Dr. , of Warren, 7. 491. 

, of :^ew Gloucester, 2. 162, 168. 

Byfield, 6. 382, 384, 385, 394, 405. 

academy, 3. 215. 

parish, 5. xxxii. 
Byron, Lord, 8. 484. 

Cabahis met Champlain, 7. 254; with- 
drew from the coast, 8. 254. 

Cabarras bay, 8. 116, 119. 

Cabot, George, 5. xxxvii. 
John, 9. 102. 

Sebastian, his voyage involved in 
obscurity, 2. 7a; discovered the 
continent, 2. 14a; inflamed with a 
desire to go upon a voyage of 
discovery, 2. 14a; his proposed 
route to reach India, 2. 14a, 15a; 
discovered Labrador and Hudson's 
bay, 2. 35a; obtained charter and 
sailed along the coast of the 
United States, 2. 15a; his discov- 
eries the basis of English claims, 
2. 15a; 9. 102; called the land 
Baccalaos, 9. 15a, 16a; in the 
service of Spain, 9. 18a; proposed 
to people the coast and call it 
New England, 5. 162n; possibly 
came to settle the coast, 7. IBOri; 
mentioned, 7. 133; 9. 102; map of 
cited, 9. 76a; memoir of, see Bid- 
die, Richard. 

Cabots, the, discovery by, 2. 14a, 
18a; discovered Newfoundland 7. 
26; on the coast of Maine, 7. 130, 
130n. 

Cacique, same as sachem, 2. 18a. 

Cade, a common name in Hingham 
and Watertown, i. 12Sn. 

, purchased land of Tucker, i. 

64n, 127; nothing known of him, 
I. 128n. 

Cadia, corrupted from Aquoddie, 4. 
191 ; see Acadia. 

Cadie, name given to the continent 
by the French, 2. 16a; on De 
Laet's map, 2. I7a; a corruption 
of Aquoddie, 4. 191; see Acadia. 

Cadillac, Sieur Antoine de la Mothe, 



his memoir found, 6. 275 ; prom- 
inent in the government, 6. 275; 
land granted to, 6. 275; 8. 830; 
sent to France, 8. 275 ; his memoir 
communicated to the government, 
8. 275, 276; a portion published, 8. 
276; among the Iroquos, 8. 276; 
sent to Detroit, 8. 276; at Fort 
Mackinaw, 8. 276 ; memoir noticed, 
8. 276; a responsible officer; 8. 276; 
mentioned, 6. 362; 7. 309n; 8. 349. 

Cadiz, Sir Ferdinando Gorges at the 
capture of, i. 109. 

Cady, a common name at Hingham 
and Watertown^ i. 128n. 

Caesar, consented to the deed of John 
Wadleigh, i. 359; the history of 
unknown, i. 359; see Moxusson, 
Caesar. 

Cage, the, 2. 185. 

Cagnawagas, the, 4. 123, 124, 125, 130, 
132, 136. 

Cain, the Rev. Mephibaseth, 4. 316, 

348, 349, 370, 871, 383, 384. 
Prince tried for murder, 7. 387; 9. 

204. 
Cainbequi, 7. 67. 
Calais, France, 4. 86; 8. 128. 
Maine, 6. 209; 8.78, 474. 
an Indian, 6. 211. 
Caldwell, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 19. 
John, 4. 55. 

Joseph, preceptor in Farmington 
Academy, 8, 71. 

Capt. , 3. 345, 346. 

, his house burned to hinder 

Arnold, i. 497. 
Caleb, an Indian, 4. 157. 
Calef, the Rev. Jonathan, 4. 314, 348, 

349, 368, 370, 371 ; ordination ser- 
mon cited, 4. 336. 

Joseph, lived in Boston, i. 312 
married Hannah Jordan, i. 312 
biographical notice of, 3. 209 
mentioned, 8, 226n. 
Robert, 9. 65; ridiculed the witch- 
craft delusion, 9. 37, 38; his Salem 
witchcraft cited, i. 2639i. 

Stephen, claimed land in Sheepscot, 4. 
230; boundary of his claim, 4. 
230, 231. 
Dr. , of Ipswich, 7. 237. 

Calender, the change of the, i. 21. 

Calf, Dr. John, supposed author of the 
Seige of Penobscot, 7. 203. 

Calhoun, John C, 7. 463; 8. 264, 353, 
361, 362, 366, 423, 424. 425, 429, 
430.^ 

California, the river of Laconia sup- 
posed to flow towards, 2. 6G; men- 
tioned, 4. 13, 20, 85; 7. 433; 9. 
244, 245 246. 

Calle, Richard, signed petition to 
Charles 11, i. 401. 

Callicot, Richard, representative of 
Falmouth, i. 163; a juror, 1. 188; 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



45 



administered the estate of John 
Wilkinson, 3. 38. 

Calliere, Gov. Louis Hector de, 6. 
276; 7.47,48. 

Oalnes Wiltshire, 6. 86. 

Caltrup, , counsel for Gorges, 2. 

37. 

Calvert, Sir George, 2. 33. 

Calvin, John, 4. 253 ; 6. 24. 

Calvinism, 5. liii. 

Calvanistic Baptists, 5. Iv; 7. 222. 

Calvinists, 5. liii; 6. 24, 27, 28. 

Cambridge, England, Gibson educated 
at, I. 59/1 ; Dr. Childs educated at, 
I. 95n; Dr. Vaughan educated at, 
6, 86; mentioned, 6, 411. 
Mass., former home of Joseph 
Holmes, i. 250n; the expedition 
to Quebec set out from, i. 447, 
495; date of Arnold's leaving, i. 
494, 501-502; sick to be seat to, i. 
512, 513; home of Danforth, 2. 65a; 
survivors of the Narragansett war 
to meet at, 2. 136; provincial con- 
gress met at, 2. 213; troops sent 
to from Bath, 2. 214; Cadillac's 
account of 6. 287; mentioned, i. 
39, 470, 475, 499, 544; 2. 144, 186, 
188; 3. 85w, 196, 197, 201, 203, 204; 

4. 143, 261, 265, 268, 272, 289)i, 330; 

5. 276n, 347, 391, 440; 6. 347, 374, 
384, 395, 396, 401, 404, 407; 7- 236, 
328, 8.441; 9.68. 

Camden, the Rev. Paul Coffin in, 4. 
325, 326; formerly Meduncook, 4. 
326 ; described, 4. 326 ; business of, 
4.326; mentioned, 3. 217; 4. 106; 

6. 71 ; 9. 81 ; history of see Locke, 
hills, 5. 312, 313, 346, 348; 6. 294, 

295, 298, 299, 300, 310, 314; 7. 253. 
Lord, 6. 49; 8. 400. 
William, his Britannia, cited, 1. 109; 

2. ma. 71. 

Cameronians, 6. 28. 

Cammel, Edward, 2. 205. 

Cammock, Margaret, widow of Thom- 
as, married Henry Jocelyn, i. 47- 
48; 3. 13, 85, 230; administered 
her husband's estate, 3. 231. 

Robert, 3. xvi. 

Capt. Thomas 1st, married the 
daughter of the Earl of Warwick, 

3. XV, xvi. 

Capt. Thomas 2d, received a grant 
at Black Point, i. 47, 80, 120, 533n; 
3. 12; 9. 367; a relative of the 
Earl of Warwick, i. 47; 3- ^vi, 12, 
25, 86; 5. 214; at Pascataqua, i. 
47; possession of grant given by 
Neale, i. 47; 3. 229; gave deed to 
Jocelyn, i. 47, 198; 3-230; death 
of, I. 47; 3. 18, 35; his widow 
married Jocelyn, 1.47-48; 3.13,35; 
extent of his patent, i. 80; a com- 
missioner, I. 84, 364; 3. 13, 36; 
date of his patent, i. 533n; his 



ancestry, 3. xvi ; a son of Robert, 
3. xvi; his settlement called Black 
Point, 3. 10; founder of Scarbo- 
rough, 3. XV, 12; 5. 214; why he 
received the grant, 3. 12; arrived 
in New England, 3. 12; agent for 
Gorges and Mason, 3. 12; grant 
from Gorges and Mason, 3. 12, 13; 
conveyed land to Tre worthy, 3. 

12, joined by Henry Jocelyn, 3. 

13, 35; his patent confirmed, 3. 
13; made his will, 3. 13; Jocelyn 
a legatee, 3. 13, 35; Foxwell 
brought an action against, 3-14, 
17; complained of John Winter, 
3. 14, 80-81 ; not deterred by Win- 
ter, 3. 15; Foxwell and Smyth ap- 
praised his estate, 3. 25,26; gave 
grant to Ambrose Boaden, 3. 79; 
site of his house, 3. 88; 5. 198; 
died in the West Indies, 3. 231; 
his wife to administer his estate, 
3. 231; inventory of his estate, 3. 
231; carried corn to Boston, 5. 204; 
witnessed the delivery of the 
grant to Shurt, 5. 214; mentioned, 
I. 534; 3. 16, 26, 30, 38, 67, 86-87; 
9. 308. 

Camock, see Cammock. 
Cammock' s neck, 3. 88. 
patent, sold to Timothy Prout, 3. 
221, delivery of possession, 3. 229; 
mentioned, i. 48, 80, 533n; 3. 13 
116, 212; 6. 138. 
Campanius, cited, 7. 309n,> 310n. 
Campbell, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 19. 
Sir Archibald, 8. 52. 
Colin, 8. 20. 
Duncan, his history of Nova Scotia, 

cited, 9. 99ti. 
family, Argyle the head of, 6. 6. 
the Rev. Hugh, preached in Scarbo- 
rough, 3. 158; a Scotchman, 3. 159. 
the Hon. James, 8. 178. 
Col Thomas, i. 522, 523, 532. 

, Nobleboro ceded to, 6. 18. 

the Rev. , of Tiverton, 4. 269. 

Campo Bello, 6. 103; 8. 15. 
Cam, Thomas, 6. 295, 310. 
Canaan, now Lincolnville, 7.334; com- 
mon schools in, 8. 158; mentioned, 
4. 295, 296, 314, 348, 349, 368, 370, 
371, 379, 380, 399, 400, 401, 404; 6. 
35; 8. 171. 
academy, incorporated, 8. 171 ; name 
changed, 8. 171; opened, 8. 171; 
preceptors of, 8. 171 ; merged into 
a high school, 8. 171. 
Canabas, Sachem on the Kennebec, 4. 

105. 
Canada, Sir William Alexander created 
Viscount of, 1. 67w; name given to 
Alexander's grant, i. 79; 4. 221; 
Sir William Phipps' expedition to, 
1.21471; the Jordan family taken 
to, I. 234, 312; the French in, 



46 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETT. 



Canada — continn ed. 

promised to assist the Indians, i. 
288; an expedition from attacked 
Schenectady, i. 297; the governor 
of ordered the destruction of Fal- 
mouth, I. 301; prisoners taken to, 
I. 301; 2. 152, 199; 3. 390; 7. 113, 
170, 174; a tradition that the Fal- 
mouth records were moved to, i. 
SOSn; 4. 230; the OauDibas desired 
a teacher from, i. 433; the gov- 
ernor of attracted the Indians to 
St. Francis, i. 435; Arnold to head 
an expedition to, i. 447, 494, 499, 
500; Montressor's path known in, 
I. 458; Arnold to restore liberty 
in, I. 467; Arnold's desire to reach, 
I. 470, 471, 472, 474, 475; Gen. 
Schuyler sent to, i. 486; Arnold's 
career in, i. 529; soldiers in the 
first expedition to, to have land 
grants, 2. 135n; captured by the 
English, 2. 152, 153, 182; ceded to 
the English, 3. 176; Indian routes 
to, 3. 316, 322; tribes from met at 
Falmouth conference, 3. 382; sent 
a wampum belt, 3. 382 ; a name giv- 
en to the coast of New England, 5. 
155; surrender of 1760, 5. 176; 
conveyed to France by Charles i, 

5. 200; held by the French 
through the Stuarts, 5. 242-243; 
the Bay State prevented Maine 
from becoming a part of, 5. 257; 
the capture of resolved upon, 5 
281; prejudicial to the English 
Colonies, 5. 398; the Abnaki 
mixed with the Indians of, 6. 207 : 
the French population in 1701, 6. 
238; to use the Indians against 
the English, 6. 238, 239; granted 
lands to the Indians, 6. 238, 239 ; 
the expelled Acadians went to, 

6. 343^; Carigan regiment in, 7. 
42 ; Jesuits the only instructors in, 

7. 59; Frontinac governor of the 
second time, 7. 59; acquired by 
Great Britain, 8. 23; the French 
fear to lose, 8. 124; regions con- 
tained in, 8. 319; Sully did not ap- 
prove the colonization of, 9. 97; 
under the jurisdiction of France, 
9. 110; mentioned, i. 34/i, 333, 515, 
527, 530; 2. 62, 163, 168, 272; 3. 
105, 297, 316, 378, 383, 387, 398, 
404, 425, 427, 428; 4. '^^n, 97, 98, 
147, 154, 155, 159, 181, 303, 324, 
345, 346; 5. Ixii, 63, 90, 266, 284, 
404; 6. 213, 223, 232, 233, 234, 235, 
236, 237, 238, 241, 272, 275, 276, 
281 ; 7. 62, 83, 85, 86, 90, 92, 99n, 
169, 203, 286, 356, 357, 389, 390, 
391, 404, 479; 8. 14, 18, 85, 98, 126, 
127, 144, 149, 153, 215, 222, 231, 
332, 244, 273, 274, 349; 9. 2, 36, 52, 
87, 183, 213, 219, 268w; Arnold's 



expedition to, i. 447-532; letters 
of Arnold on the expedition, i. 
447-498; Conquest of, see War- 
burton, George; History of, see 
Ducreux, Francis du; Uarneau, 
Francis Xavier. 
East, 9. 101. 

the river of, a boundary of Laconia, 
2.52a; mentioned 3. 301; 9. 349^ 
see also river St. Lawrence. 

Canadians, i. 480; 8. 130, 135. 

Canadey, see Canada. 

Canagh, Peter, 7. 327. 

Canal, to unite the Kennebec and Kew 
Meadows rivers, 2. 220. 
street, i. 248n. 

Canaries, the, 2. 18; 4, 23; sent wi^ 
to America, i, 56, 551; 3. 98; first 
sent to, I. 551. 

Canary Company, the, Duke of York 
interested in, 7. 139; incorporated, 
7. 13971. 

Canceau, Du Monts, and Du Pont 
Grave to meet at, 7. 250; dis- 
patches sent to, 7. 250; see also 
Canso. 

Canebais, a name for the Kennebec, 
4. 103. 

Cannada, a name given to the whole 
New England coast, 5. 155; see- 
Canada. 

Cannibas, the, visited by Biart, i. 429; 
attempt to protect them from the 
Hurons, i. 433; Biart' s influence 
left among, i . 433 ; sent to Canada 
for a teacher, i . 433 ; declared that 
the English should not stand on 
their soil, i. 434; so named by the 
Jesuits, 5. 327; location of, 5. 327; 
6. 234, 280-281 ; 7. lOln; 8. 205-206; 
some of the tribe taken by Wey- 
mouth, 5. 327-328; extinct, 5. 328; 
same as the Norridgewocks, 6. 
232, 234; on the Kennebec, 6. 281; 
in Acadia, 7. 101 n; ruled by St. 
Castine, j.oon; on the Kennebeck 
Grant, 8. 205-206; mentioned, 4. 
96; 6.212, 232; 8.215. 

Cannon street, 9. 351. 

Canoes, manner of carrying them over 
land, I. 504-505. 

Canso, number of Indians at, i,286n; 
boundary of Acadia, 5. 325 ; French 
had much traAe, and fisliing on 
the coast at, 5. 325; mentioned, 8. 
116, 119, 301, 302, 309; see also 
Canceau. 

Canterbury, 3. 68. 

Canton, China, early trade with, 4. 24. 
Mass., Robert Thornton a resident 
of, I. 146n. 

Cap Corneille, 7. 263. 

Capawick, belonged to the Province 
of Maine, 2. 70; now Martha's 
Vineyard, 2. 25; mentioned, 3. 29, 
80, 81. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



47 



Capeanawhagen, a spelling of Cape 

Manwagan, 3. 86n. 
Cape Ann, former home of the Wake- 
leys, I. 212; too highly praised, 2. 
98; sea-serpent at, 3.89; ship of 
the Plymouth Colony fishing at, 
5. 168; plantation begun at, 5. 168, 
the first place permanently occu- 
pied in Mass., 5. 168?i, 182; the 
Arbella at, 5. 199 ; home of Thomas 
Gardner, 5. 236^1 ; Champlain at, 7. 
262; I. 1071, 153, 208; 2. 99, 151; 3. 
3l5n; 4. 322; 5. 385; 7. 265; 8. 
228)2. 

Colony, foundation laid by Conant, 
5. 168, 194; in 1626 the most im- 
portant settlement on the coast, 
5. 199, 199n. 
Blanc, Champlain at, 7. 262; now Cape 
Cod, 7. 262. 

Blomidon, 8. 129, 134, 149. 

Bonawagon, 5. 239, 240. 

Breton, as a sailing direction, 2. 18a; 
destination of Challonge, 2. 23a; 
captured, 4. 257 ; part of the grant 
to Alexander, 7-27; to belong to 
the French, 7. 83; mentioned, i. 
34,; 5. 333; 6. 384; 8. 149, 302, 319, 
331, 332; 9. 101, 348. 

Breton, island of, see island of Cape 
Breton. 

Breton point, 5. 380. 

Breton war, interrupted the settle- 
ment of Buxton, 2. 139. 

Clear, 7. 334. 

Cod, Capt, John Smith at, i. 31; 2. 
34a; 7. 315; the Pilgrims arrived 
at, I. 33; settlements on, i. 50; 
Joshua Bangs came from, 1. 1-^6^; 
named by Gosnold, 5. 155; French 
ship wrecked on, 5. 164; on Hub- 
bard's map, 5. 261ii; called Malle- 
barre, 5. 325, 329; 8. .321; a bound- 
ary of Acadia, 5. 325 ; Du Mont at, 
5. 329; 8. 321; Champlain at, 7. 
262; 8.317-318; called Cape Blanc, 
7. 262 ; Weymouth at, 7. 293 ; men- 
tioned, i.34n; 2. 84, 258, 261; 4. 
372, 373, 374; 5. 347; 6.211,288; 
7.29, 255ri; 8. 200, 201, 

de Vert, taken from the Dutch, 7. 
139. 

Diamond, i, 520, 521, 522. 

Elizabeth, formerly a part of Fal- 
mouth, I. 21; a boundary of the 
Plough patent, i. 45, 80; a part of 
the grant to Goodyear and Tre- 
lawny, i. 48, 52; a boundary of 
New Somersetshire, i. Q6; bound- 
ary of Ligonia, i. 95; mills erected 
at, 1. 119, 120, 243/1 ; land at sold 
to K. Jordan, 1. 130; land at con- 
veyed to John and Robert Jordan, 
I. 232; Robert Jordan conveyed 
land at to Nathaniel Fryer, i. 238; 
land conteyed to Robert Elliott, i. 



235n; fishermen settled at, 1.276; 
road laid out, i. 278; home of the 
descendents of Philip Gunnison, 
I, 310; home of John Wallis, i, 
317; home of Robert Jordan, 2, 
233; 6. 188; sent militia tu Fal- 
mouth, 3. 197; Macclenaghan at, 
3. 275n; Presbyterians at, 3, 
275w; visited by Raleigh Gilbert, 
3. 302; called Semiamis, 3. S02n; 
part of called Purpooduck, 4, 108; 
boundary of the grant to Dye, 5, 
xxi; Scotch emigrants at, 6, 32; 
slaves held in, 7. 214; mentioned, 

1. 42, 52, 324; 2. 85, 86; 3- 212; 4, 
14, 23, 111; 5. 327, 442; 6. 137, 180; 
7. 219, 259, 265; 8. 152; 9. 130, 367. 

Harbor, 7. 301. 

HatteraF, 6. 210. 

Horn, 4. 24. * 

Jellison harbor, 5. 377- 

La Heve, 7. 250, 260. 

Neddick, had two garrison houses, 
7. Ill, 112; site of one, 7. 112; de- 
scribed, 7. 112-113; suffcered from 
Indian wars, 7. 113; mentioned, 8. 
128; 9. 318, 367. 

Neddick creek, 9. 318n. 

Neddick river, 7. 112. 

Nesick, 9. 367. 

Newagen, formerly Capemanwagen, 

2. 48a; visited by Levett, 2.48a; 
5. 168; early settled, 2. 86n; de- 
scribed, 2. 8671; home of Thomas 
Cleaves, 2. 236; home of John 
Tucker, 2. 236; settlement de- 
stroyed, 4. 223; gran'ed to Levett, 
5. 168; already given to others, 5. 
186; tax of in 1674, 5. 250; Wey- 
mouth's men landed at, 6. 311 ; 
now Southport, 6. 311; mentioned, 
4. 107; 5. 249, 250; 8.310,311; 9- 
125, 130, 131. 

Newagen island, 2. S^n; 5. 315. 

of Good Hope, 4. 24; 7. I39ri. 

of Sagadahock, 2. 86. 

P or pus, boundary of the Plough 
patent, i. 45, 80; 3. 32; boundary 
of Lygonia, i. 97; 3- 23?t; land in 
granted to John Bush, i. 97; land 
in granted to Richard Moore, i. 
97; 3. 77; submitted to the juris- 
diction of Mass., I. 100, 102, 103, 
165; 3. 43; home of Morgan How- 
ell, I. lOOn, 185; ordered to lay 
out highways, i. 165; distance 
from York, i. 165; presented for 
not attending the court's order, i. 
184, 185; number of militia in, i. 
228; not represented in the first 
assembly, s. 241; to furnish one 
man for Fort Loyal, i. 266; saw- 
mills at, I. 268, 269; dispute about 
the boundary lire, i. 361, .548; 
commission apipointed, 1.86I; the 
line settled by paying a tavern bill, 



48 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Cape Porpus — continued. 

I. 361-362; now Kennebunkport, 

1. 362; 2. 80n; the selectmen of 
put Charles Potum under family 
government, 2. 379; fined for not 
taking care of the children, 2. 380; 
Capt. Shapleigh commissioner for, 

2. 389: the people of sign the 
petition to Cromwell, i. 392; de- 
sired a magistrate, i. 397; need 
a minister, i. 397; houses of 
I. 550; Capt. Levett at, 2. 80 
boundary of Dye's grant, 5. xxi 
Champlain at, 7. 261 ; mentioned, 
I. 546; 2. 81, 147; 3. 225; 9. 366. 

Porpus falls, i. 357; land at belonged 
to John Wadleigh, i. 358. 

Porpus river, land at granted to 
John Stratton, i. 80n, 353; Levett' s 
account of, i. 353; now Mousam 
river, i. 353; claimed as a bound- 
ary of Wells, 1.361; mentioned, i. 
41n. 

Rosier, Lieut. Small at, 5. 384; origin 
of the name, 5. 384n. 

Rouge, the hunter at, i. 492, 497. 

Sable, a boundary of the grant to 
Alexander, i. 34; mentioned, 5. 
251; 7. 264; 8. 126; 9. 99, 102, 105, 
109, 110. 

Sable Indians, i". 218; 3. 416, 422, 428. 

Salles, 3. 347. 

Sante, i. 492, 493, 497. 

Small Point, supposed to be site of 
the colony of the Plymouth Com- 
pany, 2. 27a; probably visited by 
Popham's colonists, 3.294ii; men- 
tioned, 9. 130. 
Capemanwagen, visited by Levett, 2. 
48a, 86; now Cape Newagen, 2. 
48a; granted before the arrival of 
Levett, I, 49a, 50a; part of Booth- 
bay, 86n; early settled, 86/1; men- 
tioned, I. 551; 2. 88; 5. 168; see 
Cape Newagen. 
Capen, Charlotte, daughter of Thomas, 
married John Sowdon, 8. 153. 

Hopestill, 8. 152. 

Patience, 8. 153. 

Thomas, son of Hopestill, 8. 152; 
married Jane Noble, 8. 152; chil- 
dren of, 8. 153. 
Capisic, definition of not determined, 
I. 205n. 

falls, Frances Small lived near, i. 
114; land at granted by Capt. 
Davis, I. 252; mentioned, i. 65, 
65n, 205, '255. 

river, land near conveyed to James 
Andrews, 1. 117; land at conveyed 
to Francis Small, i. 118; mills 
erected at, i. 119, 210, 243w, 250, 
269; settlements extended to i. 
204; Geo. IngersoU jr. had a house 
at, I. 204, 205, 321; Richard Pows- 
land, settled near, i. 205, 322; 



Thomas Cloice" settled near, i. 
205, 252; home of John IngersoU, 
I. 213, 311, 321; house at burnt 
by Indians, i. 214; families at, i. 
216, 286; land near granted to 
John Skilling, i. 245; land at con- 
firmed to Mary Munjoy, i. 255; 
Geo. Munjoy owned land at, i. 
256; Silvanus Davis had a mill at 
I. 269; road to, 278-279; Joseph 
IngersoU lived at, i, 312; Sam- 
uel Ingersol lived at, i. 312; men- 
tioned, I. 112, 206, 255; 4. 104. 
Capitol hill, i. 410. 
Cappes, Father Felix, 7. 82. 
Captain Brown's hill, 4. 280. 
Card, Francis, taken prisoner with his 
family, i. 224; 2. 192; 3. Ill; es- 
caped, 3. 111. 
John, signed the petition to Charles 
IL, I. 402. 

Caren, Corporal , 5. 25. 

Carey, Dr. Ezry, 2. 125. 
Maurice, 2. 125. 

Judge , 2. 117. 

Carew, George, 7. 302. 
Cargill, Arbor, 9. 149, 150, 151. 
Charles, 4. 213, 214, 227. 
David, received land from Mary 

Mulford, 2. 234; 4. 231. 
Henry, 4. 213, 
homestead, the, 4. 213. 
Capt. James, grandfather of Joseph, 
4. 223; attacked the Indians, 5. 
369; sent to find canoes, 373; 
burned the blockhouse at Fort 
Pownall, 387; mentioned, 5. 367, 
368, 368a, 370, 374, 378, 385; 6. 338. 
Capt. Joseph, 4. 216, 217, 219, 223, 
227. 
Cariguan Regiment, joined by St. 
Castine, 7. 41; in Canada, 42; dLs- 
banded, 43. 
Salieres, 6. 41. 
Carle ton, 9. 110. 
Gen. Guy, reported at Montreal, i. 
477; burned Caldwell's house to 
hinder Arnold, 497; went down 
the river to Quebec, 519; humane 
to the prisoners, 525 ; discovered 
a plot among the prisoners, 525, 
527; paroled the prisoners, 527; 
buried Montgomery with honors, 
525; mentioned, 499, 521. 
Osgood, 8. 17. 
Carlisle, the Earl of, 2. 54. 
Joseph, 4. 321, 352. 
M., 5. 152. 
Carlton, Jonathan, 3. 180; moved to 
Machias, 3. 177. 
Moses, 7-357; his daughter married 

the Hon. Erastus Foote, 6. 72n, 
Thomas, 5. 183. 
Carlyle, Thomas, 8. 478. 
Carmen, Thomas, 5. 314. 
Carmichael, William, 3. 339. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS, 



49 



Carey, the Rev., 7. 235, 
, 9- 21. 

Carney, Addison, 4. 213, 
Mrs, Addison, 4. 213. 

Carolina, 6. 233. 

Carolinas, the, Scotch-Irish settle in, 
6, 9; condition of in 16t>4, 7. 154. 

Caroline Case, the, 8. 91. 

Carpenter, Philip, lived at Spurwink, 

1,320. 
Seth, 4, 360, 
Thomas, 2. 179. 

Carr, George, 4. 321, 352, 353. 
Sir Robert, commissioner to settle 
the difficulty between Maine and 
Mass. I. 173; at Pascataqua, i, 
373; people of Maine desire his 
protection, i. 181; went to Eng- 
land, I. 181?i-182^; death of, i. 
lS2n; mentioned, i. 185, 376. 
Thomas, 9. 382, 

Carrabasset river, visited by Montres- 
sor, I, 459?i. 

Carrartoank, see Carritunk. 

Carratuncas Carrying Place, i. 511. 

Carrel, Armand N., history of the 
Counter Revolution in England, 
cited, 7, 137n. 

Carritunk, 4. 313, 337, 368, 369, 378, 
379, 398, 
Falls, visited by Montressor, i. 459; 
a boundary of the Kennebec pur- 
chase, 2, 276; Indian name of the 
Kennebec falls, 4. 105; mentioned, 
1. 505; 4. 313, 345, 346, 348. 

Carrying places, i. 471, 472, 473, 475, 
476,478; 3. '^21, 322; 8.256. 

Carswell family, settle in Sterlin":, 6. 
23. 

Cart path of Walter Phillips, 9. 134, 
15L 

Carter, Nathaniel H., preceptor of 
Portland Academy, 8. 165; men- 
tioned, 8. 413, 
Richard, 3, 173. 

Carter's mill, 3. 151. 

Cartwright, Col. George, commissioner 
to settle dispute between Maine 
and Mass., i, 173, 185; at Boston, 
I. 173; captured by the Dutch, i, 
182n; counselor, i. 376; gave an 
account of l^ew England to tHe 
Council for Foreign Relations, «», 
246, ^ 

Carver, Jonathan, his travels cited, i. 
412; 6. 270. 
Robert, signed the treaty of 1713, 6. 
255; autograph, 6. 255. 

Casco, beaver trade at, i,55; Cleeves 
the first settler at, i. 61 ; long used 
as a name for Falmouth, i. 65; 
Mrs. Mac worth's property at, i. 
lOn; home of Thomas Wise, i. 71 ; 
Mitton constable of, i. 88; courts 
held at, i, 91, 98, 138, 185, 188, 
376, 540, 547; 3. 45; the people of 



join Cleeves, i. 91; taxed, r, ,Q4» 
368; home of Arthur Mac worth, i- 
iUn; included in Ligoni^i, i, 97; 3- 
23n; Thomis Morris lived at, lOOn; 
Hugh Mosier lived at, lOOn; sub- 
mitted to the jurisdiction of Mass., 
I. 105, 385, S8Q; 3. 45, 46; to be 
called Falmouth, i. 106, 387; a 
general name for a large territory, 
I, 112; inhabitants in 1658, i. 114; 
home of George Lewis, 1. 117, 383; 
Scitterygusset hved at, i. 118; 
home of Francis Small, i. 118; 
home of John Phillips, i. 119; 
mills at, I. 120, 130, 269, 280; 2. 
171; home of Francis Neale, i. 
129; Robert Jordan authorized to 
use land at, i. 130-131; a map of, 
I. 148; desired a minister, i. 161n; 
3. 10-11, 153; home of Geo. Mun- 
joy, I. 177; sent a petition to the 
king, I. 178; described by J ocelyn, 
1.203, 551; attacked by Indians, 
1.211; 3.107, 140; 5.253; militia 
in, I. 22s ; the tragedy at, com- 
menced by Mugg, I. 229; treaty 
made with the Indians at, i, 230; 
Fort Loyal in the care of Gendall; 
I. 231; land at conveyed to Su- 
sannah Brackett, i. 236; inhabi- 
tants in 1675, I, 236n; peace con- 
cluded at, I. 241; home of Joseph 
Holmes, i, 250^i; Anthony Brack- 
ett in command at, i. 270; sur- 
veyed, I. 279; feared to be the 
center of Indian troubles, i. 288; 
deserted, i.291; 4.73; 6.191; fort 
in care of private citizens, i. 291- 
292; soldiers need supplies, i. 
297%; soldiers killed at, 1.302; 3. 
107; held by the enemy, 3. 303?*; 
relatives of soldiers killed at to be 
paid, 3, 303ri; treaty of, 3. 303; 2. 
171; 3. 115; anecdote, i.304; land 
at left to the children of James 
English, 1.309; Thomas Reading 
moved to, 309; home of John 
York, I, 318; home of Elisha An- 
drews, I. 319; home of James 
Andrews, i, 319; home of Ebenezer 
Davenport, i. 320; home of 
Thomas Felt, i. 320; home of 
Joseph Holmes, i, 321; home of 
Samuel Pike, i, 322; home of 
William Royal, i. 322; home of 
John Tucker, i. 322; home of 
Lewis Tucker, i, 322; home of 
Nathaniel Wharfe, i. 323; home 
of Michael Milton i. 384; Stephen 
Batchelor called to preach in, i. 
549n; letter to from the govern- 
ment of Mass., I. 550; visited by 
Indian Sagamores, 2. 49a; Mount- 
joy a magistra e for, 2. 64a; name 
given to by Levett, 2. 85ii; de- 
nied the jurisdiction of Mass , 3. 



50 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Case — continued. 

44; ordered to establish roads, 3. 
128; called Acosico, 4. 108; defi- 
nition of the name, 4. 115 ; a front- 
ier town in 1713, 5. 298; Kobert 
Jordan officiated at, 6. 181, 188, 
189; mentioned, i. 30, 48; 2. 35, 
88; 3. 107, 111, 120, 121, 136, 332, 
374, 413; 4. 109; 9. 29, 367; see 
Casco Bay and Falmouth. 
Bay, islands in to be a part of Fal- 
mouth, I, 21; called Ancocisco, i. 
31; deserted, i. 31; boundary of 
Way's grant, i. 40n, 80; boundary 
of the Trelawney patent, i . 48, 80 ; 
Cleeves the first settler on, i. 61; 
land at granted to Arthur Mac- 
worth, I. 68; George Luxton in, 
I. 71; a triton in, i. 77; 
boundary of the Massachu- 
setts claim, 1. 100; a good harbor, 
I. 181; fish plenty, i. 181; Ann 
Brackett escaped across, i. 235; 
land near owned by Peter Bow- 
doin-, I. 276; surveyed, i. 279; 
Cleeves held a court at, i. 547; 
frozen over, 2. 218; claimed as a 
boundary of the Kennebec pur- 
chase, 2. 276; boundary of the 
plough patent, 3. 32; visited by 
Raleigh Gilbert, 3. S02n; many 
islands in, 3. 302^1 ; boundary of 
Wharton's grant, 3. 325, 326; In- 
dians summoned to a conference 
at, 3. 377; on Hubbard's map, 5. 
26l7i; Du Monts at, 5. 329; Sir 
Edmund Andros at, 7. 54; expe- 
dition to Port Royal returned to, 
7. 76: described by Champlain, 7, 
259; why it is annexed to Fal- 
mouth on the records, 8. 234, 234?i; 
mentioned, i. 54, 60, 62, 63, 64n, 
68, 69, 97m, 148n, 149, 151, 166, 226, 
235%, 282n, 387, 460, 54J, 54(1, 549, 
556; 2. 49a, 172, 218,283; 3- 43^i, 
89, 315, 316, 329, 330, 331, 332, 
344, 347, 348, 377, 379, 395, 396, 
411, 419, 421 424, 427, 435, 445; 4. 
105, 160, 166; 5. 42, 63, 326, 327, 
395; 6. 138, 185; 7. 220, 262; 8. 
110, 220, 22Qn, 227, 230, 237, 238; 
9. 27 29; see also Casco. 

fort see Fort Loyal. 

Indians, Scitherygusset chief of the, 
I. 118. 

river, a boundary of Trelawny's 
patent, i. 46, 48, 71; uncertainty 
of the true one, i.49; Cleeves and 
Tucker enlarged their borders on 
the, I. 68, 117; people of com- 
plained of winter, i. 72-73; bound- 
ary of Hope Allen's purchase, i. 
126; sawmills to be erected on, i. 
130; Robert Jordan one of the 
chief proprietors on the, i. 130; 
crossed by a ferry, i, 278; to be 



called Levett's river, 2. S6n; men- 
tioned, 2. 132, 133, 221. 

Case, Elder Isaac, 4. 306; preached 
at Thomaston, 7. 225; at Win- 
throD, 7. 225; representative to 
the general court, 7. 225; died 7. 
226; peculiarities of, 7. 226; father 
of the Hon. Isaac, 7. 225. 
the Hon Isaac, son of Elder Isaac, 
7. 225. 

Cash, Alice, 4. 403. 
John, 4. 403. 
Samuel, 4. 403. 

Caskoe, see Casco. 

Cass, Lewis, 8. 366, 436, 443. 

Cassiers, , i. 529. 

Casteen see Castine. 

Castile, 6. 120n. 

Castine, formerly Baggaduce, 2. 215; 
6.107-108; 7.201,328; expedition 
against, 3. 204; 7. 203; Arthur 
Bragdon wounded at, 3.204-205; 
held by England, 4. 78; called 
Majabawaduce Point, 4. 324, 324n; 

6. 107, 108; the most enduring of 
French settlements, 6. 3 ; home of 
Isaac Parker, 6. 997i; early known 
to French fisherman, 6. 109; coins 
found near, 6. 114; harbor of, 6. 
114; attacked by Andross, 6.191; 
included in Bagaduce, 7. 4; last 
vestiges of the Pilgrim' s fort near, 

7. 37 ; formerly Pentagouet, 7. 79'; 
Elder Jesse Lee preached at, 7. 
227; common schools in, 8. 158; 
Indian name of, 9. 266n: men- 
tioned, 4. 324?i, 377; 5. xx, 59, - 
885n, 394, 395; 6. 108, II6, 235; 7. 
25; 8.319, 330; 9. 160, 161, 163. 

coins, where found, 6. 114; finder of, 
6. 114-115; number found, 115-116; 
kinds found, 6. 115; examined by 
Dr. Stevens, 6.116; described, 6. 
117-125; supposed to have been 
hidden by St. Castine, 6. 12.5-126 ; 
one picked up at the fort, 6. 126n. 
Castine' s fort, 6. 114. 

war, same as King William's war, 
6. 112; occasioned by the English, 
6. 112. 

see St. Castine. 
Castle island, Boston, 6. 284. 

of Cormentin, captured by the 
Dutch, 7. 139; captured by the 
English, 7. 139. 

pinnace the, 8. 229, 229n. 

William, 5. 385, 385n; 8. 125, 229n, 
242. 
Caterramoggus, 6. 257. 
Cathance river, 3. 313; a boundary of 

the Kennebec purchase, 2. 277. 
Cathay, Columbus supposed he had 
reached it, 2. 13a-14a; Cabot ex- 
pected to discover it, 2. 14a, 15a; 
country comprised in, 2. 76a; men- 
tioned, 5. 344; 9- 304. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



51 



Catliolicism among the Indians due to 
St, Castine's exertions, 6. 111. 

Catholic missions in Maine, i. 426- 
428. 
priests, their inflnenr-e over the In- 
dians, I. 229; see also Jesuits the. 

Catholics in Ireland, 6. 6; but few 
came to America before the Rev- 
olution, 6. 10: mentioned, 7. 219, 
283; 9. 103. 

Cattle destroyed by wolves, i. 366; 
imported, 2. bOn; expected at Pas- 
cataqua, 3. 21 71; scarcity in Maine, 
3, 72, 12n; turned loose, 3. 143; 
marked, 3. 143, 144; mentioned, 3. 
88, 120: see goats. 

Cauley, , owned the Higgins farm, 

3. 16n; married Widow Biadford, 
3.79. 

Caulin, Capt. , 8. 139, 140. 

Cavesisix mill, 9. 151. 
river, 9. 134, 136. 

Cebahis, 7. 97. 

Cecil, Lord, 4. 68; 5. 148; cod pre- 
sented to, 5. 145. 

Cedar, common at the River Des 
Loups, I. 450. 

Celer, Reynold, signed the petition of 
1672 to Mass., 5, 241. 

Cellen, Thomas, petitioned to Mass. 
to stop the strife between Cleeves 
and Jordan, i. 141. 

Celtic, the, i. 427. 

Cendalle, Walter, 5. 63, 64. 

Center street, i. 248, 249, 315. 
street school house, 8. 165. 

Central America, coast of discovered, 
2. 14a. 

Chabi nocks, Thomas, sagamore of 
Wells, deed to John Wadleigh, i. 
357-358. 

Chadbourn, Benjamin, 8. 162. 
Humphrey, associate, i. 165; held 
the county court, i. 170: had a 
sawmill at Kittery, i. 268; mili- 
tary officer for Kittery, i. 369; 
signed the petition to Cromwell, 
I. 394. 
Prof. P. A., 6. 347, 361 ; on the oys- 
ter shell deposit at Damariscotta, 
6. 345-351. 

Chadwick, the Rev. Benjamin, mar- 
ried Eunice Willard, 3.. 163; 
preached at Dunstan, 3. 163-164; 
• death of, 3. 164. 
Jason, 2. 289. 

Paul, killed, 5. Ixiii; 9. 204; trial of 
his murderess, 8. 387. 

Chain lakes, the, Col. Montressor at, 
I. 436. 

Chairnsay, see D'Aulney. 

Chaises in 1770, 7. 23on. 

Chaleur bay, 7. 49/i. 

Ohallong, Capt. Henry, 2. 26; com- 
manded the expedition of Sir F. 
Gorges, 2. 23a, 18; 5. 833; cap- 



tured, 2. 23a, 19; 5. 333; to be met 
by Hanham and Pring, 2. 23a; 
sick, 2. 19; liberated, 2, 19; had 
one of Weymouth's Indians with 
him, 5. 333; did not follow his 
sailing directions, 5. 333. 
George, his Annals of the United 
Colonies cited, i. 83, 84, 229n, 23971 ; 
3. 59«; 9. 311n, ?A2n; his Opinions 
of Eminent Lawyers cited, 2. 267^1. 
William, visited by the Rev. Paul 
Coffin, 4, 318, 320, 350 352. 

Chalowner, see Challong. 

Chamberlain, Joshua L., his Maine, 
her place in history, cited, 8. 184ri. 

Chamberlin, Jeremiah, 4. 369. 

Chamberling, Daniel, 1.556. 

Chambers, Stephen, i. 531. 

Chambault, Father, letter cited, 7. 5. 

Chamble, captured, i. 482. 

Chambly, M. de, in command at Pen- 
tagoet, 7. 46, 340; wounded, 7. 46; 
attacked, 7. 340; surrendered, 7. 
340; surprised at the attack, 7, 
340-341. 

Chambly' s Company, 7. 45. 

Chamners, Henry, swore allegiance to. 
the Duke of York, 5. 237. 

Champagne, the province of, 9* 99. 

Champernoon, Francis, counsellor, i, 
7371, 88, 364; 3. 63a; lived at Kit- 
tery, 1. 88/-y, 177, 230; 3.55; active 
in opposing Mass., i., 170; pre- 
sented for renouncing the author^ 
ity of Mass., i. 171; 31 55; ap- 
pointed Justice of the Peace, i.. 
177; commissioned to make a- 
treaty with Indians, I..230; a rel- 
ative of Sir Walter Raleigh, 2.. 
63a;2; nephew of Gorges, 3, 55; 
mentioned, i. 545; 9*.302, 355, 365. 
Sir Philip, 2. 6San. 

Champigny, , cited, 7. 43, 43n, 62. 

Champlain, 9. 183. 
Samuel de, sailed along the coast of 
Maine, i. 25, 26; 3. 99; accompa- 
nied the French to Nova Scotia, j., 
99; 7. 249; his description of the 
Indians, 3. 99; laid the foundation, 
of Quebec, 5. 178; surrendered to 
David Kirk, 5. 196; in Penobscot 
bay and river, 6. 109; 7, 3, 96, 253,. 
318; named Mount Desert, 7. 28; 
met Bashaba, 7. 96, 97, 98, 252, 
254; birth of, 7. 248; son of a fish- 
erman, 7. 248; became a sailor, 7.. 
248; an officer in the Royal Ma- 
rines, 7.. 248; in the West Indies- 
and Mexico, 7. .248;- a man.of ob- 
servation,^ 7x, 249,. 261.-262,. ihi the^ 
expedi1;ion with ©u Monts„7;.249;; 
Royal Geographer, 7-.249„2$l; de- 
scribed and published an a<acou»t 
of the coast of Maine, 7. 249 ; where 
buried, 7, 249; on his first voyage 
of discovery, 7. 250; second voyage 



52 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Champlain, Samuel de — continued. 
7. 250; at Holy Cross, 7. 251; 
in charge of the expedition to 
Norumbegfa, 7. 251-252, 254; de- 
scribed Norumbega, 7. 252-253; 
described Penobscot bay, 7. 253; 
took the altitude of Norumbega 
river, 7. 254; at the Quinibequy 
river, 7. 255, importance of this 
voyage, 7. 255-256; not sufficiently 
noticed by historians, 7. 2557i; 
left St. Croix, 7. 257; at Sheep- 
scot river, 7. 259, 263; heard of 
the Chaudiere and St. Lawrence, 
7. 259; passed Casco bay, 7. 260; 
at Isle de Bacchus, 7. 260; at 
Saco river, 7. 260; described the 
culture of maize, 7. 200; made a 
chart of the coast, 7. 26J ; at Cape 
Porpus, 7. 261 ; passed the Merri- 
mac, 7. 262; at Cape Ann, 7. 262; 
at Plymouth, 7. 262; at Cape Cod 
and Nanset, 7. 262; 8. 311, 318; 
met Marchim at Chonacoet, 7. 
262 ; at the Kennebec, 7. 262, 263 ; 
met Anasson, 7. 262; hears of 
Europeans, 7. 262-263 ; named the 
Isle of Le Nef, 7.263; points to 
be noticed in this voyage, 7. 263; 
decided to remain in America, 7. 
263, 264; his narrative the first 
thoroughly intelligible contribu- 
tion to the cartography of Maine, 

7, 266; mentioned, 7. 27, 29. 96, 
97n, 98, 98^, 256, 257, 295, 313, 314, 

8. 317; 9. 102, 132, 132w; his Jour- 
nal edited by Laverdiere, 7. 245; 
cited, 2. 9; 3-99: 6. 109n; Coast- 
ing Voyages in the Gulf of Maine, 
by Gen. John M. Brown, 7. 243-266. 

Champlain^ s rocks, 7. 6. 
Champlin, the Kev. J. T., Educational 
Institutions of Maine, While a 
District of Mass., 8. 155-180. 
Champney, the Kev. Ebenezer, 

preached at Bath, 2. 223. 
Chandler, Anson G., 9. 176. 

Daniel, 2- 182. 

family, the, 5. lix. 

John, proprietor at Pemaquid, 5. 
302. 

John, of Minot, 2. 115. 

Gen. John, first representative to 
Congress from Maine, 9. 169, 173; 
father of, g. 169; his age at the 
time of his father's death, 9. 169; 
in the war of the Revolution, 9. 
170, 178-182:; in the war of 1812, 
.i>„ 170, 183-200; of a military 
spirit, 9. 170, 171; established an 
; arsenal at Augusta, 9. 170; estab- 
lished the Bangor railroad, 9. 171 ; 
moved to Maine, 9. 171 ; prominent 
in town affairs, g. 172; justice of 
the Court of Sessions, g, 172; 
prominent in state affairs, 9. 172, 



173, 175-176; self-taught, g. 173- 
174; interested in education, 9. 
174; sheriff of Kennebec county, 9. 
174-175, 200-205 ; his political opin- 
ions, 9. 175; interested in the sep- 
eration of Maine from Mass., 9. 175 ; 
moved to Augusta, 9. 176; death 
of, 9. 176; his character, 9. 174, 175- 
176, 176-177; children of, 9. 176; 
death of his widow, 9. 176; men- 
tioned, 4.305,3.55,378,400,403; 5. 
xxxvii, xlii; Extracts from his 
Journal, 9. 178-205; account of by 
George F. Talbot, 9. 167-177. 
John A., 9. 176. 
Joseph, 2. 177; taken prisoner by 

the Indians, 2. 182. 
Capt. Joseph, birth of 9. 169 ; in the 

Kevolution, 9. 169; died, 9, 169. 
Peleg, 2. 113. 
PelegW., 4. 7; 6.379. 
Reuben, 2. 114. 
Dr. Seth, 2. 120, 122. 

Dr. , of Bowdoin College, 5. 

xviii. 

Channing, Commodore, , 9. 185. 

the Rev. William Ellery, 5. xxxiii, 
xxxiv, xlvi; 6. 13; 7. 408. 
Chapin, the Rev. Perez, 2. 125; 4. 330. 
Chaplin, the Rev. Jeremiah, 8. 178, 

179. 
Chapman, Abner, 7. 369, 371, 372. 
John, of Falmouth, married Rachel 

Ingersoll, i. 311. 
Lydia, daughter of Abner, 7. 369; 
married to the Hon. Robert P. 
Dunlap, 7. 369. 

, starved, 2. 101 ; extravagance 

of, 2. 101-102. 
Charles i, coins of his reign found on 
Richmond's island, i. 43n; Nich- 
olas Bartlett in his army, i. 116??; 
Baker active in bringing him to 
the block, i. 336; Capt. John 
Smith presented his description 
of New England, 2. 35a; MorreFs 
Latin poems dedicated to, 2. 46a; 
issued an order for a general gov- 
ernment of New England, 2. 53a- 
54a.; Maine named in honor of his 
queen, 2. 58n; charter of the Ply- 
mouth Company returned to, 3. 
31 ; confirmed the charter of 
Gorges, 3.31, 37; 5. xxi; gave a 
patent to Trelawney, 5. 170n; 
conveyed Canada and Acadia to 
France, 5. 200, 215, 231; under 
French influence, 5. 242n ; a traitor 
to his own people, 5. 243; his 
charters designed to perpetuate 
Episcopalianism, 6. 183 ; death of, 
7. 136; Mass. rejoiced at his 
death, 7. 148-149; denied that he 
gave Nova Scotia to France, 9. 
110-111; mentioned, i. 68, 543, 
54«, 258, 266, 266; 3. 317, 331, 333, 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



53 



4. 7, 26, 124, 139, 140, 141, 142, 
146; 5. xlv, 145, 207, 207/1, 278; 7. 
141n, 159; 9. 101, 225, 310n, 312; 
Memoirs of, see Aiken, Lucy. 

II of England, recognized the title 
of Ferdinando Gorges, i. 138, 174; 
insisted that Massachusetts should 
be more tolerant, i. 162; death of 
1.273; 7. 158; on his accession 
Baker fled to America, 7. 336; his 
accession caused John Wheel- 
wright to return to New England, 
7. S4An; Wells memorial to, 7. 357, 
359, 400-401 ; friendly toward Sir 
Thomas Temple, 7. 398n; restora- 
tion of, 2. 63a; 3. 50; 9.328; gave 
a grant to James, Duke of York, 

2. 232; 8. 144n, 184; his accession 
changed the political affairs of 
Maine, 3. 33; Sir John Gorges 
petitioned to him for his rights, 

3. 33, 50; people of Maine sent a 
petition to, 3. 129; immersed in 
sensualism, 5. 257 ; hated by Mass., 

5. 257; a traitor to England, 5. 
266; his reign dated from the 
death of his father, 7. 136; char- 
acter of, 7. 136-137; a pensioner 
of Louis XIV, 6. 136, 136)1 ; assisted 
by the Duke in the government, 

6. 137-138; created his brother 
Lord High Admiral, 7. 138, 138n; 
incorporated the Canary Com- 
pany, and the Royal African Com- 
pany, 7. 139n; ordered Clarendon 
to write a history of the Rebellion, 

7. 141n; married the Infanta of 
Portugal, 7.144n,145w; mentioned, 

1. 554; 2. 73a, 261, 257; 3. 63n, 
231, 232; 5. 5, 48, 132, 232n, 265, 
272; 6. 7, 124, 150, 151, 188; 7. 
141n, 192n; g. U, 22, 332. 

II of Spain, 6. 120, 120n. 

Prince, Capt. John Smith presented 
his description of New England 
to, 2. 35a; 5. 162; named places 
on Smith's map, 5.I62; mentioned, 

2. 39a, 59na; became Charles i, 
which see. 

river, a boundary of Massachusetts 
Bay Colony, 2. 60a; boundary of 
grant to Brereton, 2. 46n; bound- 
ary of grant to Darrel and Old- 
ham, 2. 47n ; mentioned, 7. 489 ; 9. 
349, 366. 
the, 9. SS2n. 

Charleston, 7. 224, 413. 

Charlestown, Mass., home of Thomas 
Kimball, i. 150; home of John 
Phillips, I. 248; Martha Munjoy 
born in, i. 256; former home of 
John and Thomas Jones, i. 259; 
Daniel Parker moved to, i. 302; 
mortality among the early set- 
tlers of, 2. 31aw; home of Col. 
Francis Morton, 2. 50n; asked to 
aid in building Bunker Hill mon- 



ument, 3. 247, 248; compared to 
Kittery, 4. 205; Walter Phillips 
died in, 4. 210; Cadillac's account 
of, 6. 287; mentiened, 2. 144, 175; 

3. 207, 244, 250, 254, 269n; 4. 241, 
249, 261, 267, 268, 272, 373; 5. 230, 
418, 422; 6. 17; 8. 209, 450; 9. 35; 
History of, see Frothingham, 
Richard. 

R. L, 2. 134. 

artillery, 3- 268. 

lecture, the, 9. 23. 

Charlevoix, Peter Francis Xavier, 

valuable fund of information in 

his works, i. 404; his Histoire 

Generale cited, i. 422, 433, 434; 

4. Ill; 7. 41, 45n, 60, 76^, 78n, 
8471, 85n, 319n, 341; 8. 9; 9. 103w, 
108^1, 109^. 

Charnisay, see D'Aulney. 
Charnock, John, 7. 138n. 
Charters, their distinction from pa- 
tents, 5. 206-207; of Mass., i. 32, 
78, 273; 9. 34-35, 37; Du Monts, 
I. 25; to Gorges, i. 86; to the 
Virginia Company, i. 28; to Maine 
Historical Society, 1. 11 ; to Wells, 
I. 360-361; see Great New Eng- 
land Charter. 

street, 2. 231; 9. 64, 65. 
Chase, Amos, 2. 138. 

Daniel, 4. 315. 

Elbridge, 8. 183n; 9. 141, 146. 

Elizabeth Daniel, 4. 315. 

Father, 4. 351. 

Joseph, 4. 315. 

Mercy, 4. 315. 

Salmon P. 5. xxv, xxvi, xxxiv, xxxv; 
9. 254. 

Stephen, 4. 318, 319, 320; married 
Mary Osgood, 4. 2J8n. 

Capt. Thomas, 4. 219. 

Capt. William, 4. 213, 216n; g. 139, 
142, 154. 

, married Betsy Bodfish, 4. 404. 

Chatham, England, 3. 216. 

Mass., 2. 144. 
Chaudiere pond, part of Arnold's 
command to meet at, i. 468, 470, 
471, 473; Arnold at, i. 476, 495; 
mentioned, i. 470, 478, 482. 

river, Arnold to lead his expedition 
through the valley of, i. 447; the 
place intended for the embark- 
ation of Montressor's expedition, 
I. 448, 466; settlements on, 1.448- 
449; depth of, i. 449; compared 
to the Penobscot, i. 453; Montres- 
sor at, I. 465; famous for fish, i. 
465 ; Arnold hoped to reach it in 
ten days, i. 471, 474; Arnold at, 
I. 477; meaning of, i. 514; men- 
tioned, I. 459, 476, 503, 506, 507, 
508, 512, 513, 515, 520n, 522, 523; 
4. 86, 346, 380, 399; 7. 168, 170, 
175, 193, 256, 259, 389; 8. 21, 215, 
216, 220, 230, 231, 233, 235. 



54 



MAIJ^E HISTORICAL SOCIETT, 



Chavacovett, Indian name for the 
Slieepscot river, 4* 105. 

Cheaspide, 2. 70of; 3. 89; 9. 351. 

Chebaccho, 6. 384 ; a name sometimes 
given to Great Chebeag, i. 145. 

Cheba^codegan island, in North Yar- 
mouth, 2. 180. 

Chebascodegar, 2. 167. 

Chebattis, definition of, 4. 191, 192. 

Chebattiscook, definition of, 4* 191. 

Chebeag, see Great and Little Chebeag. 

Chebeague, g. 2Q6n. 

Chebegnadose, 5* 156n. 

Cheberrina, agreed to a peace, i. 228; 
his lands given to Gorges, i. 281. 

Chebiscodego, former name of Great 
Chebeag, i. 148w. 

Chebucto, now Halifax, 8. 125; French 
fleet arrived at, 8. 125; fleet sailed 
from, 8. 126; see Chignecto^ 

Checkley, Capt. Samuel, 2. 287w; 5. 
237n; sold land to Timothy Prout, 
2.287; claimed land at Slieepscot, 
2. 236-287. 

Cheepie, the Indian devil, 3. 19n. 

Cheever, Ebenezer, 8. 177. 
Ezekiel, 5. 801, 802. 
the Rev. George B., 8. 485 ; his edi- 
tion of Mourt's Relation cited, 5. 
lUn. 
Nathaniel, 7. 284. 

Mr. , 8. 227. 

the Rev. , of Boston, 7. 237. 

Chelmsford, 2. 146. 

Chelsea, Maine, 7. 405 ; formerly Hal- 
lowell, 7. 388-884. 
Mass., Moses Felt lived in, i. 156; 
Macclenaghan at, 3. 275?i; men- 
tioned, 3.271, 281; 5.489. 

Chenebec river, see Kennebec river. 

Cheputnaticook, Indian name of St. 
Croix river, 4. 105. 

Cheputnecook lake, 8. 15. 

Chegnecto, 7. 195. 

Cherokee Indians, i. 501. 

Cherryfield, 6.41; 8. 178. 

Cherry mountain, 9. 217. 

Chesapeake bay; Newport to transport 
a colony to, 3. 290; mentioned, 3. 
288; 5.855. 

Chessom, Dunken, 3. 110; in the gar- 
rison at Black Point, i. 227n; pos- 
sibly a resident of Black Point, 3. 
83-84. 

vChester county, 2, 46n, 

Maine, 4. 321, 383, 347, 382, 392, 393. 
N, H,, 4,320; 8,9. 

^Chesuncook, derivation and meaning 
of, 4, 189. 

Che-va-co-bet, river, 9, 133. 

Chewouki, 9, 183. 

■Chiballs in abundance, 3. 305, 307. 

Chiene, Capt. -, 2. 248. 

Chignecto, 7, 195; 8, 182, 146, 245?i, 
262; see Chebucto. 

Child, James, 7, 285, 



Dr. Robert, purchased Tine's patent, 
I. 94; 9. 816; biographical notice 
of, i.95n; remonstrated with the 
authority of Mass., 7. 146, 146ri. , 

China, Columbus supposed he had ^ 
reached it, 2. 13a, 14a; Tartars 
driven from, 2. 76a; mentioned, 4* 
24, 72; 5. 860. 
Maine, 8. 890; formerly Harlem, 2. 

285. 
academy, S. 175. 

Chinese, the, 6. 222, 223. 

Chinus, the Indian god, 4. 379. 

Chipman, Ward, 8. 106. 

Cbippeways, 9. 290; same as Algon- 
quin, I. 412. 

Chissimore, Daniel, at Black Point, 3. 
83; at Newbury, 3. 88w. 

Chissimore' s hill, 3. Si-^ju. 

Choat, Abraham, visited by Paul Cof- 
fin, 4.353, 354; came from Ipswich, 
4. 3.54. 

Choate, John, 4. 145, 161, 164. 

Chocheco, Indian treaty signed at, 6. 
237; treachery toward the Indians 
at, 6. 237. 

Chocorua, friend of the whites, 9. 212; 
driven to his death by the whites, 
9. 812. 

Choctaw deputation, 6. 263. 

Chops point, 5. 822, 823. 
the, 3. 312; 6. 16; fort erected at, 3. 
314; 8. 128^i. 

Chonacoet, country of the, 7. 260, 261, 
262, 26S, 265. 
river, the, now the Saco. i. 288. 

Chaufours, Louis D' Amours des, 7. 
71 w, 75. 

Christ, 6. 148; claimed as a French- 
man, I. 287ft. 
Church, Boston, 9. 68. 
Church, Gardiner, 7. 404, 413. 
Church, Hartford, 7. 488. 
Church, Oxford, 5. 150, 

Christian disciple, the, 4. 252. 
Examiner, the, cited, 2. 4San; 6. 
232w, 284n. 

Christianity, first planted in Maine, i. 
481 ; degraded by the Jesuits, 5. 
177. 

Christian Mirror, the, cited, i. 325w; 
4. 115; 6.427. 
worship, first in New England, 6. 
176n, 177-178. 

Christo, an Indian, 4. 157. 

Chronicles of the Pilgrims, see Young, 
Alexander. 

Chronological History of New Eng- 
land, see Prince, the Rev. Thomas. 

Chrystal Hills, now the White Moun- 
tains, 2. 84, S4n. 

Chubb, Capt. Pasco, in command at 
Fort William Henry, Pemaquid, 5. 
290; 7. (y'S; 9. 43; attacked by Iber- 
ville, 5. 290; summoned to surren- 
der, 7. 65 ; confusion of his soldiers ; 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



55 



7. 65; surrendered, 2. 240; 3. 139; 
5. 291; 7. 65; 9. 43; his conduct 
censured, 3- 139; 5- '^91, 2d2n, 293, 
294; 9. 43; imprisoned at Boston, 
7. 65 ; his cowardice deprived the 
coast of the only defense, g. 43; 
liberated, 7. 65 ; went to Andover, 
7. 65; murdered, 3. 150; 7-65-66; 
a valuable officer, 3. 150-151. 

Chub fish, I. 506. 

Church at Pleasant Cove, controversy 
over the, 8. 11 In, 113??. 
Major Benjamin, sent with troops 
to Maine, i. 292; 2. 196; accompa- 
nied by friendly Indians, i. 202, 
294, 295; his instructions, i. 293, 
303; 3. 105, 137; 9. 41; his zeal, i. 
293; his manner of attack, i. 293- 
294; his account of the battle, i. 
294-295; dates of his birth and 
death, i. 294»; his arrival saved 
Falmouth, i. 295; letter of cited, 
I- 295n, 296^; visited Spurwink 
and went up the Kennebec, i. 296; 
2. 196; 3. 136; held a council of 
war, I. 296; 3. 136; promised to 
return to Falmouth, i- 297; en- 
treated the government to send 
help to Casco, i. 297; 3- 136; sec- 
ond visit to Maine, 1.303-304; at 
Kennebec, 2. 196; at Femaquid, 2. 
196, 239; 5. 330, 331; defeated the 
Indians at Falmouth, 3. 136; 6. 
133; at Blue Point, 3. 136; accom- 
panied by Scattow he went to Bos- 
ton, 3- 136; site of his encampment, 
1690, 3- 322-323; destroyed the 
fort at Rouameno, 8. 353; built a 
fort at Pemaxjuid, 4. 73; destroyed 
the settlement at Penobscot, 4. 
113; 9. 41; his opinion of Fort 
William Henry, 5. 282; fought 
the Indians at Back Cove Creek, 
6. 133; found many Indian places 
deserted, 7, 5-6; took the daugh- 
ter of 8t- Castine prisoner, 7. 66- 
67; harbored at Matinicus, 8. 311. 

Churchers, the, 7. 101. 

Church, Lieut , with Arnold, i. 

477, 47a 

, of Farmington, 4* 333. 

of England, members of settled in 
Pascataqua, 2, 6 law; Gorges en- 
couraged the settling of, 2, 62a; 
a clergyman presented for baptis- 
ing, 2, 62a-63a; members of ex- 
empt from church taxes, 3. 154^; 
Gorges devoted to, 4. 69; to be 
established in Gorges' colony, 4, 
69; established in North America 
by Gilbert 6, 174; the first formal 
religious act in America done by, 
6. 174-175; service of held early in 
An^erica, ^. 175^, 177n, 177-178; 
only recognized by Northern Vir- 
ginia, 6. 176; Weymouth a mem- 



ber of, 6. 177; Gibson attached to, 
6. 182; people of Falmouth desired 
to worship by the form of, 6. 192 ; 
the formalities of kept by Pop- 
ham's colonists, 7. 304; the Rev. 
Robert Jordan a member of, 8. 
294)1; mentioned, 3. 274, 276; 5. 
xxii; 8. 110, llhi, 112n; 9. 23h, 

352, 355; see also English Church 
and Episcopal Church. 

of Portland, 5. lii ; see First Parish 
of Portland. 

Churches, first in Maine, 5. liv. 

Churchill, , of Carritunk, 4. 399. 

Churchill's river, 6. 267. 

Churchman, John, 7. 221. 

Church point, 8. 143. 

Chute, Dr. J. A., his definition of Pa- 
pooduck, I. 20711 ; visited the Del- 
awares, 4. 115; facts communi- 
cated by, 4. ll'">. 116, 192. 

Cilley, the Hon. Jonathan, graduated 
from Bowdoin College, 6. 79; set- 
tled at Thomaston, 6. 79; held 
public office, 6. 79; challenged by 
Graves 6. 79-80; killed, 6. 80; 
Henry Clay a supposed agent in 
his death, 6. 80-81. 

Cinnamon, said to grow in Maine, 5. 

353, 360. 

Cinque Chaques 5. 2\9n. 

Civil power above the military power, 
7. 158. 

Claghorn, , of New Vineyard, 4. 

343. 

Clam cove, 4. 326. 
pudding pond, 4. 272. 

Clapboard islands, to be included in 
Falmouth, 1.IO6, 145, 387; granted 
to Mrs. Munjoy, i. 146; occupied 
by Thomas Drake, i. 146; claimed 
by Mass., 3. ^'Sn; mentioned, i. 
101, 111, 202. 

Clapp, the Hon. Ebenezer, 6. 366; 
birth of, 6. 16n\ studied law, 6. 
76, 16n; graduated from Harvard 
College, 6. 76; practised in Nan- 
tucket and Bath, 6- 76; held pub- 
lic office, 6. 76; married Sarah 
Winslow, 6. 16n; death of, 6. 76, 
76n, 355. 
Roger, his Memorial cited, 5. 
197?i, 206n; his edition of Mather's 
Journal cited, 5. 253. 
Lieut. Roger, 7. l^Sn. 

Clare, 8, 143. 
Count of, 6. 331. 

Claremont, 6. 68. 

Clarendon, 9. 159. 
Edward Hyde, B^arl of, a prominent 
figVire in public affairs, 7. 140-141 ; 
sprang from the , middle to the 
highest rank, 7. 141-142; a fol- 
lowe;r of the Stuarts, 7. 142; his 
daughter the wife of James 11, 
7, 143, 14471 ; interested in Amer- 



56 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Clarendon, Earl of — continaed. 

ican affairs, 7. 148, 144n, 147-148; 
purchased Stirling's rights for the 
Buke of York, 7. 143, 144; instru- 
mental in the marriage of Charles 
II, 7. 145w; corresponded with 
Samuel Maverick, 7. 147, 147?i; 
mentioned, 5. 2. 

Papers, the, 7. 147n, 149?i-150n. 

Clark, Capt. , of Boston, g, 40n. 

Clark's point, land at granted to 
Mitton, I. 115; Thomas Brackett 
lived at, i. 154, 220; home of 
Thaddeus Clark, i. 308; 6. 131; 
home of Geo. Cleeves, 6. 131. 
Clarice, Alice, her claim at Sheepscot, 
2. 2:1.^. 

Anna, married William Hasty, jr., 3. 
211. 
Deborah, 2. 179- 

Edward, signed the petition to 
Cromwell, i. 395. 

Elizaheth, daughter of Thaddeus,. 
married Edward Tyng, i. 248, 308, 
315; 6. 131. 

Elizabeth, wife of Thaddeus, grand- 
daughter of Cleeves, i. 150, 194; 
daughter of Michael Mitton, i. 
150, 194; testimony of, i- 150. 

Ephraim, 7. 219. 

family, 4. 13; 6.133. 

Hannah, 2. 165. 

Isaac, inn-holder at Hallowell, 7.276. 

Isaac, son of Thaddeus, r. 308; lived 
at Framingham, i.308; his widow 
died in Boston, i . 308. 

Jacob, claimed land at Sheepscot, 2. 
235; married Alice Davis, i. 237; 
sold land to Charles Frost, 2. 237; 
controversy with the Kennebec 
Purchasers, 2. 276. 

the Kev. James Freeman, 8. 441. 

Jno., 4. 313, 369. 

John, paid tax to Falmouth, 1.323. 

John, married Capen, 8. 153. 

Jonas, found the latitude of the 
Merrimac river, i. 101; to find the 
eastern boundary of Maine, i. 202. 

Jonas, proprietor at Pemaquid, 5. 
302. 

the Hon. Jonas, son of the Jlev. 
Jonas, 6.366; married Sarah Watts, 
6.366; his daughter married the 
Hon. Joseph Dane, 6. 366. 

the Rev. Jonas, of Lexington, 6. 

the Pev. J. S., his James 11 cited, 
7. 137w, 138, 138n, 144w. 

Louis Gaylord, 8. 476. 

Dr. Parker, 2. 165. 

Samuel, proprietor at Pemaquid, 5. 
302. 
Clarke, Thaddeus, married Elizabeth 
Mitton, I. 124, 155, 157, 260, 308; 
6. 131 ; but little known concern- 
ing him, I. 156; resided at Fal- 



mouth, I. 180n, 216; to ascertain 
the eastern boundary of Maine, i* 
202; an ensign, i.24l, 245; select- 
man for Falmouth, i. 245, 324; 
his daughter married Edward 
Tyng, I. 248; 6. leSl; conveyed 
land to Tyng, i. 248; his mother- 
in-law lived with him, i. 248; 
trustee for Falmouth, i. 271, 554, 
555; commissioner for Andross, 

I. 282; consulted with Major 
Church, I. 296; killed, i.301; 7. 
60; lived in Ireland, 1.308; a man 
of enterprise, i. 308; of a limited 
education, i. 308; lived on the 
Keck, 1.308,320; children of, i. 

^ 308; signed the petition to Charles 

II, I. 402; named Clark's point, 
6, 131; mentioned, i. 253, 294, 
302, 310. 

Thomas, purchased part of Ees- 
keagan island, 2. 191, 192; had a 
fort at Arrowsic, 2. 192 ; his daugh- 
ter married John Watts, 2. 201; 
his title faulty, 8.207n; mentioned, 
2.202; 7. 153n. 

Major Thomas, 3. 330; 5. 249- 

Timothy, 4. 228. 

the Eev. William, pastor at Wells, 
1.349/1. 

, married Ann Powell, 7 .234- 

Miss , taken to Quebec, 7. 60. 

Prof. , 6. 410. 

Clarkson, Capt- , commander of 

the Broad Bay, i. 457, 468, 469. 
Claverhouse, John Graham of, com- 
pared to Andros, 5. 265; men- 
tioned, 6. 8. 
Claw-boards, exported, i. 551. 
Clay cove, description of the lots near, 
I. 246; owners of the lots, i. 246; 
Mary Munjoy released Iier rights 
in, 1.255; Indian name of, 6. 109n; 
mentioned, i. 62, 64?i, 116, 127, 
242, 246, 315. 

Henry, supposed agent in the duel 
between Cilley and Graves, 6. 80- 
81; mentioned, 5. xxxvii; 7. 463, 
464, 469; 8. 33. 34, 35, 37, 40, 44, 
67, 71, 352, 353, 354?i, 362, 366, 423, 
424, 425, 428, 430. 

John, 4. 388. 

Jonas, wife of, accused of inconti- 
nency, i. 372. 

pits, 3. 222; granted to Matthew 
Libby, 3. 130, 

Richard, 4. 388. 
Cleanley, Thomas, in the garrison at 
Black Point, i. 227n. 

Cleaveland, Dr. , father of Prof. 

Parker, 6. 384-385; married Eliza- 
beth Jackman, 6. 385. 

the Rev. Eben, 4. 322. 

Ebenezer, expelled from college, 6. 
383. 

the Rev. John, expelled from col- * 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



57 



lege, 6. 383 ; licensed to preach, 6. 
384; settled in Chebacco, 6. 384; 
characteristics of, 6. 384; in the 
war of the Revolution, 6. 384; 
grandfather of Prof. John, 6. 383, 
384. 

the Rev. John of North Wi'entham, 
6. 395. 

the Rev. J. P., 6. 379, 394n, 406. 

Nehemiah, 6. 379, 405. 

Prof. Parker, his death announced, 
6. 355; eulogy to be provided, 6. 
355; ancestry of, 6. 383, 384; birth 
of, 6. 382, 385-386; character of 
his father and grandfather, 6. 333, 
384, 385; baptised, 6. 386; sent to 
Dumraer Academy, 6. 386; studies 
when a boy, 6. 386-387 ; in college, 
6. 387; consulted witli Drs. Parish 
and Smith, 6. 388-389; behavior 
when in college, 6. 387, 389-390; 
graduated, 6. 390; a teacher, 6. 
390-391 ; intended to study law, 6. 
391-392; his mind in doubt, 6. 
392-393: again consulted Dr. Par- 
ish, 6. 393; chose the ministry, 6. 
394, 394n; letter from Dr. Smith, 
6.395; taught at Dummer Acad- 
emy, 6. 395; tutor at Harvard, 6. 
395; entered upon new duties, 6. 
395-396; considered the ministry 
and law, 6. 396-397 ; interested in 
general literature, 6. 399; con- 
ducted the Literary Miscellany, 6. 
399 ; gave up the idea of the min- 
istry, 6. 399-400 ; in favor of law, 
6. 400; thought of settling in 
Maine, 6. 400-401 ; appointed to a 
professorship in Bowdoin College, 
6.401,402; married, 6. 402; still 
enjoyed general literature, 6. 403; 
lectured on Natural Science, 6. 
403-404; scientific papers pub- 
lished by, 6. 404; became inter- 
ested in mineralogy, 6. 404-405 ; a 
student, 6.405-407; published his 
Treatise on Mineralogy and Geol- 
ogy, 6. 408; opinions of the work, 
6. 410-411; second and third edit- 
ions published, 6. 411 ; honors con- 
ferred upon, 6. 411, 412; corres- 
ponded with foreign savans, 6. 
411-412; offered professorships in 
other colleges, 6. 412; his reputa- 
tion as a lecturer, 6. 412-413, 415- 
416; secretary of the medical fac- 
ulty, 6. 413-414; his untiring dili- 
gence, 6.414-415, 417-418; math- 
ematics supplanted. 6. 416-417; 
reason of his success as a teacher, 
6. 418-419; his personal character, 
6. 420-421 ; address on Intemper- 
ance, 6. 421 ; interested in the fire 
department, 6. 421-422 ; afraid of 
lightening and the cause, 6. 422, 
423; his '* cautionary bump/' 6, 



422-423; a man of method, 6. 424- 
425 ; his moral character, 6. 426- 
429; closing days, 6. 429-431; 
death of, 6. 355, 356, 382, 431; 
funeral of, 6. 431-432; mentioned, 
6. 356, 364, 366, 367, 373, 374; 7. 
397, 408; 8. 176, 509; his mineral- 
ogy cited, I. 326; letter from Ste- 
phen Thatcher, 6. 95-96 ; Eulogy 
by Leonard Woods, 6. 375-432; 
Resolutions of the Bowdoin 
Alumni, 6. 433-435; Resolutions 
of the Maine Historical Society, 
6. 377-378. 

the Rev. Dr. , 6. 429. 

, of Anson, 4. 397. 

Cleaves, Thomas, fisherman, 2. 236; 
lived at Cape Newagen, 2. 236; 
land granted to, 2. 236-237. 
see Cleeves. 
Cleeves Elizabeth, daughter of Geo., 
married Michael Mitton, i. 66, 
157, 194; 6, 131. 
George, established on the Spur- 
wink, I. 46, 52, 54, 61, 193, 533; 
ejec+ed by John Winter, i. 46, 53, 
55, 58, 60, 61-62, 66; laid the 
foundation of Portland, i. 46, 59, 
60, 316n; 6. 131; his claims rested 
upon a purchase from Bradshaw, 
I. 4:Sn; declaration agaist Winter, 
I. 48w, 71, 132, 533; brought an 
action against Winter, i. 53, 54; 
date of his settlement fixed, i. 54; 
a native of Plymouth, England, i. 
59, 19471 ; erected a house, i. 59, 
62, 63w, 254; received a lease from 
Gorges, i. 61, 67, 145, 543-544; 
conveyed land to John Phillips, 
I. 62, 119, 315; description of his 
property, i. 62; managed land 
speculations, i. 63; details of his 
life lost, I. 64; George Taylor 
lived with, i. 64ti; a partner with 
Tucker, i. 64w, 533, 548; interested 
in political affairs, i. 64n; in Eng- 
land, I. 65, 90, 99, 115, 117; 3. 40; 
acquired a title from Mass., i. 65; 
deed to him and Tucker, i. 65; 
extent of grant, i . 65-66 ; received 
a further commission, i. 66; leased 
land to Michael Mitton, i. 66, 67, 
115, 123, 148, 155, 206; his daugh- 
ter married Mitton, i. 66, 115, 131, 
132, 148, 157, 194, 260; arrived in 
America, i. 66; brought a com- 
mission to Gov. Winthrop, i. 66, 
91; acted as governor, i. 67, 90, 
97; commissioned to search for 
Lake Iroquois, i. 67; I'eceived a 
grant from the Earl of Sterling, i. 
67; his character, i. 67, 138-139, 
143, 187, 193, 544; 9. 310, 312; 
lived with Tucker, i . 67-68 ; started 
a settlement on the Presumpscot, 
I. 68; witnessed Vine's deed to 



58 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Cleeves, George— continued. 

Macworth, i. 69; Eobert Sankey 
his provost marshall, i. 69n; ac- 
tion in court in his favor, i. 70-71 ; 
sued by Winter for slander, i . 73 ; 
settled the suit by arbitration, i. 
74; Godfrey brought action 
against, i. 74-75, 366; g. 309; gave 
grants to Geo. Lewis, i. 75, 115, 
118; to Thomas Wise, i. 75, 115; 
to Mosier, i. 75, 115; fined for 
rash speeches, i. 84; quarreled 
vs^ith Trelawney, i. 90; addressed 
himself to Rigby, i . 90 ; appointed 
deputy, I. 90; 3. 32, 40; his Fal- 
mouth title confirmed, i. 90; at- 
tacked Vines, i. 91, 546; 3- 39 
guilty of forgery, i. 91, 144; 3. 40 
deputy of Ligonia, i. 91; 3. 32 
appealed to Mass., i. 91; 3. 39 
called a court in opposition to 
Vines, i. 91; proposed arbitration, 
I. 92; offered to enter the con- 
federacy, 1.92; his party triumph- 
ant in England, i. 92; letter of 
distress, 1.93-94; threatened with 
violence, i. 95, 549; second letter 
of distress, i. 95; in Boston, i. 95, 
102-103; proposed arbitration, i. 
95; verdict not satisfactory, i. 96; 
the British commissioners declare 
in his favor, i. 96; 3.39; assumed 
undisputed sway and gave grants 
as the agent of Rigby, i. 97, 115, 
127, 145, 148,547; 3-32,40; called 
deputy president, i. 97n, 99, 146, 
535, 541; 3. 22; opposed the en- 
croachment of Mass., I. 102; in 
Boston as agent for Ligonia, i. 
102-103; disregarded court sum- 
mons, I. 104; submitted to Mass., 
1. 105, 170, 386, 546; commissioner, 
I. 106, 138, 159, 163, 166, 388, 546; 
3. 23; sold land to Joseph Phippen, 
1. 113; to John Lewis, i. 113, 117; 
to Atwell, 1. 114; his controversies 
caused him to neglect his own 
land, 1. 115; consideration received 
fromMitton, 1.II6; Mitton's deeds 
not recorded, 1. 116, 155; conveyed 
land to Bartlett, i. 116; second 
grant from Rigby, 1. 117; the same 
conveyed to Tucker, 1. 117; grants 
to James Andrews, i. 117; Ann 
Mitton, I. 117, 154, 204-205; to 
Durham, i. 121; Rider, i. 121; 
Ingersoll, i. 121-122; Thomas 
Skellings, i. 122, 195; consider- 
ations received, i. 122; conveyed 
land to Nathaniel Mitton, i. 123; 
6. 131; sold Hog island to Thomas 
Kimball, 1. 124, 150; sold his house, 
1. 124, 153; conveyed land to Hope 
Allen, I. 124, 241; 6.132; to Nich- 
olas Bartlett, i. 127; his auto- 
graph, I. 125, 126, 544; his best 



land sold, 1. 128; quarreled with 
Eobert Jordan, i. 130, 131, 132; 
quarreled with Mitton, i. 131; 
Mitton a witness against, i. 132; 
brought action against Jordan, i. 
132; judgment against, i. 133; 
petition to the general court, i. 
133-134; second appeal, i. 134- 
137; result unknown, i. 137; his 
fortunes at a low ebb, i. 138; 
'brought an action against Small 
and Phillips, i. 138; unsiistained, 
I. 138; sued by Elbridge, i. 138; 
verdict against, i. 138; paid dam- 
ages to Elbridge, 5. 230; his con- 
troversies an liinderance to the 
people, I. 140-141, 187; 9. 312; 
died, I. 142, 192-193; Falmouth 
to exercise ownership over his 
lands, I. 143; terms upon which 
he lived with Mis neighbors, i. 
143; explanation concerning his 
grants, i. 145; conveyed Little 
Chebeag to Walter Merry, i. 146; 
Elizabeth Clarke his sjranddaugh- 
ter, 1. 150; the first deputy chosen, 
I. 163; never a court associate, i. 
163; letter of cited, i. 167-168; 
friendly to Mass., i. 170, 546; wit 
ness against Jordan, 1. 172; signed 
petition to the king, 1. 180; bound 
to keep the peace, i. 187: last ap- 
pearance of his name on the rec- 
ords, I. 192; exact date of his 
death unknown, i. 193; date of 
his wife's death unknown, i. 194; 
land conveyed to Munjoy, i. 194; 
his prosperity, i. 194; land con- 
veyed to Martin and Atwell, i. 
207; Elizabeth Tyng his grand- 
daughter, I. 315; gave the grant 
to Wells, I. 354; aathorized Baker 
and Knight to carry out his work, 
I. 356; grant to John Saunders, 
I. 357; gathered testimony con- 
cerning Robert Nash, i. 382; his 
deposition given in full, i . 382-383 ; 
called an interloper, i . 533 ; one of 
the committee on Jordan's petit- 
ion, I. 535, 538, 540, 541 ; his inden- 
ture with Gorges, i. 543-544; per- 
suaded Rigby to buy the Plough 
Patent, i . 546 ; his false reports con- 
cerning Gorges, 5. 46 ; refused to 
pay court expenses, i . 546 ; in the 
Star Chamber, i. 546; dissolved 
partnership with Tucker, i. 548; 
his right to hold a court denied, 
I. 548; threatened by Vines, i. 
548; ordered to submit to Gorges, 
I. 548; called a court, i. 547; laid 
an injunction of Jordan, i. 549; 
signed petition to Mass. general 
court, I. 550; attempted to de- 
prive the Blue Point patentees of 
their rights, 3. 22 ; grant to Watts, 



IKDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



59 



3.22; presided at the Assembly, 
3. 32, 40; complained of his asso- 
ciates, 3. 42; conveyed land to A. 
Jocelyn, 3. 68; to Richard Moore, 
3.77; witnessed Cammock's deed 
to Jocelyn, 3. 230; mentioned, i. 
70, 72, 76, 112, 114, 120, 134, 383, 
384. 546; 3. 15; 9-^63. 
Joan, wife of George, i. 116; ex- 
ecuted the deed of sale of the 
Cleeves' homestead, i. 124; sig- 
nature of, I. 125; conveyed land 
to Brackett, 1. 192; her great age, 
1. 193 ; date of her death unknown, 
I. 194. 
Cleeves' neck, former name of Port- 
land, I. 59n. 
Cleeves vs. Winter, Cleeves ejected by 
Winter, i. 46; basis of Cleeves' 
claim, I. 48^; date of Cleeves' 
settlement, i . 52n ; Cleeves brought 
action against Winter, i. 53, 54; 
verdict, i. 54, 70-71; Cleeves 
ordered to leave, i. 60; Winter 
charged with irregularities, i. 71; 
details of the case, i. 71-72; to be 
settled by arbitration, i. 74; 
award, i. 74; the case used as a 
basis of the action against Jordan, 
I. 132; Jordan as referee, i. 234w; 
Cleeves called an interlopper, i. 
533; judgment given in full, i. 
541; answer of Winter, i. 542; 
cited, 3. 15. 
Clemens, William, i. 243, 246, 247. 
Clements, Richard, surveyor under 
Andros, i. 275; opposed by Rob- 
ert Lawrence, i. 275; ordered to 
find the best place for wood, i. 
279; surveyed land for Sylvanus 
Davis, I. 282. 
Sarah, married the Rev. William 
Fessenden, 4. 289n. 
Cleverly, Thomas, 3. 110; hved at 

Black Point, 3. 83. 
Clewer, 2. 257, 257n, 263, 264. 
Cleworth, 2. 257n. 

Clifford, David, served in the Conti- 
nental Army, 2. 214. 
tihe Hon. •Nathan, ancestry of, 9. 
239; birth, 9. 239; education of, 
9. 239-240; studied law, 9. 240; 
, admitted to the bar, 9. 240 ; moved 
to Maine, 9. 240 ; opened an office 
in Newfield, 9. 238, 240; a demo- 
crat, 9. 240, 256; member of the 
legislature, 9- 238, 240-241 ; mem- 
ber of Congress, 9. 241-242; At- 
torney General, 9. 243; in the 
Cabinet, 9. 243-244 ; commissioner 
to Mexico, 9. 244, 247 ; moved to 
Portland, 9. 247; justice of the 
Supreme Court, 9. 247; value of 
his reports, 9. 249-250; his idea of 
the Constitution and law, 9. 251- 
252; enjoyed legal investigation, 



9. 252 ; his power of application, 
9. 253-254 ; his days shortened by 
his devotion to duty, 9. 254-255; 
an example for the young, 9. 255 ; 
president of the Electorial Com- 
mission, 9. 256; his character, 9. 
249, 250, 256, 257; mentioned, 8. 
174 ; Memoir of James Ware Brad- 
bury, 9. 235-257. 
William H., son of the Hon. Nathan, 
9. 249; edited his father's reports, 
9. 249. 
James, i. 503, 510, 515. 
Clinton, De Witt, 2. 11a; 5. xl; 8. 373. 
Sir Henry, 7. 203. 

Maine, 4. 316, 317, 348, 349, 350, 370, 
371, 373, 383. 
Cloyes, Abigail, daughter of John, 
married Jenkin Williams, i. 156, 
157. 
Abigail, wife uf Nathaniel, i. 190n. 
Abigail, wife of John, i. 156. 
Cloyes family, i. lOOn. 

George, i. 157; son of Thomas, i. 

308; lived at Salem, i. 308. 
Hannah, daughter of Thomas, i. 

157, 308. 
Jane, witnessed the deed to George 

Munjoy, i. 553. 
John, petitioned to the general 
court, I. 144; moved to Water- 
town, I. 156; married twice, i. 
156; his children, i. 156, 189, 205, 
260, 308; signed petition to the 
king, I. 180; a witness against 
Neale, i. 200; father of Thomas, 
I. 205, 308; lived at Falmouth, i. 
215; conveyed land to his son 
Thomas, i. 259; probably moved 
to Falmouth after the war, i. 260; 
land belonging to conveyed to 
Peter Housing, i . 310n ; mentioned, 
I. 155. 
John, jr., his wife a tale-bearer, i. 
189; did not return to Falmouth 
after the Indian war, i. 250; land 
conveyed to, i. 260; a son of 
John, I. 260; mentioned, i. 156, 
216. 
Julian, wife of John, guilty of tale- 
bearing, I. 189; birth of, i. 190n; 
her child accused of stealing, i. 
190; mentioned, 1. 156, 308. 
Nathaniel, son of first John, i. 260; 
land conveyed to, i. 260; accused 
of misbehavior, i. 189-190; Abi- 
gail his second wife, i. 190n; men- 
tioned, I. 156, 2ri6. 
Peter, i. 156; lived at Wells, i. 260. 
Sarah, married Peter Housing, i. 
156; figured in the Salem witch- 
craft, 1. 190n, 308. 
Susannah, wife of Thomas conveyed 
land to Isaac and John Jones, i. 
259. 
Thomas, son of John, killed by the 



60 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Cloyes, Thomas —continued. 

Indians, 1. 157, 302;a'bS e evidence 
against Nathaniel Cloyes and 
Abigail Williams, i. 189; settled 
near Capisic, i. 205, 216, 252; pur- 
chased land of Munjoy, i. 205, 
255 : received land from his father, 
1.259,310; conveyed land to Isaac 
and John Jones, i. 259; married 
Susannah Lewis, i. 261, 808; chil- 
dren of, I. 308; lived on Middle 
street, i. 308; sold land to John 
Gustin, I. 310; lived on the N'eck, 
I. 320; fined for card-playing, i. 
378; mentioned, i. 156, 259, 308, 
310n. 
Thomas jr., son of Thomas, i. 157, 
308; died in Boston without issue, 
I. 308. 

Coale, James, 2. 194. 

Coasting trade, the, i. 278. 
voyage of Champlain to Maine, 7. 
243-266. 

Coatson, John, 4. 56. 

Cobb, Gen. David, attorney for William 
Bingham, 7. 356; his daughter 
married John Black, 7. 359 ; men- 
tioned, 7. 284; 8. 167; moved to 
Maine, 6. 61n; death of, 6. 6 In; his 
daughter married S.S.Wilde, 6.61n. 
Matthew, 5. lii. 
Samuel, 4. 164, 166. 

Cobbasecontee, signification of , 8. 205%. 
pond, 4. 104, 107, 109; see Cobbassee 
Contee waters. 

Cobbasseecontee, Paul Cofiin at 4. 
305, 306; now Gardiner, 4., 305n; 
mentioned, 4. 355. 

Cobbasseecontee waters, a boundary 
of the grant to the Plymouth col- 
ony, I. 44; 2. 203, 275, 280; 8. 204, 
341; a name given only to the 
mouth of the Kennebec, 4. 113, 
113-114; meaning of, 4. 113, 114, 
305, 306; 8. 205n; the river of, 4. 
305, 350; 7. 198, 423. 

Cobbisecontee, the, a boundary of the 
Plymouth colony grant, i. 44; see 
Cobbasecontee and Cobbasse Con- 
tee waters. 

Cobequitte, 8. 142. 

Cobireconteague river, 8. 207. 

Cob-money, 6. 119, 121. 

Cobscook, river, 8. 7, 8, 9. 

Coburn, Sally, 4. 354. 
Major , of Pittston, 4. 354. 

Cochecho, now Doyer, 2. 79 ; settlement 
at. 2. 79; mentioned, 3. 439. 

Cochineal, said to be found in Maine, 
5. 353,360. 

Cochran, Jacob, 3. 165. 

Cocke, John, in the garrison at Black 

Point, I. 227n; lived at Black 

' Point, 3. 88 ; deposition of, 5. 

237ri; mentioned, 3. 110. 
John of Hadley, 4. 293. 



William, a juror, i. 188; lived at 
Casco bay, i. 2B6n. 

see also Cooke. 
Cockell, 3. 23. 

Cockran, , of ISTew Sharon, 4. 306. 

Cock Robin, a nickname given to a 
member of the Jordan family, i. 
233n. ^ 

Codde, derivation of, 6. 301, 301n. 
Codfish, called Baccaloas, 2. 16a; 
caught by Popham's colonists, 3. 
292; in abundance, 3. 295; pre- 
sented to Cecil, 5. 145; secured 
the good will of the government, 
5. 145; a figure of one in the Mass. 
state house, 5. 145; in Pemaquid 
bay, 5. 153; excited the cupidity 
of Europe, 7. 296 ; on the seal of 
the Plymouth Company, 7. 219n ; 
mentioned, 3. 97. 
Codfishing profitable in Acadia, 6. 282. 
Codman, Charles R., 3. 246. 

the Rev. John, 5. li. 

Randolph, 8. 173. 

Randolph A. L., 8. 389, 457. 

Richard, received land of Dr. Hale, 
6. 132; conveyed the same to Rob- 
inson and Reed,. 6. 132. 

Coe, Elizabeth, married , Tucker, 

I. 154. 

Isaac, I. 154. 

John, moved to Rhode Island, i. 
154n. 

John 2d, lived in Little Compton, i. 
IHn. 

Dr. John, i. 154n. 

Martha, married Farnum, i. 

154. 

Matthew, received land of Richard 
Tucker, 1. 122; his daughter mar- 
ried Thomas Wakeley, i. 122-123, 
153; came to Falmouth, i. 153; 
death of, i. 154; children of, i. 
154, 312; his family in Falmouth, 
I. 216. 
Coifin, Abigail, 4. 249n. 

Anna, 4. 239. 

Charles, his account of The Narra- 
gansett Townships, 2^ 131-150. 

Charles, son of Col. Joseph, 4. 241 ; 
birth of, 4. 241; married Hepsibah 
Carnes, 4. 241; graduated from 
Harvard College, 4. 241 ; a physi- 
cian, 4. 241 ; died at Newbury, 4. 
241. 

Charles, son of the Rev. Paul, 4. 
249n; married Mary Davenport, 
4. 249n; to enter Dartmouth Col- 
lege, 4. 293; mentioned, 4. 235, 
248w, 258?i. 

Dr. Charles, teacher at Gorham 
Academy, 8. 168. 

Capt. David, son of Col. Joseph, 4. 
241; birth of. 4. 241; married 
Mary Pike, 4. 241 ; lost at sea, 4. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



61 



241; mentioned, 4. 261, 265, 333, 
365, 395, 400. 

David, son of Paul, 4. 2i9n; mar- 
ried Eliza Little, 4. 249n. 
Deborah, daughter of Peter, 4. 239. 
Dorcas, daughter of the Rev. Paul, 
4. 249n; married Dr. Brewster, 4. 
249n. 
the Rev. Ebenezer, 4. 332. 
Elizabeth, 1st. daughter of the Rev. 

Paul, 4. 249n. 
Elizabeth, 2d, daughter of the Rev. 
Paul, 4, 249n; married Nathaniel 
Gould, 4. 249n. 
Elizabeth, daughter of Tristram, 4. 

240. 
Enoch, son of Col. Joseph, 4. 241; 

his birth and death, 4. 241. 
Enoch of Epping, 4. 299. 
Capt. Enoch, his tavern sign, 4. 310; 

wrecked at Plymouth, 4. 310. 
Eunice, daughter of Peter, 4. 239- 

240; came to America, 4. 240. 
family, 4. 235 ; 5. lix. 
George W., 8. 80, 73, 
homestead, 4. 241. 
James of Pepperellboro, 4. 299. 
James, son of Tristram, 4. 240; went 

to Nantucket, 4. 240. 
Joan, daughter of Peter, 4. 239. 
Joan, wife of Nicholas, 4. 239. 
Joan, wife of Peter, 4. 239. 
John, son of Nicholas, 4. 239. 
John, son of Peter, 4. 240. 
John, son of Tristram, 4. 240; moved 

to Nantucket, 4. 240. 
John Gorham, son of the Rev. Paul, 

4, 249n; married Elizabeth Rice, 

4. 249w. 
John Pine, 4. 239. 

Col. Joseph, a son of the Hon. Na- 
thaniel, 4. 241; married Margaret 

Morss, 4. 241; died in Newbury, 

4. 241 ; children of, 4. 241 ; com- 
mittee for Narragansett owners, 

2. 138, 242n. 
Joshua, son of Col. Joseph, 4. 241; 

married Sarah Bartlett, 4. 241; 

date of his birth and death, 4. 

241 ; lived at Newbury, 4. 241 
Joshua, his History of Newbury 

cited, 3. 83n, 220n, 221n, 235, 239n, 

240^1, 241. 
Joshua of Rockingham county, i. 

64n. 
Mary, daughter of Col. Joseph, 4. 

241; birth and death of, 4. 241. 
Mary, daughter of the Rev. Paul, 4. 

249^. 
Mary, daughter of Peter, 4. 239-240; 

came to America, 4. 240. 
Mary, daughter of Tristram, 4. 240; 

date of her birth, 4. 240; moved 

to Nantucket, 4. 240. 
Nathaniel, 4. 164, 166. 
Dr. Nathaniel, 5. xviii, lli, 445, 



Nathaniel, son of James, 4. 299. 
Nathaniel, son of Paul, 4. 250n. 
the Hon. Nathaniel, son of Tristram 
2d, 4. 241 ; birth of, 4. 241 ; mar- 
ried Sarah Dole, 4. 241; lived in 
Newbury, 4. 241 ; death of, 4. 241 ; 
children of, 4. 241. 
Nicholas, date of his will, 4. 239; 

children of, 4. 239. 
the Rev. Paul, Memoir of by Cyrus 
Woodman, 4. 235-259 ; son of Col. 
Joseph, 4. 241 ; birth of, 4. 241 ; 
married Mary Gorham, 4. 241, 
241 n, 249; of literary tastes, 4. 
242, 243-244, 255; in college, 4. 
241; a school teacher, 4. 242, 261; 
preached in Buxton, 4. 242, 242n, 
243; 7. 219, 272; paid by the Nar- 
ragansett proprietors, 4. 242 ; the 
author of over one thousand ser- 
mons, 4. 242n; ordained. 4. 243- 
244 ; named Buxton, 4. 245 ; law- 
suit to obtain his salary, 4. 245; 
letter to his parish, 4. 245-247; 
children of, 4. 249?i-250/i, 250; vis- 
ited Fryeburg, 4. 250; at Brom- 
field, 4. 250; at first not in favor 
of the Revolution, 4. 250; declined 
the parish of Newbury, 4. 250-251 ; 
colleague appointed, 4. 251; an 
Armenian or Calvinist, 4. 251-252; 
his religious opinions, 4. 252-254; 
familiar with the classics, 4. 255; 
friend of Dr. Fessenden, 4. 255; 
his contemporaries, 4. 255-256; 
character, 4. 256, 258; title con- 
ferred upon, 4. 256; his physique, 
4. 256; death of, 4. 256-257; an 
observer of many changes, 4. 257- 
258; funeral of , 4. 259 ; mentioned, 
2. 141, 142; 4. 28171, 284^, 287n; 8. 
180 ; Journal of a Tour from Wells 
to the Connecticut river, 4. 261- 
266; Tour to Rhode Island, 4. 
267-274; Tour from Buxton to 
Piggwackett, 4. 275-292; Remarks 
on the Fight at Piggwackett, 4. 
290-292; Tour to Hanover, 4. 293- 
299; A Missionarv Tour, 4. 301- * 
405. 

Paul, son of the Rev. Paul, 4. 249. 

Peleg, 2. 291. 

Peter, son of Nicholas, 4. 239; date 
of his will, 4. 239; children of, 4. 
239-240. 

Peter, son of Tristram, 4. 240. 

Peter, cousin of Paul, 4. 297. 

Rebecca, daughter of the Rev. Paul, 
4. 250/1 ; married Pelatiah Harmon, 
4. 250^. 

Sarah, cousin of the Rev. Paul, mar- 
ried Knight, 4. 297. 

Sarah, daugter of Col. Joseph, 4. 
241; birth, 4. 241; married the 
Rev. Daniel Little, 4. 241 ; death, 
4. 241. 



62 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Coffin, Sarah, daughter of the Rev. 
Paul, 4. 249; married Dr. Ezra 
Dean, 4. 249n. 
Stephen, son of the Rev. Paul, 4. 
249n, 299 ; married Sarah Reed, 4. 
249«. 
Stephen, son of Tristram, 4. 240; 
date of hio birth, 4. 240; moved 
to Nantucket, 4. 240. 
Susanna, daughter of Col. Joseph, 
4. 241; married James Boyd, 4. 
241; her descendents, 4. 241; 
death of, 4. 241. 
Susanna, daughter of the Rev. Paul, 
4. 250w ; married Joseph Woodman, 
4. 250/1. 
Tristram, son of Nicholas, 4. 239. 
Tristram, son of Peter, 4. 239, 240; 
came to America, 4. 240; married 
Dianis Stevens, 4. 240; children of, 
4. 240; lived at Salisbury, Haverhill 
and Newbury, 4. 240; commis- 
sioner, 4. 240; moved to Nantucket, 
4. 240; left England on account of 
Cromwell, 4. 240; dates of his 
birth and death, 4. 240. 
Tristram, son of Tristram, 4. 240; 
birth of, 4. 240; married Judith 
Somerby, 4. 240; built a house at 
Newbury, 4. 240; children of, 4. 
241. 
William, of Concord, 4. 298. 

Di>. ., of Falmouth, 3. 222. 

the Rev. , of Kingston, 4. 265, 

267. 
Coffyn, see Coffin. 

Cogaiivesco, visited Levett, 2. ST; men- 
tioned, 2. 88, 92. 

Coggeshall, Deacon , of Newport, 

4. 269- 
Cogswell, Charles M., married Marga- 
ret Russell, 2. 165. 
John, arrived at Pemaquid, 5. 217- 
218; moved to Ipswich, 5. 218; 
his family of worth, 5. 218. 
Jonathan, i. 11. 
the Rev. Jonathan, 6. 358. 
Dr. Wilham, 8. 413. 

the Rev. , of Saco, 5. xixn. 

Cohasset, home of John Jacob, i. 

246/1 ; History of cited, i. 246. 
Cohorn, Baron, 8. 245 /i. 
Masters, 8. 275, 280; described, 8. 
245n. 
Coin, origin of the word, 6. 147. 
Coinage of Elizabeth, pure, 6. 130; of 
copper, 6. 130; the rose introduced, 
6. 130; American, 6. 135-137; mil- 
ling and dating introduced 6. 139, 
141; of England, 6.149-151; the 
history of, 6. 147-149. 
Coins, /ownc? at Portland, where found, 
6. 129,130, 134, 135; of the reign 
of Elizabeth, 6. 129-130; a six- 
pence described, 6. 130-131; titles 
of real estate where the coins 



were found, 6. 131-133; various 
ideas of who lost the coins, 6. 133- 
134, 1.35; described, 6. 134-135; 
found at Richmond'' s island, date 
of finding, 6. 129, 137; described, 
6. 139-143, 146; how found, 6. 144; 
conjectures concerning, 6. 145-146; 
mentioned, i. 43ii, 51n; see also 
Castine coins. 
Coke, Sir Edward, managed the pro- 
secution of Raleigh. 2. 25a; op- 
posed the Plymouth Company, 5. 
169; mentioned, 5. xxx; his State 
of England cited, 5. 298w. 

Mr. , 2. 87. 

Cokers, , married Robert Jordan, 

I. 234n. 
Colbert, Jean Baptiste, 7. 47. 
Colburn, Capt. Andrew, i. 468, 474, 
502. 
Reuben, 2. 286. 
William, 7. 10, 12, 13, 16, 47. 
Colby, Samuel, 4. 283w. 

, of Anson, 4. 367. 

University, 8. 170, 177. 
Colchester, 2. 145. 
Cold, a year of extreme, 6. 178. 

fever, 6. 90. 
Cole, Edward, signed the petition to 
Mass. 5. 240. 
James, signed the petition to Mass., 

5. 240. 
John, resided at Negwaset, 2. 190; 
signed petition to Mass., 5. 
240. 
John, of Buckfield, 4. 361, 390. 
Mrs. John, 4. 336. 
Judge, contributed article on Gov. 

Lincoln, i. 408. 
Nicholas, lived at Casco bay, i. 236w; 

early settler at Wells, i. 362. 
William, one of the first settlers at 
Wells, I. 362; a juror, i. 535; 
signed petition to Mass., 5. 240. 
Colerain, piisoners taken by Indians 

at, 4. 156, 264. 
Cole's islet, 4. 225. 
Colicott, see Oallicot and CoUecot. 

Colign^ Soligne, Count de, 7. 42. 

Collecot, Capt. Richard, a coaster, 3. 

318; depositioQ of, 3. 3lSn, 331- 

332 ; commissioned to hold a court, 

5. 249; mentioned, 3. 71; 5. 241. 

William, signed the petition to Mass., 

5. 240. 

Collection of papers relating to Mass. 

Bay Colony, see Hutchinson, 

Thomas. 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, 

6. 412. 

CoUens, Robert, indicted for assault, 
I. 369; partially guilty, 1.369; his 
punishment, i. 369-370. 
Collier, Sir George, 6. 102. 
James, 8. 212w. 
John, leased the paper mill at Fal- 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



63 



mouth, 3. 336 ; sold lease to Waldo 
and Westbrook, 3. 337. 
Robert, 8. 212?i. 
Collings, Abraham, lived on the Keck, 
1/320. 
Christopher, cansed his own death, 
I. 187-188; 3. 71, 80; constable for 
Scarborough, 3. 55; settled at 
Black Point, 3. 70; site of his 
house, 3. 70, 81 ; convicted of scan- 
dal, 3. 70; children did not attend 
church, 3. 70-71; his death sus- 
picious, 3. 71, 80; a successful 
farmer, 3. 72; inventory of his 
estate, 3. 73; presented for not 
paying the minister's stipend, 3. 
154; a quaker, 3. 154. 
Collins, Christopher jr., sold land to 
Joshua Scottow, 3, 72. 
Matthew, married a daughter of 
Andrew Alger jr., i. 214^; 3. 105. 
Mary, presented for non-attendance 
at church, 3. 70-71; punished for 
Quakerism, 3. 71 ; her later history 
unknown, 3. 72. 
Samuel, 5. 33, 34, 40. 
Timothy, 3. 110; in the garrison at 
Black Point, i. 227n. 
Colonial history of New York, cited, 
5. 232w. 
laws, cited, i. 163n. 
papers, cited, i. 353; see Sainsbury, 

W. Noel, 
village, a, described, 7. 303. 
Colonists at Sagadahoc might have 

kept a journal, 3. 283. 
Colonization, expense of Gorges in 
settling Maine, i. 272n; Gorges 
received no pecuniiry benefit from, 

1. 272n; of no interest to the Eng- 
lish, 2. 18a-19a; failure of Raleigh, 

2. 19a; the opening of Virginia, 2. 
19a; French unsuccessful, 2. 19a- 
20a; interest revived in England, 
2. 20a; 7. 294; the interest of 
Gorges first awakened, 2. 22a-23a; 
7. 134; cause for discouragement 
in, 7. 23a; attempt made to awak- 
en a general interest in, 7. 24a, 27a ; 
of national importance, 7. 26a-27a; 
discouragements of early settlers, 
7. 30a-31a; courage of the Pil- 
grims, 7. 31a; given up by the 
Plymouth Company, 7. 33a; re- 
port of John Smith's voyage, 7. 
35a; failure of the second attempt 
in New England, 7. 39a; the grant- 
ing of the charter to the Plymouth 
Company a great step toward, 7. 
41a; Popham intrested in, 7. 20; 
London merchants interested in, 7. 
20; Southampton interested in, 7. 
26; benefits detived from, 7. 59-00, 
63, 64; exhibited a peculiar view of 
society, 7. 269; first attempt in 
Maine, 4. 13; due to the fisheries, 



5. 145; 7. 318; not due to govern- 
ment aid, 5. 148; the Aldworths 
interested in, 5, 149, 150, 151; 
Walsingham interested in, 5. 150, 
151 ; first step toward in England, 
5. 153; the settlement at Pema- 
quid, the initial step in New Eng- 
land, toward, 5. 157; 8. 309; chief 
inducements for, 5. 173; Bacon on, 
5- 173n; that of the French in 
Maine one of the causes of her 
crimson annals, 5. 175: stimu- 
lated by the account of Wey- 
mouth's voyage, 5. 332, 333, 344; 
the death of Popham a severe 
blow to, 5. 351 ; that of New Eng- 
land might have been changed if 
Popham' s colony had settled else- 
where, 5. 352; by the French, 6. 
3; Popham' s family interested in, 
7, 318; the fur trade and fishing 
an impulse to, 7. 318; Popham's 
colonv the first to attempt it, 8. 
403; not approved of by Sully, 9. 
97 ; the Huguenots excluded from, 
9. 100; Alexander's attempts at, 
9. 100-101; La Tour entered into 
the spirit of the English, 9. 103; 
Godfrey interested in, 9.-302; John 
Smith interested in, 9. 303. 
Colorado, 9. 246. 
Colt, Caleb, 4. 55. 
Pet. r, 4. 56. 
Peter and Co., 4. 56. 
Colt's tail, the, 5. xxiii. 
Columbus, Christopher, solved the 
problem af land to the west, 2. 
13a; supposed he had reached 
Cathay, 2. 13a-14a; took an Arabic 
scholar with him, 2. 14a, 76a; re- 
sult of his last voyage, 2. 14a; his 
discoveries caused a great sensa- 
tion, 2. 14a; his ships excited the 
Indians, 5. 143; mentioned, 2.7; 
9. 3.58. 
Colvil place, i. 484. 
Comah, Richard, signed the petition 

to Cromwell, i. 394. 
Comasconty river, 8. 204; a boundary 
of the grant to Plymouth colony, 

2. 203. 

Combinations for government, i. 85, 
98, 101. 

Commission of Alexander Woodrop, 
5. 74-75. 

Commissioners and ordinances of Gor- 
ges, 1 . 73 ; duties of the early, 3. 24n ; 
for Falmouth and Scarborough, i. 
106, 159, 164, 197, 200, 267, 389^; of 
Massachusetts, i. 105, 176, 196; of 
the Duke of York, 4. 220, 224; 8. 
185; of the king, i. 173, 181, 184; 

3. 56, 57, 58, 63; report of Lincoln 
county, 5. 188n; of Maine, 5. 
233. 



64 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Commissions, for settling the Duke of 
York's title, 5. 59-60; to John 
Allen, 5. 69; to Thomas Sharp, 5. 
73; to Nicholas Manning, 5. 100- 
101; to Gyles Goddard, 5. 101-102, 
106-107; to Capt. John Palmer, 5. 
Ill; to the Justices of the Peace 
of Cromwell county, 5. 113-119; to 
John West, 5. 125-129; used by 
Mass. to hold court in Maine, 5. 
249-250. 

Common schools in Maine, 8. 179. 

Compass, the, varied one point, 3. 292. 

Complaining, a punishment for, 3. 57- 
58. 

Conant, Gov. Roger, 5. I68/1, 182, 194, 
199. 
, brought a suit against Jack- 
son, I. 6471. 

Concord, the derivation and definition 
of, 4. 193. 
Maine, 7. 357. 

Mass., the Provincial Congress met 
at, 2. 212; mentioned, •z. 281; 3. 
65n; 276; 5. li; 9.68. 
N. H., called Pennacook, 4. 278?i; 
people move from to Pryeburg, 4. 
273/1 ; captives taken at, 6. 241; 
mentioned, 2. 146; 4. 287, 289, 298, 
342; 8.450. 
the, Gosnold's ship, 7. 293,'309w. 

Condition of the religious denomina- 
tions of Maine at the close of the 
Revolution, 7. 217-229. 

Conduskeag, Indian name of Bangor, 
7. 8; mentioned, 7. 14, 15, 16, 18. 

Coney, Daniel, co-operate member of 

the Maine Historical Society, i. 

11; mentioned, 8. 161, 342; 9. 204. 

Female Academy, 8. 175. 

island, in the Kennebec river, 3. 304. 

see also Cony. 

Congin, Munjoy's property at, i. 258; 
resettled by Danforth, i, 258; for- 
mer name of, i. 258. 

Congregationalism, 6. 29. 

Congregationalists, in Bath, 2. 226, 
227; in Georgetown, 2. 220, 221; 
6.32; in Minot, 2. 127; quarreled 
with Presbyterians, 6. 13; Pres- 
byterians merged into, 6. 30; by 
their deeds justified land, 6. 187; 
at Falmouth dissatisfied, 6. 192; 
feared the spread of Quakerism, 
7. 221; at Pleasant Cove, 8. llln; 
mentioned, 4. 360, 386, 396, 397, 
401, 403; 5. lii, Iv; 6. 32, 33; 7. 
219, 431 ; 8. 497. 

Congress, Continental, the, i. 486; 2. 
149. 
of the United States, 1.337; 4. 60; 
5. xxxvii, xli, xliv; 6. 136; 7. 203; 
204, 205; 9. 170, 172, 173, 175, 200, 
202, 241, 242, 251. 
street, Portland, owners of lots 
bounded by, i. 247, 249; formerly 



Queen street, i. 247; called Main 
street, i. 316; mentioned, i. 248: 

6. 132. ^ 

the Provincial, 2. 149, 212. 
Congressional Globe, the, 8. 98. 

reports, cited, 5. 145, 145n. 
Conick Falls, mills at, 4. 350. 
Connecticut, James York moved to, 

1. 318; took possession of the 
papers of Arnold, i. 447-448; to 
furnish part of the force to fight 
the Indians, 2. 132; why the early 
attempts to settle were successful, 

2. 219, 270-271; the ideas of the 
early settlers impressed upon, 4. 
72; issued copper coinage, 6. 136; 
Massachusetts claimed jurisdic- 
tion over, 7.152, 152n; mentioned, 

7. 313, 500, 514, 524; 2. 113, 133, 
134, 158; 3. 155, 179, 320w, 416, 
441; 4. 284n; 5. xxix, xlvi, Iv^, 6; 

6. 15, 31, 32, 36, 47^, 72n, 223, 358; 

7. 161, 234, 335, 403, 437; 8, 119, 
14S, 166, 309; 9. 29, 319, 332; his- 
tory of, see Trumbull, Benjamin. 

colonial records, cited, 7. 152n. 
Historical Society, 4. 5 ; 7. 4.35 ; pub- 
lications of cited, 5. 141. 
river, a boundary of Canada town- 
ship, 2. 1357?, mentioned, 1. 513; 
4.263, 275/i, 346; 5. 396; 6. 211, 
236, 238, 239. 240n, 242, 384; 7. 
153; 8. 17, 25, 47, 48, 349; 9. 209. 

Connoyer, Madam de, anecdote of, i. 
433. 

Conolley, , found a chest of coins 

at Johnson's narrows, 6. 126. 

Conquest of Canada, see Warburton, 
George. 

Considerations on the Sovereignty, 
Independence, Trade and Fish- 
eries of New Ireland, the supposed 
author of, 7. 205. 

Constitutions of Clarendon, 7. 141m. 

Continental army, Arnold's address 
to, I. 492, 493; Arnold's letter to, 
I. 497; soldiers of Maine who 
served in, 2. 214; the Rev. John 
Cleaveland in, 6. 384; mentioned, 

3. 204. 

Controversy between Cleeves and Jor- 
dan, 1. 128, 134; between Cleeves 
and Winter, see Cleeves vs. Winter. 

Convention to draft the constitution 
of Maine, 5, xli-xlii. 

Converse, Capt. Isaac, effected a peace 
with the Indians, 5. 283; sent to 
learn the designs of the French, 
5. 284, 331 ; sent to make a treaty 
with the Indians, 5. 288; deposi- 
tion of, 5. 399; in charge of the 
Storer garrison, 7. 116; his noble 
defense, 7. 116; letter of cited, 5. 
283/1. 

Conveyancing, first in America, 5. 195; 
first in Massachusetts, 5. 195 ; first 
in Plymouth, 5. 195. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIOXS. 



65 



Conway, Indians at, 2. 90, 92; the 
Rev. Paul Coffin at, 4. 250; the 
Rev. Nathaniel Porter ordained 
at, 4. 250; formerly Pegwagget, 9. 
2I0; broad meadows of, 9. 213-214; 
mentioned, 6. 2:35. 
Cony, Daniel, 4. 7. 
Dr. Daniel, 5. xviii. 
Gov. Samuel, 8. 459. 
Sarah, Lowell, daughter of the Hon. 
Daniel, 8. 342; married Reuel 
Williams, 8. :)42. 
the Hon. Daniel, 8. 342. 

, of Campobello, 6. 103. 

see also Coney. 
Cooasiisip, definition of, 4. 191. 
Cook, Amos Jonas, teacher at Frye- 
burg Academy, 8. 163; iabroduced 
musical instruction, 8. 163-164. 

Dr. , 7. 227. 

Elder Gideon, 7. 222. 

Hezekiah, 4, 'SSQ. 

Lemuel, a Revolutionary pensioner, 

9. 159, 161. 
Robert, 5. 88- 
Cooke, Elisha, commissioner of North 
Yarmouth affairs, 2. 175; agent 
for Mass. Bay Colony, 5. 398; 9. 
26, 29, 34; mentioned, 2. 265; 3. 
380; 5. 276^, 277^. 
James, 5. 100. 

John, 3. 110; in the garrison at 
Black Point, i, 221 n. 

, 2. 260. 

Peyton, 3. 232. 
Sir Edward, 2. 34, 37. 
Cook's bridge, 4-275. 
Coolbroth, George, son of John, 3. 
209. 
John, biographical notice of, 3. 209. 
Lemuel, son of George, 3. 209; a 
centenarian, 3. 209, 
Coole, Nich., signed the petition to 
Cromwell, i. 395. 
William, witnessed the deed from 
Gorges to Wheelwright, i. 344. 

CooUdge. Dr., , 7. 458, 467. 

Coombs, Leonard B., 8. 51, 52. 
Stephen, 2. 212. 

, of Scarborough, 2. 173. 

Cooper, Alexander, signed the petition 
to Charles 11, 1. 402. 

Lieut. , I. 501, 524. 

river, 7. 224. 

Thomas, purchased land of Munjoy's 

estate, i, 129. 
Thomas, to take up land in Pema- 
' quid, 5. 109-110, 

William, signed the treaty of 1714, 
6. 259; his autograph, 6. 259. 
Cooper's hall, 9. 350. 
Coos, 4. 363; meaning of, 4, 115, 182. 

county, 9. 218. 
Copernicus, 7. 243. 

Copley, John Singleton, 6.51; 7,243. 
Copones island, 3, 344, 345. 

5 



Copp, Benjamin, first settler of Jack- 
son, 9. 214. 

Copper coins issued by the states, 6. 
136. 

Copp's hill, Boston, 9. 69. 

Copstown, 4. ;>99. 

Coptic, the, I. 413. 

Corbctt, Abraham, 5. 8. 

Corbin, Lydia, i. 208. 
Robert, lived in Falmouth, i. 105, 
114, 115, 185; signed the submis- 
sion to Mass., I. 105, 386; cleared 
a marsh, i. 121; probably came 
from Boston, 1. 121; captain of tlie 
Speedwell, i. 121; married Lydia 
Martin, i. J22, 207; killed, i. 121, 
219. 221; consented to the agree- 
ment between Jordan and Tucker, 
I. 131; petitioned to the general 
court, I. 144; joined in the op- 
position to Mass., 1. 170; presented 
for breach of oath, i. 171; pre- 
sented for desecrating the Sab- 
bath, I. 171-172; signed the pe- 
tition to the king, i. 180; a juror, 

1. 185; commissioner, i. 197, 200; 
to support his mofcher-in-law, i. 
208; wife taken prisoner, i. 219, 
221; mentioned, i. Vzi], 141. 

Corbin' s sound, settlements at de- 
stroyed, 5. 253. 

Corbinson, Samuel, 4. 233. 

Corinthian elegance, 4. 77. 

Cork, Ireland, families moved from to 
Maine, 2. 204; home of Morris 
O'Brien, 2.243; mentioned, 3. 220. 
Maine, why so named, 2. 204; men- 
tioned, 6. 15. 

Corn, one peck of to be paid annually 
to the Indians, i. 230; 3. 102, 102 i- ; 
prices of, i. 229?i; the English re- 
fused to pay the tribute to tho 
Indians, i. 287; the first raised ia 
New Gloucester, 2. 155; as a con- 
sideration in the purchase of land, 

2. 190; purchased for the suite i- 
ing families of Scarboiough, 3. 
200; the great crop in the United 
States, 4. 22; fine growth of in 
Maine, 4. 344, 345; a surplus at 
Plymouth in 1625, 8. 201, 202; car- 
ried to Boston to grind. 9. 308. 

Cornbury, Viscount of, 7. 141n; see 

also Clarendon, Earl of. 
Corney, Ehsha, son of John, i. 3 8; 
moved to Gloucester, i.308; de- 
position of, I. 157, 157n. 

John, a laborer, i. 308; lived 
with the Ingersolls, i. 308; pur- 
chased land at Nonsuch point, i. 
308; moved to Gloucester, i. 308; 
date of his death, i. 308; married 
Abigail Skillings, i. 308; date of 
her death, i. 308; children of, i. 
308; lived on the Neck, i. 320. 

island, 3. 290, 292. 

same as Carney, i. 308. 



66 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Cornliill, residence of Cyrus Eaton, 7. 
490. 
London, 2. 8, 10, IL 
Cornish, 4. 276w. 
Corn mill at Barberry creek, i. 243?i; 

at Scarborough, 3. 167- 
Cornvill, 4. 'SUn, ;348. 
Cornwall county, Nicholas Manning a 
judge in, i. 279^; named, 4. 221; 
8. 185-180; to send a member to 
. the New York general assembly, 
5-4; Goddard the representative, 
5. 4n; commission to the Justice 
of Peace at, 5. 113-119; set oh", 7. 
158; boundary of, 8. 186; entitled 
to a representative, 8, 186; pe- 
tition for the removal of the cap- 
tain of Fort Charles, 8. 187 ; taxed 
rigorously, 8, 187; began to hate 
the Stuarts, 8. 187; mentioned, 2. 
284; 3. 855; 4. 224, 225, 226; 5. xxi, 
95, lUO, 105, 106, 108, 109, 111, 114, 
119, 120, 122, 125, 126, 242, 265, 
266, 274, 277; 8. 191. 
England, i. 112, 113m. 
mines, 5. 173. 
province of, 5. xx. 
Cornwallis, Gen. Lord Charles, 3. 205- 

206; 6.87; 7.334. 
Cornwell, the Kev. Wait, 2. 113. 
Corry, Joseph, his History of Bristol 

cited, 2. 51an; 5. 148ii. 
Cortereal, Gaspar de, named Labrador 
and the country near Hudson^ s 
bay, 2. 16a. 
Cortes, Hernando, prepared to ex- 
plore the coast, 2. 16a?i; his dis- 
patches cited, 2. lOan. 
Corthell, the Hon. Wilham J., 8. 158. 
Cortland, Stephen Van, 5. 75, 94, 130. 
Corvo island, 3. 290. 
Corwin, George. 7. 153/i. 
Corunna, 8. 147; 9. 178. 
Cosins, a spelling of Cossons, 3. 37w. 
Cossons, John, a member of the Li- 
gonia Assembly, i. 99; lived at 
Westcustogo, I. 99; ordered to 
make reparation to the Indians, 
3. 37; lived at North Yarmouth, 
3. 37n; mentioned, i. 541. 
Casten see Castine. 

Cote de Lanzon, granted to the In- 
dians, 6. 238. 

Cothren, , of Farmington, 4. 396. 

Cotta, John, sold land to Capt. S. 
Davis, 4. 230. 

, married a daughter of Richard 

Wharton, 3. 329. 
Cotton, the Rev. John, his character 
maligned by Robert Jordan, 1. 172; 
minister of the first church of 
Boston, I. 172??; death of, i. 172/i; 
mentioned, 3. 110; his diary cited, 
2. 42n. 
the Rev. John, of Hampton, married 
Anne Lake, 5. 253; his widow 



married the Rev. Increase Mather, 
5. 253. 

Roland. 4. 149, 150, 166. 

street, Portland, owners of lots 
bounded by, i. 248, 249. 

Thomas, 3. 166. 

William, land deeded to by Skillings, 
I. 315; mentioned, 3. 165, 160; 4. 
164, 166. 

wool, 3. 307. 
Coucking stool, 3. 57. 
Counce's shipyard, 6. 302. 
Council chamber, Whitehall, 3. 328. 

for foreign plantations, 5. 245, 246, 
247, 257, 258, 266n; 7. 149; 9. 331. 

for the ruling, planting and govern- 
ing New England in America re- 
ceived a charter from James i, 8. 
200; 9.225; incorporated, 2. 40a, 
262-266; members of, 2. 40a, 49an, 
56a; objections made to, 2. 40a; 
8. 200; its rights established, 2. 
40a, 4 la; 8. 200; extent of grant 
to, 2. 46n, 274: 3.30; 9-225; acted 
independent of the crown, 3. 30; 
grant to Trelaw^ny and Goodyear, 

1. 584; patent to Rigby, i. 546; 
sent two ships to North Yirginia, 

2. 27a; officers of the expedition, 

2. 27a; ships of, 2. 27a; site of the 
first colpny, 2. 28a; return of part 
of the first colony, 2. 29a; second 
expedition, 2. 29a; return of all 
the colonists, 2. 30a ; colonists 
lacked courage, 2. 31a; people of 
Plymouth applied to them for a 
charter, 2. 41a; gave a grant to 
the Pilgrims, 2. 41a, 42a, 42an, 
274-275; 8. 341; 9. 118; the Ply- 
mouth colonists already settled 
within the company's territory, 2. 
42a; second charter granted to, 2. 
42an ; attention called to the gov- 
ernment of their territory, 2. 43a; 
looked after the religion of the 
people, 2. 45a; Levett a member 
of, 2. 49aji; 5. 167; gave a charter 
to British merchants, 5. 50a; their 
charter laid the foundation of 
New England, 2. 51a; 8.200; the 
charters granted by them occa- 
sioned perplexity, 2. 51a-52a; 

3. 31-32; the first charter that 
concerned Maine, 2. 52a; Gorges 
a member of, 2. 56a; grant to 
Vines, 2. 73a; grant to Saeo, 2. 
81a; grant to Aldworth and f^l- 
bridge, 2.87n; 5.207-214; grant to 
Bradford and others of Plymouth, 
2. 202-203, 275; 8. 341; extent of 
the grant, 2. 203; grant to Cam- 
mock, 3. 12; grant to Bonython, 
3. 17; grant to Gorges and Mason, 
1622, 3. 30; gave land belonging 
to Gorges to other parties, 3. 31- 
32; supposed cause of the blun- 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



67 



der, 3. 32; grant to Purchase, 3. 
315, 216, 325, 326, 330, 331 ; grant 
to Way, 3. 315, 316, 325, 326, 331 ; 
grant to Wharton, 3. 325; grant 
to Levett, 5. 107; 9. 225; gave a 
license to the Eagle to trade, 5. 
168; grant to the Earl of Sterling, 

8. 184; grant to Pierce, 8.201; 9. 
118; letter from the Plymouth 
colonists, 8. 202; Pierce changed 
his patent, 9. 119; Plymouth de- 
sired a seperate charter, 9. 120; 
adjudicated the settlement, 9. 120; 
grant to Beauchamp and Leverett, 

9. 225; Godfrey agent and attor- 
ney, for, 9. 306; list of patents 
granted by, 9. 365-368; resigned 
their charter, 2. 53of, 54, 58a; 3. 
31 ; division of the territory, 2.54; 
mentioned, 2. 89, 291; 9. 117; see 
Plymouth Company. 

minutes, 5. 8, 9, 14, 16, 18, 32, 73, 75, 

91, 9:^, 94, 104, 107, 134. 
of the United Colonies, g. 30. 
records, 5-276, 277>i, 278j?, 283>i, 284^1, 

29071, 292n; 8. 229n, 234. 
records of Mass., 5. 386j2; 7. 167. 

Counselors, the duties of, 3. 37. 

Country sloop, 4. 183. 

County magistrates, i. 107, 267. 
of Canada, granted to Sir William 

Alexander, 4. 221. 
Palatine, 8. 184, 

Court, first held in Maine, i. 83; held 
Cleeves,*!. 98; those in Maine di- 
vided, I. 188; taxes levied for the 
expenses of, i. 368; to be held 
annually, 3. 48; held by associ- 
ates, I. 162, 170; to be held at 
Biddeford, 5. xxiv; at Black Point, 
3. 41, 78; at Casco, 1. 185, 186, 187, 
376, 540; 3. 45-46; at Falmouth, 
1. 132, 166, 184, 186, 242, 245, 258; at 
Fort Loyal, 1. 242, 245 ; at Gorgeana, 
I. 98; at New Castle, 2. 232; at 
Pemaquid, 5. 248, 249; 7. 1.56; at 
Kichmond's islaml, i. .536; at Saco, 
I. 88, 195, 364, 366, 367, 375, 533, 
541; 2. 53a; 3. 11, 36, 37, 48; at 
Scarborough, i. 162-163; 3.48,57; 
at Sheepscot, 2. 232; 8. 185; at 
Spurwink, 3. 16; at Wells, i. 207, 
267, 346, 368, 377; 3- 57; at York, 
I. 159, 160, 170, 171, 174, 175, 184, 
186, 196, 268, 271, 278, 366, 369, 
373, 380; 2. 64a; 3. 48, 53, 54, 58, 
156; 5. XX'V. 
house, vVarren, 8. 172. 
of Gorges, established, i. 53, 54, 59n, 
73w, 83, 88; form ''of process, i. 
TSn; officers of, i. TSn, 83-84, 88; 
first held at Saco, i. 83; coexten- 
sive, I. 84; order to kill Indians 
w^ho have murdered the English, 
I. 84-85; to see that the Indians 
are not wronged, i. 85; the trial 



by jury observed, i. 85; large 
powers of, i. 85-86; cases before, 
I. 89; to be held annually, i. 89; 
divided the province into two 
parts, I. 89; the inferior court to 
be held three times a year i. 89; 
ordered that all children be bap- 
tised, I. 89; mentioned, i. 94, 184, 
195, 364. 
of Sessions, i. 267, 381. 
of the King's Commissioners, 1. 195. 

Courtour, Thomas, signed the petition 
to Cromwell, i. 395. 

Cousins, John, gave satisfaction to an 
Indian, i. 85; biographical notice 

of, I. Son; lived at Casco bay, i. U4, 
236h; mentioned, i. 99, 382. 
John, of Yarmouth, 2. 171. 

Cousins' island, formerly Hog island, 

1. 150; called Surquesong, 2. 167; 
half of owned by Richard Bray, 2. 
171; mentioned, i. 95^; 2. 178: %.. 
346. 

river, called Sisquisic, 2. 167; home- 
of Thomas Reding, 2. 171; saw- 
mills at, 2. 181 ; mentioned, 1. 114, 

2. 1.52. 
Covenanters, the, 6. 28. 

Coventry, home of Dennis Morough, 
I. 314. 

Coverly, , of Pownalboro, 4. 330, 

331. 

Cowasacks, the, lived on the Connect- 
icut, river, 6. 236. 

Cowes, 6. 322. 

Cow island, i. 151; within the limits 
of Falmouth, i. 145. 

Cowley, Abraham, grand juryman, i. 
371; signed the petition to Crom- 
well, I. 395. 

Cows, value of, i. 229n; scarce in 
Maine, 3. 72, 72n; of large size, 4., 
375. 

Cowsegan, 2. 236; 4. 104. 
river, 2. 236. 

Cox, Thomas, married Hepzibah Dav- 
enport, I. 306^1. 
William, 5. 192. 

, married Thankful Davenport, 

I. 306}!. 

Coxall, Baptist church formed at, 7.. 
222. 

Coxbinson, Samuel, signed the petitoin 
to Mass., 5. 240. 

Coxe, Edward, married Oliver Godfrey, 
9.301. 
John, married Tabitha Davenport, 
I. 306^. 

Coxe's head, 2. 214; 9. 161. 

Coxspur island, 9. 179. 

Crabs, abundant in Casco bay, i. 18t.. 

Oraddock, Adam, proprietor at Pema- 
quid, 5. 302. 
George, proprietor at Pemaquid, 5. 

301, 303. 
George, of Boston, 3. 336. 
Gov. Matthew, a. 47n. 



68 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Craech, Andrew, signed the petition 

to Gov. Brad street, i. 2SSn. 
Crafford, Mordecai, 2. 230. 
Craft, John Staples,* 2. 120, 122. 

Moses, 4. 363. 

Samuel, 4. 363. 

, of Jay, 4. 340. 

Craggie, Andrew, 8. 170. 

Cragin, Lieut. , 4. 350. 

Craig, Sir James, governor of Canada 

7. 390. 
Craigie's farm, 4. 359. 
Cramake, H. T., Arnold's letters to, 

I. 486, 487. 
Cram's mills, 2. 281. 
Cranberry isle, 8. 325. 
Cranch, Andrew, lived at Falmouth, 

1. 320. 

Craner, the Rev. , settled at Wal- 

doborough, 5. 404. 
Cranes, plenty, 2. 82. 
Cranfield, Gov. Edward, 5. 91, 92, 93. 
Cranmer, Thomas, 6. 25. 
Crawford, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 16. 

Abel, 9. 214, 215. 

Erastus, g. 215. 

Ethan Allen, 9. 215, 216. 

family, at Worcester, 6. 13; at Stir- 
ling, 6. 23; at New Harbor, 9. 215. 

house, 9. 218. 

pond, 4. 328. 

Thomas, in the Continental Army, 

2. 214. 

W. H., 7. 464. 
Cray river, g. 297. 
Creighton family, settle in Warren, 6. 

21. 
Creole case, the, 8, 91. 
Cresy, the Rev. IS^oah, 2. 121. 
Creuxiur, see Du Creux. 

Crevacoeur, , French merchant at 

Pemaquid, 2. 240. 
Crewe, John, 5. xlv. 
Crignon, Pierre, 8. 332. 
Crimea, 4. 11; 5. 254. 
Crimean war, 8. 371. 

Crispe, , patent granted to, 9. 367. 

Crittenden, the Hon. John J. 7. 463, 

465,468; 8.424. 
Crocker, David, signed the petition of 
Mass., 5. 240. 
Edward, killed at Falmouth, i. 302. 
John, 3. 180. 
Reuben, 3. 180. 

the Rev. Dr. , 7. 432. 

Crocket;, Ann, 9. 384. 

John, married Mary Knight, 3. 215. 
Thomas, slandered Ann Godfrey, 9. 
383-384. 
Croesus, anecdote of, 8. 335-336. 
Cromwell, Oliver, John Wheelwright 
in favor with, i. 344n; people of 
Maine sent a petition to, i. 103, 
392-395, 397n; appointed Sir 
Thomas Temple governor of Can- 
ada, I. 398; captured Bristol, 2. 



72a; used Popham's house as a 
garrison, 77a; at the zenith of his 
popularity, 5. 231; righted the 
wrongs of Kirk and Alexander, 5. 
231 ; grant to Temple, 7. 52 ; men- 
tioned, 4. 240, 272; 5. 231; 6.27; 
7. 137, 138, 323; 8. 349; 9. 164, 320, 
323, 325, 328, 356. 
Richard, 9. 325, 326w, 328, 350. 
Cronder, Ane, 9. 337. 
Crooked river, 4. 386. 
Crooker, Isaiah, 2. 211, 212. 
Crosby, Henry, signed petition to Gov. 
Bradstreet, i. 2837i; lived at Fal- 
mouth, I. 320. 
John, 8. 167. 
Judge, 6. 41. 

the Rev. Otis, preached in Bath, 2. 
224. 

, of Sandy river, 4. 312. 

Cross, Daniel E., 4. 283?i. 
river, 4. 46; 9. 131, 137. 
Stephen, married Hepzibah Law- 
rence, nee Munjoy, i. 257, 313. 
Crouch ri\er, 3. xv. 
Crown, Henry, married Alice Rogers, 
I. 208. 
point, expedition against, 9. 82; en- 
terprise frustrated, 9. 83; men- 
tioned, 5. 382n; 8. 263. 
Crows, reward for killing, 2. 115-116. 
Cruser, the, 2. 209; see Seguin, the. 
Cu a, 5.333; 8. 281n. 
Cucking-stool, to be set up, i. 185; 

described, i. 185. 
Cuckholds, the, 7. 301. 
Cuife, Henry, executed for high trea- 
son, 2. 71a. 
Culliver, John, lived at Falmouth, i. 

320. 
Cumberland, (Maine) i. 146; 2. 85, 
146, 178, 181. 
(N. -S.), formerly Schegnecto, 8. 130. 
association, the, i. 326)i; 5. lii. 
bar, the, 5. xxv, xxvi, xxviii, xxx, 
xxxiv, xxxix, xli, xlii, xlv; 7. 
485; 8.420, 421, 433. 
cotton factory, 2. 148. 
conference of churches, 2. 127. 
county, Maine, set ott from York, 3. 
43u; incorporated, 6. 43; men- 
tioned, 3.225; 4. 78; 5. xxi, xxv 
xxvi; 7. 233; 9. 89. 
county. Pa., i. 500. 
medical association, 8. 420. 
railroad company, 6. 372. 
registry of deeds, i. 264ji. 
the, 5. 34. 
Cuming, Thomas, 3. 110; in the gar- 
rison at Black Point, i, 227?i. 
Cummings, the Rev. Abraham, preach- 
ed in Bath, 2.224; mentioned, 4. 
305. 
the Rev. Henry, of Billerica, 4. 342. 

Dr. , 6. 144. 

, of Saco, 3. 120. 

gore, 4. 303 ; incorporated, 4. 338. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



69 



Cumstock, Lieut. , i. 501 ?i. 

Cuncanpot, Captain, his mark, 4. 135 ; 

gave deer skins as a present, 4. 

135; mentioned, 4. 123, 127, 128, 

130, 133, 137, 140, 142. 

Cunnateconett, sold land to Geo. Mun- 

joy, I. 129. 
Cunningham, Allen, 8. 476. 
Barnabas, 7. 331. 
Robert, i. 503, 508, 509. 

, 6. 26. 

Cunningham's island, 9. 133. 
C'M)g, M., his etudes philologiques 
cited, 9- ^^3, 274, 275, 277, 278, 
282 290. 
Curing 'and packing fish for the for- 
eign market, 3. 317. 
Curney, a sp'?lhng of Corney, i. 308. 
Currency, tiie Lydians first adopted 
metallic, 6. 147; value of paper, 
3. 201, 201b. 
Currents, abundant in Maine, 3. 87. 

Currier, Capt. , of Enfield, ;. 205, 

296. 
Curtis, Eunice, daughter of Joseph, 
married Richard Cutts, 3. 21n. 
Joseph, married Sarah Foxwell, 3. 
21n; lived at Kittery, 3. 21 w; 
daughter of, 3- 21^- 
Thomas, signed petition to Charles 
II, I. 402; amount of land granted 
to, 9- 378. 
William, 3. 179. 
Cureo, 4. 309, 332, 333. 
Cur win, George, 5. 241. 

J., letter on New England affairs, i. 
398-399. 
Cushenoc, head of navigation on the 
Kennebec, 7. 168; 8. 235; site of 
the Plymouth trading house, 8. 
203; Gov. Shirley at, 8 229; road 
built to Fort Halifax, 235; men- 
tioned, 7. 169, 174, 175, 177, 178, 
104, 195, 198; 8. 217, 219, 220, 22{Jn, 
228, 237, 240, 244n, 266, 269, 270, 
282n, 341. 
Cushenoc falls, 8. 204n; see Cushnec. 
Gushing, block-house at, 4. 110, 329; 5. 
367n; 7-327,334. 
Caleb, 8. 428. 
Gen. Charles, 2. 214; taken prisoner 

by John Jones, 4. 43, 45. 
Charles, son of Judge William, 4. 
16; 6. 47w; biographical notice of, 
6. 47n; sheriff, 6. 46; taken pris- 
oner, 6. 46. 
Christopher, 2. 219. 
Ezekiel, sold Bang's island, i. 150n; 
to impress men into carrying stores 
to Fort Halifax, 7. 185, 186. 
family, 4. 78. 
John, son of William, biographical 

notice of, 6. 4Qn-^ln. 
the Rev. Jonathan, 4. 265. 
Roland, early lawyer of Maine, 4. 16; 



engaged to Jane Lithgow, 5. 418 ; 
birth of, 6. 47 )i; graduated from 
college, 6. 47; settled in Pittsbo- 
rough, and Waldoborough, 6. 47 ; 
death of, 6. 47. 

Thomas, 2. 218. 

Judge William, graduated from 
Harvard College, 6. 44; settled at 
Pownalborough, 6. 44-45; held 
county offices, 6. 45; associate 
justice, 6. 45, 46; moved to Scit- 
uate, 6. 45; judge of the supreme 
court, 6. 45, 46; death of, 6. 45; 
personal appearance, 6. 46; men- 
tioned, 2. 204; 4. 16; 5-418. 

Col. , 8. 228, 260, 266. 

Cushman, Bazaleel, teacher at Hebron 
Academy, 6.371; 8. 169; at Port- 
land Academy, 8. 165, 169, 413; at 
Brighton Academy, 8. 173. 

the Rev. David, 6. 360; ancient set- 
tlement of Sheepscot, 4. 207-228; 
Weymouth's voyage, 6. 307-318. 

the Rev. David Q. 9- 149; biography 
of Cyrus Eaton, 7. 487-495. 

G. G., 8. 75. 

Isaiah, 4. 390. 

Job, 2. 115. 

Jona., 4. 364. 

Joshua, 4.7,350; 7-390. 

Ralph, teacher in Belfast Academy, 
8. 172. 
Cushnoc, now Augusta, 2. 275; 4. 105; 
the limit of the Plymouth claims, 
2. 275; proprietor's house built at, 
2. 282; mentioned, 4. 112, 113; see 
Cushenoc. 
Cussin, John, his testimony concern- 
ing Robert Nash, i. 382. 
Custego, 4. 104. 

Custom-house, a, never established by 
parliament in New England, 9. 
46, 54. 
Cutery, Goodwife, 5. 65. 

Cutler, Major , 349. 

Cutt family, the, one of prominence, 
8. 295 ; the name now called Cutts, 
8. 295. 
Cutter, the Rev. Ammi R., called to 
preach in North Yarmouth, 2. 
184, 186; biographical notice of, 
2. 186-187. 

Capt. ; 4. 159. 

Dr. , 7- i^35. 

the Rev. , of Warren, 7. 492. 

Cutting, Jonas, 8. 453, 469. 
Cutts, Bridget, married the Rev. Wil- 
liam Screven, 7. 223. 

John, 9. 363; came from Wells, 8. 
294 ; settled at Portsmouth, 8. 295 ; 
appointed president, 8. 295. 

Margaret, daughter of Richard, 8. 
294; married William Yaughan, 
8. 295. 
Cutt's mills, 4. 281n. 



70 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Cutts, Richard, appointed Justice of 
the Peace, 1. 177; lived at Kittery, 

1. 177; 3. 2 In; 8. 295; magistrate, 

2. 6Sa; married Eunice Curtis, 3. 
2l7i; children of, 3.21 ?i; a creditor 
of Thomas Wannerton, 5. 225; 
came from Wales, 8. 294; a ship 
builder, 8. 295 ; engaged in fishing, 

8. 294; moved to' Portsmouth, 8. 
295; mentioned, 6. 343; 7. 228, 224; 

9. 363. 
Thomas, 4. 205. 
Major, , 8. 295. 

Cuvier, Baron George C. L. D., 6. 411, 

429. 
Cydavael, 7. 380. 
C , George, signed the petition to 

Bradstreet, i. 283. 

Dabadis, Joseph, his bark and her 
ca,rgo stolen, 7. Sij; claimed dam- 
ages, 7. 86; his story, 7. 86-88; 
probably the same as Robardcc, 
7-92; a younger brother of An- 
selm de St, Castine, 7. 92; disap- 
peared from history, 7. 92 ; men- 
tioned, 7, 75. 
Daebe, see Daeve. 

Daeve, Thomas, land gi-anted to, i. 
251; nothing else known of him, 
I. 252w. 
Dagget, Capt. Peter, of North Vine- 
yard, 4. 3U, 343, 39(>. 
Capt. Samuel, of North Vineyard, 
4.311, 390. 
Dale, Sir Thomas, 7. 28; 8. .320. 

William, swore fealty to the Duke 
of York, 4. 221. 
Dallar, John, sr., 4. 281. 

John, jr., 4. 281. 
Dalling, John, leased Monhgan, 8. 188. 
Dalton, tlie Rev. Timothy, preached 
at Hampton, i. :]44u. 

Mrs. , of Wiscasset, 4. 331. 

Damalier, Father, , manuscript 

cited, 6.212/1, 215?/; 9. 262. 
Damares Cove island, 5. 2Sln; see 

Damaris Cove island. 
Damarine, sold land to John Parker, 

2. 190; see also Robinhood. 
Damariscotta, derivation of, 4. 105, 
189; settlement destroyed, 4. 223; 
land records destroyed in Boston, 
4. 228; sold land to Christopher 
Tappan, 4. 232; home of Robert 
Scott, 4. 2;>2; formerly Madamas- 
contee, 4. 379; as a seaport, 5. 
331; settled by people from Ire- 
land, 6. 22 ; the Rev. Jacob Bailey 
preached at, 5. 196; oyster shell 
deposit at, 5. 345-351 ; 7. 301 ; 
Arthur Noble moved to, 8. 152; 
Col. Vaughan's establishment at, 
.8. 299-300; garrison at, 8. 299; 
mentioned, 4. 210, 211, 231, 329, 
330; 5. 188/1, 326, 329, 338; 7. 157, 



363; 8. 166, 185, 291, 298, 299, 300, 
309, 310, 311; 9. 153; see Damaris- 
cove. 
Fresh Falls, 8. 152. 
mills, 2. 279; 9.137. 
pond, 8. 152, 296, 297, 301. 
river, boundary of grant to Aid- 
worth and Elbridge, i. 37; Sil- 
vanus Davis purchased land at, i. 
253; Thomas Gent claimed land 
at, 2. 235; Isaac Taylor claimed 
land at, 2. 236; 4. 230; Silvanus 
Davis' land claim at, 4. 230; a 
boundary of New Dartmouth, 5. 
95-96; the redoubt at considered 
useless, 5. 395; mentioned, 2. Si^n; 
4. 105; 5. 330; 6. 313, 347, 349, 361 ; 
7. 132; 8.296, 297; 9. 137, 151. 
Damariscove, the inhabitants of met 
Thomas Elbridge, i. 37; destroyed, 
4. 223; headquarters for early 
shipping, 9. 130; mentioned, 5. 
172, 239, 241; see also Damaris- 
cotta. 
island, probably visited by Pop- 
ham's colonists, 3. 294/1 ; included 
in Pemaquid, 5. 181; 7. 320; men- 
tioned, 3. 2d{)n; 4. 105; 5. 237//, 
314, 346. 
Dambrell's cove, 8. 193. 
Damerill's cove, home of John Parker, 
I. 383; early hshing at, 5. 183; tax 
of 1674, 5. 250; mentioned, 8. 193. 
Damrose— Coggin river, 3. 330. 
Dam's Mills, Freewill Baptists at, i. 

Dana, B., 8. 205/i. 

the Rev, Daniel, married Sally Em- 
ery, 4. 289/2 ; preached at Newbury- 
port, 6. 170. 
Joseph, 4. 7. 

the lion. Judali, co-operate mem- 
ber of the Maine Historical Soci- 
ety, I. 11; married the widow of 
Gen. McMillan, 4. 278n ; mentioned, 
4. 279/?, 283/i, 
J. W., I. 128?i. 
Richard, 4. 113. 
Samuel, 7. .356, 357. 
Judge ~— , 5. XXXV, xlii, 
Dmd, John, 7. 146w. 
Dane, Jemima, F., mother of the Hon. 
Joseph, 6. 364; death of, 6. 364. 
John, 1st, settled at Ipswich, 6. 364. 
John, 2d, father of the Hon. Joseph, 

6. 361; death of, 6. 3(54. 
the Hon. Joseph, co-operate mem- 
ber of the Maine Historical Soci- 
ety, I. 11; his ancestry, 6. 364; 
birth, 6.364; graduated from Har- 
vard, 6. 364; admitted to the bar, 
6. 3(>4 ; opened an office at Kenne- 
bunk, 6. -364; retired from the bar, 
6. 365; held public office, 6. l}C)o; 
married Mary Clark, 6.366; chil- 
dren of, 6. 366; his character and 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



71 



tastes, 6. 365, 366, 36V; died, 6. 
364, 366; mentioned, 6. 355, 390; 
8.391, 392, 393.397, 399. 

Joseph, son of the Hon. Joseph, 6. 
366. 

Nathan, son of the Hon. Joseph, 6. 
366. 

Nathan, of Beverly, 6. 364; 7. 19; 8. 
2C8h, 342, 391. 

Philemon, one of the proprietors of 
Buxton, 2. 138; lived at Ipswich, 
4. 242?? ; assignee of Narragansett 
Township No. i, 4. 242n. 

William, signed petition of 1672, to 
Mass., 5. 240. 

, of Wells, 5. xlii. 

Danford, John, lived in Newbury, 1. 
323; married Dorcas White, i. 
323. 

Nathaniel, lived at Newbury, i. 323; 
married Mary White, i. 323. 
Danforth, Thomas, disposed of land 
belonging to Bartlett, i. llOn^ J i7; 
deed to Edmund White, i. 146; 
granted Little Cbebeag to iSilvanus 
Davis, I. 145-147, 253; president 
of the province of Maine, i. 147 ?i, 
240, 316; 2.65a; 3. 129; received 
a grant of Great Cbebeag, i. 147- 
148; confirmed the title of James 
Andrews to Bangs island, i. 149; 
confirmed Mrs. Munjoy's title to 
House island, i. 151. 280-281; 
sent to Maine as an agent, i. 176, 
254; to resettle the towns, i. 20(); 
appointed Gendall to regulate the 
settlement of North Yarmouth, i. 
231; constituted as governor, i. 
240; held courts at Falmouth and 
Fort Loyal, 1.242,245; liis object 
in granting lands, i. 245 ; appropri- 
ated land owned by Mary Munjoy, 
I. 254; corfirmed landholder's 
titles I. 271, 273; exhorted the 
people to live at peace, i- 284; re- 
stored to his government, i. 292; 
gave instructions to Major Church, 
I. 292-293; granted land to Joseph 
IngersoU, i. 311; granted land to 
Daniel IngersoU, i, 311; John 
Parrot settled under, i. 314; deed 
to trustees of Falmouth, i. 554- 
555; incorporated North Yar- 
mouth, 2. 171-172; executed a 
deed to North Yarmouth, 2. 173; 
empowered to confirm titles, 3. 
129; appointed trustees for Scar- 
borough, 3. 129-130; deed to Scar- 
borough, 3. 232-234; mentioned, 
I. 245n, 249, 255, 258; 8. 226, 227; 
9.29, 
Daniels, Arthur, signed the petition 
to Charles 11, i. 402. 

Eramket, sold land to Thomas Ste- 
vens, 3. 315. 

Jeromkin, sold land to Thomas and 
York, 3. 315. 



Joseph, signed the petition to 
Charles 11, i. 402; lived at Fal- 
mouth, I. 320, 

Mrs. , of Mount Vernon, 4. 306, 

336. 

Danube, the, 4. 10. 

Danvers, the Kev. George Burroughs 
preached in, i. 262; formerly Sa- 
lem, I. 262; 4. 232: Arnold at, i. 
502; mentioned, 8.389. 
records, cited, i. 302. 

Danville, 2. 157, 159, 161, 163. 

D'Anville, M., map by, 8. 96. 

Dare, John, signed the petition to 
Mass., 5. 241. 

Darent-farol river, 9. 297. 

Darling, James, married Mary Lewis, 

1. 261. 

Darnley, Henry, Lord, 6. 140}i. 
Darracott, George, 3. 2()6, 267, 268. 
Darsequunt. 4. 123, 128. 
Dartford, 9. 297, 297ji. 
creek, 9. 297. 
deanery of, 9. 298. 
Dartmouth, England, Weymouth at, 
3. 288; the Nacheen sailed from, 
7. 321; mentioned, 5. 324. 
Maine, 2. 235; former name of New 
Castle 2. 232; same as Sheepscot, 

2. 232. 
Mass., 4. 270 

College, Charles Coffin to enter, 4. 
293; attempt made to call it an 
university, 5. xlviii ; Francis Brown 
president ot, 7. 372; Dr. N. Lord 
president of, 8. 163; graduates 
froni^ W. Barrows, jr., 8. 169; Ed- 
mund Eastman, i. 328; N. WrFul- 
ler, 6. 71 ; Sanford Kingsbury, 6. 
68; Benjamin Orr, 6. 57; Nathan- 
iel Perley, 6. 62; E. W. Kipley, 6. 
66n; Ether Shepley, 8. 413; Geo. 
F. Shepley, 8. 420; Nathaniel 
Wells, 1.340; Benjamin White, i. 
340; Samuel Wild, 6. 60; men- 
tioned, 4. 295, 332; 5. xli, xlvii, 
xlix, lv)i, Ivi; 6. 61, 412; 7. 418; 8. 
163, 450, 483. 

the Earl of, 7. 216. 

the, 5. 143. 
Dary, Edward, signed the petition to 

Mass., 5. 241. 
D' Aulnay, Charles de Menou — Chairn- 
say, Signeur, captured the Ply- 
mouth fort, 5. 215; claimed the 
territory as far as Pemaquid, 5. 
215; professed friendship towards 
Mass. Bay Colony, 5. 215-216; 
216n; visited Pemaquid, 5, 220; a 
debtor to Shurt, 5. 220; took pos- 
session of the Plymouth Colony's 
country, 6. 109-110; built a fort, 
6. 110; made Penobscot his resi- 
dence, 6. 110, 111; quarreled with 
La Tour, 6. 110; conquered by the 
English, 6. 110; took possession 
of Pentagoet,, 7. 33; articulation 



72 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



D'Aulnay, Charles de Menon — cont'd, 
with Willet, 7. 33-34; cheated the 
colonists, 7. 34; enlarged the fort, 
7. 37; mentioned, 5. 203, 304; 6. 
363; 7. 33; 8.330; 9- ll':J- 
Jeanne Mo tin, 7-75. 
D'Aulnay's fort, Wannerton killed 

at the attack of, i. 77^?. 
Danphin comity. Pa., i. 519, 531. 

jail, I. 523. 
Daveis, the Hon, Charles S., contrib- 
uted article on Gov. Lincoln, i. 
408; delivered an oralion at Frye- 
bnrg, I. 409; mentioned, 5 292n; 
6. 433. 
Davenport, Ahner, 7. 285. 
Addington, 3. 411, 438, 444. 
Benjamin, 7. 285. 

Ebenezcr, signed the petition to 
Gov. Bradslreet, i. 283«; married 
Dorcas Andrews, i. 305, 308; a 
son of Thomas, i. 305n; date of 
birth, I. 305 ?z; date of death, i. 
30671 ; children of, i. 30Gn; moved 
to Falmouth, i. 308; lived on the 
Presumpscot river, i. 308; moved 
to Dorchester, i. 309; at New 
Casco, I. 320. 
^Hepzibah, daughter of Ebenezer, 

married Thomas Cox, i.306n. 
Isaac, 8. 177. 
Mary, married Charles Coffin, 4. 

249>?. 
Capt. Nathaniel, 2. 133. 
Tabitha, daughter of Ebenezer, i. 
306/*,; married John Cox, i. 3U6?2. 
Thankful, daughter of Ebenezer, 

married Cox, i. 306?i. 

Thomas, lived in Dorchester, i. 305?t ; 
father of Ebenezer, i. 305n. 
Daveulry, 7. 3S2. 
Davers, Sir Charles, executed for high 

treason, 2. 7 1 of. 
Davess, see Davis. 
David, the, 7. 320. 

Davidson, Major James, married Mary 
Lith'iow, 5. 418, 423; 8. 287; his 
narrative cited, 5. 387;?. 
Davie, Alice, married Jacob Clarke, 
2. 235, 237. 
George, 2. 237; lived at Wiscasse^ 
point, 2.235; land grant at Sheep- 
scot, 2. 235. 
Humphrey, 5. 241, 249. 
TJiomas, i. 252». 

William, his daughter married Jacob 
Clarke, 2. 237. 
Davies James, 3. 301, 303. 

Kobert, see Davis, Cai>t. Robert. 

, friend of Paul Coffin, 4. 273. 

Davila, Padilla, 2. 9. 
Davis, Alice, married Jacob Clarke, 2. 
235, 237. 
Lieut Ambrose, i. 296. 
Benjamin, of Fairfield, 4. 310, 315. 
Mrs. Benjamin, of Farmington, 4. 
342. 



Daniel, of Portland, 5. xxiv, xxv, 
xxvi, xxxiv, XXXV, xxxix; 7. 19, 20. 
Edmund, 2. 189. 

the Hon. George T., birth of, 8. 441 ; 
graduated from Harvard College, 
8. 441 ; studied law, 8. 441 ; prac- 
tised at Greenfield, 8. 441; met 
Margaret Fuller, 8. 441 ; direction 
and development of his character 
8. 441-442, 443; established a 
newspaper, 8,4-12-443; in the gen- 
eral court, 8.443; in Congress, 8. 
443-444; returned to his legal 
business, 8. 444; married Miss 
Eussell, 8.444; made conversation 
an art, 8. 445, 446-447; his social 
gifcs, 8. 445; Bowles estimate of, 
8. 445-446, 448; moved to Port- 
land, 8. 439, 446; his influence, 8. 
445-440; died, 8. 444; memoir by 
the Hon. George F. Talbot, 8. 438- 
448. 
Isaac, probably live ^ near the Cap- 
isic, I. 206; Ids children i. 206, 
309; lived near the Fore river, i. 
216; land granted to, i. 242; at 
Stroudwater, i. 309, 320. 
Isaac P., 3. 246. * 

Jacob, son of Lawrence, i. 309; 
lived at Purpooduck, i. 309, 320. 
James, son of Isaac, lived at Ips- 
wich, 1.309. 
James, father of Davistown, 4. 323. 
Capt. James, of the Mary and John, 
7. 302 ; sent to England with dis- 
patches, 7. 303; returned with 
supplies, 7. 307. 
Capt. John, deputy president, i. 
267, 381 ; son of Isaac, 1.309; lived 
in Gloucester, i. 309; accused of 
adultery, i. 372; elected military 
officer of York, i. 373; a witness 
against Sarah Morgan, i. 375; 
signed the petition to Cromwell, i, 
395; signed petition to Charles, 
II, I. 402; witnessed signatuie of 
deed to trustees of Falmouth, i. 
555. 
the Hon. John, 8. 71. 
Sir John, executed for high treason, 

2. 71«. 
John, an enemy of Gen. Chandler, 

9. 204. 
John, of Buxton, 4. 344. 
John, of Scarborough, 3. 77- 
John, of SJieepscot, 2. 2-35. 
Judge John, his edition of Morton's 
Memorial cited, i. 203; 2. 11a, 42a, 
i)laii; 5. 183??. 
Josiah, killed, 4. 287. 
Lawrence, lived at Falmouth, 1. 155, 
180», 216, 309; presented for rail- 
ing and swearing, i. 171; lived 
near Long Creek, i. 206; lived in 
Ipswich, I. 309; moved to Pur- 
pooduck, I. 309, 320; children of, 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



73 



309, 310; signed the petition to 
Charles ii, i. 402. 

Mary, 2. 235. 

Mercy Noble, 4. 315. 

Nathaniel, an early settler at Sandy 
River, 4. 37. 

Elder Nehemiah, settled at Sheep- 
scot, 7. 222, 225. 

Nicholas, of York, his granddauj]^h- 
ter married John Royal, i. 2S9n; 
signed petition to Cromwell, i. 
395; signed petition to Mass, g. 
381. 

Olive, 2. 235. 

Rachel, daughter of Lawrence, i. 
309, 310; married first Robert 
Haines, second to , Wedge- 
wood, I. 309, 310. 

Robert, married Jane Andrews, i. 
305-306. 

Capt. Robert, pilot of Popham's 
second expedition, 3. 293; exam- 
ined the coast, 3. 293-294, 294n; 5. 
158; sent to England with letter, 
3. 303; 5. 158^; returned to Sag- 
adahoc, 3. 308; presented code to 
Cecil, 5. 145; called Sergeant 
Marshall, 5. 158^; 7. 302. 

Roger, signed the petition to Charles 
II, I. 402. 

Capt. Richard, 3. 301. 

Sarah, taken prisoner at Falmouth, 
1.302. 

Samuel, son of Isaac, lived at 
Gloucester, i. 309. 

Silvanus, received grant of Little 
Chebeag, i. 147; wounded at Ar- 
rowsic island, 1.224; 2.192-193; 
purchased land of Gedney, i. 242^, 
246; land grant to, i. 244, 247; his 
warehouse the largest in Maine, 
I. 247, 279; purchased land of 
Nathaniel Mitton, i. 248; an enter- 
prising man, i. 250, 253, 254, 285; 
petitioned for grants and privi- 
leges, I. 250-251, 253-254; petition 
partially granted, i. 251; granted 
land at Capisic, i. 252; land 
granted at Nonsuch Point, 1. 252; 
his daughters legatees of Ingles, 
I. 252w; purchased land at Dam- 
ariscotta, i. 253; lived near the 
Kennebec, i. 253; prchased In- 
gersoll's sawmill, 1.253; escaped 
from the Indians, 1.253; in com- 
mand at Arrowsic, i. 253; estab- 
lished at Falmouth, i. 253; land 
granted to by Danford, i, 253; had 
a sawmill at Casco, i. 269, 280, 
311, 317; trustee for Falmouth, i. 
271, 555; advised the people to 
comply with the edicts of An- 
dross, I. 274, 275; his letter to 
John West, i. 275; granted a ferry 
privilege, i. 278; licensed to sell 
liquor, i. 279; unpopular, i. 280, 



283-284; land already owned by 
Lawrence granted to, i; 280; ac- 
cused of running away from the 
Kennebec, 1.280; procured a war- 
rant for the arrest of Lawrence, 
I. 280-281; basis of his claims, i. 
280-281; his lands confirmed, i. 
282; commissioner for Andross, 
I. 282; in favor at court, i. 282; 
compared to Jehu, i. 283; petition 
of Falmouth against, i. 283-284; 
his reply, i. 284; supplied Fort 
T oyal, I. 184)1, 292; answered by 
-uawrence, i. 285; his strong party 
following, I. 285; autograph of, 

1. 284; counselor, i. 285, 309; 2. 
233; letter of cited, 2. 293yi; con- 
sulted with Major Church, 2. 293, 
296; list Ox his soldiers killed, 2. 
295?i; in command at Falmouth, 

2. 298; 5. 277, 295; 7. 59; his ac- 
count of the capture of Fort Loyal, 

1. 300-301; 7. 60; taken as a 
prisoner to Quebec, i. 301; 7. 60; 
returned, i. 301," 309; 9. 32; re- 
sided in Boston, i. 309; died, i. 
309; his property, widow and 
children, i. 309; the death of 
Lawrence settled the disputed 
claims, i. 313; purchased Web- 
ber's sawmill, i.3l7; lived on the 
Neck, I. 320; court held at his 
house, I. 381; receipt from Geo. 
Bramhall, i. 556; a large land 
holder, 2. 233; claimed land at 
Damariscotta river, 4. 230; pur- 
chased land of Witman, Jeffrey 
and Cotta, 4. 230; signed the pe- 
tition to Mass., 5. 240; at Fort 
Loyal, 7. 59; surrender of, 7. 59- 
60 ; lived at Arrowsic and Sagada- 
hoc, 9. 34; counselor of Sir Wil- 
liam Phipps, 9. 34; mentioned, i. 
556; 2. 172, 219; 3. 136; his State- 
ments to the Council cited, i. 37w; 

2. 233; 7. 60; 8. 185; 9.8, 23. 
Simon, 4. S66. 

Thomas, to survey and set off the 
Plymouth Claims, 9. 228 ; made a 
settlement for the state, 9. 229- 
230, 232; his remuneration, 9. 230, 
232. 
William, of Bath, 2. 194. 
William, of Buxton, 4. 344. 
Zebulon, 2. 124. 

Gen. , 4. 16. 

Davison, Nicholas, purchased prop- 
erty at Pemaquid, 5. 230; gave the 
same to his family, 5, 230. 
Davistown, founded by James Davis, 
4. 323; mentioned, 4. 321, 322, 
323, 327, 351. 
Davity, see Davila. 
Davy, Sir Humphrey, 6. 411. 
Day, Mary, 4. 281. 
Moses, 4. 281. 



74 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Day's Academy Grant, i. 466. 
Dead river, described, i. 460; CoL 
Montressor at, i. 461, 462; Ar- 
nold's letter dated from, i. 469, 
470, 471, 473, 471, 495; oxen to be 
sent to; I. 472, 473; in Bucksport, 
4. 103; mentioned, i,476, 479, 480, 
481, 505, 506, 507, 509, 511; 2. 163; 
4. 346. 
Deadwater, 7. 13. 

Dean, Dr. Ezra, married Sarah Coffin, 
4. 249ti. 

Capt. , of Hebron, 4. 388. 

Deane, Charles, his assistance ac- 
knowledged, I. 544; his edition of 
Bradford's History cited, i, 39n. 
the Hon. John G., i. 410; 7. 4, 32, 

45, 48, 72. 
the Key. Samuel, letter to WiUiam 
Willis, 3. Q8n; dates of his, ordin- 
ation and death, 5. Iv; mentioned, 
I. 326n; 4. 20, 263; 5. lii, liii, Iv?^; 
7.219, 220, 478, 481; his Journal 
cited, 5. 450??. 
Dearborn, i. 515n. 
Benjamin, 7. 284. 
family of, 4. 89. 

Gen. Henry, lived in Gardiner, 7. 
415; mentioned, i. 500, 501, 501^, 
513, 51471, 520, 524, 528, 530; 4. 
306, 355,400; 9. 183, 184, 185, 196, 
199. 
Gen. Henry A. S., drew the atten- 
tion of the public to the erection 
of a monument on Bunker Hill, 
3. 244-245; mentioned, 3. 246, 247, 
248, 251, 252. 255; 8. 162. 
John, 3. 204; 9. 181-182. 
Dearing, George, lived at Black Point, 
I. 384; 3. 24, 74; his testimony 
concerning Kobert Nash, i. 384; 
nothing known of him, 3. 24-25; 
his widow married Jonas Bailey, 
3. 74; mentioned, 3. 38??. 
Mrs. George, married Jonas Bailey, 

Kobert, purchased land of Robert 
Jordan, 3. 209; biographical no- 
tice of, 3. 209-210. 

Roger, (sen.), lived at Black Point, 
3. 83; his house attacked, 3. 151; 
children taken prisoners, 3. 151; 
site of his house, 3. 151; his wife 
killed, 3. 151; meetings held at 
his house, 3. 158; mentioned, 3. 
166, 182. 

Roger, jr., 3. 83, 83?i. 

Roger, son of George, 3. 25. 

William, murdered his wife, 3. 182; 
committed suicide, 3.182; a sou 
of Roger, 3. 182. 

Mrs. William, murdered, 3. 182. 

aee also Deering. 
De Bry, Theodore, his Americae Pars 

Quarta cited, 2. 76a. 
De Callieres, Louis Hector, govorner 
of Canada, i. 434. 



Decemanbo, 3. 380. 
Decker's narrows, 9. 131. 
Declaration of Independence, 6. 13 ; 7. 
162. 

De Coulon, Capt. , led the French 

attack at Minas, 8. 139, 140; 
wounded, 8. 140, 140n, 143, 145; 
signed the capitulation, 142. 
Dedham, 2. 145; 4. 268; 7. 429. 
Deed of Gorges to Cleeves and Tucker, 
I. ()5 ; first conveyancing on Amer- 
ican soil, 5. 191-192, 195; from 
'Gorges to Usher, 2. 257-260; from 
Usher to the Mass. Bay Colony, 
2. 261-264. 
poll of Plymouth Colony, 9. 119, 120. 
Deerfield, Mass., Indian conference 
held at, 4. 123; Indians at, 4. 262; 
destroyed, 6. 239; mentioned, 2. 
145; 4. 133, 142, 262. 
N. H., I. 340; 4-298-299. 
academy, 8. 17. 
Deering farm, part of the property of 
Nicholas Mitton, 6. 131 : owned by 
Anthony Brackett, 6. 132; men- 
tioned, i. 117, 122, 195; 6. 131. 
Mary, engaged to William Lithgow, 
jr., 5. 419, 422; married Com- 
modore Preble, 5. 419, 422; death 
of, 5. 419n. 

, present owner of Bracket's 

farm, i. 219, 295, 298. 
Deering's bridge, i. 195; 2. 162. 
Deer island i. 466; 4. 104. 
Wander, 4. 275, 276, 277, 290. 
Wander meadow, in Hollis, 4. 276^ 
276». 
Dehamida, captured by Weymouth, 
2. 21 ; as a guide for the explorers, 
2. 21; given to Popham, 5. 332. 
De Laet, J., map of, 2. 17a. 
De la Saussaye, Sieur , in com- 
mand of the pecond ship that 
brought colonists to America, i. 
429. 
Delavall, Thomas, 5. 10, 29. 
Delaware, in the Duke of York's pa- 
tent, 4. 222; 5. 3; passed under 
the English, 7. 154; mentioned, 5. 
xxxvii, 6. 
bay, 2. 76a; 7. 27; 8. 24; 9. 349. 

county, 5. 132. 
dialect, 4. 275n. 

Indians, called the Lenni-Lanope, 
and the Eenope, 4. 97, 115; coun- 
try occupied by, 4. 114 ; gave name 
to many rivers, etc., 4. 114; but 
few left, 4. 114; their present 
home, 4. 114; mentioned, i.207; 
6. 217; 9. 276. 
Lord, his arrival prevented the 
colonists leaving Virginia, 3. 284. 
river, i. 530; 7. 147; 8.24. 
Delesdernier, George, 6. 103. 
John, 6. 98. 
Lewis F., letter from Albert Gal- 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



75 



latin, 6. 97-103; mentioned, 6. 95, 
360. 

Mr. , arrested Gallatin, 6. 95; 

returned to Nova Scotia, 6. 98. 
De risle, M., 6. 276, 
De Loup river, i. 507, 515. 

De Loutre, , 7. 192. 

De Malstre, Joseph, 8. 488. 
Demilier, see Damalier. 
Democratic party, 5. xxxvii. 

De Mortigny, , 7. 64. 

De Monts, see Du Monts. 

Demosthenes, 6. 400. 

Denecore, Joseph, a French neutral 

sent to Arundel, 3. 176n; 6. 342. 
Denicourt, 9. 104. 

Denison, John, signed the treaty of 
1714, 6. 258; signed the treaty oi 
1717, 6. 262; autograph of, 6. 258, 
262. 
Denmark, i. 500; cattle sent to from 
New England, 2. 503i. 
Maine, 4. 116. 
Denie, 

Lav^rence, signed the petition of 
1672, to Mass., 5. 240; see Dennis 
and Denny. 
Denne, the Rev. Samuel, 9. 300n. 
Dennes, James, lived on the Kenne- 

hec, 5. 60; affidavit of, 5. 60-61. 
Denning, Henry. 4. 55. 

Pownal, 4. 55. 
Dennis, 4. 374. 

Lawrence, letter from Capt. Brock- 
holls, 5. 67-68; signed the petition 
to Mass., 5. 240; mentioned, 5. 
33, 39, 88, 127 ; see also Denie and 
Denny. 
Robert, 5. 214. 

. of Sheepscot, 4. 320. 

Dennison, Gen. D., letter to Richard 
Martin, i. 222-223; sent with 
troops to Maine: 5. 257. 
Denny, Lawrence, Justice of the 
Peace, 5. 102, 113; mentioned, 5. 
61, 63; see also Denie and Den- 
nis. 
Samuel, 2. 208, 221; moved to Ar- 
rowsic, 2. 201; his character, 2. 
201. 
Major, 7. 182; 8. 250. 
Dennysville river, 4. 109. 
Denonville, Jacques Rene de Brisay, 
Marquis de, letters of cited, i. 
434; 7. 55n; not a satisfactory 
governor, 7. 59 ; mentioned, 7. 48, 
51. 55, m, m. 
Denset, Ann, daughter of Francis, 6. 
342. 
Charles, son of Francis, 6. 342. 
Dennis son of Francis, 6. 342. 
Francis, a French neutral sent to 

York, 3. 176m; 6.342. 
Francis, jr., 6. 342. 
John, son of Francis, 6. 342. 
Joseph, son of Francis, 6. 342. 



Mary, daughter of Francis, 6. 342. 
Noon, son of Francis, 6. 342. 
Peter, son of Francis, 6. 342. 
Denys, Jean, drew a map of the Gulf 
of St. Lawrence, 5. 178. 
M., 9. 112. 

Deposition of Cleeves, Mitton and 
others, i. 382-384. 

De Ramzay, , plan to dislodge 

him, 8. 126; fled from Schegnecto, 
8. 128, 130, 131, 132, 133; hoped 
the Acadians w^ould desert the 
English, 8. 130; unable to march 
to Minas, 8. 139. 
Derby Academy. 7. 407. 
line, the, 9. 218. 

Mrs. , of Brighton, 7. 409. 

Dermer, Capt. Thomas, relieved sail- 
ors on the island of Monhegan, i. 
32; letter to Gorges, 2. 29, 31n; 
sent out by Gorges, 2. 30; 5. 163; 
7. 321; failed to meet Rocroft, 2. 
30-31; in Virginia, 2. 30, 31 ; died 
2. 31; the first Englishman to go 
through Long Island Sound, 2. 
3 hi; at Monhegan, 5. 163; ex- 
plored the coast, 2. 163-164; re- 
turned to Monhegan and sailed 
for England, 2. 164; found the 
Indians treacherous, 2. 165 ; made 
a profitable voyage, 7. 321 ; fruits 
of his voyage, 7. 322; mentioned, 
2. 40. 

De Roquemont, , captured by 

Kirk, 9. 102. 
Derry, 6. 5, 6. 

Deslines, , 7. 70, lOn. 

De St. Castine, see St. Castine. 
Desire, the, brought slaves to Boston, 

7.210. ' 

Detroit. J. J. Henry at, i. 503, 530; 
Cadillac in 1701 sent to take pos- 
session of, 6. ^276; expedition 
against, 1760, 4.'278n; captured, 

4. 282; mentioned, 7. 234. 
DeveUiH, Charles, married Martha 

Lithgow, 8. 288; children of, 8. 

288. 
Gen. Charles, son of Charles, 8. 

288; a distinguished soldier, 

statesman and jurist, 8. 288 
Richard, married Caroline Lithgow, 

5. 422. 

Samuel, married Noble, 8. 152; 

children of 8. 152. 

, married Mary Lithgow, 5. 422. 

Devereaux, Humphrey, 5. xxxii. 
De Vere case, the, 5. xlv. 
Devil, the Indian, called Abbamocoke, 
3. 96n; Magahunta, 4-379; Majo 
Lando, 4. 107 ; see Satan. 

De Villiere, see De Coulon, Capt. . 

Capt. , 6. 04, 65. 

Devil's Den, the, 6. 406. 
falls, visited by Montressor, i. 459. 



76 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Devonshire, England, i. 95ii, 352n; 2. 
11; 4. 69, 239, 239n; 5. xln, 249n; 
6.4, 179; 7-403^, 409. 
Maine, Robert Drake born in, i. 
236}i; Geo. Munjoy born in, i. 
258; Munjoy a common name in, 

1. 258; named, 5. 249, 249?i; 
Thomas Gardner treasurer of, 5. 
249; court to be held in, 5. 250; 
settlements in destroyed, 5. 253; 
Boothbay the principal plantation 
in, 6. 155; mentioned, 2. 40a, 266, 
274; 5. 242; 6.6. 

mines, 5. llSn. 
Dexter, Franklin, 3. 246. 

Dr. , 6. 404, 405, 412. 

Diamont, John, signed the petition to 

Cromwell, i. 394. 
D' Iberville. Pierre Lemoine, in com- 
mand of the expedition against 
Pemaquid, 5. 289; 7. 63; com- 
manded L'Envieux, 7. 63; cap- 
tured the New art, 5. 289-290; 7. 
63; at Pentagoet, 7. 63; attacked 
Fort William Henry, 5. 290-291; 
7. 64-65 ; surrender of the fort, 7. 
65 ; planned an expedition against 
Boston, 7. 67. 
Dick, a Scotch-Iris^ name. 6. 19. 
Dickens' Academy, 8. 373. 
Dickenson, the Hon. Daniel S., 8. 100, 

426. 
Dictionary of Coins cited, 6. 118n. 
Dieppe, 2. 29; 5. 178; 8. 322, 329, 332. 
Dier, John, 5. 57. 
see Dyer. 

Digby, , chief shipwright, 3. 308; 

7. 302, 315. 

gut, 8. 129. 

Lord, 2. 33. 

neck, 8. 129. 

Dighton. 2. 145. 

rock, 6. 223. 
Dike, John, 7. 371. 

Nancy, daughter of John, married 
the Rev. John W. Ellingwood, 7. 
371. 
Diligence, the, fitted out at Halifax, 

2. 246; surrendered to O'Brien, 2. 
246; commissioned by Mass., 2. 
247; commanded by Lambert, 2. 
247. 

Dillaway, Arthur, 3. 180. 

James, 3. 179. 
Dillingham, George F., 7. 104. 

Dingiey, Capt. , of Raymondton, 

4. 301, 385, 386. 
Dinsmore, Elijah, 9. 215. 

James, 7. 327-328. 

Gov. Samuel, 6. 58?j. 

Capt. Thomas, 7. 334. 

, of Carrytunk, 4. 398. 

Discoverer, the, 5. 152. 

Discoveries, chief inducements for, 5. 

173. 
Distillery, built at Hallowell, 4. 46. 



Distribution of French neutrals, 3. 
I76n. 

District of Columbia, 8. 355, 356. 

Ditton, William, married Sarah God- 
frey, 9. 299n, 301, 371. 

Divorce, granted to William Norman, 
1.370. 

Dix, John Adams, 8. 436. 

Dixon, Sergeant Robert, killed, i, 
519; first to fall at Quebec, i. 519. 
William, 9. 382; signed petition to 
Cromwell, i. 395. 

Dixton, 4. 339. 

Doane, Capt. , 8. 137. 

Documentary History of Maine, cited, 
7. 364; of the United States, see 
Force, Peter, 2. 8a. 

Documents relating to the colonial 
history of New York, 5. 175ji, 
232^1, 248JI, 250n, 251n, 256?i, 272^1, 
275^, 279w, 283n. 

Dodd, Eliza, married John Royall, i. 
289. 
John, jr., 4. 55. 

Doddridge, the Rev. Philip, 4. 251; 
Four Sermons, 4. 336; Rise and 
Progress, 4. 359 ; Ten Sermons, 4. 
336. 

Dodford, 3. xvi. 

Doe, the Hon. Charles, graduated from 
Berwick Academy, 8. 163. 

Dogs, strength and courage of, 3. 143; 
anecdote of one and a lion, 3. 143; 
trained to act as spies, 7. 327; see 
hounds, 8. 276 w. 

Dole, Ebenezer, 7. 285. 

Sarah, married Nathaniel Coffin, 4. 

241. 
William, lived at Sheepscot, 2. 233. 

Dollar, John, 4. 281. 

Dollars Spanish, value of, 3. 201. 

Dollen, 5. 39; signed the petition to 
Mass., 5. 241. 

Dolling, John, 5-33; a Justice of the 
Peace, 5. 103. 

Donaquek, 8. 330. 

Doneys, the, seized and sent to Fal- 
mouth, I. 288-289. 

Dongan, Gov. Thomas, extent of his 
jurisdicticm, 2.232; land granted 
by, 2. 235, 236; agent of the Duke 
of York, 4. 220; governor of New 
York, 4. 224; 7. 47; governor of 
Sagadahock, 4. 224; Pemaquid' s 
petiti<m to, 5. 70-72, 81-88; letter 
to the Council of New Hampshire, 
5. ' ^4; advised the annexation 
of '. naquid to Boston, 5. 265; 
quarreled with Andros, 5. 267; 
squeezed the people of Pemaquid 
dry, 5. 267; laid claim to part of 
Acadia, 7. 47-48; accompanied by 
a Jesuit, 7. 48; mentioned, 2. 235, 
5. 59, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 95, 101, 
102, 103, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 
110, 113, 125, 129, 267?i; 7-50; 8. 
187, 189, 192, 194. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



77 



Donnell, Capt. Benjamin, 2. 205. 
Henry, resident of Donnell's islanvi, 
I. 145w; formerly lived at York, 
I. 145u, 148. 309; purchased Jew- 
ell's island, i. 148; driven from 
the island, i. 148; married a 
daughter of Thomas Reading, i. 
148, 309; his name given to the 
island, i. 148; lived at Oasci bay, 
I. 236ii; occupied JewelFs island 
as a fishing station, i. 309,' 320; 
his children, i. 809-310; signed 
the petition to Cromwell, i. 395. 
Henry, jr., son of Henry, i. 309; 

moved to York, i. 309. 
Jeffries, leased land to Sylvester 

Gardiner, 2. 203. 
Nathaniel, son of Samuel, i. 310; 
death of, i. 310; signed the peti- 
tion to Charles 11, i. 402; sued 
to obtain his land claims, 2. 202; 
verdict in favor of, 2. 203; extent 
of his claims, 2. 204. 
Samuel, son of Henry, i. 309; a 
counselor, i. 309; 9. 34, 46; died, 
I. 310; father of Nathaniel, i. 310. 
vs. Jeffries, 8. 219ii. 

Donnell's island, name given to Jew- 
ell's island, i. 14on; origin of the 
name, i. 145. 
pond, 2. 220. 

Doors, a rarity, 4. 343. 

Dorchester Antiquarian Society, 5. 
197n. 
England, 3. 316, 320^, 330, 331; 5. 

182. 
hill, 3. 19Y. 

Mass., home of Richard Callicot, i. 
163; home of Thomas Davenport, 
I. 305?i; home of Ebenezer Daven- 
port, I. 309; Gyles Barge moved 
to, 3. 82; mentioned, i. 382; 2. 
145, 175; 3. 653^; 4. 272; 5. li, 423; 
8. 263. 

Dormer, see Dermer. 

Dorr,- , of Starks, 4. 367. 

Dorrel, John, grant to, 2. 47n. 

Dorset, county of, i. l'34n. 

Dorsetshire, i. 234?z. 

Dorumby, Max, sold land to Alexan- 
der Thwoit, 2. 205. 

Dosquet's island, 8. 317. 

D'Ossoli, Countess of, 7. 408. 

Donaquet, Cadillac's account of, 6. 
280; same as Frenchman's bay, 6. 
28031. 

Doughty, Thomas, had a sawmill at 
Saco, I. 269. 

Doughnuts of the olden time, 9. 218- 
219. 

Douglass, Sir Howard, 8. 44. 

the Rev. Nathan, i. 326n. 

William, originated the practice of 

abusing Mather, 9. 20 ; his British 

settlements in North America 

cited, I. 32, 45; 2. 135, 146; 5. 



176)1, 182^, 199n, 267n, 282n; 6. 9, 

10, 181. 
Douset, Francis, a French neutral sent 

to York, 3. 176u; see Denset. 
Dover cliffs, 3. 296. 

England, 3. 91; 7. ISln; 8. 128; 9. 

Maine, home of Capt. Richard Wal- 
dron, I. 167, 212, 215, 293; Simon 
a prisoner at, i. 218; slaughter at, 
I. 291; Major Waldron killed at, 
I. 291 ; home of the Yorks, i. 318; 
the church of met in council at 
Wells, I. 348; acknowledged the 
jurisdiction of Mass., i. 385, 386 
destroyed by Indians, 3. 135 
owned by the Yaughans, 8. 394 
John Merrick interested in, 8. 394 
church built at, 8. 394-395; be- 
came a shire town, 8. 395; men- 
tioned, I. 105, 106; 3. 46; 7. 401. 

N. H., Burdett resided at, i. 89n; 
home of Edward Allen, i. 241; 
early home of George Bramhall, 
I. 306; formerly Cochecbo, 2. 79?i; 
settlement commenced, 2. Idn; 
mentioned, i. 333; 4. 265, 267, 
299; 5. xxiii, xxiv, 286; 8. 65, 169, 
298, 391. 

treaty of, 7. 136n. 
Down, county of, 6. 5. 
Downing, John, 4. 146, 163, 165, 166. 

Joshua, signed the petition to 
Charles ri, i. 401. 

Lucy Wmthrop, letter of cited, 9. 
317. 

, married Rebecca Trickey, ne4 

Rogers, i. 208. 
Downs, George, teacher in Belfast 
Academy, 8. 172. 

the, 2.34a; 9. 304. 
Drafton, Thomas, signed the petition 

to Charles 11, i. 402. 
Drake, Abraham, born in England, i. 
236?i; his children, i.236n; agree- 
ment with Anthony Brackett, i. 
235-236 ; lived at Hampton, i. 236n. 

Abraham, jr., son of Abraham, birth 
and death of, i. 236n. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Abraham, i. 
2mn. 

Sir Francis, 3.95; 7.295; 9. 301. 

F. S., his Town of Roxbury cited, 
8. 264. 

Hannah, daughter of Abraham, i. 
236^. 

Jane, wife of Abraham, i. 236?i. 

Mary daughter of Abraham, i. 236n. 

Robert, born in Devonshire, i. 236n; 
at Exeter, i. 236n; died at Hamp- 
ton, I. 236ti; his son, i. 236m. 

Robert, 2d, son of Abraham, i.236n,. 

Sarah, daughter of Abraham, i.236^. 

Samuel G., his Aboriginal Races of 
North America cited, 5. 144n; his 
Life of Cotton Mather cited, 9. 2- 



78 



MAINE HISTOKIOAL SOCIETY. 



Drake, Samuel G. — continued. 

3, 30; Indian Wars cited, 3. 136n; 
7. 6h, 67 ; History of Boston cited, 
5. 196/1 ; 6. 14; 7. iSSn, 145, 145??, 
146w; 9. 308ri; Tragedies of the 
Wilderness cited, 3-355; 5. 265n, 
2T2n. 

Susannah, daughter of Abraham, 
married Anthony Brackett, i. 236, 
236n. 

Thomas, occupied Clapboard island, 

1. 140. 

Draper, Nathaniel lived at Sheepscot, 

2. 233; witnessed deed from Rob- 
inliood to Mason, 2. 234; swore 
fealty to the Duke of York, 4. 
221; mentioned, 2. 235, 236. 

William, signed petition of 1672, to 
Mass., 5.240. 
Dresden, formerly Pownalborough, i. 
502; 2.279; 4-43; 5. Ix; 6.67; 
Arnold's troops at, i. 502; gar- 
rison at, 2. 199; public building 
buih, 2. 279; settled by Germans, 

2. 280; 4. V, Ix; called Eastern 
Kiver, 2. 282; land at granted to 
Dr. Gardiner, 2. 282; settlement 
commenced at, 2. 282, 283; land 
grants at for religious purposes, 2. 
293; visted by a Koman Catholic 
priest, 3. 273 ; Dr. Gardiner cleared 
alarm at, 5. Ix; Episcopal Church 
established at, 5. Ixi; the Rev. 
Jacob Bailey established in, 5. 
439; formerly Frankfort, 6. 195; 
mentioned, 4. 15, 16, 315, 3.54, 380; 

5. 418, 422; 6. 67; 7. 405; 8. 210w, 
213ji, 240, 268, 287. 

Dresser, Henry, biographical notice of, 

3. 210. * 

Nathaniel, killed by Indians, 3. 170- 
171, 171^1, 210. 

place, the, 3. 210. 

Richard, 3. 210. 
Dreuillctts, Pere Gabriel, sent to the 
Cannibas, 1. 432; formed a reg- 
ular mission, i. 433; envoy to 
Boston for the protection of his 
people, 1.433; called away, i.433; 
his influence, i. 433; mentioned, 

6. 219; 8. 341. 

Drew, the Rev. William A., preceptor 

at Farmington, 8. 171. 
Drought of 1761-2, 3. 177; 4. 270, 273. 
Drown claim, origin of, 5. 230; led to 

grievous ills, 5. 230; settled, 4. 

233. 
Drowne, Shem, proprietor at Pema- 

quid, 5. 302. 
Thomas, 5. 304; first clerk at Pem- 

aquid, 5. 301. 
Drum-beating in place of bell-ringing, 

2. 185. 

Drummond, Capt. , 5. 368. 

, of Bath, 3. 277. 

Drunkenness, four men fined for, i. 



84; among the fishermen, 1.56-57; 
law concerning, i. 381; see intem- 
perance. 

Dubisont, Joseph, 3. 180. 

Du Bois' Manuel of Coins cited, 6. 
118^, 119n, V20n, 121n, 123?i. 

Dublin, Ireland, 6. 368. 
Maine, 6. 27. 
Presbytery, 6. 30. 

Dubreuil, , 8. 330. 

Duche, M., 6. 276. 

Duck, manufactured in Boston, 4. 58. 

Ducking-stool, 2. 185; 3. 57. 

Ducks, plenty, 2. 82. 

Duck- trap, now Linconville, 4. 324n; 
mentioned, 4. 324, 325, 326. 

Ducreux, Pere Francis, his Historia 
Canadensis cited, 6. 210; see also 
Le Creux, Francois. 

Dudley, Joseph, president of New 
England, i. 273, 316; married a 
sister of Capt. Tyng, i. 316; a 
judge in the court held at York, 
I. 380; letter from Sir F. Gorges, 
I. 544-.545; questioned Gorges 
having been in the French wars, 
I. 545; his influence prevented 
mischief in New England, 2. 57; 
John Wheelwright's letter to, 3. 
343-344; Cyprian Southack's let- 
ter to, I. 344-346, 346-347; letter 
from Shadrack Walton, 1.349-350; 
letter from William Partridge, i. 
348; sent an expedition against 
Port Royal, 7. 76; failure, 7. 76; 
sent the forces back, 7. 76-77; 
sent another expedition 7. 78; ex- 
tent of country over which he 
held authority, 8. 190/i; an enemy 
of Gov. Phipps, 9. 47, 48, 53; com- 
plained of the cost of the fort at 
Pemaquid, 9. 48; coveted the 
governorship, 9.53-54; mentioned, 
I. 266^, 5.53; 2. 52; 3. 331, 362; 5. 
92, 199, 297; 6. 250, 251, 252; 8. 
190; 9. 56. 
Moses, 4. 309. 
Paul, extracts from his papers, 5. 

425-429. 
Peter, 4. 363. 
Thomas, 3. 3l8)i; 5. 171. 
William, commissioner for North 
Yarmouth, 2. 175; lived at Rox- 
bury, 2. 175; son of Joseph, 2. 
175; signed the treatv of 1713, 6. 

253; signed the treaty of "1717, 6. 261; 
autograph of, 6. 253, 261. 
, a teaching Friend, 4. 356. 

Dugan, Capt. J., i. 496. 

Duke's Patent, the, 5. 8. 

province, the, condition of the peo- 
ple of, I. 552; l)eople to be car- 
ried from to New York, 5, 9; to be 
protected by New Yoik, 7. 157; 
divided into counties, 7. 158; men- 
tioned, 5. 9, 235, 255. 



INDEX- TO COLLECTIONS. 



79 



territory, the, same as the Duke's 
province, 5. 9; encouragements for 
people to settle in, 5. 80; aban- 
doned by Andros, 5. 'ZoS. 
Dumiresque, Edward, married a 
daughter of Philip Bretton, i. 211. 

Mrs. Philip, 7. 405. 
Dummer Academy, 6. 3S6, 40G. 

Charles, 6. :'j&.). 

Jeremiah, trustee for North Yar- 
mouth, I. 272; 2. 173: agent for 
Massachusetts, i. 898ji; 2. 266; 
mentioned, 7. 86, 233, 284; his 
Defense of the New England 
Charter cited, 5. 176?i, 282», 298n; 
his Memorial Showing the French 
PossessioLS on the liiver of Can- 
ada cited, I. 34. 

Nathaniel, 7. 284. 

Richard, the Plough Patent sent to, 
I. 45n. 

Governor William, received a letter 
from Wenelnonett, 3.377-378; his 
answer, 3. 378-379; met the In- 
dians at Falmouth, 3. 380, 381; 
letter from the Indians, 1727, 3. 
407-408; letter from Capt. Heath, 
3-408-409; letter to the Indians, 
3. 410-411; mentioned, 2. 135; 3. 
395, 396, 397, 405, 407, 409, 410, 
411, 414, 415, 421, 422, 427, 435, 
443, 445, 447; 4. 150, 152, 153, 154, 
155, 158, 159, 170, 174, 176, 179; 5. 
372. 
Dummer' s treaty, signed, 7. 88; an 
annoyance to the French, 7. 88. 

war, 6. 16, 32. 

Dumoiifc, , 8. 457. 

Du Monts, Pierre du Guast, Sieur, 
commissioned lieutenant general 
of France, i. 25; received a char- 
ter from Henry iv, i. 25, 27; 5. 
309, 322, 325; 7. 27; extent of 
grant, 5. 177; 7. 27; took posses- 
sion of the territory in the name 
of the king of France, i. 25n; 7. 
27; sailed and accompanied by 
Champlain, i. 25-26; 7. 249; 8. 
317; 9.98; withdrew his attention 
from Acadia and turned his trade 
to the St. Lawrence, i. 26; estab- 
lished a colony on the St. Croix, 
I. 26; and B\j of Fundy, i. 26; 
his expedition drew the attention 
of the English to the coast of 
Maine, i. 28; his colony the first 
attempt to settle in Maine, i. 28; 
passed a winter at St. Croix, 2. 
20a; 5. 328; 8. 317, 320-321; a fur 
trader, 5. 174n; confiscate^ the 
cargo of Capt. Rosigol, 5. 17472; 
set up a cross on the Kennebec, 
5. 322; Acadia within his grant, 
5. 325; had a knowledge of the 
country, 5. 325; coasted to the 
westward, 5. 328-329; 8.321; his 



route compared to Weymouth's, 
8. 329 ; probably passed the Ken- 
nebec, 8. 329, 330; at Damaris- 
cotta, 8. 329, 330; Popham's col- 
nists settled on his grant, 7. 27; 
his charter tranf erred to Guerche- 
^ ville, 7. 28; 8. 323; his expedition 
carefully prepared, 7. 249; to meet 
Du Pont-Grave, 7. 250: arrived at 
Port au Mouton, 7. 250; sent dis- 
patches to Canceau, 7. 250; had 
higher motives than the little 
island of St. Croix, 7. 251, resolved 
to abandon his plantation, 7. 256; 
to seek a better site for his col- 
ony, 7. 257; interested in the cul- 
ture of maize, 7. 260; to return to 
St. Croix, 7. 262, 263; transplanted 
his settlement to Port Koyal, 7. 
263, 314 ; 9. 98 ; returned to France, 

7. 263; his settlement and fort de- 
scribed, 7. 313-314; the settle- 
ment destroyed by Argall, 7. 319; 
at Cape Cod, 8. 317-318; explored 
Penobscot bay, 8. 318; sent out as 
the head of an expedition, 9. 98; 
his colonists both Catholics and 
Protestants, 9.98; his settlement 
the basis of the French claims, 9. 
102; mentioned, 5. 178; 6Albn: 8. 
29, 245, 249, 255/i, 264, 2i5o. 

Du Monts' island, formerly Holy Cross 
island, 7. 251; mentioned, 8.317, 
330. 

Dunbar, Col. David, commissioned 
governor and surveyor general, 6. 
18; 8.296; 9. 80; Fort Frederick 
his seat of government, 6. 18; his 
government beneficial, 6. 18; in- 
vited the Scotch-Irish to settle at 
Pemaquid, 6. 18; Mass. protested 
against his government, 6. 19; 
built a house and fort at Pema- 
quid, 6. 20; 7. 159; his govern- 
ment terminated, 6. 20; 9. 80; re- 
turned to England, 6. 20; govern- 
or of St. Helena, 6. 20; 8. 298; his 
widow married Henderson, 6. 20; 
probably met by Col. Vaughan, 8. 
296; gave perpetual lease holds, 

8. 297; lieutenant governor of 
New Hampshire, 8. 297; opposed 
by Col. Waldo, 8. 298; disregarded 
the rights of patentees, g. 80; 
mentioned, 6. .33, 35. 

Mrs, , married Henderson, 6. 20. 

Dunbarton, 4. 289n. 

Duncan, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 14. 

Dungan, see Dongan. 

Dunham, James, 2. 115. 

Dunk, George M., 8. 242n. 

Dunkirk Seventy Four, the, American 

soldiers imprisoned in, 7. 334. 
the 3. 216. 
Dunlap, John, deposition of cited, 3. 

323n. 



80 



MAINE HISTOKIOAL SOCIETY- 



Dunlap, Capt. John, son of the Rev. 
Robert, 7. 367 ; father of the Hon. 
Robert P., 7. 367. 
the Hon. Robert Pinckney, his ances- 
try, 7. 307 ; birth of, 7.067 ; graduated 
from College, 7.367; studied law, 
7. 367-368; held public offices, 7. 
368; governor, 7. 368; prominent 
in Freemasonry, 7. 368; president 
of the Bible Society, 7.368; charac- 
teristics of. 7. 368-369; married 
Lydia Chapman, 7. 369; deeply 
religious, 7. 369; visited Illinois, 
7, 369; death of, 7, 370; mentioned, 
I, 12; 6. 33, 371; 7. 371 ; 8. 61, 62, 
63, 64, 67, 394, 415, 456. 
the Rev. Robert, birth of, 6. 33 ; first 
settled minister at Brunswick, 6. 
33, 155; 7. 367; death of, 6. 33; 
resided at Booth Bay, New Castle 
and Sheepscot Bridge, 6. 155; 7. 
367; a native of Antrim, 7. 367; 
graduated at Edinburgh, 7. 367; 
came to America, 7. 367, father of 
Capt. John, 7. 367. 
Mary Tappan, mother of the Hon. 

Robert P., 7. 367. 
William, his history of New York 
cited, 5, 3w. 

Bunnell, Henry, 9. 382; see Donnell. 

Dunning, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 16. 
Capt. David, 7. 182, 184, 193; 8. 251, 
252, 252n, 255, 256^1, 257, 266^1. 

Dunn's Mills, 2. 112. 

Dunstable, 4. 287. 

Dunstan, settled by the Algers, 3. 26- 
27, 82, 101 ; origin of the name, 3. 
27, 28; meeting at, 3. 160; the Rev. 
William Tompson preached at, 
3. 160; the Rev. Geo. Whitfield 
preached at, 3. 161 xi; incorporated 
as a parish, 3. 162; the Rev. Rich- 
ard Elvins preached at, 3. 162; 
Methodists in, 165; first post office 
in, 3. 250m; mentioned, 3. 104, 105, 
106, 120, 125, 128, 159, 167, 168, 
169, 169n, 190, 196, 207, 210, 211, 
213, 218, 220, 226, 227. 
Hannah, see Dustin, Hannah. 
Landing, a shipping-post at, 3.57n; 
home of Elias Oakman, 3. 76; 
mentioned, 3. 169^, 214. 
river, 2. 84n. 

Dunster, the original name of Dun- 
stan, 3. 28. 
England, the home of the Algers, 
I. 213n. 

Dunston, a corruption of Dunster, 
3.28. 

Dunstorre, former home of the Algers, 
I. 213n. 

Duponceau, Pierre Eteinne, i. 413; 4. 
96; 5.96;9. 262, 276, 285. 

Du Pont-Grave, , accompanied by 

Champlain, 7. 249; sailed from 
Honfleur, 7. 249 to meet Du 



Monts, 7. 250; attempted two un- 
successful voyages of discovery, 7. 
264; decided to return to France, 
7. 264; met Ralleau, 7. 264. 

Durant, Moses, lived at Falmouth, i. 
320. 

Duren, Charles, biographical notice 
of the Rev. Charles Freeman, i. 
325w. 

Durend, g. 297. 

Durham, Gore, 4. 294. 
Humphrey, purchased land of Geo. 
Cleeves, i. 121, 129; his farm, i. 
129; petiuoned for Mass. to settle 
the contr versy between Cleeves 
and Jorda^n, 1. 141 ; his land in the 
possession of Anthony Brackett, 
I. 154; resided at Falmouth, i. 
ISOn, 215; killed, i. 219, 221; his 
wife taken prisoner, i. 221; men- 
tioned, I. 122, 123, 212. 
John, liveo it Falmouth, 1.320. 
Maine, Friends' monthly meeting 
held at, 7. 221; mentioned, 2. 118; 
7. 273. 
N. H., home of the Rev. John 
Adams, i. 328; formerly Oyster 
River, i. 346; the Rev. John Buss 
preached at, i . 346-347 ; mentioned, 

3. 315n; 4-265, 267,373. 
Palatinate of, i. 400. 

Durrell, , married Rachel Emery, 

4. 372-373. 

Durrie, , 5. 37. 

Dusseldorf, 5-407; 6.322. 

Dustin, Hannah, killed seven Indians, 
4- 389. 

Dutch, the, captured Geo. Cartwright, 
I. 182n; Mrs. Lee on board of a 
vessel of, i. 293; explored Long 
Island Sound, 2. 31; inclined to 
settle the coast, 2. 38; trade Avith 
the Indians, 2. 67; value of their 
trade on the Hudson, 2. 68n; at- 
tempted to settle in Maine, 4. 218, 
220; 5. xxi; 6. 1, 23n; 7-25; left 
Maine and did not return, 4. 227; 
captured New York, 5. 3, 231, 248; 
captured the fort at Pentagoet, 7. 
46; dispossessed the English of 
the foreign trade, 7. 139; captured 
the Castle of Cormentin, 7. 139; 
lost the same, 7. 139; encroached 
upon the territory belonging to 
the English, 7- 139-140, 143; trade 
the cause of the war with, 7. 140; 
in Kew York, 7. 140; Clarendon's 
project against, 7. 143, 144, 145; 
reduced to English allegiance, 7. 
150; destroyed the foi't at St. 
John's river, 7. 340; bribed the 
captain of the Mayflower, 8. 200, 
201 ; authority for this fact, 8. 200; 
mentioned, 2. 7; 5-27; 7. 143, 147, 
153w, 154, 156; 8. 326; 9. 11, 19, 
349. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



81 



Dutch coin, found in Portland, 6. 135. 
king, 8. 348, 350, 351 ; see also Neth- 
erlands, the king of. 
war, the, 5. 30. 

West Indian Company, the, 7. 150. 
Du Thet, Gilbert, a Jesuit sent to 

America, i. 429; killed, i. 431. 
Dutton, 8. 454. 

house, Hallowell, 7. 276. 
the Rev. John, 2. 121, 
Samuel E., 8, 452. 

the, British hospital ship, 7. 474; 
Dr. McKinstry died on board of, 
7. 474. 
Warren, 3. 246. 

Col. , gave land to Hallowell 

Academy, 8. 160. 

Col- , of Fairfield, 4. 372. 

Duval, Gabriel, 5. xlviii. 
Duvall, William, part owner of the 
Katches at Pemaquid, 5. 9; 
Katches to be delivered to, 5. 10, 
11. 
Duxbury, 2. 113, 146, 175; 4. 272. 
D wight, Thomas, 2. 291. 

Dwlnal, , an early settler of 

Bakerstown, 2. 113. 
Dwithine, Nathaniel, signed the peti- 
tion of 1672, to Mass., 5, 240. 
Dye, John, received a grant from the 
Plymouth Company, i. 45, 80; 3. 
32; extent of the grant, i,45; 3. 
32; 5. xxi; his grant called the 
Plough Patent, i. 45, 80; 3, 32. 
see Dyer, 
Dyer, Christopher, lived at Sheepscot, 
2. 233; swore fealty to the Duke 
of York, 4, 221 ; signed the peti- 
tion of 1672, to Mass., 5. 240; 
built a stockade, 9. 136; men- 
tioned, 5. 57; 9. 151. 
G. signed the treaty of 1717, 6. 261 

autograph of, 6. 261. 
John, signed the petition of 1672, 
to Mass., 5. 240; mentioned, 5. 57 
Jonas, 3. 180. 
Mathew, signed the petition of 

1672, to Mass., 5. 240. 
William, commissioner, 2. 233; 5. 
236; lived at Saco, 5.233; swore 
fealty to the Duke of York, 4. 
221; signed the petition of 1672, 
to Mass., 5. 240. 
see Dye. 
Dyer's neck, 9. 136. 
river, 2. 235; 4. 211, 212, 213; 9. 135, 

136. 
riverbend, 9. 153, 154. 
stockade, 9. 136. 
Dymond, Israel, 5. 33, 84, 40. 
Dyre, Capt. , 5. 8. 



Eag, the Indian for land, 2, IQan. 
Eagle, the, Witheridge master of, 5. 
168; at Pemaquid, 5. 168; owned 
6 



by Bennet, 5. 168; fishing on the 
coast, 5. 186n. 

Eakwood, 3. 69«,. 

Earl of Bute, the, built at Bath, 2. 
:d09. 

Early documents relating to Maine 
cited, I. SSn. * 

History of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church in Maine by Dr. 
Edward Ballard, 6. 171-202. 
Lawyers of Lincoln and Kennebec 
Counties by Frederick Allen, 6. 
43-81. 

Earthy, John, warned the Indians of 
Laughton's treason, 5, 251; at- 
tempted to negotiate a treaty 
with the Indians, 5. 251-25i; 
made peace with the fcJachems, 5. 
252. 

East Boston, 6. 17; 7. 210. 
Bridgewater, Mass., 5. xxxv. 

Easterlings, 6. 151. 

Eastern Argus, the, cited, 5. I74w; 8. 
368. 
boundary, the, 9. 224. 
diocese, the, 6. 201 ; 7. 420. 
river, 2. 282; 4. 354; 5, Ix. 

East Greenwich, 5. 129. 

Eastham, 2. 146. 
the Rev. Edward, graduated from 
college, I. 328; preached in Lim- 
erick, I. 328; death of, i, 328. 

Easthampton, 2. 234; 4. 231. 

East India Company, Duke of York 
interested in, 7. 138-139; incorpo- 
rated, 7, J39ri; Godfrey petitioned 
to, 9. 305n. 
Indies, the, occupied by Portuguese, 

2.59. 
Kingston, 4. 267. 

Eastlanders, 4. 97. 

East Machias, 3. 179; 8. 165. 

Easton, Mass., 5. xl?^. 
Col. , I. 484, 521. 

Eastport, 7. 251; 8. 15, 69, 70. 

East river, 21. Sin. 
the fixedness of the people of, i. 9. 

Eastwick, Stephen, signed the treaty 
of 1713, 6. 255; autograph of, 6. 
255. 

East Windsor, 6, 31. 

Eaton, Angelina, daughter of Cyrus, 
7. 491; assisted her father, 7. 4Ji, 
495; death of, 7.491,495. 
Benjamin, father of Cyrus, 7. 487; 
in the war of the Revolution, 7. 
487; a shoemaker, 7. 487; deal i 
of, 7. 487. 
Cyrus, parents of, 7. 487; birth of, 
7. 487; a shoemaker, 7. 488; early 
love of learning, 7. 488; at the 
academy, 7. 488; employed as a 
farmer, 7. 488-489; studied sur- 
veying, 7. 489; worked at brick- 
making, 7. 489; still studious, 7. 
489-490; a school teacher, 7. 490, 



82 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETT. 



Eaton, Cyrus —continued. 

491; calculated an eclipse, 7. 490; 
in Warren, 7. 490; his home 7. 
490; married Mary Lermond, 7. 
491 ; children of, 7. 491 ; valuable 

. aid from his daughter, 7. 491, 494- 
495 ; death of his wife, 7. 491 ; his 
character, 7. 492-498; became 
blind, 7. 492, 494; held in high 
esteem, 7. 493 ; a successful teach- 
er, 7-493; skilled in the languages 
and surveying, 7. 493-494; his 
publications, 7. 494, 495; degrees 
conferred upon, 7. 494; member 
of many learned bodies, 7. 494; 
death of, 7. 487, 491-492; men- 
tioned, 6. 108, 293, 309, 322-323; 
his Annals of Warren cited, 3. 
227^1 ; 4. 106, 109; 5. 367n, 370n, 
375 ?i, 382n. 

David, son of Benjamin, 7. 487. 

Ebenezer, killed, i. 182. 

the Rev. Eiisha, preached in Mer- 
riconeag, 2. 187; death of, 2. 187- 

Eliza Ann, dauOhter of Cyrus, 7. 
491. 

Emily, daughter of Cyrus. 7. 491, 
492 ; her valuable aid to her father, 
7. 491, 494-495. 

family, 7. 484. 

George Oscay, son of Oscar, 7. 491 . 

John, letter to Col. Sloughttr, 5. 
133. 

the Rev Joseph, i, 350; 7. 222. 

Mary, v^rife of Benjamin, 7. 487; 
death of, 7. 487; lived with her 
son David, 7, 487. 

Oscar, son of Cyrus, married Mary 
W. Standish, 7. 491 ; children, of, 
7. 491: death of, 7. 491. 

the Rev. Samuel, preached in North 
Yarmouth, 2. 187; death of, 2. 
187; mentioned, 2. 115, 117, 119; 
4.377; 7-^19. 

Theophilus, 9. 31^. 

Dr, , of Harpswell, 4. 332. 

General , 8. 17. 

, 2. 47^. 

Widow , of Farmington, 4. 308, 

310, 303, 365, 396. 
Ebens, Edward, killed at Falmouth, 

I. 295. 
Eb-nee-cook, 9. 131. 
Ebronfield, Henry, 2. 280. 
Ecclesiastical Sketches of Maine, see 
Greenleaf, Moses. 

Tribunal, established in Maine, 5. 
236; the only one in America or 
England, 5. 286. 
Eckfeldt's Manuel of Coins, cited, 6. 

118n, liyn, 120w, 121n, 123n. 
Ecphantus, 7. 343, 
Edauweeno, 3. 412. 
Eddington, 7. 5. 
Eddy, Col. , 7. 10, 16. 

the, 8. 297, 301. 



Eden, land in granted to Mde. de 

Gregorie. 
Edes, Philip, signed petition to Brad- 
street, I. 2SSn; lived in Falmouth, 
I. 320. 

Judge , 9. 251. 

Edewancho, 3. 358, 
Edgar, the, 9. 34n. 
Edgartown, 5. 153. 

Bdgecomb, ordered to relinquish their 
rights to the state, 2. 292; land 
in claimed by Stephen Calef, 4. 
230; Freewill Baptist Church 
formed at, 7. 222; mentioned, 4. 
330; 9. 131, 137. 

Christian, 3. 110. 

Christopher, in the garrison at 
Black Point, i. 227n; signed the 
petition to Charles 11, i. 402; 3. 
129; probably a son of Nicholas, 
3- 25. 

GiObins, served in the Continental 
Army, 3. 204. 

Joanna, married Puncheon, 3. 

25. 

John, in the garrison at Black Point, 
1. 227n; 3. 110; selectman of Saco, 
3. 25; mentioned, 3. 110, 121. 

Mary, married first to George Page, 
second to John Ashton, 3. 25, 82. 

Michael, in the garrison at Black 
Point, I. 227/1 ; 3. 110; probably a 
son of Nicholas, 3. 25. 

Nicholas, acknowledged the govern- 
ment of Mass., I. bS6; 3-47; set- 
tled at Black Point, 3. 24, 38n, 83; 
ancestry of, 3. 25 ; moved to Saco, 
3. 25; his children, 3. 25, his 
daughter married John Ashton, 
3. 25, 82. 

Nicholas, 2d, grandson of Nicholas, 
3. 25 ; agent for the heirs of Sir 
Richard, 3. 25. 

Sir Richard, 3. 25. 

Robert, in the garrison at Black 
Point, I. 227n; 3. 110; signed the 
petition to Charles 11, i. 402; 3. 
V29n; a son of Nicholas, 3. 25; 
married Rachel Gibbins, 3. 25; 
death of, 3. 25. 
Edgeremet, 3. 380; 5-283. 
Edgmaroggan river, 4. 105. 
Edict of Nantes, the revocation of the, 
drove French refugees to Maine, 
I. 276; 8. 213w; signed by the 
king, 9. 98 ; admitted Protestants 
to places of trust, 9. 98. 
Edinburgh, 5. 422; 6. 33, 34, 157, 167; 
7. 367. 

Review, the, cited, 6. 8, 410. 

University, 6. 31; 7.478. 
Edmans, Robert, signed the petition 

to Mass., 5. 240. 
Edmonds, Sir Thomas, British min- 
ister to France, 2. 39a; in charge 
of the affail^ of Capt. John Smith, 
2. 39a. 



INBEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



83 



Edmundston, 8» 4 

Edowauhkeriti, 3. 412. 

Education, laws in favor of, i. 204; 3, 
VSln) Scarborough presented for 
not providing schools, 3. l;]l. 

Educational Institutions of Maine 
while a District of Mass., bv the 
Rev. J. T. Champlin, 8. 155-160. 

Edward i, founded the Hambourg 
Company, 7, 189». 

II, 4. 2.39. 

III, introduced the Rose Noble, 6. 
130; legend introduced on his 
coinage, 6. 131, 139; mentioned, 
6. 149, 150. 

IV, 6. 149. 

VI, no interest during his reign in 
discoveries, a* 18a. 
Edwards, John, lived at Purpooduck, 

1. 320. 

Jonathan, his observations on the 
Language of the Monhegan In- 
dians, cited, 6. 208>i, 212, 212n, 
215n.* 
R., 2. 173. 

the Hon. Ogden, i. 448. 
Pierpont, i, 448. 
Eel river, 8, 104. 
Efvaragoosaret, 4, 163. 
Egeremet, murdered, 5. 292; at Fort 

William Henty, 7, m. 
Egerton Manuscript, the, cited, g. 

H22n, 360. 
Eichenberg's newspaper, cited, 6. 325. 
Elberfield, 5. 405 
Elbridge family, 5. 149. 

Giles, empowered Shute to purchase 
Monhegan, i. 36; 2. oOa; 7. 171; 
sent the patent to Shute, i. 36-87; 
father of Thomas, i. 37; received 
a tract of land, i. 80; 7. 135; the 
estate of Aldworth bequeathed to, 

2. 51a; 5. 154; his grant conflicted 
with the deed of John Brown, 2. 
87n; his son Thomas moved to 
Pemaquid, 5. 154; had a settle- 
ment at Monhegan, 5. 200; his pa 
tent in full, 5. 207-214; a friend 
of Jordan, 6. 189; mentioned, i. 
39; 5. 196, 197, 214, 223, 226. 

John, 5. 226; a descendent of Giles, 
5. 154; founded the Bristol Infirm- 
ary, 5. 154. 

Thomas, son of Giles, i. 37; 5. 154, 
226, 227; held a court, i. 37, 138; 
autograph of, i. 37; 5-5226; sued 
by Cleeves, i. 138; verdict in his 
favor, I. 138; 5. 230; moved to 
Pemaquid, 5- 154, 226, 227; heir 
of Aldworth, 5. 226; alienated his 
property, 5. 229-230; sold it to 
White aad Davison, 5. 230; em- 
broiled in difficulties, 5. 830; a 
friend of Jordan, 5-230; awore al- 
legiance to the Duke of York, 5. 
Wl, 2^n; liv^ ^t Pemaquid, 5. 



237n; neglected, 5. 237n; peti- 
tioned Mass. to govern Maine, 5. 
238, 240. 
Elden, Capt. John, settled at Buxton, 

2. 139; 4. 245; came from Saco, 2. 
139; at the seige of Boston, 2. 139. 

Elden' s Corner, 2. 140. 

Elder, John, married Martha Kniffht, 

3. 216. 

Elective franchise, the, of Mass., ap- 
plicable to Maine, i. 201. 
Elias, the, commanded by Andries, 1;. 

136. 
Eliot, first church in, 5. liv; the Rev. 
John Rogers settled in, 5. liv. 

Benjamin, 3. 375. 

the Rev. John, his church, i. 264; 
his work as a missionary, i. 446; 
only one man now able to read 
his Indian Bible, 6. 205; men- 
tioned, 5.194; 9. 276; his Indian 
grammar cited, 4. 96, 99; 9. 276, 
285n. 

the Rev. John, of Boston, one of 
the founders of the Mass. Histor- 
ical Society, 2. 11a; his Biograph- 
ical Dictionary cited, 5. xlvii. 
Elizabeth, Queen, coins of her reign 
found at Richmond's island i. 43n; 
appointed Gorges governor of 
Plymouth, 1. 109; death of, 2.21a;, 
interested in America, 5. 1.50; gave 
a patent to Raleigh, 5. 152; coin 
of her reign found at Portland, 6. 
129; her coinage of pure metal, 6. 
130; coinage described, 6. 130; 
England prosperous during her 
reign, 6. 174; incorporated the 
East India and Turkey Companies, 
7. 139; sanctioned American 
slavery, 7. 209; mentioned, 2. Q6a, 
77a, 15; 4. 68; 5. 170n; 6. 5, 24,, 
30, 139, 146, 150, 151; 7.295,364, 
380; 9-300. 

the, 5. 135. 

islands, the, 2. 20a. 
Elizabethtown point, paroled prison- 
ers landed at, i. 528. 
Elkins, Christopher, lived at Black 
Point, 3. 83. 

Henry, in the garrison at Black 
Point, I. 227n; 3. 110; signed the 
petition to Charles 11, i. 402; 3.- 
129n; mentioned, 3, 232. 

Samuel, 4. 315. 

Thomas, under-marshal for Gorges, 
I. 88; lived at Black Point, 3. 83. 

, lived at Long R^aoh,. a; 206;; 

house burnt, 2. 205. 
Ellacott family, i. 95 j*.. 
Ellicot family, i. ,95ft.. 

Vines, grandson, of Richard ¥iii^J9„ 
I. 95n. 
EUingham and Gayle, amotuiit; of hmM 
granted to, 9. 37$. 
I Ellington, 6. 31./ 



84 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



EUingwood, the Kev. Jolm W., 
preached in Bath, 2. 226; son of 
Capt. Joshua, 7. 371 ; birth of, 7. 
371 ; apprenticed to a silversmith, 
7. 371; married Nancy Dike, 7. 
371 ; set up business for himself, 
7. 371-372; deeply religious, 7. 
372 ; studied theology, 7. 372 ; or- 
dained, 7. 372; resigned his pas- 
torate, 7. 372-373; death of bis 
wife, 7. 373; married Mrs. H. M. 
Smith, 7. 373; character of, 373- 
374, 375; as a dentist, 7. 374-375; 
his missionary trees, 7. 375; hon- 
orary degrees from college, 7. 37G; 
sermons printed, 7. 377-378 ; death 
of, 7. 373; mentioned, 2. 206; 4. 
227. 
Capt. Joshua, 7. 371. 
JEliot, formerly part of Kittery, i. 269; 
< 6. 200; called Sturgeon Creek, 7. 

221; Friends at, 7. 221. 
Daniel, moved to Machias, 3. 179. 
Elizabeth, married to George 

Vaughan, 8. 295. 
Robert, lived at Falmouth, i. 155; 
in the garrison at Black Point, i. 
227/1 ; received a deed from Robert 
Jordan, jr., 235?!; tax paid to Fal- 
mouth, I. 323; lived at Black 
Point, 3. 83; land at Black Point 
granted to, 3. 213 ; Elliot Vaughan 
his heir, 3. 226; biographical no- 
tice of, 3. 210; mentioned, 3. 16n, 
110, 132, 211. 
Elliott's plantation, 3. 213. 
'Ellis, Freeman, 4. 361, 390, 391, 401. 
Mrs. Freeman, 4-391. 
Joanna, 4. 390. 

the Rev. , of Little Compton, 4. 

270. 
•Ellsworth, 6. 35, 36, 275; 8. 4. 
4. 364. 

Oliver, stockholder in the woolen 
mills, 4. 55 ; Justice of the Supreme 
Court, 4. 56 ; father of the govern- 
or, 4. 56. 
Elson, John, 3. 110. 

Samuel, i. 227n. 
.Elvins, the Rev. Richard, preached at 
Dunstan, 3. 162; death of, 3. 162- 
163; lived at Salem, 3. 163; a 
baker, 3. 163 ; influenced by White- 
field, 3. 163; married Mrs. Willard, 
3, 163; poem by, 3. 163/i; men- 
tioned, 3. 204. 
j:iwell, Edward Henry, The White 
Hills of New Hampshire, 9. 207- 
219. 
John, 4. 290. 
^Ely, Justin, 4. 262. 
Emanuell river, 3. 293. 
Embden, i. 459n. 
Emerald Island, the 6. 5. 
Emerson, Benjamin Dudley, teacher 
at Warren, 8. 172. 



Edward, 7. 284; married Susanna 

Perkins, 8. 389. 
the Rev.Ezekiel, i^reached at George- 
town, 2. 221-222; an account of, 
2. 222; menti'oned, 4. 295, 330, 348, 
349, 377; 7. 219. 
Joseph, of York, preached in Wells, 
1 . 346 ; one of the first settlers of 
Wells, I. 362; 3. 55; signed the 
petition to Cromwell, i. 395; ex- 
empt from presentment, 3. 54; 
biographical notice of, 3. 210; 
mentioned, 6.395; 9. 381. 
Ralph Waldo, 8. 451. 
stream, 4. 374. 
William, 4. In; 7. 414. 

Dr. , 5. xviii. 

Emery, Jona., 4. 372, 401. 
Mrs. Jona., taken prisoner at Fair- 
field, 4. 380. 
Jonathan, 2d, 4. 373. 
Dr. Joseph, traveled with the Rev. 
Paul Coffin, 4. 289; located at 
Frytjburg, 4. 289}^; married Miss 
Fessenden, 4. 289n; his daughter 
married the Rev. Daniel Dana, 4. 
289n. 
Elder Joseph, 7. 222, 225. 
Moses, a lawyer, 5. xxvi; 8. 397. 
Moses, early settler at Bakerstown, 
2. Ill, 112; an elder, 2. 112, a fer- 
ryman, 4. 112; his hunting feats, 
4, 112. 
Moses, jr., first male child born in 

Bakerstown, 2. 111. 
the Rev. Moses, 2. 127. 
the Hon. Nicholas, i. 326?i; 8. 57; 

%47, 397, 431, 456. 
Noah, 4. 205. 
Rachel, daughter of Jona., 4. 372; 

married to , Durrell, 4. 372- 

373. 
Sally, daughter of Dr. Joseph, mar- 
ried to the Rev. Daniel Dana, 4. 
289w. 
Simeon, 4. 205. 

the Rev. Samuel, educated at Har- 
vard College, I. 340; minister at 
Wells, 340, 347; married in Wells, 
I. 347; his salary, i. 347; lived in 
his own house, i. 348; died at 
Winter Harbor, i.348; buried in 
Wells, I. 348; mentioned, i. 350. 
Judge Stephen, 6. 41, 369; 8. 170. 

Dr. ^ of Hampton, 4. 279. 

Emery's ferry, 4. 316. 

mills, 2. 112. 
Emmes, Nathaniel, 2. 179, 180. 
Emmet, Eger, 4. 148, 151, 152, 15?, 

154, 155, 163, 164. 
Emmons, Dr. Nathaniel, 6. 393. 

Mr. , of Hallowell, 6. 67. 

E. Mmetinic, Isle de, now Monhegan, 
7. 315; mentioned, 7. 293?i, 306, 
314, 315. 
Encyclopedia Americana, 6. 210n* 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



85 



Endicott, Gilbert, had a sawmill at 
CapePorpus, i. 268. 
Capt. John, sent to America, i. 41; 
at Salem, i.41; Robert IngersoU 
sent to, I. 113; acknowledged the 
deed from Cleeves to Allen, 1. 126; 
Cleeves' letter to, 1. 167-170; pur- 
chased land of Nathaniel Mitton's 
estate, i. 248; letters to cited, i. 
280w, 396-397; 2. 47; mentioned, 
5. 168n, 199; 9.329, 336. 

Eneas, a friendly Indian, 1.469; signum 
of, 6. 255; mentioned, 4. 155, 163. 

Enfield, 2. 145; 4-295,296. 

England, Capt. John Smith returned 
to, I. 31; Sir Richard Hawkins 
sailed to Amerca from, i. 32; 
Capt. Rocroft sent a captured 
bark to, i. 32; Capt. Christopher 
Levett returned to, i.42n; beaver 
skins sent to, i . 55 ; different kinds 
of merchandise sent to, i. 57, 536; 
4. 23; Cleeves went to, i. 65, 100, 
115, 117, 546; 3- 40; the Church 
of to be establiseed as the rehgion 
of the people of Maine, i. 86; 
George Burdett came from, i.S9n; 
Burdett left his wife and children 
in, I. 89^; the civil wars in de- 
stroyed all that Gorges had estab- 
lished in America, i. 90; 2.60a; 
Dr. Child born in and returned to, 
i.95n; the political events in cause 
a decision in favor of Rigby, i. 96; 
Godfrey's government sent a re- 
monstrance to, I. 101, lOln; Nich- 
olas Shapleigh returned to, lAidSn; 
the government of gave no sup- 
port to the commissioners of 
Maine, i. 195; trade with Rich- 
mond's island, i. 280; 4. 23, An- 
dros sent to, 4- 297n; Edward 
Tyng died in, 4. 316; John and Na- 
thaniel Wallis born in, 4. 3l7n; 
the Hutchinsons returned to, 4. 
342n; John Wheelwright went to, 

4. 344ii; the names of cities in 
given to American places, 4. 355n; 
the laws of to be used in New 
England, 4. 400; 2. 50a; 6. 174; 
Ethan Allen sent in irons to, i. 
489; pipe-staves sent to, i. 536; 
Thomas Jenner moved to, i. 547; 
threats to send Cleeves a prisoner 
to, I. .549; John Jocelyn returned 
to, I. 550n; the basis of her claim 
to the American coast, 2. 15a, 19a; 
7. 26, 296; 9. 102; no efforts made 
to follow the discoveries of the 
Cabots, 2. 18a; the interest for 
colonization revived in, 2. 20a, 27a; 

5. 343-344; 7. 294; Pring returned 
to with a load of furs and sassa- 
fras, 2. 22a; attempts made to 
awaken the interest of the govern- 
ment of in colonization, 2. 24a; 



return of the Sagadahoc colonists 
to, 2. 29a, 30a; trouble in pre- 
vented the scheme of a general 
government in New England, 2. 
54a; bought and sold, the cry of 
Essex, 2. 70a; climate of com- 
pared to that of New England, 2. 
98; interested in American fish-, 
ing, 2. mn; the fishing trade in 
decayed, 2. 104; the soldiers of 
held Castine, 4- 78; the first 
American possessions of, 5. 148; 
the first step of her colonial greats 
ness, 5. 153; Weymouth carried 
Indians to, 5. 157, 349, 350; 6. 
314; Nahanada in, 6.159; appreci- 
ated the value of the naval stores 
of New England, 5. 298, 298ji; 
excited over the marvelous dis- 
coveries in America, 5. 343-344; 
the war with France a hindrance 
to her colonies, 5-397; her jeal- 
ousy of Ireland like her jealousy 
of America, 6. 8-9; history of the 
coinage of, 6. 149-151; Allerton 
made voyages to as agent for the 
Company of undertakers, 7. 30, 
American slavery due to, 7. 209; 
sanctioned the slave trade, 7. 212; 
claimed the right of possession 
of the coast of Maine, 7. 296; pre- 
pared to defend her right, 7. 296; 
opened contracts for charters, 7. 
296, 297 ; tenor of the charters, 7. 
297 ; learned the value of a way 
from Halifax to Quebec, 8. 18; pre- 
tended that the United States de- 
sired the conquest of Canada, 8. 
18; desired a right of way, 8. 18- 
19; her indecency toward the 
United States, 8. 46; her treat- 
ment of the United States in 1861, 
8. 99, 100; mentioned, i. 47n, 49, 
52, .54, 65n, 73, 80n, 83, 89, 95, 96, 
113, 113^, 115, 116, 120, 146, 153, 
176, 177, 194, 207, 213, 236^, 258, 
336, 352, 403, 528, .5.54; 2. 14a, 20a, 
45a, 47a, 48a, 52a, 56a, 64a, 72a, 
77a, 78a, 15, 21, 44, 45, 46, 47, 50, 
65, 91, 100, 141, 172, 189, 190, 201, 
248, 257, 258, 261, 266, 274; 3- 15, 
21^, 25, 28, eS2, 38, 48, 50, 53, 55, 
63, 68, 69ii, 89, 90, 92, 98, 133, 175, 
209, 217, 218, 219, 220, 232, 283, 
284 288, 290, 309, 315^, 316, 318, 
320^, 321, 325, 327, 331, 332, 351, 
355,356,366; 4-4,5,11,18,68,69, 
132, 138, 239, 293, 396; 5- xxi, 
xxxiv, xxxvi, xln, xlv, Ivii, Iviii, 
lix, Ixi, 5, In, 26, 48, 49, 59, 82, 
113, 125, 129, 145, 147, 148, 150,, 
l>58n, 177, 185, 195, 196, 199, 200,, 
204, 207, 217, 221, 231, 236, 245,. 
248 266, 271, 273, 276, 815,. 321,. 
324, 330, 334; 6. 5, 20, 22, 24, 27, 
28, 49, 86, 88, 89, 96n, 119,. 124, 



86 



MA^E HISTOKICAL SOCIETY. 



England— continu ed. 

131, 139, 149, 150, 151, 167, 169, 
179, 180, 181, 184, 186%, 187, 193, 
194, 195, 220, 242, 321, 322, 325, 
327, 331, 335, 336, 354, 358, 3a4, 
410, 411; 7. 15, 16, 25, 30, 31, 32, 
58, 135, 136, 336w, 137, VSln, 139, 
140, 142, U2n, lUn, 147, 156, 202, 
223, 227, 234, 235, 293, 294, 295, 
303, 304, 306, 307, 308, 321, 328, 
334, 355, 356, 364, 382, 383, 404, 
405, 406, 409, 410, 423; 8. 64, 84, 
90, 99, 100, 114, 128, 185, 191, 201, 
203, 220, 238, 263, 268m, 294, 295, 
298, 302, 308, 309, 318, 326, 349, 
350, 352, 412; g. 3, 9, 11, 13, 17, 
19, 23ji, 24, 25, 26, 27, 30, 33, 34n, 
38, 44, 47, 48, 52, 53, 54, 56, 61, 68, 
70, 75, 83, 89, 102, 103, 105, 106, 
107, 118, 122, 132, 199, 223, 224, 
225, 246, 247, 304, 310, 311, 311^, 
313, 313w, 314, 315, 316w, 318, 323, 
325, 339, 340, 341, 343, 347, 349, 
350, 352, 257, 361, 362, 368, 369, 
373, 374; the Churcli of, see Eng- 
lish Church and Episcopal Church. 
William, purchased land of Samo- 
set, 5. 188n. 

English, Capt. , commanded a 

packet between Boston and Fal- 
mouth, •!. 278. 
channel, of dangerous navigation, 

2. 36an. 
church, first mention of the service 
of in New England, 6. 175, 175?z; 
the Rev. John Wiswell, settled at 
Falmouth, 6. 193; see Episcopal 
church, 
coinage, found at Castine, 6. 124. 
James, purchased land of Nathan- 
iel Mitton's estate, i. 248; ad- 
dressed a petition to the select- 
men of Falmouth, i. 250; asked 
for certain privileges, 1.250-251; 
petition partially granted, i. 251; 
his daughter a legatee of Silvanus 
Davis, I. 309. 
record commissioners, publications 

of, 2. 9a. 
the, captured Mount Desert, i, 26n, 
27; dispute with the French in 
regard to the boundaries, i. 27; 6. 
3/1 ; occupy the country as far as 
the Kennebec, 6. 27-28; their at- 
i;ention drawn to the coast of 
Tilaine, 6. 28 ; settled in Bermuda, 
New Foundland, Plymouth and 
Yirginia, 6.33; received laud from 
Squidryset, 6. 42; offended by the 
purchase of Maine by Mass., 6. 
239; refused to pay the corn trib- 
ute to the Indians, 6. 287; hin- 
dered the fish from ascending the 
Saco, 6. 287; stole the lands from 
the Indians, 6. 287; hated by the 
.French, 6. 287, 287n; 5. 176, 266/i, 



278 : far surpassed by the French 
in their regard for the religion of 
the Indians, 5. 405; changes in the 
language, 5. 426; policy of the 
Jesuits towards, 5.433; flattered 
Dreuilletts, 5. 43;1; proposed a 
treaty with the Cannibas, 5.434; 
Tliury inflamed the Indians 
against, 5. 436; 2. 169; the in- 
fluence of Rale an insuperable 
barrier to their plans of occupancy, 

1 . 436 ; their hatred of the French, 
1. 442 ; built a church for the Nor- 
ridgewocks, 442^1 ; their claim to 
America founded on Cabot's dis- 
coveries, 2. 15a; 7. 26, 296; had 
little interest in discoveries, 2. 18a; 
satisfied with fishing, 2. 18a; 
Somerset friendly to the, 2. 48a, 
50a; had no settlement on the 
coast when Levett arrived, 2. 49a- 
50a; the settlements of, 2. 7; ex- 
cited revenge among the natives, 

2. 169; the French intrigue to ex- 
terminate, 3. 152; 5. 251; Canada 
ceded to, 3. 176; early in Maine, 
5. xxi; 6. 3, 4; extent of territory 
they settled, 5. xxi; character of 
tliose that settled New England, 

5. xxii; their fishing ships early 
on the coast, 5. 144; the colonies 
founded by private adventure, 5. 
148; wrought out the principles 
of freedom, 5. 149; their fisheries 
a source of trouble with the 
French, 5. 174-175; hedged in by 
the French, 5. 243; 8. 223; the 
Mohawks friendly to, 5.256-257; 
compared to the French, 5. 295- 
296; 6. 277; the disputed bound- 
ary of Acadia, 6. 3^; St. Castine 
a formidable adversary of, 6. Hi- 
ll 2; 7. 43; sometimes the aggres- 
sors, 6. 112; early fished on the 
banks of Newfoundland, 6. 173; 
called the Abnakis the Tarantees, 

6. 208; Rale instigated the Indians 
against, 6. 235; to be kept from 
Acadia by tlie Abnakis, 6. 281 ; 
attempted to settle Pentagoet, 6. 
281 ; to be held in check by the 
Indians, 6.281-282; their title not 
strengthened by Weymouth, 7. 
26 ; their claim to the Penobscot 
better than that of the French, 7. 
29; delicate about marrying with 
Indians, 7. 44; Jesuits jealous of, 

7. 58; never ceded Pemaquid to 
the French, 7. 136; their African 
trade taken by the Dutch, 7. 139; 
lost the Castle of Cormentin, 7. 
139; recaptured the same, 7. 139; 
the colonial affairs of in 1664, 7. 
151-154; lasting evidence of the 
power of, 7. 156; Champlain 
heard of their discoveries in 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



87 



Maine, 7. 263; first began, 1606, 
to organize movements io^ set- 

I tling the New World, 7. 294; 

' many places were settled owing 
to the influence of Popham's ex- 
pedition, 7. 808; Pemaquid the 
first point of their colonization, 7. 
309, 312; places settled before 
Popham's colony arrived, 7. 810; 
considered the St. Croix their 
eastern boundary, 8. 189; men- 
tioned, 3. 99, 109, 189; 5-252; 6. 
360; 7. 29, 50, 55, 59, 60, 61, 62, 68, 
66, 69, 77, 79w, 83, 85, 86, 89, 90, 
91. 

Enniskillen, 8. 114. 

Enos, Lieut.-Col. Roger, letters to 
from Arnold, i, 468, 472, 478, 474, 
475; to send provisions, i. 478, 
474, 475-476; to forward a letter 
to Washington, i. 478; returned 
to Dead river, i. 481; to send 
back the sick and feeble, i. 482; 
mentioned, i. 500, 511 518. 

Enow, Thomas, signed the petition to 
Bradstreet, i. 288ri; lived at Fal- 
mouth, I. 820. 

Envieux, La, sent to capture Fort 
William Henry, 7. 68; commanded 
by D' Iberville, 7.68. 

Epenowe, captured at Martha's Vine- 
yard, 2. 25, 26; 5. 144n; man of 
consequence, 5. 25-26; sent out 
with Capt. Hobson, 5. 27; escaped, 
5. 27-28, 31; met by Dermer, 5. 
81; wounded Dermer, 5. 81; in 
London, 5. 178. 

Episcopacy in Falmouth, i.52, 58, 161, 
162; New England an enemy to, 
5. 217 ; solicitude for at Pemaquid, 

5. 248; opposed by Presbyterians, 
6. 26, 27 ; favored by Presbyterians, 

6. 27; planted in Virginia, 6.29; 
mentioned, 5. 149. 

Episcopal church, the, never prevailed 
in Maine, 4. 70; Dr. Gardiner a 
patrun of, 5. Ix; established at 
Dresden, 5. Ixi; R. H. Gardiner a 
supporter of, 5. Ixvi ; in Falmouth, 

5. 439; established at Richmond's 
island, 6. 138, 181 ; connected with 
the designs of the early voyagers, 

6. 175n; not the first established 
in New England, 6. 176n; the first 
in Maine, 6. 116n; has the right 
of first occupation by the right of 
possession, 6. 177 ; renewal of en- 
deavors of, 6. 178-179; Gorges 
given the right to establish it, 6. 
179; first established in New Eng- 
land, 6. 180; at Portsmouth, 181; 
at the Isle of Shoals opposed, 6. 

81 ; Province of Maine, in favor 
of, 6. 183; charter of Charles i, in 
favor of, 6. 183; dreaded the 
tyranny of Mass., 6, 186-188; no 
colony which adhered to per- 



mitted in the New England con- 
federation, 6, 188; relieved by 
Charles 11, 6. 188; church built at 
Falmouth, 6. 192-193; the Rev. 
John Wis wall settled at Falmouth, 

6. 198; increase in the church, 6. 
198-194; Samuel Maverick a mem- 
ber of, 7. 145; had but two 
churches in Maine in 1809, 7. 417; 
of Rhode Island, 7- 480; men- 
tioned, 6. 174, 174?i; 8. 499; see 
also English church. 

Episcopalians, in Georgetown, 3. 277; 
in Providence, 4. 268; in Maine 
injured by Land, 5. 221; generally 
adhered with the Royal cause, in 
1775, 5. 440; in Ireland, 6. 6; 
united with Presbyterians in Ire- 
land, 6. 26; in Portsmouth, 6. 165; 
Maine distinctly of their creed, 6. 
188; 8.419; dreaded the tyranny 
of Mass., 8. 186; not soothed by 
the treatment of Mass., 8. 187; 
about Casco bay, 7. 220; in Rich- 
mond, 7. 418; in Boston, 9. 28n; 
mentioned, 5. Iviii; 8. 112^i. 

Epping, 4. 265, 299; 6. 870; 9. 169. 

Eraskoheagan. Indian name of Par- 
ker's island, 4. 105. 

Erby, 5. 258. 

Erixis, 6. 259. 

Erocois, see Iroquois, 
lake, now Lake Charaplain, 2. 78a; 
3. 84}^. 

Erremaneeseck, 3. 112. 

Erremaumeck, 3. 412; 

Ersegontegogs, the, 3. 857. 

Erving, John, 8. 222n. 

Espaguheat, 3. 412. 

Esparagoosaret, 4. 155, 164. 

Espegnect, 3. 880. 

Esquimaux, the, their language dif- 
ferent from other natives, i. 41Sn 
attacked by the Micmacs, i. 414 

7. 889; speak the Karalit, 4. 97, 
eaters of raw flesh, 7. 889 ; attacked 
by the Abnakis, 7, 889. 

Essex, 6. 384. 

county, England, 3. xv, xvi. 

county, Mass.. i. 64^; 2. 154; 4. 231, 
282; 6.864, 383,885. 

county records, cited, i. 150?2. 

bar, 6. i^6(3. 

district, 8. 451. 

the Earl of. Gorges served under, i. 
109; a friend of Gorges, 2. 67tt; 
trial of, 2. 67a; defended by 
Gorges, 2. 67a, 68a; Raleigh an 
enemy of, 68a; message sent to 
the queen, 2. 6'da', asked for a 
private interview, 2. 70a; confined 
the queen's messengers, 2. 70a; 
attempted to excite the people, 2. 
70a; returned to his house, 2. 70a- 
71a; committed to the tower, 2. 
71a; executed for high treason, 2. 
71a; mentioned, 7. 381. 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Essex house, 2. 68a, 69a, 71a. 
the, 9. 178. 

Etchemins, the, lived in Acadia, 7. 
lOln; one given to Cham plain, 7. 
262; included with the Abnakis, 
7. 339; attacked the fort at Pema- 
quid, 7. 341; mentioned, 6. 210, 
211, 212, 225. 

Eteminquois river, i.288. 

Etienne, Governor -, 7. 20, 21. 

Etserraboonet, 3. 408. 

Europe, early trade with Richmond's 
island, 5. 174?i; the maratime na- 
tions of jealous, 5. 309; the ex- 
citements in drove emigrants to 
America, 6. 5; mentioned, i. 413; 

2. 76a, 206, 209, 270, 280, 28.5, 287; 

3. 308; 4. 10, 11, 85, 86, 257; 5. 
Ixii; 6. 91, 138, 280, 285, 322, 361, 
412; 7. 85, 295, 296, 432; 8. 264, 
297, .320,460, 491, 493, 499; 9. 76, 
82, 83, 140, 164. 

European politics effected the Ameri- 
can colonies, 5. 201. 

races, the, their tendency to im- 
provement, I. 9; characteristics 
of, I. 9-10. 

settlements in America, cited, i. 263. 
Europeans, how they obtained In- 
dian lands, 5- 169; their influence 
over the Indians, 5. 193; none 
found on the coast before 1604, 7. 
256. 
Eustis, Major Abraham, 9. 184. 

Governor William, 7. 413. 
Euxine, the, 4. 10. 
Evangeline, 5. xxii. 
Evans, Abigail, daughter of John, 
married James Osgood, 4. 278n. 

Catherine, wife of David, 4. 281. 

David, 4. 281. 

the Hon. George, trustee of Bow- 
doin College, 7. 457; birth of, 7. 
458; graduated from college, 7. 
458; settled in Gardiner, 7.458; de- 
fended Dr. Coolidge, 7. 458, 467; 
held political offices, 458-459; an 
exciting canvas over his election, 
7. 459; his labors in Congress, 7. 
459-460, 463-464; his eloquence 
and influence in debate, 7. 460-463, 
466, 469; promoter of the system 
of warehousing, 7. 464; on the 
Ashburton treaty and Oregon dif- 
ficulties, 7. 464; control ed every 
department in Mane, 7. 465 ; peo- 
ple jealous of, 7. 465; retired from 
Congress, 7. 466; as a lawyer, 7. 
466-467; his speech at the Cool- 
idge trial, 7. 467-469; address to 
Polk, 7. 469-470; to Webster, 7. 
470; in private life, 7. 471; men- 
tioned, I. 410; 6. 41, 361, 371; 7. 
415; 8.56, 174, 432,433. 

Jol.n, one of the owners of Frye- 
burg, 4. 278, 278n; in the French 



war, 4. 278n; in the expedition 
against the St. Francis Indians, 4. 
278n; his dan ghter married Lieut. 
James Osgood, 4. 278n. 
the Rev. Israel, 4. 298. 

Evans' History of Bristol, cited, 5. 
149?2, 154:^. 

Eveleth, Capt. Nathaniel, early set- 
tler of New Gloucester, 2. 153, 
155. 
John, graduated from Bowdoin, 6. 
369; death of, 6. 369n; teacher at 
Hebron Academy, 8. 169. 

Evelyn, John, his Diary and Corre- 
spondence cited, 5. 245, 246, 247. 

Evening Post, the, cited, 8. 208n. 

Everest, see Everett. 

Everett, Andrew, land granted to, 9. 
378, 382. 
Charles Carroll, his Memoir of the 
Rev. Leonard Woods, 8. 481-511. 
Ebenezer, 5. xxix; 6. 359. 
Edward, his Dorchester Oration 
cited, 5. 199w; mentioned, 2. v; 3. 
242, 246, 247, 248, 251, 259; 8. 100, 
428, 443. 

Evrest, John, master of the Primrose, 
5. 135. 

Ewing, , 8. 424. 

Exchange street, Portland, owners of 
lots bounded by, i. 246; home of 
Joseph Ingersoll on, i. 311, 312; 
land on sold to Phineas Jones, i. 
311; mentioned, 1.298; 8. 225n. 

Excise Bill, the, opposed by Scarbo- 
rough, 3. 187. 

Exeter, England, 2. 20a; 3. 289, 308; 6. 
15, 182. 
N. H., the Rev. John Wheelwright 
in, I. 182ii, 341, 343, 355; Robert 
Drake settled at, i.236w; the first 
settlers of Wells came from, i. 
340, 353, 355; home of Needham, 

1. 340; home of Hutchinson, i. 
.340; mentioned, 2. 188; 3. 217; 4. 
267; 7. 235; 8.159, 298. 

Academy, 8. 160. 
the Dean of, 6. 180. 
Experiment, the, 9. 178 179. 
Ex river, 6. 15. 

Extracts from the Memoir of De La 
Mothe Cadillac, 6. 273-289 ; from 
the Records of York, i. .363-391, 
Eyer, Tho., 9. 365. 

Fabyan, Joshua, 3. 188, 200n. 
Fairbanks, Benjamin, 7. 272, 273. 

, of New Vineyard, 4. 396. 

Fairfax, 8. 390; now Albion, 2. 291; 
settled by the Kennebec purchsers, 

2. 291. 

Fairfield, 4. 315, 317, 349, 371, 372, 
378, 380, 381, 401, 404. 
Edward, in the garrison at Black 
Point, I. 221n; 3. 110; possibly a 
resident of Black Point, 3. 83. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



89 



Jeremiah, 7. 287. 

Gen. John, 8. 4, 38, 73, 74, 76, 77, 78, 
81, 82, 85, 87, 102, 397, 458, 459; 9. 
248. 

the Rev. John, 2. 141; 4. 243, 244, 
256, 267; 7. 216. 

William, 9. 93. 
Fall* brook, land near sold to the 
Wakeleys, i. 153; mentioned, i, 
120. 

cove, Geo. Lewis owned land near, 
I. 123. 

fish. 1.506. 
Falls of Arransoak, i. 459. 

of Carrytunk, 2. 269. 

of Winslow, 4, 375. 
Fallstown, 4. 262. 
Falmouth, Barnstable county, 8. 234n. 

England, i. 355?i; 2. 20a. 

Maine, former limits of, i. 21; de- 
stroyed by Indians, i. 21, 254; 
Eichmond's island a part of, i. 41 ; 
first attempts to settle, i. 42, 42n, 
51, 59, 68, 193, S16n; claimed by 
the Jordan proprietors," 1.48-49; 
Cleeves and Tucker driven to, i. 
54; now Portland, i. 6?m; called 
Casco, I. 65n; new settlement in 
the limits of, i. 68: James An- 
drews a resident of, i. 69, ISOn; 
submission to the jurisdiction of 
Mass., I. 70, 132, 159; families 
of, I. 76, 105, 112, 114, 144; 3. 38; 
land at granted to Cleeves, i. 97; 
home of Robert Corbin, i. 105, 
185; home of Geo. Lewis, i. 105, 
191; home of Richard Martin, i. 
105; home of Michael Mitton, i. 
205; home of Francis Neale, i. 

105, 197, 200; home of Francis 
Small, I. 105; home of Thomas 
Stanford, i. 105, 180n; home of 
John Phillips, i. 105, 121; home 
of John Wallis, i. 105, 180n, 185; 
home of Nathaniel Wallis, i. 105, 
185; home of Nicholas White, i. 
105; to establish boundaries, i. 

106, 387; to include Spurwink, 
Casco bay and Clapboard island, 
106, 152, 387; the eastern bound- 
ary to be the boundary of the 
jurisdiction of Mass., 1. 107; home 
of Robert Jordan, i. 107, 180^; 
the inhabitants of in 1658, i. 105, 
112, 114, 144, 157, 180n, 203, 215, 
246, 249, 275-276, 286, 319-323: 
limits of marked out, i. Ill ; origin 
of the name, i. 112; land at con- 
veyed to Geo. Lewis, 1. 118; first 
mills at, I. 120, 121 ; land at con- 
veyed to Robert Jordan, i. 132; 
Geo. Cleeves a resident of, i. 133, 
134, 145; 6. 131; Cleeves a deputy 
for, I. 138; appealed to Mass. to 

, settle the conflicting claims at, i. 
140, 143-145, 280-281; not to dis- 



pose of the land claimed by 
Cleeves, 1. 142; freemen in, 1. 144; 
origin of the names of the islands 
within the limits of, i. 145-146; 
Jewell's island given to John 
Tyng, I. 148; home of Hannah 
Halloon, i. 149; to receive taxes 
from the islands in Casco bay, i. 
152 ; islands in the present limits 
of, I. 152; Matthew Coe moved 
to, I. 153; home of Geo. Munjoy, 
I. 153; 2. 232; 3. 322n; home of 
John Wakeley, i. 153; home of 
Isaac Wakeley, i. 153; home of 
Thomas Wakeley, i. 153, 212; 
home of Anthony Brackett, i . 154, 
ISOn, 185, 218, 230n, 306; home of 
Thomas Brackett, i. 154; list of 
residents of, i. 155, 156, 215; a 
growing population, i. 157, 210; 
commissioners for, 1. 159, 163, 164, 
166, 174-175, 197, 231,267; 3-23; 
Geo. Lewis constable for, i. 159; 
ordered to attend religious wor- 
ship, I. 160, 201; a minister pro- 
cured, I. 161; 3. 11; desired 
Thomas Jenner to find a minister, 
I. 161; 3. 11; to choose a deputy, 
1.163; 3.47; represented by Rich- 
ard Callicot, I. 163; Cleeves a 
commissioner for, 1. 163; Thomas 
Neale the last deputy for, i. 164; 
roads at not passable, i. 165 five 
days' journey from York, i- 165; 
courts held at, 1. 166, 184, 242, 245, 
258; prison at, i. 116, 182n, 187; 
party spirit high against Mass., i. 
170-171; Anthony Brackett con- 
stable at, 1. 175 ; home of Laurence 
Davis, I. 180n; home of Humphry 
Durham, i. 1$0%; home of Walter 
Gendall, i. 180n, 185, 231, 232; 3. 
75, 83, 135; home of John Guy, i. 
180n; home of Michael Madiver, 
I. 180n; home of Simpson Penley, 
1. 180n; home of George Phippen, 
1. 180n; home of Joseph Phippen, 
I. 180n; home of James Ross, i. 
180^, 230, 314; home of Thaddeus 
Clarke, i. 180n; home of Robert 
Stamford, i. 180n, 188; home of 
Ralph Turner, i. 180 /i; home of 
Nathaniel Wharfi, i. 180n; home 
of Jenkin William, i. 180n; ac- 
cused of not attending to the 
king's business, i. 184; presented 
for not attending to the court's 
order, i. 184-185; home of Geo. 
Ingersoll, 1.185,197,311; ordered 
to have an oversight of children 
and servants, i. 186, 204; home of 
Phineas Ryder, i. 188; home of 
Hugh Mosier, i. 189n; Cleeves 
the first planter in, i. 193; 6. 131; 
Francis Neale a leading man in, i. 
200; Ralph Turner constable of, i. 



90 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Falmoutli, Maine — continued. 

200; land in conveyed by Neale 
to Pliippen, I. 200n; people of 
move to Salem, i.200?i; presented 
for not sending a juror, i. 200-201 ; 
trade in, i. 202, 278, 279, 425; the 
internal affairs of but little known, 
I. 203; described by Jocelyn, i. 
203; governed by selectmen, i. 203, 
204, 245; land at granted to An- 
thony Brackett, i. 204; presented 
for not attending to the children, 
I. 204, 380; home of Kichard 
Powsland, i. 206; prosperity at, 
I. 210, 254, 275-276; attacked by 
Indians, i. 214; 3. 135; 4. 73, 222; 
Andrew Alger killed at, i. 214n; 
3. 135; gave land to Geo. Bur- 
roughs, I. 216-217, 262; number 
of men killed at, i. 221, 222n, 29.5n, 
301-302; Capt. Silvanus Davis 
moved to, i. 224; soldiers sent to, 
I. 226, 289, 290; affairs at, i. 228; 
James Ross retuned to, i. 230; 
death of Anthony Brackett, i. 
230^; death of Joshua Brackett, 
I, 230n; Walter Gendall com- 
missioner, I. 231; not occupied 
till after the peace, i. 231, 254; 
Robert Jordan did not return to, 
I. 232; complained of the taxes, 
I. 240; not represented in the first 
assembly, i. 241 ; Thaddeus Clarke 
ensign of, i. 241; Geo. Bramhall 
moved to, i. 241, 308; tannery 
established at, i. 241; Anthony 
Brackett lieutenant at, i. 241 ; site 
of the meeting-house, i. 244n; 
selectmen of, i . 245 ; landholders 
in, I. 246, 248n, 249; land specu- 
lators in, I. 248n; a municipal 
government organized, 1.249; set- 
tlers who did not return after the 
Indian wars, i. 250; Neale's prop- 
erty sold to Joseph Holmes, i. 
250n; Davis and English peti- 
tioned for certain privileges at, i. 
250-251 ; petition partially granted, 
I* 251; land grant to Gendall, 
Dacre, Ingersoll, Madefer, Wallis, 
Daniel and Haines, i. 251; land 
grants to Davis, Ingles, Ingersoll 
and Webber, i. 252; indebted to 
Silvanus Davis for her prosperity, 
1. 254, 285 ; prostrated by the war, 
I. 254, 277, 303, 304; public house 
opened at, 1.258-259; John Cloice 
moved from, i. 260; Mary Lewis 
born at, i. 261; early tax list, i. 
261 /I ; as a frontier post, i. 265; 
to garrison Fort Loyal, i. 266; to 
try small cases, i. 267; lumber 
business of, i. 269; to send pris- 
oners to Fort Loyal, i. 271; land- 
holders titles confirmed, i. 271; 
tax of the people of, i. 271-272, 



323 ; contested claims of the peo- 
ple, I. 272; land at surveyed, i. 
274-275; increase of, i. 275-276; 
French refugees arrived at, i. 276; 
destroyed, i. 277; chief business 
of, I. 277; agitated by internal 
commotion, i. 280-281; petition 
to Gov. Brads tree t, i. 282; the 
people exhorted to live in peace, 
1 . 285 ; feared to be the center of 
Indian troubles, i. 288; Indian 
prisoners sent to, i. 289; soldiers 
at commanded by Lockhart, i. 
290; forces withdrawn, i. 291; 
people fled to Casco bay, i.291; 
home of Silvanus Davis, i. 293; 
saved by Major Church, i. 295; 3. 
105; council of war held at, i. 296; 
soldiers quartered at, i. 296; Capt. 
Willard stationed at, i. 296; fear 
of the Indians, 1.297, 298; no reg- 
ular troops at, I. 298; location of 
the forces at, i. 298; the destruc- 
tion of ordered by the governor 
of Canada, i. 301; town records 
destroyed, i. 303, 303n; 2. 175; 4. 
229; the town ruined, i. 277; 303, 
304; 3. 137; 4. 73, 222; 6. 135, 191; 
7. 59; the dead buried, 1.303; vis- 
ited by Phipps and Church, i.303; 
3. 137; relatives of the soldiers to 
be paid, i. 303?i; Anthony Brack- 
ett returned to, i.306; Bramhall 
and the Cloice family returned to, 
I. 310-312, 317; Dominicus Jordan 
active in, i. 312; Nathaniel Jor- 
dan established at, i. 312-313; the 
Jordan posterty in, i. 313; home 
of Geo. Tuck, i. 313; James Ross 
jr. born in, i. 314; the Wallis pos- 
terity in, 1.317; Thomas Walter 
moved to, i. 317; John York 
moved to, i. 317; tax list, i. 323; 
boundary lines settled, 1.387; to 
send deputies to the court of elec- 
tion, I. 387; to have a court, i. 
385, 387; Danforth's deed to the 
trustees of given in full, i . 554-555 ; 
home of John Palmer, 3. 82; or- 
dered to keep a ferry, i. 127; or- 
dered to establish a road, i. 128; 
garrison house at destroyed, i. 
137; Geo. Burroughs preached at, 
I. 156; French neutrals sent to, i. 
176 ; 6. 342 ; a revolutionary con- 
vention held at, 3. 188; home of 
John Skillings, 3, 223; home of 
Philip Lewis, 3. 322m; home of 
Thomas Westbrook, 3.335; Waldo 
and Westbrook owned land in, 3. 
336; paper mill at, 3. 336, 337; 
treaty of 1726, 3. 377-405, 395, 396; 
treaty of 1727, 3. 407; tonnage of 
in 1774, 4. 24; only port of entry 
in the state, 4. 24; commissioners 
for the treaty of 1749 met at, 4. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



91 



145-167; tax of 1734, 4. 197; of 
1761, 4. 197; compared to Kittery, 

4. 202-208; the people of cut hay 
in Fryeburg, 4. 288; first church 
in, 5. liv; {see also first church of 
Portland); Capt. Silvanus Davis 
in command at, 5. 277, 895 ; Gov- 
ernor Pownall at, 5. 365 ; fort to 
be built at, 5. 365; fort at in a 
poor condition during Andros' ad- 
ministration, 5. 395; Capt. Lock- 
hart removed from, 5. 395; In- 
dians defeated at, 5. 395 ; letter of 
the Rev. Jacob Bailey describing 
the destruction of, 5. 487-450; 
Bailey officiated at, 5. 439; Mow^att 
declared his intention to destroy 
it, 5. 489, 440, 448; alarmed by 
the approach of the fieet, 5-441- 
442 ; fieet formed a line of attle, 
5. 442-443; the people allowed two 
hours to depart, 5. 443; great ex- 
citement at, 3. 197-198 ; 5. 443-445 ; 
a committee sent to wait on Mow- 
att, 5. 445-446; companies from 
the adjoining towns arrived, 3. 
197; 5. 446; destruction of de- 
scribed, 3. 198; 4. 78; 5. xxxii, 447- 
449; the people's property stolen, 

5. 449; the town ruined, 5. 449- 
450; Bailey's description exagger- 
ated, 5. 450n; arrival of the Scotch- 
Irish, 6. 11; destitution among 
the same, 6. 11, 12 ; names of those 
who remained, 6. 12; the Bow- 
doins came to, 6. 17; renewal of 
the church at, 6. 192; Brockwell 
preached at, 6. 192; people of in 
favor of the Church of England, 

6. 192; the Rev. Mr. Hooper at, 6. 
192; the Rev. John Wiswell called 
to preach at, 6. 193; called Kas- 
kabe, 7. 59; Governor Shirley held 
a council at, 7. 167, 168, 175; 8. 
224, 225 ; an express route formed 
to Fort Halifax, 7. 168; slaves 
held in, 7. 214; population in 1764, 

7. 214; Society of Friends formed 
at, 7. 221 ; first printing office at, 

8. 179; Indian conference of 1754, 
8. 220; mentioned, i.70, lOln, 107, 
108, 113, 135, 146, 150, 172; 2. 118, 
144. 149, 171, 172, 178, 180, 182; 3. 
22, 24n, 49, 116, 186, 171, 184, 185n, 
202, 216, 221, 22271, 227, 275^, 360, 
378, 408, 409, 410, 411, 419, 420, 
424, 427, 448, 445, 446; 4. 23, 108, 
147, 153, 160, 166, 170, 171, 175, 
176, 182, 332, 403; 5. 230, 369, 374, 
3857i; 6. 4; 7. Ill, 167, 178, 187, 
220, 480; 8. Ilia, llln, 118, 152, 
209, 211, 226n, 227, 228, 229, 229n, 
230, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 241, 
245, 245w, 246, 258, 268, 276, 294, 
312; 9, 29, 32, 41, 69, 76, 88, 89, 
172. 

<3kizette, first printed, a. 179. 



grammar school, 5. xxxii. 
neck, 3. 15. 

records, destroyed by Indians, i. 
303w; 4. 229; said to have been 
taken to Canada, 4. 280; cited, i. 
142/1, 319. 
Fal River, i. 112. 

Falstaff, Sir John. 3. 223; 5. 203; 6. 68. 
Fame island, Montressor at, i. 456. 
Families in Falmouth in 1640, 3. 38. 
at Black Point, 1640, 3. 38, 38n; see 
also inhabitants. 
Famine river, i. 450. 
Faneuil, Benjamin, land granted to, 2. 
288. 
hall, 3. 264; 9. 81. 
Peter, 9. 81. 
Farley, Hon. E. W., 8. 167. 
Joseph, 6. 78. 
Michael, i. 246. 
Michael jr., land granted to, i. 244; 

lived in Ipswich, i. 246. 
William J., son of Joseph, 6. 78; 
graduated from college, 6. 78; 
studied law, 6. 78; located at 
Thomaston, 6. 78; character of, 
6. 78; death of, 6. 78. 
Farmer, John, his Genealogical Regis- 
ter cited, I. 164n; 3. 115n; his 
Book of Indians cited, 3. 324; his 
edition of Belknap cited, 3. 84^; 
5. 176?2, 204, 247w, 2mn; Letter to 
Dr. Abiel Holmes cited, 2. 181, 
143, 146, 150. 
Farmington, incorporated, 4. 39; 7. 
276; population of, 4.39; great 
freshet in, 4. 40; an Indian settle- 
ment in, 4. 808; Baptists in, 4. 
808; Methodists in, 4. 308, 333, 
864; po\erty in, 7-272; mentioned, 
2. 146, 286; 4. 308, 309, 810, 332, 
333, 836, 337, 340, 341, 842, 343, 
868, 364, 864n, 365, 382, 892, 398, 
394, 895, 396; 6. 74; 7. 274, 277, 
285, 884, 488. 
academy, incorporated, 8. 171; 
opened, 8. 171 ; preceptors, 8. 171 ; 
merged into the State Normal 
School, 8. 171. 
Falls, Indian settlement at, 4. Sin; 
the Indian name of, 105n. 
Farm School, 9. 68. 
Farnham, Daniel, 2. 204. 

Farnsworth, Capt. , letters to from 

Arnold, i. 468, 472. 
Farnum, John, 7, 223. 

, married Martha Coe, i. 154. 

Farrar, Prof. John, 7. 408. 
Farrett, James, agent of the Earl of 
Sterling, 7. 144; land titles traced 
from him, 7. 144. 
Farrington, Abel, first white child 
born in Norridgewock, i. 510. 
Capt. Thomas, i. 510. 
children, the, of uncommon size, 4* 
286. 



92 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Farrin, John, served in the Continen- 
tal Army, 2. 214. 

Farwell, Lie at. Josiah, 4. 287. 

Father of American conveyancing, 
the, 5. 195. 
of the Cape Ann Colony, the, 5. 199n. 

Faxon, Dr. John, 6, 372. 

Lydia, daughter of Dr. John, mar- 
ried to Solomon Thayer, 6. 372. 

Fayal, wine from, i. 56, 551; 3. 98; 4. 
23. 

Fayette, 4. 306, 339, 341, 363, 392, 393, 
6. 100. 

Fay, Joseph, land granted to, 2. 281. 

Fayerweather, the. Rev. Samuel, in- 
vited to preach in Wells, i. 348; 
declined, 1.348, 349. 

Featherstonehaugh, 4. 105; 8. 82, 84. 

Febiger, Col. Christian, i. 500; 510, 
528. 

Federalists, 4. 59, 60, 61 ; 5. xxxvii, xl. 

Federal party, the, 5. xxxvii. 

street, Boston, 6. 12; in Wiscasset, 

4. 330. 

Felch, Eliza, died, i. 333. 

Fellowship, the, i. 77; 3. 90. 

Fellows, Joseph, 2. 179. 

Felt, George, purchased land of the 
Indians, i. 129; petitioned to the 
general court, 1. 144; died, i. 156?i; 
lived at North Yarmouth, i. 156, 
188; biographichal notice of, i. 
156^; mentioned, 2. 170, 171, 181. 
George jr., married Jane Macworth, 
1. 70n, 156, 225 ; sold land inherited 
from his father, i. 129; lived in 
Falmouth, i. 155, 215, 320; son of 
George, i. 156, 225ti; a juror, i. 
188, 198; killed, i. 225; his family 
moved to Chelsea, i. 225; children 
of, I. 225; sold land to Walter 
Gendall, i. 232; lived at Casco 
bay, I. 236n, 320; signed the peti- 
tion to Gov. Bradstreet, i. 283. 
Jonathan, i. 225. 

the Rev. Joseph B., a descendant of 
George, i. 2'2Qn; arranged the 
Mass. archives, 2. 41an; his assist- 
ance acknowledged, 2.47a; 3. 117n, 

5. 168n, 186n; Annals of Salem 
cited, i.262n; 3. 12w; 5. 199; His- 
tory of Ipswich cited, 5. 218n; 
Ecclesiastical History of New 
England cited, 9. 317w; History of 
Massachusetts coinage cited, 6. 
119n; Lectures on the Salem 
witchcraft cited, I. 264n; Memoir 
of Roger Conant cited, 5. 199n, 
204n. 

Moses, lived in Falmouth and North 

Yarmouth, i. 156, 236n, 320. 
Samuel, i. 225. 
Felton, Edward, master of the Angel 

Gabriel, 5. 219n. 
Felts Falls, 2. 181. 

Fenderson, Pelatiah, served in the 
war of the Revolution, 3. 204. 



Fenno, Richard, 2. 264. 

John, 4. 57. 

Miss ; 7. 328. 

Ferdinand of Arragon, 6. 120n 
Fergusons, the, settled in Worcester, 

6. 13. 

Ferlands, L'Abbe, Canada, cited, g. 

98n, 108n, 109n. 
Fernald, the Rev. , of Thomaston, 

7. 492. 

Fernald' s point, 8. 325. 
Ferries, at Spurwink river, i. 278; 3. 
16; privilege granted to Silvanus 
Davis, I. 278; price of toll, 3. 16, 
127; Falmouth and Scarborough 
ordered to establish one, 2. 127- 
128; at Blue Point, 3. 225. 
Ferry, Maine, 4. 355. 

rocks, 3. 35, 88, 142, 155, 157. 
Fessenden, the Rev. Joseph B., 4. 289^1. 

Gen. Samuel, 4. 289n; 5. xli; 6.41. 

the Hon. Thomas, 4. 2Sdn. 

the Rev. William, first settled min- 
ister at Fryeburg, 4. 250, 289?i; 
his sister married Dr. Emery, 4. 
289?i; biographical notice of, 4. 
28931 ; children of, 4. 289?i; men- 
tioned, 4. 255, 256; 7. 219; 8. 164. 

the Hon. William Pitt, coins found 
in his ga^rden, 6. 129; graduated 
from college, 7. 474; law partner 
with William Willis, 7. 474; men- 
tioned, 5. xxvi; 6.151; 8.363; 398. 

, of Sandwick, 4. 271. 

, teacher at Hebron Academy, 

8. 169. 

Few, the Rev. Charles, his assistance 
acknowledged, 9. 333n. 

Fickett, Daniel, 3. 83. 
John, 3. 83. 
Samuel, 3. 173. 

Fiddler's Reach, 2. 218; 4. 43, 47; 8. 
llOw, 114. 

Field, Lieut. Daniel, 3. 173. 

Darbey, first White Mountain tour- 
ist, 2. 68n; 9. 209; gave a glowing 
account of the country, 9. 209. 
Judge , 9. 251. 

Fifteen Mile Stream, 4. 350, 352. 

Figuit, see Fickett. 

Fillebrown, Thomas, 4. 7; 7. 284. 

Fillemore, Millard, 7. 421. 

Finch, Lord, council for Gorges, 2. 37. 

Firearms, used by Indians, 8. 285. 

First Church of Boston, part owner 
of Great Chebeag, i. 147; John 
Phillips a deacon of, i. 153; of 
Portland, see First Parish, 
flag of piracy raised in New England, 
5. 205 ; hostile fleet fitted out, 5. 
205. 
Parish of Portland, the Rev. Dr. Ich- 
abod Nicols settled over, 5, lii; 6. 
374; the Rev. Thomas Smith first 
pastor of, 5. liv; the sixth church 
in Maine, 5. liv-lv; the first east 
of Wells, 5. liv; Dr. Deane's pas- 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



93 



torate, 5. Iv, Ivn; the Rev. Horatio 
Stebbins settled over, 6. 374. 

Fish, exported, i. 32, 56, 57, 538; 2. 
34a, 209; 4.23; 8. 202; abundant 
in Casco bay, i, 181; the lack of 
the cause of the second Indian 
war, I. 287; abundance of, 3. 292, 
293, 294, 295, 307; 7. 30992; cured 
for the foreign market, 3. 317; 
curious ones, 3. 91-92. 

Fisheries, the, engaged the early at- 
tention of the settlers at Black 
Point, 3. 26; at Stratton's island, 
3. 27 ; Humphrey Warren engaged 
in, 3. 123, 123n; Capt. Scottow en- 
gaged in, 3. 126; business extinct 
during Queen Anne's war, 4. 74; 
poor in Kittery, 4. 200; a help to 
geographical discoveries, 5. 144, 
145, 183; British navigation in- 
creased with the growth of, 5. 
145, 183; originated one of the 
disputes which led to the death 
of Charles i, 5. 145; extended to 
the New England shores, 5. 155; 
one of the chief inducements for 
colonization, 5. 173; 7. 318; a 
source of evil to the English and 
French in America, 5. 174-175; 
facilitated by the settlements, 5. 
182; a monopoly of injurious, 5. 
200; ruined, 5. 275; early known 
to British merchants, 7. 133; at 
Pemaquid, 7. 219; spoiled by too 
many factors, 7. 320; at Isles of 
Shoales, 4. 23 ; 8. 294 ; vigorously 
prosecuted by the Plymouth Col- 
ony, 9. 78;- of the Laconia Com- 
pany, 9. 306; mentioned, i. 30, 31, 
35, 55, 551; see also lishing. 

Fisher, Prof. George P., 6. 'SbSn. 

Fishermen, early at Pemaquid, 5. 144, 
155; at Monhegan, 5. 155; at iSTew 
Harbor, 5. 191 ; at Sagadahoc, 5. 
232; driven from the coast by the 
French, 5.295, 298; warned not to 
visit Acadia, 7. 50-51; early on 
the coast, 7. 130, 133-134; 8.310; 
number on the coast in J 701, 8. 
185; alarmed by the news of war, 
8. 228. 

Fish House Hill, 3. 320. 

Fishing, trade with foreign countries, 
1.32, 56, 57; vessels on the coast 
of Maine, i. 55 ; at Cape Elizabeth, 

1. 275; largely carried on in New 
England, i. 278; 2. 99n, 103-104; 
of interest to England, 2. 18a; in- 
stilled a desire for colonization, 2. 
20a; vessels sent out by Popham, 

2. 33a; of importance to the Eng- 
lish, 2. 38a, 38; at the mouth of 
the Kennebec, 2. 48a; 7. 313; 
Gorges interested in, 7. 50a ; Wes- 
ton engaged in, 7. 79n; John Par- 
ker engaged in, 2. 192 ; number of 



vessels on the coast in 1675, 2. 233; 
Plymouth Colony engaged in, 2. 
275, 279; continued during the 
settling of the Kennebec Purchase, 
2. 278; carried on by the English 
very early, 3.9; 5. 144, 168; 6. 174; 

7. 132; at Eichmond's island, 3. 
74; 4. 23; three voyages made a 
year, 3. 97; prices paid for, 3. 98; 
curious names, 3. 98; at Isle of 
Shoals, 4. 23; at Sebasticook, 4. 
317; laws relating to, 5. 78, 79, 81; 
monopolized by the Plymouth 
Company, 5. 169, 215, SdQ; at 
Monhegan, 5. 183; 6. 283; at Dam- 
erille's cove, 5. 183; Melshare 
Bennett licensed, 5. I86/1; at Pem- 
aquid, 5. 223; endeavor to make a 
monopoly at Pemaquid, 5. 259, 
260; early on the banks of New- 
foundJand, 6. 173; excited the 
cupidity of Europe, 7. 296; estab- 
lished at Matinicus, 8. 295; for 
sturgeon illicet, 8. 326; see also 
tisheries. 

island, 5. 20, 25. 
Fishkill, 3, 203, 204. 
Fish river, 8. 31, 43. 
Fiske, the Rev. Albert W., preached at 
Scarborough, 3. 162; moved to 
Kittery, 3. 162. 
the Rev. Joiin O., biographical notice 
of Rev. J. W. Ellingwood, 7. 371- 
378. 
Josiah, teacher in Lincoln Academy, 

8. 166; teacher in Warren Acad- 
emy, 8. 172. 

Fitch, Jabez, signed the treaty of 1713, 
6. 256 ; autograph of, 6. 256. 
John, 7. 163. 

Capt. Joseph, proprietor at Pema- 
quid, 5. 302. 
Thomas, 3. 411, 438, 444. 
Fitchburg, 8. 413. 

Fitts, , married a daughter of 

Isaac i)avis, i. 309. 
Fittz, Eben, 3. 180. 
Fitzgerald, 4. 317. 

Lord Edward, 8. 4, 75. 
George, 4. 349, 350. 
Fitzpen, the original of the present 
Pliippen, I. 113n. 
family, Robert Jordan married into. 
I. 234n. 
Five Nations, 4. 130. 

Wounds, the, 5. 219n. 
Flag, one given to the Indians, 5. 376, 

377. 
Flagg, Gershom, 2. 280; 7. 113n. 
Mrs. J. P., 7. SoQ. 
Mary, 7. 396. 

, the builder of fort at Fal- 
mouth, 5. 317, 318, 366, 367, 384. 

, of Clinton, 4. 317-318. 

Flanders, 7. 141n. 
of America, the, i. 413. 



94 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Flavel, John, 7. 448. 

Flax, grown in Littleboro, 4. 305; 

raised in N^ew England, 6. 328. 
Flaxseed, 2. 98. 

Flea, John, signed the petition to 
Gov. Bradstreet, i. 2SSn; lived at 
Falmouth, i. 320; signed the pe- 
tition to Charles 11, i. 402. 
Fleet street, Portland, novf Summer 
street, i. 242w; owners of lots 
bounded by, i. 247, 247w. 
prison, the, 7. 31. 
Fletcher, the Rev. Nathaniel, i. 349, 
349w; 4.259; 8.392. 
Richard, 5. xli. 
Seth, 3. 28. 
T., 7. 186. 

, of Canaan, 4. 368. 

, signed the petition to Crom- 
well, I. 395. 

Capt. , 8. 9. 

Fletcher's neck, 2. 83/i. 
Flewen, Thomas, signed the petition 
of 1672 to Mass., 5. 241. 

Fling, , of Seven Mile Brook, 4. 

347. 
Flin<-, abundant, i. 504. 
Edward, 4. 309, 341. 
Elizabeth, 4. 309. 
Dr. James, 5. li. 
mountain, 4.IO5. 
Polly, 4. 309. 
Koyal, 8. IQ. 
Sally, 4. 309. 

Mr. , of Farmington, 4. 363, 364, 

395. 

Mrs. , 4. 394. 

Flipson, Frederick, 5. 130. 
Flores, the island ot, 3. 290, 292. 
Florida, on De Laet's map, 2. 17a; the 
southern limit of the claim of 
England, 2. 19a; the early part of 
North America settled, 2. 20a; 
Champlain hoped to extend his 
discoveries to, 7. 163; mentioned, 
I. 25; 2. 16a, 76a; 8. 6, 319, 331, 
332. 
Historical Society, 7. 484. 
Floridans, the, 4. 97. 
Florins, the origin of the name, 6. 149. 
Flory, Capt., see Hableville. 
Flour mills, i. 269; 4. 16; see grist 

mills. 
Floyd, Capt. John, arrested for asking 
for provisions for his garrison, 5. 
395, 396; deposition of, 5. 399. 
Flucker, Lucy, daughter ot Thomas, 
married to Gen. Knox, 9. 90, 227 ; 
her Tory friends opposed her mar- 
riage, 9. 90; attained a high posi- 
tion, 9. 90. 
Thomas, married Hannah Waldo, 9. 
85, 89, 227 ; secretary of the prov- 
ince, 9. 89 ; a loyalist, 9. 89 ; went 
to England, 9. 89; purchased 
Samuel Waldo's shares in his 



father's patent, 9. 89 ; his property 
forfeited, 9. 89; his daughter mar- 
ried Gen. Knox, 9. 90, 227; his 
charges for removing Gen. Waldo's 
remains, 9. 93. ^ 

Mrs. Thomas, 9. 90. 
Fluelleu, an Indian Sagamore, 4. 411. 

tract, the, owned by Major Phillips, 
4. 411. 
Fluent Hall, Portland, 8. 165. 
Fly, James, biographical notice of, 3, 
2J0. 

William, 3. 210. 

Flye, , of Fifteen Mile Stream, 4. 

352. 
Flying Point, 9. 132; formerly Pine 

Point, 2. 171. 
Flynt, Henry, signed the treaty of 
1713, 6. 255; autograph of, 6. 255. 
Flypsie, Fr., 5. 75. 

Fogg, Daniel, lived at Kittery, 3. 78; 
at Scarborough, 3^.^ 78; moved to 
Machias, 3. 178; biographical no- 
tice of, 3. 210-211; mentioned, 3. 
159, 166. 

David, served in the war of the 
Revolution, 3. 204. 

James, 4. 205. 

John, meetings held at his house, 
3. 166, death of, 3. 211; children 
of, 3. 211. 

John jr., 3. 211. 

Jonathan, 3, 211. 

Moses, 3. 211. 

Reuben, in charge of provisions, 3.^ 
200; served in the war of the Rev- 
olution, 3. 203. 

Samuel, 3. 168. 

Seth, at the capture of Louisburg, 
3. I72n, 211. 

W., 2. 171, 181. 
Foglant point, 4. 269. 
Follen, Abraham, submitted to the 
jurisdiction of Mass., i. 386; 3. 46; 
lived at Black Point, 3. 86. 
Folly mill, 2. 181. 

Folsom, Albert A., preached at Bath, 
2. 228, 

Charles, his assistance acknowl- 
edged, 6. 123??. 

George, found the patent of Lewis 
and Bonighton, i. 44n; his Anni- 
versary Discourse, 2. 3-73; the 
same cited, 2. 79; 8. 294; his Cat- 
alogue of Original Documents 
cited, I, 133n; 7.481; his History 
of Saco and Biddeford published, 
1. 5; the same cited, i. 44«, 109, 
175; 2. 48n, 49«, 2377i; 3- ^^n, 24n, 
35n, 99ri, 153, 190, 202n; 4. 411; 5. 
xix, 15«n, I70n, 174ri, 224%; 6,179, 
182^, 183n, 188/1, 357; 7. 255n, 301. 

Dr., 5. xviii. 
Foote, the Hon. Erastus, birth of, 6. 
72n; studied law, 6. 72w; opened 
an office in Camden, 6. 71, 72n; 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



95 



moved to Wiscasset, 6. *72; held 
public office, 6. 72; married, 6. 
72w ; death of, 6. T2n ; left one son, 
6. 72«. 

Erastus jr., 6. 72n. 

Robert R., 5. 100. 
Forbiish, a iScotcli-Irish name, 6. 19. 
Force, Peter, his American Archives 

cited, 2. 8a; 5. I70n, 199m, 440. 
Ford, Gideon, 4. ;i53. 

Joane, wife of Stephen, i. 375; pun- 
ished for abuse and slander, i. 
375. 

Stephen, lived at the Isle of Shoals, 
I. 37); his wife punished for slan- 
der, I. 375. 
Fore river, bound of Trelawny's 
grant, i, 48; claimed as the origi- 
nal Casco river, i. 49; title to the 
land on the south shore given to 
Trelawny, i. 71; controversy of 
the title revived, i. 74; land on 
conveyed to James Andrews, i. 
117; Robert Jordan never occu- 
pied land north of, i. 142; early 
trade at, i. 201-202; settlement 
on, I. 206; families living near in 
3675, I. 216; possibly the same as 
Levett^s river, 2. Son; mentioned, 
I. 46^,, 60m, 72, 140, 155, 180m, 193, 
248, 293, 311; 8. lllaM. 

street, Portland, i.62; of Wiscasset, 
4. 330. 
Foreside, home of John Maine, 2. 171. 
Forester, , counselor of the Ply- 
mouth Company, 8, 21 9w. 
Forests, the, secured for the British 

navy, 6. 18. 
Forks, the, of the Kennebec River, i. 

459. 
Forsyth, John, 5. xxxvii; 8. 67, 69, 70, 

78. 
Fort Albany, 7. 140. 

Ann, 5. 395- 

Anne, 9. 143, 151, 153, 154. 

Awrania, 7. loHn. 

Beausejour, 8. 223, 246, 281n. 

Brunswick, 8. 284. 

Charles, name given to the fort at 
Pemaquid, 5. 271; Capt. Weems 
surrendered, 5. 272; built, 7. 157; 
8. 186; garrisoned by New York 
troops, 7. 157; 8. 186; the com- 
mander obnoxious, 8. 187; men- 
tioned, 5. 24, 30, 271; see also 
Fort Pemaquid. 

Cumberland, 4. 285. 

Dummer, a minister sent to, 4. 129; 
trading house at, in the care of 
Capt. Lithgow, 4. 129, 131, 132; 
mentioned, 4. 141, 262. 

Buquesne, the march to, 4. 282 ; now 
Fort Pitt and Pittsburgh, 4. 282m. 

Edward, 4. 285. 

Edgecomb, 9. 181. 

Frankfort, site of, 6. 195n; called 



Fort Shirley, 6. 195; commanded 
by Goodwin; 7. 177. 

Fredei'ick, at Pemaquid, the seat of 
Col. Dunbar's government, 6. 18; 
supplied with troops, 6. 18; cap- 
tured, 6. 283; mentioned, 5. 366n: 
9. 110. 

Gaspereaux, 8. 281n. 

George, built to protect the colo- 
nists, 2. 28a, 197; built by Capt. 
Gyles, 3. 314-315, 314n, 355; In- 
dian conference at, 8. 211n, 213; 
mentioned, 3. 316, 320, 443; 7. 192; 
8. 283w, 285; 9. 160. 

George, N. Y., 9. 185, 187, 196. 

Halifax, built by Shirley, i.460; 2 
279, 282; 8. 207^1 ; situation of, i 
460n; 2. 199; 5-423; 7. 167, 168, 175, 
176; 8. 235, 236, 238-240, 251, 253 
garrisoned by New England troops 
I. 460; described, i. 460; 7. 176 
provisions to be sent to, i. 468 
Arnold's exploring party at, i 
504, 510; 8. 277; commanded by 
Capt. Lithgow, 5. 366m, 417,423; 

7. 177, 178; 8. 1.52, 238, 283; or- 
dered to be built 1754, 7. 167, 196 
road built to, 7. 168; 8.235-236, 
garrison left it, 8. 168, 177; part 
of the garrison attacked, 8. 168- 
169, 171-172; stores for stopped, 

8. 169; funds and supplies raised 
for, 7. 197; 8. 169, 172, 174, 182- 
183 ; a truckman appointed for, 8. 
170; prisoners from carried to 
Canada, 7. 170, 174; to be re- 
enforced, 7. 170, 172, 174, 179; 
men enlisted for, 8. 197, 243, 244, 
244n, 267, 270-271, 278; soldiers 
sent to escort provisions to, 7. 
170-171, 177; Capt. Lithgow to 
give information concerning the 
needed repairs at, 7. 174, 183-184; 
built to curb the enemy, 7. 175; 
Preble commissioned as com- 
mander, 7. 178; in a deplorable 
condition, 7. 179-181, 182, 185, 188, 
193; 8. 246-249, 257-258; an at- 
tack threatened, 7. 184, 193; had 
no flag, 7. 185; poor accomoda- 
tions at, 7. 185, 188; improved 
by Lithgow, 7. 186, 187, 188; 
stores carried to, 7. 187; furs sent 
from, 7. 188; plans of, 7. 189, 190; 
8. 236, 239, 272; stone from at 
Marshfield, 7. 190n; 8. 281, 282n; 
the corner stone of at Augusta, 7. 
190m; 8. 281; cost of repairing, 7. 
192; an Indian killed near, 7. 194; 
soldiers desired to be i*eleased, 7. 
197; boats at decayed, 7. 198; men 
to be discharged, 7. 198; the most 
extensive fortification in Maine, 
of the last century, 8. 199; built 
to further the interests of the Ply- 
mouth Company, 8. 223; report of 



96 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Fort Halifax — continued. 

Shirley, 8. 228; could only be at- 
tacked by small arms, 8. 239, 273 ; 
the materials for were prepared 
at Frankfort, 8. 240 ; materials car- 
ried to, 8. 241; name of, 8. 24'2n; 
inscription on the stone, 8. 242n; 
the builders attacked, 8. 243 ; fears 
of a further attack, 8. 244; hard- 
ships of the builders, i. 240n, 247, 
249, 249n, 250n; expense of trans- 
porting stores, 2b2n; plans for 
laid before the Council, 8. 261; 
troops sent to guard provisions, 
8. 266; goods at, 8. 268; pay of 
men at, 8. 270 ; men at attacked, 
8. 271; Col. Montressor at, 8. 273; 
foundation of surveyed by the Rev. 
T. O. Paine, 8. 273, 274; well at 
built by Uen. Winslow, 8. 274; 
guard sent to from Wells, 8. 275 ; 
Ezekiel Potter ensign ab, 8. 275, 
275?i; part of removed, 8. 277; 
Lieut. Howard at, 8. 278; no gar- 
rison at in 1777, 8. 278; used for 
other purposes, 8. 278 ; one flanker 
remaining, 8. 278, 279, 280; Capt. 
Lithgow a trader at, 8. 285-286; 
remains of repaired, 8. 289; a relic 
of the past, 8. 289; mentioned, 2. 
241 ; 4. 16, 112, 113, 318, 350; 5.IX, 
368; 8. 112n, 114, 153; 8.204, 22 hi, 
222n, 223, 22$«, 237, 238, 265, 279, 
282, 283, 283/1, 285, 286, 287, 289?i; 
Its Projectors and Builders, by 
William Goold, 8. 197-289; Ma- 
terials for the History of, by 
Joseph Williamson, 7. 165-198. 

Hill, Augusta, 8. 275-276. 

Hill, Boston, 5. 48; 9. 308/i. 

Hill, Gorham, Capt. Phinney set- 
tled at, 2. 146-147 ; home of James 
Phinney, 2. 148; home of Hugh 
McLellen, 2. 148-149. 

Independence, 8. 120^^, 229n. 

island, origin of the name, i. 150; 
now Bang's island, i. 150. 

James, 5. 8, 27, 73, 74, 75, 91, 101, 
103, 104, 105, 107, 108, 109, 110, 
111, 113, 130, 132. 

Knox, 9. 162. 

La Tour, 9. HO. 

Loyal, committed to the care of 
Walter Gendall, i. 231; court 
held at, i. 242, 245 ; erected, i. 242 ; 
its site, I. 243, 299; 7. 59; com- 
manded by Edward Tyng, i. 246, 
265, 316 ; erected on land belong- 
ing to Mary Munjoy, i. 254; main- 
tained by the revenue from trade 
with the Indians, i. 265, 266; gar- 
rison raised, i. 266; number of 
men in the garrison, i.266; partly 
supported by Mass,, i. 266; report 
of the Mass. committee concern- 
ing, I. 266/1 J sawmills taxed to 



support, 1. 267; to be commanded 
by Anthony Brackctt, i. 268, 270; 
Henry Harwood discharged from, 
1 . 270 ; Walter Gendall to be sec- 
ond in command, i. 270; to be re- 
paired, I. 270; to be used as a 
prison, 1.270-271 ; mill tax stopped 
by Andros, i. 270n; supplied by 
Silvanus Davis, i. 284?i, 292; the 
defense left to private individuals, 
I. 291-292; forces withdrawn, i. 
291-292; besieged, i. 299-300; 7. 
59; capitulated, i. 300, 303; 3. 
137; account of the attack, i. 300- 
301; prisoners taken to Quebec, i. 
301, Brackett and Bramhall killed 
near, i. 296; John Parker sought 
refuge in, 1.302; cannon removed 
from, I. 303; Indian captives 
taken to, " 7. 57; Capt. Silvanus 
Davis in command at, 5. 395; 7. 
59; surrender of, 7. 59-60; 9. 29; 
massacre at, 7. 60; St. Castine not 
guilty of perfidy, 7. 60; Lieut. 
Clarke killed at, 7. 60; mentioned, 
I. 298; 2. 172; 3. 138, 345, 348; 5. 
285; 9.32, 41. 

Mackinaw^, Cadillac at, 6.276; one 
of the French cordon of military 
posts, 6. 276. 

Niagara, 9. 185. 

Orange, 7. loHn- 

Pemaquid, guns taken from to Bos- 
ton and New York, 5. 131n, 278, 
279?i; to be under the governor of 
New England, 5. 265 ; in ruins. 5. 
265-266; to be repaired, 5. 267; 
Andros entertained Indian squaws 
at, 5. 268; named Fort Charles, 5. 
271; capitulated, 5. 271-272, 274, 
278 ; destroyed by the Penobscots, 
5. 272; site of, 5.278; dismantled, 
5. 279; described, 5. 291, 291^, 
292w; 9. 41-42; the ruins of, 5. 
29I71; demolished by the French, 
5-293; 9. 44n; Massachusetts ad- 
vised to rebuild it, 5. 296, 297; 
probably an earthwork, 7. 135; 
erected by Dunbar, 7. 159; built 
by Phipps, 9. 41 ; mentioned, 5. 20, 
21, 22, 30, 46, 47, 197, 205, 217, 
251, 260, 326; 7. 133; 9. 43n, Un; 
see also Forts Charles and Pow- 
nell, and William Henry. 

•Penobscot, occupied by St. Castine, 
7. 45n. 

Pentagoet, commanded by de Cham- 
bly, 7. 46; captured by the Dutch, 
7.46; in possession of St. Castine, 
7. 47 ; letter of Gov. Dongan to, 7. 
47; stood on the site of the Ply- 
mouth trading house, 7. 52; re- 
mains of, 7. 52; surrendered to de 
Grandfontaine, 7.52-53; occupied 
by three natives, 7. 52 ; condition 
of in 1687, 7. 53; St. Castine 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



97 



erected a house near, 7. 53; or- 
chard near, 7. 53; Andros pre- 
pared to rebuild 7. 54; the idea of 
rebuilding given up, 7. 55; be- 
longed to the French, 7. 55; men- 
tioned, 7. 37 ; 8. 330. 

Pitt, formerly Fort Duquesne, 4. 
28211. 

Plymouth, on 'ihe Penobscot, 5. 215 ; 
captured by D'Aulney, 5. 215. 

Point, I, 63n; 2.238; 5. 377n, 384n; 
9. 88, 92, :^24. 

Point Harbor, 5. 378/1. 

Point Light House. 5. 383n. 

Popham, I. 29n; 3.' 286; 7. 127, 259; 
9. 130. 

Pownall, materials for collected at 
Falmouth, 5. 365, 385n; Preble in 
command at, 5. 366^i, 386; site ot 
decided upon, 5. 383, 385n; com- 
pleted and cost of, 5. 386; 8. 246>^; 
named in honor of the governor, 
5. 365n, 386; garrisoned till the 
vrar of the Revolution, 5. 386; 
officers in command at, 5. 386 ; dis- 
mantled by Mowat, 5. 386-387, 
387?i; remains of still visible, 5. 
387; Gen. Waldo buried at, 9. 92; 
mentioned, i. 502; 5. 365, 370n; 6. 
200; 7. 8, 198; 9. 93; see also Fort 
Pemaquid and Forts on the Penob- 
scot. 

Preble, i. 207n. 

Richmond, at Dresden, 2. 199; built, 
2. 279, 279n; 8. 206, 206n; Mr. 
Macclenachan at, 3. 274, 275; 4. 
195; 8. 110^; a frontier fortress, 
4. 75; a truckhouse established at, 
4. 157; the Rev. Jacob Bailey 
moved to, 6. 197; Capt. William 
Lithgow in command at, 5. 417; 7. 
177; 8. 206n, 2.38, 285; decayed, 8. 
211 ; to be rebuilt and enlarged, 8. 
211, 211n; officers of, 8. 211;2; at- 
tacked, 8. 212; extent of the 
buildings at, 8. 2i2n; a residence 
of the minister, 8. 212n; the prin- 
cipal fort on the Kennebec river, 
8. 215; proposal to move it up the 
river, 8. 2l5n; Indian spy at, 8. 
216; site of, 8. 268; dismantled, 8. 
2QSn\ mentioned, 3. 407, 408; 4. 
113, 145, 158, 159, 168, 171, 172, 
175, 178; 5. 428; 7. 168, 175, 179, 
180, 185, 195; 8. 117n 205w, 207n, 
214, 215, 232, 239, 247, 251, 252w, 
260, 267, 268, 285, 287. 
Forts, (in general), at Arrow^sic, 5. 
253; at Black Point commenced, 
3. 131, 132; land given by Scottow, 
3. 132; described, 3. 132; at Bruns- 
wick, 3. 373; at Carleton, 9. 110; 
at Casco, I. 291; 3. 345, 348; to be 
erected at the Kennebec river, 5. 
87; 7. 167, 170, 195; John North 
sent against, 7. 167; at New Cas- 

7 



tie, I. 291 ; at Norridgewock, 4. 
346; at Parker's point, 2. 171; at 
Passadumkeag built by the 
French, 7. 4; destroyed by West- 
brook, 7-4; at Pemkuit captured 
by Indians, 7. 341; at Pentagoet 
captured by D'Aulney, 8.330; at 
the Penobscot, 5. 365, 386; 7. 4, 
340 ; 9. 87 ; (see Fort Pownall) ; at 
Saco, 4. 147; 5. 283,395; at St. 
John River, 5. 365n; 7. 340; at 
Sheepscot river destroyed, 4. 227; 
at Ticonic Falls, 5. Ix; built by 
Popham's colonists, 3. 286, 301, 
302, 303, 307, 308; at the Chops by 
Lewis and Noble, 3-314; Shirley 
asked to send soldiers to, 3. 314; 
built by Flaojg, 4. 318; built at 
Boston, 5. 197; built by Castine 
and visited by Pownall, 5. 385, 
385n; built by La Have, 7. 33; 
built by the Pilgrims, 7. 37 ; early 
on the Pejepscot, 3. 316, 319, 323; 
another built by Andros, 3. 316, 
320n; site of the first, 3. 319, 320; 
site of the second, 3) 320n; In- 
dians attempt to blow it up, 3. 
320ji; deed executed in, 3. 320-321 ; 
why built at Augusta and Wins- 
low, 3. 274. 
St. Georges, erected, i. 29; 7. 298; 
Indian treaty at, 4. 168; Gov. 
Pownall at, 5.367; in Thomaston, 
5. 36771; resisted the attack of the 
French, 5. 367n; Indians lurked 
around, 5. 368; Indians made a 
pretense of desiring a treaty, 5. 
369; sick at, 5-374; lime made at, 
5- 375, 375^; mentioned, 4- 146, 
147, 168; 5. 156^, 360, 369; 6. 241, 
300; 7.86, 317. 
St. Louis, 9. 99, 102, 109. 
Shelden, 4. 262; see Shelden's fort. 
Shirley, formerly Fort Frankfort, 6. 
195%; site of, 6. 195 ?i; erected. 8. 
207n, 214; part of to be used as a 
goal, 8. 209n; mentioned, 8. 210)j, 
2Un, 239, 240. 
the, a part of Hallowell, 7- 384n. 
Fortune, the, brought the patent to 

New Plymouth, 9. 118. 
Fort Western, letters of Benedict Ar- 
nold dated from, i. 467, 468; Ar- 
nold at, I. 494, 495, 502-503; built, 
2.279; 8. 207n; described, i. .503/*; 
8. 20Tn, 240n; Arnold left, i. 471 ; 
at Augusta, 2. 152, 199; 4. 39, 
306n; 5. Ix, 417; the Rev. Paul 
Coffin at, 4. 306; Capt. William 
Lithgow in command at, 5. 417; 
8. 240n; Capt. Howard in com- 
mand at, 5. 366n; 8. 283; road 
built from to Fort Halifax, 7. 168; 
garrison left at, 7. 168; guarded 
by the Province, 8. 207n; 1764, to 
be garrisoned, 8. 278; remains of, 



98 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Fort Wesfcern— continued. 

8. 282; the nucleus which grew 
into a capital, 8. 282 ; had one com- 
mander, 8. 283; S. and W. How- 
ard trade at, 8. 288w; mentioned, 
I. 460, 502, 504, 510; 2. 152, 153, 
241; 7. 179, 180, 181, 182, 184, 191, 
193; 8. 204, 226n, 236, 239, 240, 
247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 252^, 
257, 260, 262, 266n, 269, 273, 275n, 
287. 

William, 8. 120n. 

William Henry, built, 2. 239; 5. 282, 
283 ; 7. 62 ; built by Pliipps, 7. 159 ; 

9. 40, 41-42; described, 2. 239; 5. 
282; 7-64; a barrier to the enemy, 
2.239; 9-43; treaty with the In- 
dians at, 2. 239; cost of construc- 
tion, 7. 64; proposed French at- 
tack, 2. 240; 7. 62; commanded by 
Chubb, 2. 240; 7. 63; 9. 43; 
strongest in America, 5. 282; Ma- 
jor Church's opinion of, 5. 282; 
called Fort Pemaquid, 5. 282; In- 
dian messenger killed at, 7. 63; 
de Iberville sent with an expedi- 
tion against, 7. 63 ; 9. 43 ; invested, 
7. 64; first attack, 7. 64-65; 9. 43; 
garrison confused, 7. 65; surren- 
dered, 2. 240; 7. 65, 159; 9. 43, 4Sn] 
destroyed, 2. 240; 7. 65; the sav- 
ages disappointed, 7.60; repaired 
and maintained awhile, 2. 241; 
mentioned, 4. 112, 28471, 285. 

York, 6. 267. 
Foss, Mrs. A. B., 4. 235, 242n. 

Benjamin, moved to Machias, 3. 

179, 211. 

John, served in, the war of the Rev- 
olution, 3. 204. 

Capt. Reuben, 3. 188. 

Thomas, 3. 173, 236. 

Walter, 3. 173. 

Zachariah, served in the war of the 
Revolution, 3. 204. 
Foster, a common name in Scarboro- 
ugh, 3. 211. 

Anno, rairricd Ether Shepley, 8. 
420; death of, 8.420. 

Col. Benjamin, commander of a 
schoon3r, 2. 246; captured the 
Tapni,quish, 2. 246; 3. 211; in 
command at Scott's point, 2. 247; 
moved to Machias, 3. 179, 211; 
mentioned, 3. 180; 4. 351. 

Benj. jr., 3. 180, 211. 

Daniel, 4. 368. 

Ezekiel, 3. 179, 180, 211. 

Ezekiel jr., 3. 180, 211. 

Isaac, 4. 360. 

Isaiah, 3. 178, 179, 211. 

Jacob, 3. 180, 211. 

Capt. John, 9. 42n, 49, 64. 

John W., 3- 180, 211. 

moved to Machias, 3. 178; land 
granted to, 3. 179; mentioned, 3. 

180, 211. 



Major-General, , 8. 78. 

, of Windsor, 2. 291. 

, of Wiscasset, 4. 330. 

the Rev. , of Berwick, 4. 265, 

267. 
Foules, Thomas, 9. 372, 373. 
Founder of Maine, the, 5. 217. 
Fourche, the, Montressor encamped 

near, i. 459. 
Four Friends, the, 3. 348- 
Four Mile Creek, 9. 185, 187, 196. 
Fower, Barnabas, bound for Mass., 
met by Sir Ferdinando Gorges, 2. 
55a. 
Fowle, Thomas, 7. 146^1. 
Fowler, the Rev. Bancroft, 8. 177- 
Fox, Charles James, 8. 4, 67, 69, 78; 
cited, 7, 137n; 144w. 

, lived at Barton's point, i. 263; 

married Hannah Burroughs, i. 
263. 
islands, named by Martin Pring, 

2. 21a, 7. 26; mentioned, 4-325; 7. 
257, 265. 

Jabez, to lay out a township, 8. 209, 
225n; visited by Shirley, 8. 225; 
biographical notice of, 8. 225n; 
mentioned, 4. 164, 166; 8. 227. 

John, ancestor of the Rev. John, i. 
31671. 

the Rev. John, lived at Woburn, i. 
316; married Mary Tyng, i. 316; 
his posterity, i. 3I671; his wife in- 
herited an interest in the Plymouth 
Company, 8. 2257i. 
Foxcroft, the Rev. Samuel, preached 
at Bakerstown, 2. 113; preached 
at New Gloucester, 2. 153, 158; 4. 
355; employed in transcribing, 4. 
356; mentioned, 7. 220. 

TUomas, 2. 158. 

, of New Gloucester, 4. 378. 

Mrs. , of Cambridge, 7. 2-36, 236?!. 

Foxwell escate, the, 3. 225. 

Esther, daughter of Richard, mar- 
ried to Thomas Rogers, 3. 207i; 
children of, 3. 2O71. 

John, son of Richard, 3. 20; father 
of Nathaniel, 3. 20. 

Lucretia, married James Robinson, 

3. 20u^ 80; children of, 3. 2O71. 
Mary, daughter of Richard, married 

George Norton, 3. 2l7i. 

Nathaniel, son of John, 3. 20; at his 
death the name becanje extinct, 3. 
20, 

Philip, signed the petition to 
Charles 11, i.402; 3. 1297i; son of 
Richard, 3. 20; moved to Kittery, 
3. 20; death of, 3. 20; in a garri- 
son, 3. 105, 117, iSln; his tax of 
1681, 3. 130; mentioned, 3. 132. 

Richard, lived at Blue Point, i. 64n, 
175n; 3. 14, 17, 18; complained of 
the town of Saco, 1. 142; contro- 
versy settled, 1 . 14^ ; lived in Saco, 
I. 143; a commissioner, i. 175, 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



99 



197; 3. 55; liis marriage, i. 175w; 
acknowledged the government of 
Mass., 1.386; 3-46; a juror, i.535; 
one of the committee upon the 
petition of Jordan, i. 540, 553; 
his declaration against Cammock, 
3. 14, IT; settled on Cammock' s 
patent, 3. 18; disturbed by John 
Bonython, 3. 18; died at Black 
Point, 3. 19; his public service 
and character, 3. 19; anecdote of, 
3. 20; children of, 3. 20, 20n; fam- 
ily name became extinct with his 
grandson, 3. 20; paid a visit to 
England, 3. 21n; an appraiser of 
Oammock's estate, 3. 25-26, 231; 
a member of the Lygonia assem- 
bly, 3- 41 ; his quarrel with Joseph 
Phippen, 3. 75; gave a bond, 3. 
73; cause of the quarrel, 3. 73; 
his daughter married John Ash- 
ton, 3. 82; mentioned, 3. 24, 38/i, 
75, 80, 89, 122, 126; 9. 3l3n. 
Richard jr., 3. 20. 

Sarah, daughter of Richard, 3. 21n\ 
married Joseph Curtis, 3. 21n; 
her child, 3. 21n. 
Susannah, daughter of Richard, mar- 
ried John Ashton, 3. 20n, 21w, 82. 

Foxwell's brook, 3. 23, 169^. 

Framingham, Mass., home of Isaac 
Clarke, i. 308; mentioned, 7. 487; 
8, 152; History of, see Barry. 

France, the king of gave a charter to 
Du Monts, I. 25; Biard returned 
to. I. 2iyn; refugees from arrived 
at Plymouth, i, 276; Capt. Edward 
Tyng died in, i. 316; the manu- 
scripts of the Jesuits taken to, i. 
412; fish sent to, i. 551; the wife 
of Charles i, a daughter of, 2. 58aw ; 
Gorges sent to assist the king of, 
2. 72a; peace with, 2. 196; heredi- 
tary hostility to the settlers of 
Maine, 2. 271-272 ; claimed a part 
of Maine, 2. 271; Popham's colo- 
nists reach, 3. 291; Acadia and 
Canada conveyed to by Charles i, 
5. 200, 215; Andros worked in the 
interest of, 5. 269; the war with 
interrupted the settlement of 
Pemaquid, 6. 22; claimed pos- 
session of Penobscot, 6. 109-110; 
expelled Acadians went to, 6. 343?i; 
held dominion over Maine, 7. 248; 
lost the same, 248; claimed the 
right of possession, 7. 296; the 
reason of her claim upon New 
France, 9. 102; given the jurisdic- 
tion of Kew France, 9. 110; men- 
tioned,. I. 86, 403, 554; 2. 13, 46, 
257, 261; 3. 99; 133, 175, 232, 287, 
Bm, 373, 395, 397, 417, 421, 422, 
m^ 427, 447; 4. 10, 11, 123, 160, 
161; 5. xxi, lix, 5, 26 49^ 90, 113, 
126,, 148, 160, 179, 207, 242, 251, 



276, 309, 320, 330, 358, 397; 6. 89, 
96^, 110, 113, 117, 124, 131, 139, 
140, 141, 149, 220, 221, 239, 250; 
260, 275; 7. 15, 16, 2S, 32, 33, 51, 
58, 62, m, 67, S2n, 83, 136, 137, 
ISln, 142, 142n, 249, 251, 256, 261, 
263, 264, 266, 278, 295, 305, 308, 
316, 335, 410; 8. 126, 192/i, 211, 
238, 271, 298, 302, 317, 321, 322, 
323, 349, 351, 428; 9. 26, 97, 98, 
101, 1(*2, 105, 212, 223, 225, 245, 
246, 304^, 369; History of, see 
Martin, Louis Henri. 

Franciae, 4. 123, see France. 

Francis i, claimed right of possession 
of Maine, 7. 296. 
chief of the Tarrantines, 4. 96. 
Capt. chief of the Penobscots, 7. 6, 
20, 21. 

Frankfort, Germany, 2. 280: 6. 325. 
326, 332. 
Maine, visited by a Romish priest, 
3. 273; his attempts to proselyte, 
3- 574; 6. 194-195; petitioned to 
have a minister, 3. 274, 275; 6. 
195; 8. 212^; no church at, 3. 275; 
the Rev. Jacob Bailey preached 
at, 3. 275; 6. 196; sought aid in 
England, 6. 195, 196; now Dres- 
den, 6. 195; called Pownalbo- 
rough, 6. 196; church built, 6. 196- 
197; Elder Joshua Hall preached 
in, 7. 229; the Rev. Mr. McLeni- 
chon preached in, 8. 112; same as 
Fort Shirley, 8. 201 n; Germans 
and French settled in, 8. 213n, 
214; Indians burn'] a house in, 8.. 
267; mentioned, 2. 284; 8. 214^ 
240, 266. 

Franklin, Benjamin, a brother of mar- 
ried Elizabeth Tyng, 1.316; letter- 
to Jonathan Williams, 3. 339-340; 
agent for Maine township, 7. 202; 
a friend of Y aughan, 7. 409 ; men- 
tioned, 5. 149; 6. 87, 335; 7.278; 
8. 11, 12, 9f, 98, 99, 264; his Diary 
cited, 6. 335. 

, married Elizabeth Tyng, i. 316. 

Conn., 5. Ivn. 
county, 4. 32, 33, 45. 
Mercury, the, 8. 442. 

Freal^e, Sir Thomas, 7. 129. 

Freale, Sir Thomas, 7. 129. 

Frebecer, Adjutant, , i. 500; see 

Febiger. 

Fredenburg, Benjamin Francis, alias 
Bela Francis Frost, preached in. 
Bath, 2. 224; his character aad^ 
name exposed, 2. 224-225. 

Fredericton, 8. 13, 38, 40, 43, 52» 65,, 76. 

Freeby, Nicholas^ i. 320. 

Freedom, Maine, 2. 291; 8. 394. 
of speeeh lathe seventeeath oenkiry^ 

3> 23i 
the principles of wroug'ht out by 
the colonists^ 5,. 149» 



100 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Freehold, Presbyterian Church estab- 
lished at, 6. 30. 
Freeman, Asa, 8. 391. 
Barnabas, 4-371, 372. 
Mrs. Barnabas, 4. 871. 
Caroline, died, 2. 114. 
Chandler, early settler of Bakers- 
town, 2. 118, 114, 115, 120, 128, 
126, 128. 
the Eev. Charles, ordained at Lim- 
erick, 1.328; biographical notice 
of, I. 324n; his Account of Lim- 
erick, 1.325-335. 
Capt. Enoch, 3. 184; 4. 164, 166; 8, 

229n. 
Mrs. Elizabeth, daughter of Ezekiel 
Potter, 8. 275; death of, 8. 278; 
her Memoir of Fort Halifax, 8. 
275-277. 
the Eev. James, 7. 383. 
John, S., teacher in Warren Acad- 
emy, 8. 172. 
Joseph, an early settler of Bakers- 
town, 2. 118; led the public wor- 
ship, 2. 113; made a deacon, i. 
114; died, i. 114. 
Kathaniel, one of the founders of 
the Mass. Historical Society, 2.11a. 
Olive, baptised, 2. 113. 
Samuel, 2. 113; 5. xlii; 8. 165; his 
edition of Smith's Journal cited, 
I. 5; 5. xix; i. 325. 
William, 6. 41. 

, of Fairfield, 4. 401. 

Judge , I. 303n. 

-Freemasons, lodge in Minot, 2. 127; 
laid the corner stone of Bunker 
Hill monument, 3. 250; names 
given to thelo(ige in Rhode Island, 
4. 269; celebration in Bangor, 7. 
20; Robert Dunlap a meml3er of 
the Grand Lodge, 7. 368. 
Freemen, number of in Falmouth, i. 

144, 201, 386. 
Freeport, home of the Mosiers, i. 76; 
called Harriseket,i 2. 167; men- 
tioned, 2. 113, 115, 171; 4- '^32; 8. 
266. 
Freetown, Maine, 6. 159; 8. 390. 

Mass., 2. 145. 
Freewill Baptists, in Wells, i . 350 ; in 
Minot, 2. 127, 130; in New Glouces- 
ter, 2. 158; Elder Benjamin Ran- 
dall the first to openly preach the 
doctrine, 7. 222 ; doctrine rapidly 
embraced, 7. 222 ; churches formed, 
7. 222; mentioned, i. 828, 332, 334. 
Freeze, Eliza, probably the mother of 
James, i. 310. 
George, heir of Jacob, i. 310. 
Jacob, son of James, i. 310; lived 
at Hampton, i. 310; his heirs, i. 
310; lived at Purpooduck, i. 820. 
James, lived on the Neck, i. 320. 
James jr., killed at Falmouth, i. 
296n, 310 ; probably a son of James, 



I. 310; his son, i. 310; land owned 
by, I. 310. 

Johathan, heir of Jacob, i. 310. 

Joseph, heir of Jacob, i. 310. 
French and English commisaries, 
cited, 7. 50n; 9. 102. 

and Indian war, a relic of, 8. 289; 
mentioned, 7. 827: 8. 109, 117, 147; 
History of, see Brake, S. G. 

coinage, known by its mint marks, 
6. Il7n; coins of the reign of 
Louis XIV, rare, 6. 118; coins 
found, 6. 117. 

Encyclopedia, cited, 7. SlOn. 

Hannah, married Oliver Godfrey, 9. 
301. 

Jeremy, a nickname for Jeremiah 
Jordan, i. 533n. 

language, formed and changed, i. 
427. 
Frenchman's bay, the French settled 
at, 6. 3; Cadillac's account of, 6. 
280; same as Donaquet, 6. 280w; 
mentioned, 3. 294?i; 6. 115, J 25, 
126. 
Frenchmen, credulity of, 4. 285. 
French Neutrals, 3. 176n; 6.389-343, 
354; see Acadians. 

Protestants, arrived at Falmouth, i. 
276; at Salem, i. 277n; in Maine, 
4. 78; in Boston, 6. 285. 

Revolution, the, a sequence of 
American independence, 6. 88; 
English people concerned in, 6. 

^ 88-89; mentioned, 7. 41, 284, 406; 
9. 164. 

Spoliation Bill, 8. 427-429. 

the, their power interrupted, i. 27; 
places where they erected their 
forts, I. 27, 28, 88; dispute with 
the English about the boundaries, 
I. 27; their intention of settle- 
ments alarmed the English, i. 27; 
dislodged by ArgalL i. 27; cap- 
tured Capt. John Smith, i. 81; 2. 
38a; rifled the trading house at 
Bagaduce point, i. 40; promised 
to assist the Indians, i. 288; their 
influence over the Indians, i. 387, 
884, 436, 441-442, 443; 2. 168, 272; 

3. 184-135, 150, 151, 152, 169-170; 

4. 14, 74, 152; 5. 175, 176; 6. 220; 
7. m, 83; 8. 298; 9. 42; their hos- 
tility to the English, i. 287, 287n, 
297; captured Pemaquid, i. 291; 
formed a junction with the east- 
ern Indians, i. 298, 291 ; at Schenec- 
tady, I. 298; a fund of information 
among their historians, i. 404; 
their superior facility to enter the 
modes of Indian life, i. 404; their 
integrity to the Indians surpassed 
the English, i. 405; the labors of 
their missionaries, i.407; the Ab- 
nakis unite with them for pro- 
tection, 1.438; they inflamed the 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



101 



Indians against the English, i. 
436; 5. 281, 295, 296; 7. 116; their 
weakness prevented their attack- 
ing the English, i . 437 ; said to have 
favored the approach of Arnold, 

1. 477; Arnold desired to know 
how they were affected, i. 479; 
received the Americans hospit- 
ably, I. 482; the number of in the 
English army, i. 488-489; named 
Acadia, 2. 16a; denied the exist- 
ence of Norumbega, 2. 17a; un- 
successful at early colonization, 

2. 19a; first colony sent to Amer- 
ica, 2. 20a; inclined to settle the 
coast, 2. 38; claimed the territory 
given to Gorges, 2. 40; answered 
by Gorges, 2. 40; favored the In- 
dians, 2. 62, 67 ; expedition against 
the Iroquois, 2. 67; in possession 
of Canada, 2. 168; end of their 
power in America, 2. 200; 3. 176; 
7.295; 8.274; attacked Fort Wil- 
liam Henry, 2. 239; resolved to 
destroy Pemaquid, 2.240; 5-289; 
captured the New Port, 2. 240; 
destroyed Pemaquid, 2. 241; 5. 
291-292 ; intrigued to exterminate 
the English, 3. 152; Louisburg 
their stronghold, 3- 1'72; assisted 
the Indians, 3. 370; 4. 73, 141; 5. 
242, 251, 256, 2567i; 6. 241; at De- 
troit, 4. 282; early in Maine, 5. xx, 
xxi; 7. 247; mostly Catholics, 5. 
xxii; the fisheries and trade a 
source of trouble between them 
and the English, 5. 174-175 ; crafty, 
5. 175, 176; cruel, 5. 176; diligent 
in colonization, 5. 194; made the 
colonists uneasy, 5. 196; robbed 
the Penobscot traders, 5-205; 7. 
32; captured the cargo of Dixy 
Bull, 5. 205; hated the English, 5. 
242, 256n; occupied Canada, 5. 
242-243; Nova Scotia ceded to, 5. 
243 ; favored by the Stuarts, 5. 251 ; 
257; increased hatred towards, 5. 
267; Andros worked in their in- 
terest, 5. 269; the Indians prom- 
ised to forsake them, 5. 283; their 
habitual treachery, 5. 285-286 ; the 
the Indians considered to be under 
their goverement, 5. 286, 295; 
their policy iu America compared 
to the English, 5. 296; the first to 
acquire a knowledge of America, 
5. 324, 329; acquired the good wi^ll 
of the natives, 5. 324-325; did 
much fishing and trading on the 
coast, 5-325; had a knowledge of 
Indian traits, 5. 325, 325n, 326; 
but little known of their posses- 
sions in Maine, 5. 330, 331; taught 
Komanism to the natives, 5. 331 ; 
maintained their titles to land 
through the Indians, 5. 365 ; gave 



an ensign's commission to an In- 
dian, 5. 368; BrockhoUs attempt- 
ed to go to the, 5. 394; held al- 
most exclusive possession of 
Maine, 6. 3 ; never had undisputed 
possession of Acadia, 6. 3, 3yi; St. 
Castine a powerful ally of, 6. Hi- 
ll 2 ; early fished on the banks of 
Newfoundland, 6. 173; protected 
the Indians, 6.237-238; destroyed 
Deerfield and Haverhill, 6. 239; 
denied having instigated the In- 
dians, 6. 241 : established a line of 
forts from (Quebec to the Gulf of 
Mexico, 6. 276; 8. 222-323; very 
minute in their reports upon the 
colonial affairs, 6. 276; their re- 
ports compared to the English, 6. 
277 ; kept the Abnakis to oppose 
the English, 6. 281; at the Penob- 
scot, 7. 25; basis of their claims 
east of the Kennebec river, 7. 26, 
27 ; interf erred with the traffic of 
Capt. John Smith, 7. 28; their 
articles of trade cheaper than the 
English, 7. 29; their claims no 
better than the English, 7. 29; not 
delicate about marrying Indians, 
7. ^4; captured Fort William 
Henry, 7, 159; proposed to cap- 
ture Fort Halifax, 7. 169-170, 184; 
erected a fort on the Kennebec, 7. 
167, 177; displeased because the 
English erected a fort, 7. 193; the 
Abnakis attached to, 7. 339; com- 
plained of the English because 
they erected a fort at Penobscot, 

7. 341 ; their infidelity at Harvard 
College, 7. 408; feared to lose 
Canada, 8. 124; sent a powerful 
fieet to America, 8. 124-125; fleet 
disabled, 8. 125 ; death of the com- 
modore and vice-admiral, 8. 125, 
125-126; plan to attack Annapolis, 

8. 126; fleet returned to France, 

8. 126; attacked Col. Noble at 
Minas, 8. 135, 139; the Penobscot 
their western boundary, 8. 188- 
189; sometimes claimed the Ken- 
nebec, 8. 189n; settled at German- 
town, 8. 213n; built a fort near 
Chaudiere, 8. 215-216; prepared to 
make an effort to regain Nova 
Scotia, 8. 222, 223; territory over 
which they held jurisdiction, 8. 
817; at Passamaquoddy, 8. 330; 
infested the coasts with pirates, 

9. 28; mentioned, 3. 139, 140, 141, 
345; 5. 30, 252; 6. 360; 7. 22, 29, 
35, 36, 37, 42, 44, 50, 55, 67, 68, 69, 
60, 61, 62, 63, 68, 82, 88, 89, 92; 8. 
318, 326,329; 9.2, 28, 29. 

Freshet of 1785, the, 4. 40. 
Fresh pond, a boundary of New Dart- 
mouth, 5. 96. 



102 



MAIKE HrSTOEICAL SOCSIETY. 



Fresh river, 4. 281. 

Frie, Adrian, signed the petition to 
Charles II, 1.402. 
Jonathan, 4. 287. 

Friend, Kichard, 5. 241. 

Friends, driven from New Hampshire, 
7. 220; at South Berwick, 7. 220, 
221; retired to Boston, 7. 220; at 
Eliot, 7. 221; society formed at 
Falmouth, 7. 221; feared by the 
Congregationalists, 7. 221 ; society 
formed at North Yarmouth, 7. 
221; held monthly meetings at 
Portland and Durham, 7. 221 ; so- 
ciety formed at Windham, 7. 221; 
number of in 1784, 7. 221; men- 
tioned, 4. 403. 

Friendship, 6. 310. 

Friend street, 8. 152. 

Frier, Nathaniel, paid a tax at Fal- 
mouth, I. 323. 

Frigates, before Quebec, i. 484, 486, 
488, 492, 493; attacked by Arnold, 
1.484,486; see the Alliance, the 
Essex, Lizard, Massachusetts, 
New Port, Niger, Nonsuch, Pearl, 
Rose, Swan. 

Frink, , 4. 265. 

Frisbie, Prof. Levi, s-li; 7. 408. 

Frizell, Alexander, signed the petition 
of 1672, to Mass., 5. 240, 
John, signed the petition to Brad- 
street, I. 2S3n; lived at Falmouth, 
1.320. 

Frobisher, Sir Martin, landed at Lab- 
rador, 6. 175n; religious services 
held by, 6. 175n; mentioned, 5. 
218n; 6. 175n. 

Frogg, Mr. , i. 333. 

Froissart, 5. 201. 

Fronde, the, 7. 41, 42. 

Frontenac, Louis de Buade, Comte de, 
governor of Canada, i. 301 ; at 
Quebec, 2. 240 ; planned to capture 
Pemaquid, 2. 240; summoned to 
surrender, 5. 272-273; 9. 31; his 
answer, 5. 273; sent Cadillac to 
France, 6. 275; second time a gov- 
ernor of Canada, 7. 59; sent three 
expeditions against the English, 
7-59; urged on the fortifications 
of Montreal and Quebec, 7. 62; 
his opinion of St. Castine, 7. 63; 
sent expedition against Fort Wil- 
liam Henry, 7. 63; 9. 43; sent 
presents to the Indians, 7. 63; 
checked by Sir William Phipps, 
9. 43; mentioned, 5. 134; 7. 48; 8. 
189n, 

Frontier settlements, the, abounded 
with heroism, 7. 131. 

.Frost, an extraordinary, 3. 308. 

Bela Francis, preached in Bath, 2. 
224; his character exposed, 2. 224. 
V Charles, signed treaty of 1714, 6. 
259 ; his autograph, 6. 259. 



Capt. Charles, held a court at Wells, 
I. 267; reported the loss of Fal- 
mouth, I. SOSn; indicted for man- 
slaughter, i . 368 ; 3. 16; acquitted, 
I. 369; miltary officer for Kittery, 
I. 373; assaulted by Richard 
Gibson, i. 378: to punish Gibson, 
I. 379; counselor, i. 381; signed 
the petition to Cromwell, i. 394; 
claimed land at Sheepscot, 2. 237; 
letter to Capt. John Hill, 3. 138- 
139; letter to Sir William Pepper- 
ell, 3. 171n; mentioned, 4. 164, 
166; 9.46. 

the Rev. Charles, 7. 378. 

George, witnessed the signature of 
Arthur Mack worth, i. 544. 

Nicholas, constable of Piscataqua, 
I. 88; to lay out the boundary of 
Wells, I. 361; signed the petition 
to Cromwell, i. 395; proposed a 
parley with the Indians, 3. 107. 

Simeon, deposition of, 4. 210, 228- 
229 ; representative from Kittery, 
4. 210, 229. 

William, had a sawmill at Wells, i. 
268, 269; registrar, i. 555. 
Frothingham, John, 5. xxxiv. 

Richard, his history of Charlestown 
cited, 2. Slan, hOn; his history 
of the Seige of Boston cited, 3. 
243-244, 269m; 5. 217w. 

William, teacher in Belfast Acad- 
emy, 8. 172. 

the Rev. William, 6. 366. 
Fry, James Brock, 3. 337. 

Martin, whipped for stealing, 3. 86. 

Richard, his petition to Gov. Belcher, 

3. 335-337; confined, 3. 335, 337; 
leased paper mill to Westbrook 
and Waldo, 3. 336, 

Frye, Gen. Joseph, anecdote told by, 

4. 284-285; one of tbe original 
proprietors of Fryeburg 4. 284/?; 
biographical notice of, 4. 284?*; 
seized, 4. 284n, 285; married Miss 
Poor, 4. 284/1 ; children of, 4. 284« ; 
escaped from captivity, 4. 285; 
site of his h#use, 4. 285-286 ; Capt. 
Stark, showed him Fryeburg, 4. 
288 ; on the fight at Piggwacket, 
4. 290-291. 

Capt. Joseph, son of Gen. Joseph, 4. 
284n; 3-237. 

Lieut. Nathaniel, son of Gen. Joseph, 
4. 284n. 

Richard W-, 4- 284n. 

Simeon, 4. 284n. 

William, 8. 89. 
Fryeburg, formerly Picqwaket, i . 333 ; 
4. 116, 275n; the centennial cele- 
bration in, I. 409; home of Gov. 
Lincoln, i. 409, 411; the Indian 
ncime of, 4. 109; visited by the 
Rev. Paul Coffin, 4. 250, 280; the 
Rev. William Fessenden ordained 



IN0EX TO OOLLECTIOM. 



103 



at, 4. 250 ; the seven owners of, 4. 
278; called the Seven lots, 4.278n; 
people move from to Concord, 4. 
278n; inhabitants of in 1768, 4. 
28'^; part of Brownfield, 4. 283ji; 
old and new line of, 4. 283 )i; Dan- 
iel Webster taught school in, 4. 
288?i; Joseph Frye one of the 
original owners of, 4. 284n; cen- 
tennial of the battle of Lovewells 
at, 4. 286n; good view from, 4. 
288; people from Falmouth and 
Gorham cut hay at, 4. 288; live- 
stock wintered at, 4. 288, 288n; 
only clearings there in 3762, 4. 
288n; Fessenden the first settled 
minister at, 4. 289n; mentioned, 
I. 501n; 4. 279, 280, 338; 6.235; 7. 
219; 8. 163, 
Academy, incorporated, 8. 163; pre- 
ceptors of 8. 163 ; land grant to, 8. 
163; suspended, 8. 163; musical 
instruction introduced, 8. 163-164; 
new buildings, 8. 164 ; females ad- 
mitted, 8. 164; funds raised, 8. 
164; museum commenced, 8. 164; 
medical lectures in, 8. 164, 179; 
mentioned, i. 264n; 4. 283n. 

Fryer, James, taken prisoner at Rich- 
mond's island, i. 227; carried to 
Portsmouth, 1.227- 
Nathaniel, his vessel attacked, i. 
227; his son killed, i. 227; a com- 
missioner to treat with the In- 
dians, I. 230; lived at Portsmouth, 
I. 230; purchased land of Robert 
Jordan, i. 233; lived at Spurwink, 
I. 270; one of the committee to 
repair Fort Loyal, i. 270; a referee 
in Jordan's will, i. 553; mentioned, 
I. 380. 

Fullam, Jacob, killed, 4. 287. 

Fuller, Ezra, 4. 363. 
Henry W., 6. 67; graduatd from 
college, 6. 71; practiced in Au- 
gusta, 6. 71; held public offices, 

6. 71; death of, 6. 71; children of, 
6.71. 

Margaret, 8. 441 , 442. 

Thomas, 5. xxviii, xxxi. 

the Hon. Timothy, 5. Ixii; 7. 408. 

the Rev. , of Bath, 2. 223. 

Fulling mill, built at Gardiner, 2. 283; 

7. 414. 
Fnlsom, John, 4. 336. 

Mrs. John, 4. 307. 

Funeral service by torchlight, 9. 56^. 

Furbish, James, i. 340. 

William, signed the petition to 
Charles 11, i. 401. 

Furlong, Patrick, i. 333. 

Furnell, Tho., signed the petition to 
Charles 11, i. 401. 

Fur trade, extinct during Queen 
Anne's war, 4. 74; Du Monts in- 
terested in, 5. 174}t; good at Pem- 



aquid, 5. 223 ; an impulse to colo- 
nization, 7. 318; spoiled by bad 
faith with the Indians, 7. 320; 
mentioned, i. 35; 2. 68n; 5. 196. 

Furs, Pring returned to England with 
a load of, 2. 22a; the French the 
first to introduce the trade in, 5. 
323; the prices of to be set by 
agreement, 5. 377; sent from 
Fort Halifax to Boston, 7. 188; 8. 
268; the Plymouth colonists early 
traded in, 8. 201, 202; mentioned, 
3. 308-309. 

Fursone, Christopher, accused of de- 
serting his wife, i. 369. 

Fypsie, Fr., 5. 94. 

Gadney, see Gedney. 

Gaethel, , 6. 325. 

Gage, Gen. Thomas, 3. 190; 7. 473. 
, settled at Buxton, 2. 138. 

Gaines, John, 2. 138. 

Gainsborough, 6. 179n. 

Gale, Edmund, lived at Falmouth, i. 
320. 

Gallatin, the Hon. Albert, president 
of the New York Historical Soci- 
ety, 2. 11a; his intellectual work 
and great age, 2. 11 an; birth of, 
6. 95, 967}; came to America, 6. 
95; at Lubec, 6. 95; assisted by 
Delesdenier, 6. 95; in the army, 
6. 96; unsuccessful as a merchant, 
6. 96, 100-101 ; teacher at Harvard 
College, 6. 96; became a citizen, 
6. 96; in Congress, 6. 96n, 101; 
secretary of the treasury, 6. Q6n; 
commissioner and minister, 6.96n, 
as an author, 2. llan; 6. 96n; 
Judge Story's opinion of, 6. 96?^; 
at Providence, Yiiginia^ and in 
Ohio, 6. 100; purchased a planta- 
tion, 6. 100; a poor farmer, 6. 100 
married, 6. 100; death of his wife 
6. 101; second marriage, 6. 101 
his political character, 6. 101-102 
in Boston and Wiscasset, 6. 102 
inquired for friends in Maine, 6. 
102-103; death of, 6. 96n; men- 
tioned, 6. 263, 360; 7. 464, 465; 8. 
33, 35, 47, 369; his autobiography, 
6. 93-103 ; his Synopsis of the In- 
. dian Language cited, 2. IQan. 

Gallipolis, 6. 205 ; 

Gallop, John, 5. 205. 
Capt. John, 2. 133. 

Gambo Falls, 2. 148. 

Gammon, Philip, signed the petition 
to Gov. Bradstreet, i.283ri; a fish- 
erman, 1.810; lived at Portsmouth 
and Purpooduck, i. 310, 820; mar- 
ried Mary Parrott, i. 310, 314; his 
descendants, i. 310. 
Gamon, Robert, signed the petition *to 

Mass., 5. 240. 
Ganettson, Freeborn, 4. 302, 335. 



104 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Gannett, the Rev. Ezra Stiles, 6. 12. 
Hannah, married Thomas Parris, 5. 

xln. 
Major, , of Pittston, 4. 400. 

Garden of the East, the, a name given 
to Sheepscot farmd, 9. 1.55?i 

Garde, Roger, register of Gorges' 
court, I. 88, 366; counselor of 
Wells, I. 343; mentioned, 3. 231; 
9.314, 317, 374, 375. 

Gardiner, first time the name appeared, 
4-78. 
(Maine), land in granted to Jones, 
Melvin and Fay, 2. 281 ; settle- 
ment at started by Dr. Gardiner, 
2. 283: 5. Ix, Ixv, Ixvii; Episcopal 
Church established at, 5. Ixi, Ixvii ; 
6. 197; bequeathed to William 
Gardiner and Robert Hallo well, 5. 
Ixi, Ixii; formerly Pittsborough, 
6. 47 ; Roland Gushing settled in, 

6. 47; the Rev. Jacob Bailey 
preached in, 6. 197; the Hon. Geo. 
Evans settled in, 7. 458; separated 
from Pittston, 7. 410; incorpo- 
rated, 7. 410, 420-421 ; sometimes 
called Gardinerstown, 7. 410; 
number of families in 1803, 7. 411, 
412; 5. Ixv; few leases paid, 7. 
411; outstripped by other towns, 

7. 411; the people of influenced to 
oppose R. H. Gardiner, 7. 412; 
trouble between the proprietors 
and settlers, 5. Ixiv; people meet 
the proprietors, 5. Ixiv; 7. 412; 
troubles settled, 7. 412; popula- 
tion increased, 7. 412 ; inn opened, 
7. 414; mentioned, 4. 15, 216n, 
3057i; 5. xvii; 6. 67; 68, 73, 92, 
358, 359, 360; 7. 283, 399, 404, 405, 
459, 470. 

Ann, married James N. Litligow, 5. 
418, 422. 

Bank, the, 6, 68, 73. 

Benoni, 5. lix. 

Sir Christopher, arrested, 2. 56a-57a ; 
3. 318w; in prison, 2. 57a; nothing 
criminal found against, 2. 57a; 
blazoned in England the outrage 
practised against, 2. 57a; an en- 
emy to the Puritans, 2. 78a; Mor- 
ton's account of, 2. 78a; fled from 
Mass., 3. 317; lived at Pejepscpt 
with Purchase, 3. 318, 318m; had 
several wives, 3. 318n; not a knight, 
3. 318n. 

the Rev. F., Biographical Notice of 
the Rev. George Burgess, 7. 429- 
456. 

Frederick Allen, 6. 41. 

Hannah, daughter of Dr. Sylvester, 
5. Ixi; married Robert Hallowell, 
5. Ixi, Ixii; 7. 404. 

Henry, his New England's Vindica- 
tion, probably written by Edw. 
Godfrey, 9. 329; cited, 9. 305, 306, 
311, 346. 



John, son of Dr. Sylvester, 7. 405 ; 
his daughter married James N. 
Lithgow, 5. 418, 422; birth of, 5. 
48-49; educated in England, 5. 49; 
admitted to the bar, 5. 49; defend- 
ant, of John Wilkes, 5. 49; govern- 
or of St. Kitts, 5. 49; came to Bos- 
ton, 5. 49; became a citizen, 5. 49; 
moved to Pownalboro, 5-49; en- 
gaged in the Perrin case, 5-49-50; 
member of the general court, 5. 
50; a law reformer, 5. 50; charac- 
ter of, 5. 51 ; lost at sea, 5. 51. 

the Rev. John Sylvester, of Trinity 
Church, 5. 422; 7. 407; taught 
Robert Hallowell, 7. 407; a pupil 
of Dr. Parr, 7. 407; of boyant 
spirits, 7. 407; mentioned, 7^414. 

Joseph, 5. lix. 

Lyceum, the, 5. Ixvii; 7. 418. 

the Hon. Robert H., co-operate mem- 
ber of the Maine Historical Soci- 
ety, I. 11; born in England, 5. 
Ivii, Ixi; brought to America, 5. 
Ixii, educated, 5. Ixii ; born at Hal- 
lowell, added the surname of 
Gardiner, 5. Ixii; moved to his 
estate, 5. Ixiii-lxiv; 7. 412 ; opposed 
by squatters, 5. Ixiii-lxiv; 7-412; 
made an amicable settlement, 5. 
liv-lv; 7-412; improvements made 
by, 5. Ixv-lxvi, Ixvii; 7-414, 418- 
419; supported the English 
Church, 5. Ixvi; married Emma 
Tudor, 5. Ixvi; 7-414; his atten- 
tion needed in Maine, 7. 410; his 
estate had suffered by his absence, 
7- 410-411; few of his tenants had 
paid rent, 7. 411; had surveys 
made, 7. 411 ; gave satisfaction to 
the next of kin, 7. 411; invited 
new settlers, 7. 412; visited the 
South, 7. 413; impression of the 
visit, 7. 413; gave a communion 
service to St. Ann's church, 7. 413; 
spent a winter in Boston, 7-414; 
returned to the Kennebec, 7, 415; 
resided in his father's house, 7. 
415; built a spacious house, 7. 
416; his hospitality, 7- 416, 417, 
423; his large household, 7. 416; 
joined the church, 7-417; enlarged 
the parsonage, 7- 417; built the 
stone church, 7. 417-418; a lay 
delegate, 7. 419-420; in public of- 
fice, 7. 420-421 ; his character, 5. 
Ixvii, Ixviii; 7- 421, 422, 423, 424- 
425; president of the Maine His- 
torical Society, 7- 422; his phys- 
ique, 7. 422 ; house burned and re- 
built, 7. 424; losses, 7. 424; chil- 
dren of, 7. 425 ; arrival of old age, 
7. 426; disturbed by the war of 
the rebellion, 7-427; his last ap- 
pearance at church, 7, 427-428; 
death of, 428; one of the Kenne- 
bec purchasers, 8. 208?i; his as- 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



105 



sistance acknowledged, 7. 384; 
letter of cited, 6. 201 ; mentioned, 
4. 9 ; 5. xvii ; 6. 358, 360, 361 , 378 ; 7. 
390,397; 8.410; his History of the 
Kennebec Purchase, 2. 269-294; 5. 
331; 8.204; his Jones' Eddy on 
the Kennebec, 4. 41-49; his Me- 
moir of Benjamin Yaughan, 6. 
82-92 ; Biography of, by the Hon. 
George Evans, 7. 457-471. 

, daughter of John, married 

James Lithgow, 5. 418. 
Dr. Sylvester, leased land of Jeffries 
and Donnell, 2. 203; an influential 
member of the Kennebec pur- 
chasers, 2. 279, 282-283; 5. lix-lx; 
commenced a settlement on the 
Kennebec, 2. 282, 283; built a 
sloop to be used as a packet, 2. 
282; land grant to, 2. 282, 283; 
built mills at Dresden, 2. 282 ; took 
upon himself the conveyance of 
land, 2. 286; birth of, 5. lix; 7. 
404; educated in Europe, 5. lix; a 
benefactor of Mass., 5. lix; in con- 
trol of the affairs of the Kennebec 
Purchasers, 5. Ix; cleared a farm 
at Dresden, 5. Ix; made improve- 
ments at Gardiner, 5. Ix; pat- 
ron of the Episcopal Church, 5. 
Ix-lxi ; death of, 5. Ixi ; character 
of, 5. Ixi; married Anne Gibbons, 
5. Ixi; 7. 404; provisions in his 
will to perpetuate his name, 5. 
Ixi-ixii ; 6. 49 ; a native of Rhode 
Island, 7. 404; had a fine medical 
education, 7. 404; had a large for- 
tune, 7. 404; his children, 7-405; 
should be remembered by the 
people of Kennebec, 7. 405; left 
for England, 7. 405; at Newport, 
7. 405; part of his property confis- 
cated, 7. 405; division of his prop- 
erty, 7. 405-406; death of, 7. 406; 
mentioned, 7. 192, 196; 8. 209, 
213n, 214, 214n, 219, 268n, 282, 
283. 
Major Thomas, commissioned to 
hold a court, 2. 232; 5. 236, 249; 
treasurer of Devon Co., 5. 249; 
lived at Cape Ann, 5. 236n; signed 
petition to Mass., 1672, 5. 240. 
William, son of Dr. Sylvester, 5. 
lix, Ix; 7. 405; had charge of his 
father's affairs in Maine, 5. Ix; 
received property from his father, 
5. Ixii; death of, 5. Ixii; 7. 406. 
Capt. Joseph, 2. 133. 
Gardinerstown, now Gardiner, 2. 283 ; 

7. 410. 
Garland, George, lived at Scarborough 
and Black Point, i. 191; 3. 83; ac- 
cused of living with Sarah Mills, 
I. 191; ordered to be married, 
I. 191, 377; forbidden to marry, 
1.372-373. 



Garlic, abundant, 3. 305. 

Garneau, Francis Xavier, his History 
of Canada cited, 7. 43m, 59, 59n. 

Garretson, Freeborn, 4. 302, 335. 

Garrison cove, 3. 107, 148-149. 
hill, 9. 143, 151, 153, 154. 
Houses of York County by the Hon. 

E. E. Bourne, 7. 107-120. 
William Lloyd, 8. 443. 

Garrisons, number of in 1744, 3. 173; 
value of, 7. 109, 115; a few still 
survive, 7. 110-111 ; seven in Wells 
in 1690, 7. Ill ; in other places, 7. 
Ill; two in Cape Neddock, 111- 
112; site of one, 7. 112; described, 
3. 174; 7. 112-113, 114, 116, 117, 
118; scenes witnessed from within, 

7. 113; the Storer, 7, 114; all de- 
serted, 7. 114; the Larrabee, 7.II6- 
117; used during Lovewell's war, 

8. 11 1m; built by Cols. Noble and 
Lewis, 8. 123, 123n, 124; first men- 
tioned, 8. 279; remained in colo- 
nial architecture, 8. 279 ; only one 
remaining, 8. 279; garrison at 
Black Point, the strongest in the 
province, 3. 107; the people sought 
refuge in, 3. 107; descent upon by 
the Indians, 3. 108; parley between 
Jocelyn and Mugg, 3. 108; the 
people treacherously left Jocelyn, 
3. 108; surrendered, 3. 108; re- 
built, 3. 140; attacked, 1703, 3. 
140-141 ; commanded by Larrabee, 
3. 141; attempt made to under- 
mine, 3. 141; Indians retreated 
from, 3. 141-142; at Burton, 5. 
373; at Damariscotta, 8. 301, 399; 
at Falmouth, ammunition to be 
sent to, 5. 277; under the com- 
mand of Capt. Sylvanus Davis, 5. 
277; at Foxwell's 3. 105; at Gor- 
ham, 3. 171 m; at Hammond's, 9. 
133; at Libby's, 3. 170; at New 
Casco, 3. 141n; at Pemaquid, 5. 
17, 47, 48; 7. 159; at Phillip's, 3. 
104; at Purpooduck, 3. 138; at 
Royall's river, 7. 57 ; at Sagadahoc, 
5. 277; at St. Georges, 3. 390; 5. 
367, 367m, 368; at Scottow's, 3. 
106; at Spurwink, 3. 137, 138; at 
Storers, 3. 138, 138w, 235; at 
Sheepscot, 4. 213; at St. John's, 
9. 87; on the , Kennebec, 9. 87; 
mentioned, i. 290, 296, 298; 2. 192, 
197, 199; 3. 137w, 138. 

Gaspe bay, 7. 49n. 

Gatchell, , of Starks, 4. 367. 

, of Yassalboro, 4. 376. 

Gates, Gen. Horatio, 3. 196m. 
Sir Thomas, sent with an expedi- 
tion to America, 2. 20; arrived at 
Jessepiok, 2. 20; met Summers, 2. 
20. 
Gaulin, , 7. "^^n, 78, 82. 



106 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCI^Y, 



Gay, the Eev. Ebenezer, 4. 272. 

, of Otisfleld, 4. 386. 

Lewis, 4. 301, 308, 385, 386. 
Peter, 4. 308, 333, 363, 364, 394. 

Gayle, Hugh, land granted to, 9. 378. 

Gazette of the United States, the, 
cited, 4. 57. 

Gebeag island, 2. 167, 178. 

Gedney, Bartholomew, land granted 
to, I. 242, 243; a land speculator, 
I. 242n; 2. 173; lived at Salem, i. 
242w, 245-246; 2. 173; sold grant 
to Silvanus Davis, i. 242n, 246; 
had a mill at Royall's river, i. 
270n; 2. 179; sold land to Walter 
Gendall, i. 270n; petitioned to 
Andros to confirm his title, i. 
270n; an actor in the witchcraft 
delusion, 2. 173; his claim at 
North Yarmouth, 2. 175, 178, 170, 
180; mill burned, 2. 179; land 
mortgaged, 2. 179; death of, 2. 
179; mentioned, 2. 172. 

Geese, abundant, 2. 82. 

Geffard, Jo., 9. 330n, 335, 

Geissenhainer, the Rev. Dr. F. W., 5. 
405. 

Gendall, Walter, owned Great Che- 
beag, I. 147; his widow married 
Theodosius Moore, i. 117, 556; 
lived at Falmouth, i, 155, 180n, 
185, 216; 2. 171; 3. ^75, 83, 135; a 
juror, I. 185, 231; witness against 
Francis Neale, i. 200; presented 
for vilifying the commissioners, 
I. 200; taken prisoner, i. 227; 
acted as an interpreter and mes- 
senger, I. 227; returned to Fal- 
mouth, I. 231; tried for treason, 
I. 231; 3. 135; a commissioner, i. 
231 ; to regulate the settlement at 
Norjh Yarmouth, i. 231; Fort 
Loyal in his care, i . 23 1 , 270 ; killed , 
I. 231, 232, 289; 2. 174; 3. 83, 135; 
a deputy, i. 231 ; exchanged farms 
with Madiver, i. 232; 3. 75; pur- 
chased land of Geo. Felt, i. 232; 
appeared for the town of Fal- 
mouth, I. 241; not allowed to 
take a seat in the first assembly, 
I. 241; land in Falmouth granted 
to, I. 261; as Indian agent, i. 266; 
site of his sawmill, i. 269, 270; 2. 
171; one of the committee to re- 
pair Fort Loyal, i.270; trustee for 
Falmouth, i. 254, 255, 270, 272; 
purchased the mill of Gedney, i. 
270n; sent with troops to North 
Yarmouth, i. 289; unsuccessfully 
attacked by Indians, i. 289; left 
no male issue, i.289; a selectman, 
I. 324; land in North Yarmouth 
granted to, 2. 173; a representa- 
tive, 2. 173; trustee for North 
Yarmouth, 2. 173; his sawmill 
burnt, a. 174; mortgaged land to 



Gedney, 2. 179; bondsman for 
James Robinson, 3. 71 ; deposition 
of, 3. 75; lived at Black Point, 3. 
75, 83, 135; letters to Scottow, 3. 
109, 123-124; captured by Indians, 
at Richmond's island, 3. Ill; 
trustee for Scarborough, 3. 129, 
233; sentenced but not punished, 

3. 135; a man above suspicion, 3. 
135; deposition concerning, 3. 
235; mentioned, i.281; 2. 172, 175. 

Geneket, 3. 380. 

General Arnold, the, Capt. Cofiin in, 

4. 310; wrecked, 4. 310; picture 
of on a tavern sign, 4. 310. 

assembly, the, of Laconia, i. 98, 99; 
of Maine, i. 73, 241 ; of New York, 

5. 3; 7, 158. 
association of Mass., 5. li. 
conference of Methodists, 7. 227. 
court of Mass., 4. 245; 5. 239-241, 

249, SlOn; 6. 12, 329; 7.204,211, 
216, 225, 236, 353, 354, 356, 389, 
391; 8. 11, 116, 118, 160, 165, 2147i, 
215n, 216, 246n, 250?i, 276w, 283n, 
294>i, 414; 9. 26, 89, 170, 307, 325, 
343, 344, 363, 364, 380. 

court files, cited, i. 266. 

entries, 5. 38, 6Q, 67, 69. 

Pattison, the, 2. 248. 

register, the, i. 195. 
Geneva, 6. 24, 95, 100. 

Bible, the, 4. 68. 

College, 7.418-419. 
Gent, Daniel, 5. 57. 

Eliz. 2. 236. 

Thomas, lived at Sheepscot, 2. 2.33; 
his land claim, 2. 235 ; swore fealty 
to the Duke of York, 4. 221 ; men- 
tioned, 2. 2.36; 4. 230, 233; 5.57, 
88, 100; 9. 139n, 142, 143. 
Geographical discoveries due to the 
fisheries, 5. 144-145. 

nomenclature indefinite, 5. 155, 155n. 
George i, 2. 241; 3. 361, 363, 365, 366, 
369, 370, 373, 375, 385, 395, 397, 
403, 416, 417, 419, 420, 421, 422, 
424, 427, 435, 447; 6. 8, 9-10, 260; 
8 295 

II, 2. 241; 4. 123, 126, 127, 128. 130, 
132, 133, 135, 137, 138, 141, 142, 
148, 149, 153, 159, 160, 161, 163, 
167 173, 174, 182, 183; 5. 372; 8. 
230, 231 ; 9- 83. 

III, 7. 15. 

Capt. , of the Rose, 7. 54, 275^. 

Georges, appraised of the approach of 
the Indians, 7. 177. 

islands, 5. 367, 369, 374, 375; 6. 356; 
9. 30; see St. Georges islands. 

river. Gov. Pownall at, 5.367; now 
St. George, 5. 367n; blockhouses 
erected on, 5. 367, 367w ; Weymouth 
supposed to have sailed up, 7. 27; 
Ashley and Pierce established a 
trading post on the, 9. 78; saw- 



INDEX. TO COLLECTIONS. 



107 



mills erected on, g. 85 ; mentioned, 
3. 227; 4. 323, 326, 327, 328; 5. 368, 
868n; 7. 255; 8. 318; 9- 85, 130. 
Georgetown, D. C, 6. 205. 

Maine, Parker's island a part of, i. 
29; formerly Arrowsic island, i. 
224; remains of Indians at, 2. 191; 
nearly destroyed, 2. 195-196; site 
of the Plymouth trading house at, 
2. 200-201; incorporated, 2. 202; 
8. 124; territory of, 2. 202; dis- 
membered, 2. 207; troops from 
killed Capt. Springer, 2.213-214; 
first church in, 2. 220; clergymen 
at, 220-222; Bath set off from, 2. 
222; French neutrals sent to, 3. 
1 16n ; 6. 343 ; destitute of a preach- 
er, 3. 273, 274; 6. 195; Macclena- 
han at, 3. 21 4n; no church at, 3. 
275; the Rev. Jacob Bailey at, 3. 
275; 6. 196, 199; number of com- 
municants at, 3. 275; the Rev. 
Willard Wheeler preached at, 3. 
276; 8. 112n; church built, 3. 276, 
277; Episcopalians at, 3. 277; 8. 
112n; conference with Indians at, 
3. 351, 361-375; 6. 260; William 
Lithgow settled in, 5. 417, 423; 8. 
285-286; destroyed by Indians, 
6. 16; Scotch-Irish settle in, 6. 32; 
James Sullivan commenced his 
law practice in, 6. 47-48,48ja; Free- 
will Baptist church in, 7. 422; 
home of Arthur Noble, 8. 109; the 
Rev. William Lenichon at, 8. llOn, 
112n; first child born in, 8. llln; 
garrison built at, 8. 123^; men- 
tioned, I. 502n; 2. 190, 192, 206, 
215, 218, 278; 3. ^73; 4. 295; 6. 
52, 313, 325; 7. 219, 275, 405; 8. 
112yi; 9. 131. 
lime, 4- 326. 
records, 8. illn. 
Georgia, ordered the foreign archives 
to be searched for records, 2. 10a; 
Acadians sent to, 6. 343^^; men- 
tioned, 2. 74a; 5. xxxvii, 326; 6. 
350; 7.425. 
Historical Society, 4-4; 7. 484. 
Georgiana, 3. 29. 
Germaine, Lord George, 7. 203. 
German Empire, the, 9. 245. 
Lutheran Church, the, 5. 408. 
Lutherans in Waldoboro, 7. 219. 
Protestants, came to Maine, 4. 78. 
William, signed the petition to 
Bradstreet, i. 2S^n. 
Germans, induced to come to Dres- 
den, 2. 280; 6. 4, 322, 325; the war 
with the, raised the price of pow- 
der, 3. 432 ; early in Maine, 5. xxi, 
xxii; 6.3,4,23; inducements held 
out by the Kennebec Purchasers^ 
5. Ix; arrived in Waldoboro, 5. 
403; 6. 369; 9. 86; driven away, 5. 
403; second attempt to settle, 5. 



403; at Booth Bay, 5. 403; 6. 322, 
323; 8. 213; 9. 85, 86; those in 
Waldoboro understood only their 
native tongue, 5. 408, 410-411; 6. 
4; their route to reach America, 
6. 322-323; suffering among, 6. 
323; at Philadelphia, 6. 328; fur- 
ther inducements, 6. 328-331 ; 8. 
214; mentioned, 4. 71; 7. 42. > 

Germantown, now Waldoboro, 8.213; 

stocking weaver at, 8. 213*?. 
Germany, 2. 76a; 280; 5. 404, 405, 407; 
6. 22-23, 151, 322, 325, 328, 332, 
360; 7.41, 432. 
Germar, 6. 411. 

Gerrish, Joseph, married Anna Tomp- 
son. 3. 225. 
Col. Joseph, 2. 138. 
Timothy, of Falmouth, 8. 241 ; signed 
the treaty of 1713, 6. 255; auto- 
graph of, 6. 255. 

Lieut. , 8. 137. 

Getchell, Benjamin, 3. 180. 
Joseph, 3. 130. 
Nehemiah, i. 504, 506, 508. 
Ghent, 6. 96ii; 8.18. 
Giant's Grave, 9. 214. 
Gibbers, Robert, 5. 48. 
Gibbins, Ambrose, agent for John 
Mason, 3. 34; letter of cited, 3.34. 
Rachel, married Robert Edgecomb, 
3.25. 
Gibbon, Edward, 4. 90. 
Gibbons, Anne, daughter of Dr. Wil- 
liam, married Dr. S. Gardiner, 5. 
Ixi; 7. 404. 
James, lived at Saco, 1. 188; a juror, 

I. 188,377. 
Dr. William, 5. Ixi; 7. 405. 
Gibbs, Col. George, 6. 407, 412. 

William, i. 150^, 217^1. 
Gibraltar, 8. 122. 

of America, the, 4. 78 8. 313. 
Gibson, Mary, married Capt. Thurlow, 
8. 412. 
Richard, punished for insubordina- 
tion, I. 378-379; fined for blas- 
phemy, I. 379. 
the Rev. Richard, at Richmond's 
island, i. 52; 6. 138, 180, 181; min- 
ister at Portsmouth, i. 58, 161; 
at Isle of Shoals, i. 58; obnoxious 
to the government of Mass., 1. 59; 
brought an action against Bonigh- 
ton for slander, i. 59n; educated 
at Magdalen College, i. 59n; may 
have preached at Spurwink, i. 
547n; at Saco, 6. 180, 201; known ■ 
at Portsmouth, 6. 181; opposed 
the encroachments of Mass., 6. 
181, 182; controversy with Lark- 
ham, 6. 181 ; obliged to acknowl- 
edge the jurisdiction of Mass., 6. 
182; left the county, 6. 181, 182; 
character of, 6. 182; mentioned, 
7. 220. 



108 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Gibson, Seth, 2. 179. 

Dr. Thomas, i. 526. 

Sergeant Thomas, i. 601. 

Deacon, , of Stowe, 8. 412. 

Giddings, Joshua Reed, 8. 443. 

Mary, married Benjamin York, i. 
319. 
Gift of God, the, sent out by the Ply- 
mouth Company, 2. 27a; 3.291; 7. 
294; commanded by Popham, 3. 
291-292; 5.351; sailed from Ply- 
mouth, 5. 851; at Monhegan is- 
land, 5. 346; at Sabino, 7. 301, 312; 
Popham's flagship, 7. 317; prob- 
ably seen by Capt. John Smith, 7. 
318; mentioned, 3. 300n; 5. 29n; 
7. 314. 
Gilbert, the Rev. Eliphalet, 8. 180. 

family, interested in English mines, 
5. ITSri. 

Sir Humphrey, undertook a voyage 
to N'ewfoundland, 2. 19a; uncle 
to Sir John and Capt. Raleigh, 2. 
27a; tonnage of his ship, 5. 219w; 
patent granted to, 6. 174; took 
possession of Newfoundland, 6. 
174; promulgated three principal 
laws, 6. 174; mentioned, 2. 15; 4. 
68, 72; 5. 151; 9. 301. 

Sir John, a member of the Plymouth 
Company, 2. 27a; a letter to cited, 
2. 28a; death of, 2. 22, 30a; men- 
tioned, 7. r29n. 

Capt. Raleigh, in command of an 
expedition sent out by the Ply- 
mouth Company; i.29; 2.21,27a; 
5. 334, 350; explored the country, 
2. 21 ; a nephew of Sir Humphrey, 

2. 27a; the only member of the 
Council of Plymouth who visited 
Kew England, 2. 51a; commander 
of the Mary and John, 3. 292; 5. 
351; rowed to the Pemaquid river, 

3. 297, 298; 5. 1.58-159, 334-335, 
348, 349, 350; 6. 314; 7. 134; Skid- 
warres acted as his pilot, 3. 297, 
298, 305; 5. .S35; 6. 314; met ISTa- 
hanada, 3. 297; 5. 159; 7. 322; exam- 
ined the Sagadahoc River, 3. 300, 
304; 5. 317; sworn assistant, 3-301; 
went to explore the coast, 3. 301- 
302; 5. 3.35; at Semiamis, 3-302; 
at Casco bay, 3. 302; his unsuc- 
cessful attempt to visit the Penob- 
scot river, 3, 303; met Sebenoa, 3. 
305; treachery of the Indians, 3. 
306; set up a cross, 3- 307; 5. 335- 
336; diligent in discoveries, 3- 
308; heard of his brother's death, 
3. 309; a nephew of Sir Walter, 4. 
68 ; death of, 4. 69 ; visited by In- 
dians, 5. 144; 7. 134; several voy- 
ages were made in his charge, 5. 
157; relied on mines to support 
his colony, 5- 173; the projector 
of the Sagadahoc colony, 5. 173n; 



interested in English mines, 5- 
173n; wintered at Sagadahock, 5- 
178; visited St. Georges island, 5. 
348; found the cross, 5. 348; 
started to visit Bassaba, 5- 350; 
his reason for returning to Eng- 
land, 5. 352; went up the Penob- 
scot, 7. 3; dropped anchor near 
Pemaquid, 7. 134; succeeded Pop- 
'ham, 7. 303; determined to return 
to England, 7. 303; returned, 2. 
30a; 7. 307, 312; offended Popham, 
7- 315, 317; mentioned, 2. 22, 27a, 
28a, 30a, .32a; 5. 148, 158n; 7. 95, 
297, 298, 302, 305, 306, 307, 309, 
310; 9. 302. 
William, 4. 805. 

Giles, , cited, 4. 8. 

Tho., commissioned justice of the 
peace, 5. 102, 113, 115, 117; see 
. also Gyles. 

Gill, Lieut.-Gov. , 4. 294; 

Gillet, the Rev. Eliphalet, 1. 10; 2- 117, 
119; 4. 305, 306, 330, 355; 7. 279, 
284. 
the Rev. Dr. , 7. 372, 415. 

Gilley, John, of Fort Western, his 
great age, i. 503n. 

Gillpatrick, Thomas, 4. 352. 

Gilman, Allen, pioneer lawyer of Ban- 
gor, 8- 452, 455; first mayor of 
Bangor, 8- 455. 
John, signed the treaty of 1713, 6. 

254; autograph of, 6. 254. 
Gov. John T., his daughter married 

the Rev. Dr. Nichols, 5. Ivii. 
the Rev. Tristram, preached at 
Bakerstown, 2. 113; at North 
Yarmouth, 2. 188; mentioned, 2. 
115, 117; 4. 332; 7. 220, 236, 237. 

Col. , 7. 235. 

Mrs. , 7. 237. 

Gilmantown, 4. 294. 

Gilmore, Robert, married Miss Bing- 
ham, 7- 355. 
Rufus, made plans of the Bussy 
land, 9. 233. 

Gilpatrick, Charles, 4. 353, 354. 
Mary H., daughter of Richard, mar- 
ried the Hon. E. E. Bourne, 8. 392; 
dates of her birth and death, 8. 
392; character of, 8. 392-393. 
Richard, 8- 392. 
Thomas, 4. 352. 

Gimpse, Thomas, signed the petition 
to Mass., 5. 240. 

Girling, Capt. , sent to recapture 

Pentagoet, 7. 35; impatient to at- 
tack, 7. 35-36 ; lost his opportunity, 
7. 36; disappeared from history, 
7-36. 

Given, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 16. 

Glass windows, scarce, 4- 280n; first 
in Buxton, 4. 280?i ; at Fort Hali- 
fax, 8. 277. 

Glazier Beamsly, 8. 121n. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



109 



Glenburne, 8. 454. 
Gloucester, Eng., i. 209. 
Mass., the descendaDts of Nathaniel 
Wharf at, i. 70n; former home of 
the Wakeleys and Matthew Coe, 
1. 158; home of Nathaniel Wharff, 
I, 208; home of Thomas Riggs, i. 
209; home of Elisha Carney, i. 
257/1, 308; John Carney moved to, 
I. 308; home of John and Samuel 
Davis, i.y09; home of Geo. Inger- 
soll, I. 311; Joseph IngersoU died 
in, I. 312; Samuel IngersoU estab- 
lished at, 1. 312; home of Jonathan 
Orris, i.314; home of Josiah Wal- 
lis, I. 316; the Wallis family 
moved to but returned, i. 316, 317 ; 
home of Samuel Webber, i. 318; 
Samuel Webber's children born 
at, I. 318; home of Samuel York, 
I. 318; former home of James 
Lane, 2. 171 ; John Tenny moved 
to, 3. 75, 75n; mentioned, 2. 144, 
151, 154: 5. 370n; 8. 228n. 
Henry, Duke of, 7. 137n. 
Gloucestershire, i. 110; 2. 66a. 
Glover, the Rev. Jesse, 9. 297. 
Goach, Barn., 2. 46. 
Goat island, 9. 108. 

Goats, value of 3., 87; the first cattle 
imported, 3. 88; purchased at 
Monhegan, 5. 172; first mentioned 
in New England, 5. I72n. 
God, the, of the Indians, Squantum, 
3, 96?i; Manitou, 4. 107; Chinus, 
4.379; Tanto, 4. Ill; 5. 187. 
Goddard, Gyles, representative of 
Cornwall county, 5. 4; 8. 194; 
commissioned a lieutenant, 5. 101 ; 
captain of the fort, 5. 106; sur- 
veyor, 5. 106-107; justice of the 
peace, 5. 113; representative for 
Pemaquid, 5. 263; carried the pe- 
tition of the Pemaquiders to New 
York, 5. 263-264; mentioned, 5. 
58, 94, 98; 8. 187. 
Godfrey, Ann, her character defamed 
and slandered, 9. 383-384. 
Catherine, 9. 299n, 301, 370. 
Charles, son of Olive, baptized, 9. 

301; buried, 9. 301. 
Edward, commenced a settlement 
at Agamenticus, i. 46, 80, 390; 
procured grants, i. 46-47, 80; 
agent for the Laconia Company, 
I. 46n; 9. 306, 306>i; agent for 
Gorges, i. 47n; 9. 306; governor, 
I. 47, 98, 18371, 234, 235n; 2. 9, 61a; 
9. 319, 335, 355; on the case of 
j Cleeves vs Winter, i . 54, 535 ; coun- 
selor, I. 73n, 88, 364, 366, 367, 368, 
369; 9. 309, 322; brought action 
against Cleeves, i. 74, 75, 367; at 
the first court held in Maine, i. 
84; resisted the encroachments 
of Mass., I. 101; 2. 61a; 3. 43; 



yielded to Mass., i. 101-102; 3. 43; 
9. 321; sent a remonstrance to 
England, 9. lOln; the first settler 
at York, i. 234n; 2. 49n; 9- 307; 
account of Jordan, i. 235%; com- 
mission to general court, in full, 
1.390-391; held a court at Saco, 
I. 541; ordered to appear before 
the council, i. 546; a man of ex- 
perience, 2. 9; suit brought by 
John Stratton against, 3. 11, 36 
commissioner for New Somerset- 
shire, 3-36; a son of Olive, 9. 301 
administered his father's estate 
9. 298, 29Sn\ his mother's will, 9, 
299, 371, 373; married Ann Mes 
sant, 9. 301 ; children of, 9. 301 
birth of, 9. 300, 301; age in which 
he lived, 9. 300-302; his early zeal 
for adventure, 9. 302-304; mayor 
of Agamenticus, 9. 304, 314; prob- 
ably a merchant, 9. 304, 304n, 305; 
emigrated to Piscataqua, 9. 305, 
306 ; time of his residence in Amer- 
ica, 9. 305-300, 307, 344, 356; agent 
for the Council of New England, 
9. 306; to deliver the grant to 
Mason and Gorges, 9. 306; in 
charge of the interests of the La- 
conia Company, 9. 306, 306^1, lived 
at Little Harbor, 9. 306n; repre- 
sented to Gorges the place for a 
future metropolis, 9. 307, 307w 
built a house at York, 9. 307, 307w 
met grantees of Gorges, g. 307-308 
visited Boston, 9. 308; ignored by 
Gov. Winthrop, 9. 308ti; a referee 
in the division of the Mason and 
Gorges grant, 9. 309; quarrel with 
Cleeves, 9.309-310; went to Eng- 
land, 9. 310, 344; cause of his visit, 
9. 310, 31 On; assisted Mass. in 
holding her charter, 9. 311-312, 
320; never thanked for his assist- 
ance, g. 311n-312n; returned to 
Maine, 9. 312; fruit of his visit, 9. 
313, 360; suggested to Gorges the 
idea of a municipal corporation, 
9. 313, 213%; an officer under both 
of Gorges' charters, 9. 314, 314n; 
mayor of Gorgeana, 9.314; report- 
ed Wm. Hooke to his father, 9. 
314n; controversy with Winthrop 
over the Isle of Shoals, 9. 315; 
sued Hull, Heard and Gooch, 9. 
316n; letter to Winthrop, 9. 317, 
317n; home of, 9. 317-318, 317ti, 
318n; his administration one of 
quiet and progress, 9. 319; asked 
parliament for protection against 
Mass., 9. 320, 338-339, 342-344; 
paper warfare with Bawson, 9. 
320, 340-342, 344; reason for his 
submission to Mass., 9. 321, 346- 
349; his lands usurped, 9. 322, 
328w; petition for redress, 9. 322, 



IIQ 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETT. 



G-odfrey, Edward — continued. 

S22n; redress ordered, 9. 322, 382- 
383 ; people ask a hearing, 9. 322- 
323 ; to go to Engla,nd, 9. 323 ; his 
movement alarmed Mass., 8. 323, 
326; the dates of his departure 
and arrival left to conjecture, 9. 
324; his work in England, 9. 324- 
326; underhanded work of his 
enemies, 9. 326-327 ; not selfish in 
his interests, 9. 327; patiently 
waited for a hearing to his peti- 
tion, 9. 328; in reduced circum- 
stances, 9. 328-329; at the feet of 
the king, 9. 320; allied with the 
enemies of Mass., 9. 329-330, 330n, 
3.5O-353, S')6; probably the author 
of 'New England's Vindication, 9. 
329n; probably at the trial of the 
regicides, 9. 330-331; associated 
with Robert Mason on a petition, 
9. .331, 352-.353; Mass. did not an- 
swer the summons, 9. 331, 3.52; 
queries and questions, 9. 360-368; 
in the debtor's cell, 9. 332, 335, 
357; sent a letter to John Win- 
throp, 9. 332, 357-358; death of 
his son, 9. 33.3 ; his last appeal to 
the council, 9. 333-334, 358-359; 
his last words, 9, 334; date of his 
death unknown, 9. 335; place of 
burial, 9. 335; probably left no 
will, 9. SHon; mentioned, i. 164n, 
365,366; 2, 80n; 3- 40-41; 5. 204; 
9. 33.7, 338, 339, 342, 344, 346, 350, 
352, 355, 357, 358, 359, 360, 363, 
364, 365, 368, 374, 375, 380, 382; 
letters of cited, i. 183; 3. 46/i; 9. 
307n; arms of, 9. 297, 335; auto- 
graph of, I. 544; 9. 300. 335; arti- 
cle in the Maine Genealogical 
Record cited, 9. 308n; Letters and 
State Papers written by, 9. 336- 
368; h'is Life, Letters and Public 
Services, by Charles E. Banks, 9. 
295-384. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Olive, 9. 299n, 

301, 370; married Brown, 9. 

301. 

Elizabeth, daughter of William, 9. 
299^, 301, 371. 

Elizabeth, wife of Oliver, 9. 298; 
death of, 9. 299, 301; will of, 9- 
299, 299n, 369--371 ; children of, 9. 
299, 299w; burial place of, 9. 299. 

family, still in England, 9. 300ri; 
Tabular Pedigree of, 9. 301. 

John, of Bangor, 8. 4.52. 

John, son of Olive, 9- 299n, 301, 371. 

the Hon. John E., Ancient Penob- 
scot, 7. 1-22, 103-104; Bashaba 
and the Tarrantines, 7. 93-102; 
Castine, the Younger, 7. 73-92; 

Jean Vincent, Baron de St. Castine, 
7.89-472; The Pilgrims at Penob- 
scot, 7w 23-^37 ; Mjamoiw of the. Hon. 



Edward Kent, 8. 449-480; ]S"orom- 
bega, 8. 315-332 ; Claude de la Tour, 
9. 93-113. 
Leah, 9. 370. 
Maria, daughter of Olive, 9* 299n, 

.301, 370. 
Mary, wife of Oliver, married Ed- 
ward Coxe, 9. 301. 
of Bouillon, 9. 335. 
Oliver, of Penshurst, 9. 298n. 
Oliver, of Barnend, 9. 298; children 
of, 9. 298, 299-300, 299n; deatlj of, 
9. 298, 299, 299n, 301; his estate 
administered by his son, 9. 298, 
298n; probably came from France, 
9. 298n; his place of burial, 9. 299- 
Oliver, son of Edward, i.47n; 9-301 ; 
married Mary Smith, 9. -301; chil- 
dren of, 9. 301; his widow mar- 
ried Edward Coxe, 9. 301 ; owned 
land at Neddick creek, 9. 318n; 
died, 9.333; burial of, 9.333^; his 
patent to Cape Nesich, 9. 367; 
mentioned, 9. 3187i, 346, 355, 363. 
Oliver, son of Oliver 2d, 9. 301 ; bap- 
tized, 9. 301; married Hannah 
French, 9. 301. 
Sarah, daughter of Oliver, 9. 299?*, 
301; married William Ditton, 9. 
299w, 301. 
Sarah, daughter of Oliver 2d, 9. 301. 
Thomas, son of Oliver, 9. 299ri, 301, 

371. 
William, son of Oliver, 9. 299w, 301, 
371. 
Godfrey's cove, 9. SOln. 

pond, 9. SOln- 
Coding, the Rev. William, 7. 222. 

Godon, , 6. 412. 

Godsoe, John, 4, 205. 

God ward. Gyles, 5-98; see Goddard. 

Goethe, Johanne Wolfgan Von, 6. 

411; 8.495. 
Goff, Edmund, signed the treaty of 
1714, 6. 257; his autograph, 6. 257. 
William, hospitably received by 
Mass., 7. 148. 

, general court held at his house, 

2. 47n. 
Gold, Alexander, signed the petition 
of 1672 to Mass., 5. 240. 
penny, 6. 149. 
Goldsmith, Oliver, 3. 77. 
Goldthwait, Capt. Benjamin, 8* 135, 
141, 142. 
Jacob, 8. 43. 

Col. Thomas in command at Fort 
Pownall, 5. 386. 
Gooch, John, selectman for WeHs, i. 
361; one of the first settlers of 
W^ells, 1.362. 
the Rev. Robert, 8* 112n. 
see Gouch. 
Goodale, Ezekiel, published school 
books, 8* 180. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS, 



111 



Goodenow, Daniel, 8. 396. 

Judge , I. 410. 

Gooding, Daniel, military officer for 

Kittery, i. 373. 
Goodman, Burgess, 7. 429. 
Rick'd, 4.56. 

Major , 2. 254. 

Good news from New England, 5. 164n. 
Goodrich Court, 7. :]81. 
the Hon. Elizur, 6. 57n. 
Capt. I. 500, 514w, 
Goodridge, Joshua, 4. 368, 399. 
Goodwin, Amos G., 8. 397. 
Daniel, signed the petition to Crom- 
well, I. 395, 
the liev. D. K., 8. 163, 337; Biograph- 
ical Notice of John Merrick, 7. 
379-401. 
Hudson C, 4. 55. 

Samuel, in command at Fort 
Frankfort, 7. 177; sent up the 
Kennebec, 7. 178; to lay out a 
township, 8. 209;' agent for the 
Plymouth Company, 8. 212, 213?i, 
214n; relieved Fort Richmond, 8. 
212. 4. 315; owned a slave, 7. 215; 
mentioned, 8. 209n, 210n. 
Goodyear, Abraham, a son of Moses, 
his epitaph, 5. liOn. 
■ Judith, daughter of Moses, her epi- 
taph, 5. 170n. 
Mary daughter of Stephen, married 

to Thomas Lake, 5. 253. 
Moses, procured a patent of the Ply- 
nuouth Company, i. 46, 48, 52, 80, 
534; 6. 138; extent of his grant, i. 
45, 80; his grant defeated the 
plans of Cleeves and Tucker, i. 
54; married a daughter of Abra- 
ham Jennings, i.56]i; 5. 170, 170n; 
a partner with Trelawny, 5. 170; 
action to test the validity of his 
patent, 5. 224. 
Stephen, deputy governor of New 
Haven, 5. 253; his daughter mar- 
ried Capt. Thomas Lake, 5. 253. 
Gookin, Daniel, 3. 114; 6. 212, 212n. 
Goold, the Hon. William, Col. Arthur 
Noble, 8. 107-153; Fort Halifax, 
Its Projectors, Builders and Gar- 
rison, 8. 197-289; Col. William 
Vaughan, 8. 291-313; Memoir of 
Sir William Phips, 9. 1-72. 
Gooseberries in abundance, 3. 293; 5. 

158. 
Goose-Fair, home of Thomas Rogers, 

'3. 20n. 
Goose river, supposed to have been 

visited by Weynioutl:i, 6. 317. 

Goosetry, Thomas, attorney for the 

Plymouth Company, 8. 219n. 

Gopam, Capt. , 2. 133. 

G0]«dAii, Jam^s Bentl^y^ 6* 10^ 
William, cited, i.520» 

Mrs. , of Gosheij, 4. 3Q7, 336. 

Q<?re, 4. 3^,5» 3^7. 



Gov. Christopher, 7. 389. 

, of Farmington, 4. 333, 342, 343. 

the, 2. 178, 180; 8. 166. 
Gorges, Anne, i. 109; 2. Qda. 
Gorges' court, 3. 36, 37, 38, 40-41. 
Gorges, Lord Edward, 2. 66an. 

Sir Edward, i. 109, 534; 2. 54. 

family, i. 109-110. 

Ferdinando, grant to, 1. 47; 2. 49; 
complaint of, i. 82; inherited the 
Province of Maine, i. 109; 2. 73a; 
sold his inheritance, 1. 109; 2.64a, 
257, 266; 3. 65; 4. 72-73; 7. 160; 
assumed jurisdiction, i. 137-138; 
167, 174; the king recognized his 
title, I. 158; John Archdale his 
agent, i. 173; a relative of Arch- 
dale, I. 173n; appointed officers, 
I, 173; his authority thrown off 
by the people, i. 176; those who 
haa received commissions joined 
the disaffected, 1. 177; reason why 
the people would not submit to, 

1. 178-180; his jurisdiction ceased 
forever, 1. 184; Jocelyn attempted 
to uphold his rights, 1. 197; wrote 
the preface to America Painted to 
the Life, 2. 8-9; exonerated for 
placing his father's name on the 
Wonder Working Providence, 2. 
10; Mass. ordered to restore his 
inheritance, 2. 63a; 6. 188; sent 
commissioners to America, 2. 63a; 
3.55-56; magistrates appointed in 
his interests, 2. 63a; edited the 
Brief Narration, 2. 73a; succeeded 
to the proprietorship of Maine, 2. 
73a ; price received for the selling 
of Maine, 2. 64a, 257, 266; deed t<^ 
John Usher, 2.257-260; confirmed 
Cammock's patent, 3-13; people 
in favor of his jurisdiction, 3. 50, 
63, 64; petition to Parliament, 3. 
50; his power denied by Mass., 3. 
52 ; cared little for the opposition 
of Mass., 3. 56; mentioned, i. 171; 

2. ma, 73a, 263, 264; 5. 246; 9. 307, 
346; America Painted to the Life 
cited, I. 31, 34, 82, S6, 87; 2. 7, 66. 
sent fishing vessels to America, 
I. 30; 2. 50a; 5. 163; sent Capt. 
John Smith in command of an 
expedition, i. 30; sent Smith on 
a second voyage, i. 31; sent 
Rocroft with an expedition, i. 
32; sent a ship under Vines, i. 
3i^; 2. 24, 33a; a member of the 
Plymouth Company, i. 33, 49; re- 
ceived a grant, i. i35, 49-50, 79, 
109, 400; 2. 52a; 3, 30; 4. 69; ex- 
tent of the grant, i. 35, 86, 281; 2. 
52a; grant extended, i.35; 3.31; 
pwpm'jty. divi4ed^.j. 35; received a 
new gran*;, i. 35; 5. 336^ g, 366; 
his aft^ption divided, i. 36,; con- 
flljat cQ^<3^rn|ng* Winjber Haj^ior, i. 



112 



MAINE HISTOBICAL SOCIETT. 



Gorges, Ferdinando— continued. 

46; confirmed Cammock's grant, i. 
47; 3-12, 13; appointed Godfrey 
his counselor, i. 47n; part of liis 
territory granted to others, i . 49 ; 
3.31-32; land on the Piscataqua 
granted to him, i. 49-50; estab- 
lished a court, I. 53, 73n; grant to 
Cleeves and Tucker, i. 61, 67, 145, 
150, 533 ; Henry Jocelyn his agent, 
I. 62n; fond of applying familiar 
names to his territory, i. 65; sent 
a commission to form a govern- 
ment for his colony, i. 66; 2. 59w' 
Arthur Macworth to give posses- 
sion to Cleeves and Tucker, i. Q6, 
69; gave Cleeves a commission to 
let and settle his territory, i. 66; 
procured a confirmation of his pa- 
tent, I. 78, 86; 3. 31, 37; 5. xxi; 
land on the Agamenticiis granted 
to, I. 80; extent of his lands in 
Maine, i. 81 ; appointed governor 
of New England, i. 83, 109; 2. 53a- 
54a; 9. 311 w; pursued his coloni- 
zation with zeal, i. 83; 2. 22a, 23a, 
26a, 27a, 35a; 7. 134; called his 
province New Somersetshire, i. 
83; 2. 52a-53a; 3. 31; 5. xxi; es- 
tablished a civil government, i. 
83; 3.36; his form of government, 

I. 86, 87; 2. 55, 57, 59a, 71; 9. 312; 
extent of the grant of 1639, i. 86; 
list of officers of his proposed gov- 
ernment, I. 87-88; sent Thomas 
Gorges as his agent, i. 89, 340-341, 
342; his labor unfulfilled, i. 90; 
joined the king's party, i. 90, 109; 
4. 69; Vines his agent and prin- 
cipal supporter, i. 90, 91, 128; 2. 
49; taken prisoner, i. 96; sup- 
posed to be dead, i. 96n, 98, 109; 2. 
8-9, 61a, 67a; 3. 32; 4. 70; 6. ISSn; - 
9. 317; date of his death, i. lOSn; 
governor of Plymouth, i. 109; 2. 

II, 51 ; 5. 157; served under Essex, 
I. 109; taken prisoner at Cadiz, i. 
109; greatly interested in coloni- 
zation, I. 109; children of, i. 109; 
nephew of, 1. 109; 3. 55; appoint- 
ed Abraham Preble a counselor, 
1. 164n; his heirs in favor at court, 
I. 167; his right to land at York 
disputed by Mass., i . 175 ; Jocelyn' s 
lands mortgaged, 1. 198; the Prov- 
ince of Maine restored to his heirs, 
I. 238; 3- 50, 55, 63, 65; 2. 64a; 
expenses in settling, i. 262/i; 2. 54; 
received no pecuniary benefit, i. 
272n, a native of Somersetshire, 
I. 354n; Ashton Phillips his birth- 
place, I. 354; list of counselors 
appointed, i. 364; indenture be- 
tween him and Cleeves and Tuck- 
er, 1. 543-544; autograph of, i. 544; 
letters to Vines, Winthrop and 



others, 1.544-545; in the French 
wars, I. 545; succored by the 
French king, i. .545;* his life of 
especial interest to the people of 
Maine, 2. va, 73a, 74a; 5. 217; re 
ceived captured Indians from Wey- 
mouth, 2. 17, 22a, 31a-82a; 5. 1.57, 
332 ; 7. 134 ; sent out a ship under 
Challong, 2. 23a; the ship cap- 
tured, 2. 23a; lived near Bristol, 2. 
25a-26a; enlisted some of the 
first people of England in coloni- 
zation, 2. 27a ; Indians in his fam- 
ily, 2. 31a-32a; the only member 
of the Plymouth Company undis- 
couraged, 2. 32a-33a; pursued a 
course of private adventure, 2. 33a ; 
formed a new company, 2. 39a-40a ; 
opposed by the Virginia Company, 
2. 33-34, 40a, 52; success by the 
king's help, 2.40a-41a; his liberal 
spirit, 2. 41a-42a, 42an, 55a; had 
a plantation at Monhegan, 2. 50a; 
5. 164: his business separated from 
Mason's, 5. 52a; 3. 34; 9. 309, 309/j ; 
sent William Gorges as governor, 
2. 53a; 3. 36; flattered himself 
that his hopes would be realized, 
2. 53a; visited a ship bound for 
Plymouth, 2. 54a, 55a; 5. 216; 
great probability th^t he wo aid 
visit America, 2. -54a; his sympa- 
thy towards New England, 2. 55a, 
56a, 58a; 5. 216-217; 8. 205; his 
influence obtained the charter for 
Plymouth Colony, 2. 42, 55a; the 
jealousy towards him unreason- 
able, 2. 55a, 58a; Governor Brad- 
ford's letter to, 2. 55a?i; 8. 205; 
had a claim on the land on Mass. 
bay, I. 56a-57a; 5. 47ii; cause of 
the jealousy, 2. 55a-.56a; Sir Chris- 
topher Gardiner turned his mind 
against New England, 2.57a; ac- 
cused of supporting dissent in the 
colonies, 2. 58a; advised the Coun- 
cil to give up their charter, 2.58a; 
suffered imputations in England, 
2. 58a; made Lord Palatine of 
Maine, 2. 58a; his authority, pow- 
er and privileges, 2. 58a; 3. 31; 6. 
179; 9. 312, S12n; his attention 
drawn from his province, 2. 60a; 
encouraged members of the chuich 
to settle, 2. 62a; the people of 
Maine claimed to be under his ju- 
risdiction, 2. 62a; but little known 
of him, 2. 6Qa; his home and an- 
cestry, 2. 66a; in an expedition 
against the Spaniards, 2. 67a; 
friend of Essex, 2. 67a; defended 
Essex, 2. Qla-dSa; advised Raleigh 
to abandon Essex, 2. 68a; why he 
was not tried for treason, 2. 71a; 
returned to Plymouth, 2. 71a; 
Weymouth's Indians drew his at- 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



113 



tention to colonization, 2. 72a; 
sent to assist the king of France, 
2. 72a; returned to England, 2. 
72a; took rides with the king, 2. 
72a; 3. 32; captured Bristol, 2. 
72a; taken prisoner by Cromwell, 
2.72a; 3.88; Maine's indebtedness 
to, 2. 73a, 74a ; formerly supposed 
to have written the Wonder 
Working Providence, 2.9-10; de- 
termined to continue his coloni- 
zation alone, 2. 23; waited for 
better times, 2. 24; met Capt. 
Hawley, 2. 25; recovered Assacu- 
met,2. 26; sent out Capt. Hobson, 
2.27; sent out Capt. Dormer, 2.30; 
7. 321; his petition of 1620 to the 
government, 7. 32; summoned be- 
fore Parliament, 7. 34, 36, 37 ; de- 
fended his patent, 7. 37-41 ; 8. 200; 
assigned territory to Sir William 
Alexander, 2. 48; gave a grant to 
his grandson and Lieut. Norton, 
2. 49; letter to Capt. John Mason, 
2. 50n; desired to give up the pa- 
tent, 2. 52 ; his share in the divis- 
ion of New England, 2. 54 ; account 
of his settling his affairs in Maine, 
2. 55, 57-58; appointed Walter 
Neale governor, 2. 68n; named 
the Province of Maine, 2. 70; 5. 
xxi; David Thompson his agent, 
2. 79; the Province of 3faine grant- 
ed to, 2. 266; 7. 161; Capt. Cam- 
mock his agent, 3. 12; not dis- 
turbed by the Plough Patent, 3. 
32; unsuccessfully resisted the 
claim of Rigby, 3. 32; neglected 
bis American interests, 3. 38; his 
goods and debts to be attended 
to by Jocelyn, 3. 39; his govern- 
ment overthrown, 3. 40-41; de- 
voted to the Church of England, 
4.69; the church to be established 
in his colony, 4. 69; the founder 
of New England, 5. 157; William 
Hooke his commissioner, 5^214; 
the founder of Maine, 5. 217; Win- 
throp's opinion of, 5, 217n; educa- 
tion not a part of his scheme of 
government, 5. 224; his coloniza- 
tion scheme impracticable, 5, 226, 
227; result of the system, 5. 233; 
became part owner of Arundel's 
and Southampton's possession, 

5. 331-332; one of the originators 
of the Plymouth Company, 5, 332 ; 
chief manager of the company, 5. 
837; 8. 200; chief proprietor, 6. 4; 
established a colony at Winter 
Harbor, 6. 179; established the 
first organized government in 
Maine, 6. 179 ; had power to nom- 
inate clergymen, 6. 179; the honor 
of early colonization claimed for, 

6. 361; on the dominion of Bash- 

8 



aba, 7. 99; by his means two of 
the natives were returned to Amer- 
ica, 7. 210; actively engaged in 
commerce, 7. 321; joined Dr. 
Sutclilf in fitting out an expedi- 
tion to Pemaquid, 7. 321 ; Dermer 
and Smith in his employ, 7. 321 • 
purpose of the enterprise, 7. 321 * 
founder of the seat of trade at 
Monhegan, 7. 322; gave a charter 
to Agamenticus, 7. 391 ; sent over 
carpenters to erect a mill, 9. 308n; 
did not visit New England, 9. Slln] 
312; mentioned, i. 34n, 68, 82, 92,' 
93, 108, 110, 137, 156/1, 238, 241 
273, 343, 344, 366, 390, 404, 534; 2. 

8, 43a, 44, 61an, 258, 259, 262, 265: 
3. 12, 39, 48, 51, 63, 233, 234, 317 
330, 331, 332; 4. 14; 5. xxi, 194 
214, 344, 345; 6. 132, l76/i, 184ti; 7. 
95, 129, 306, 307; 8. 184, 391; 

9. 209, 302, 306, 307, 307n, 309 
310^, 311, Siin, 313, 3J3/i, 316n, 
317, 318, 320, 339, 342, 344, 346 
356, 367; A Brief Narration, not 
finished at the time of his death, 
2. viii-ix; the same given in full, 2. 
1-73; cited, i.81n; 2.3a, 23a, 24a- 
25a, 57a, 73a; 5-164^, 169n; 6.305: 
7. 96n, 99n, 100, lOOn, 134^, 298 
315n; 8.201; 9.307. 

Henry, i. 109. 

John, father of Sir Ferdinando, i. 
108^. ' 

Sir John, son of Ferdinando, i. 109- 
succeeded to the Massachusetts 
grant, i. 109; 2. 46n; sold his 
claim to Brereton, i. 109, 238~:^39; 
2. 47a; petitioned to the king to 
have his rights restored, 3. 33- 
mentioned, 2, 257, 259, 262, 264' 
266. ' 

Kalph de, i. 109; 2. man. 

Capt. Robert, son of Sir Ferdinando, 

1. 34?i, 109; 2. 43a, 47a; governor 
of New England, i, ;^4n, 109; 2. 
9, 43, 43a, 77; 6. 180; married, i. 
109; 2, 47a; received a grant to a 
part of Mass. bay, i. 109; 2.43a 
46/1 ; died, i. 109; 2. 47a; arrived', 

2. 43a; gave notice of his arrival, 
2. 43a, 44a ; hospitably entertained 
by Plymouth, 2. 43, 44a, 45a; went 
to Mass., 2, 43, 44a; formed a set- 
tlement on Mass. bay, 2. 45a; or- 
ganized his government, 2. '45a; 
returned to England, 2. 47a; 3! 
38; his colony assisted by Ply- 
mouth. 2. 47a; his estate given to 
Sir John Gorges and later con- 
veyed to Brereton, 2.47a; visited 
David Thompson, 2. 48a; in the 
Venetian War, 2. 43; advised to 
return home, 2.44; his patent in 
full, 2. 44-46; grant to John Old- 
ham, 2. 47n; met Levett, 2. 79n* 

mentioned, 2. 48a, 87. ' 



114 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Gorges, Capt. Robert — continued. 

Society, publications cited, 9. 820n, 
329n. 

Thomas, on the case of Cleeves vs. 
Winter, i. 54,535; deputy govern- 
or, I. 73n, 344; 3. 31, 34; 9. 3137i; 
commissioner, i. 88; 2. 59a; ar- 
rived in America, i. 89; 2. 59a; 
held his first court, 2. 89 : Mayor 
of Gorgeana, 2. 94n; 8. 391; a 
nephew of Sir Ferdinando, i. 109; 
2. 59a ; sold land to William Royal, 

1. 289n; as agent for his uncle, i. 
340-341, 342; grants to Hutchinson 
and Needham, i. 340-341, 352, 354; 
ordered a survey of Wells, i . 342 ; 
confirmed the deed of Wheel- 
wright, I. 343, 354; named the 
town of Wells, i. 354^1 ; aiithorized 
Rishworth and Wheelwright to 
make allotments, i. 355, 359; his 
agents not anxious to carry on 
his rights, i. 356; his agents, men 
of prominence, i. 356 ; gave a grant 
to John Saunders, i. 356; as secre- 
tary and counselor, 1.364; im Bos- 
ton, 2.59a; Winthrop's opinion otV 

2. 59a; a resident of Agameuticus, 

2. .59a; his mode of government 
instituted, 2. 59a-60a; a lawyer, 

3. 31; why called "the first gov- 
ernor," 3. 31; went to the White 
Mountains, 9. 209; autograph of, 

1. 544; mentioned, i. 132, 361, 
365, 366; 2. 73a; 3. 12, 37; 9- 336, 
337, 374, 375. 

William, arrived in Maine, i. 83; 
held a court at Saco, i. 83-84, .364; 

2. 50n; Chalmers opinion of, 2. 
84n; nephew of Sir Ferdinando, i. 
109; esteemed by his uncle, 1.545; 
sent out as governor by his uncle, 
2. 50m, 53a; 3- 31, 35; 9. 309; held 
his court at Bonython's house, 9. 
309. 

Gorgeana, Edward Godfrey mayor of, 
I. 47h; assessed, i. 94, 368; now 
York, i.94n; called Agamenticus, 
I. 94n; incorporated, i. 94?i; 2. 
59a; Thomas Gorges mayor of, i. 
94n; court held at, i. 98; people^ 
of submitted to Mass., i. 102; 3. 
43 ; the metropolis of the province, 
I. 550; 2. 70; Thomas Gorges depr 
uty governor of, i. 344; two fairs 

I to be held at, 2, 59a; the mode of 
government instituted at, 2. 59a- 
60a; a woman executed at, 3. IQn; 
mentioned, 8. 391; 9, 313n, 314. 
Gorham, a part of claimed by the Jor- 
dan proprietors, i. 48-49; home of 
William Tyng, i. 316; the Rev. 
Charles Freeman preached at, i. 
326n; situation of, 2. 146; incor- 
porated, 2. 146; first settlers of, 2. 
146-147, 148-149; attacked by In- 
dians, 2. 147; 4- 156; 8. 276n; 



clergymen who preached at, 2. 
147-148; manufactory at, 2. 148; 
first child born in, 2. 148; people 
of, Whigs, 2. 148; population of, 
2. 150; garrison at, 3, I71?i; sent 
militia to Falmouth, 3. 197; peo- 
ple of cut hay in Fryeburg, 4. 288 ; 
mentioned, 2. 140, 146; 3. I7ln, 
189, 193; 4. 258, 304, 330, 332, 354, 
374, 378, 389, 393, 403; 5. xxxi; 6. 
356; 7. 390; 8. 169; History of, 
see Pierce. 

Academy, incorporated, 8. 167, 168; 
land granted to, 8. 168; opened, 8. 
168; preceptors, 8. 168-169; in a 
flourishing condition, 8. 169; to 
be a state normal school, 8. 169; 
girls at, 8. 175. 

Benjamin, 3. 246. 

Corner, 2. 147. 

family, 4. 255. 

John, 4. 267; graduated from col- 
lege, 4. 241 n; his sister married 
the Rev. Paul Coffin, 4. 241w. 

Prof. John, 7. 408, 413. 

Mary, married the Rev. Paul Coffin, 

4. 241, 241n, 249; her character, 4. 
249, 250; date of her death, 4. 250. 

Capt. Nathaniel, 4. 249. 

the Hon. Nathaniel, 2. 143. 

Col. Shubael, 2. 146. 

Stephen, 4. 258n. 

William, 4. 258n. 

Col. 8. 138. 

Dr. , 5. Ixii. 

Judge, 5. xlii. 

Squire , of Portland, 4. 378. 

Gorhamtown, now Gorham, 2. 146. 
Goshen, 4. 281n, 306, 336, 392. 
Gosnold, Bartholomew, attempted to 
plant a colony in Mass., i. 25; vis- 
ited the coast in 1602, 5. 143; 7. 
133; his ship visited hj Indians, 

5. 143; 7. 133; two of his men in 
Pring's expedition, 5. 153; named 
Cape Cod, 5. 155; saw Indians 
with English apparel, 7. 133; his 
track followed by Weymouth, 7. 
293; followed by Saltern, 7. 309n; 
mentioned, 3. 286, 289; 5. 152, 156, 
345; 7.255m, 293; 9. 302. 

Gouch, John, signed the petition to 
Cromwell, i. 395 ; sued by Godfrey, 
9. 316?i; amount of land granted 
to, 9. 378. 

John jr., signed the petition to 
Cromwell, i. 395. 

Ruth, accused of adultery, i. 365, 
366; her punishment, i. 366. 
Gould, Sir Charles, 7. 409. 

Nathaniel, married Elizabeth Coffin, 
4. 249m. 

the Rev. Nehemiah, 4. 384. 

Col. Preston, 7. 409. 

Mrs. Col. Preston, 7. 409. 

, of Gorham, 4. 878. 

Gould's Mills, 4. 281n. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



115 



Gouldsboro, 8. 319. 
Gounitogon river, 6. 240, 2i0n. 
Government, civil, i. 85, 86, 89; of 

Maine by Mass., i. 240. 
Governor's island, Boston harbor, 7. 
211. ' ' 

island, N. Y., i» 528. 
Gow, John, 7. 284. 
Gowen, James, 4. 205. 
Grace, Patrick, served in the Revolu- 
tion, 2. 214. 
Graem, a corruption of Graham, 6. 7. 
Graffam, Caleb, biographical notice 

of, 3,211. 
Grafton, county, 9. [240, 

Joseph, 5. 225. 
Graham, corruptions of the name, 6. 7. 
Aaron, 4. 339. 
family, 6. 13. 

James, agent for Dongan, 5. 130. 
267; licensed to take up land at 
Pemaquid, 5. 108-109. 
James, his History of the United 
States, error in, 2. 46an; cited, 2. 
78a. 
Grammar schools, law concerning, 3. 

168w; 8. 158, 159. 
Grammatical Sketch, a, of the Ancient 
Abnaki, outlined from the Dic- 
tionary of Rale, g. 259-294. 
Grampus, 3. 91. 
Grandfolk, 4. 106. 
Grand Design Falls, the, of St. John 

river, 8. 19. 
Grandfontaine, Chevalier de Hubert 
d'Andigny de, took possession of 
Pentagoet, 7. 45n, 46, 47; Sir Wil- 
liam Temple surrendered to, 7. 
52-53; in command at Penobscot, 
7. 340; succeeded by De Chambly, 
7.340. 
Menan, the Isle of, Cadillac's ac- 
count of, 6. 279; mentioned, 7. 
264; 8. 15, 323. 
Monahans, 4. 190. 
Prairie, the, 8. 149. 
Pre, I, 27n; 5. xxii; 8. 130, 132, 135, 

137, 142, 145, 146, 282n. 
Trunk Railway, i. 63ri, 300n. 
Trunk station now occupies the site 
of Fort Loyal, i. 243?i. 
Granger, James, 7. 70n. 
John, signed the petition to Charles 
II, I. 401. 

, 7. 77. 

Granite in Hallowell, Limerick and 

Portland, i. 325-326. 
Grant, Francis, killed at Arrowsic, 2. 
192. 
James, married Joanna Ingles, i. 

252?i. ^ ' 

Joshua, killed, i. 224. 
Peter, signed the petition to Charles 

II, I. 402. 
Samuel, his daughter married John 

Otis, 6. 73. 
Capt , of Berwick, 4. 317, 376. 



Grants, to Cleeve and Tucker, 1. 127; 
by the Plymouth Company, i. 78- 
81; byDanforth, i.242; to Gorges 
and Mason, i, 35, 78; to the Duke 
of York, 5. 5-6; from the Colonial 
Papers, 9. 365-367. 

Granville, 9. 108. 

Grapes, great store of, 3. 305; at the 
Isle of Bacchus, 7. 265; at Strat- 
ton's island, 7. 260. 

Grasshoppers, hurtful to the country 
2. 114; 4.338, 362. 

Gratioso, island of, 3. 290-291, 292. 

G ratio use street, g. 351. 

Graves, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 16. 
John, married Martha Mitton, i. 
157, 260; lived at Kittery and Lit- 
tle Compton, I. 157, 260?i; admin- 
istered the estate of Nathaniel 
Mitton, I. 248; died, i.260^; chil- 
dren of, 1. 2Q0n; lived at Falmouth, 
I. 320. 
Russel, 9. 22. 

the Hon. William J., challenged 

Cilley, 6, 79-80; killed Cilleyt 6. 

80; Henry Clay his accomplice, 6. 

80-81. ' 

Capt. , of the Bonaventure, 2. 

the Rev. , of Providence, 4. 268 

Grave Yard Point, 2. 238. 

Gray, formerly New Boston, 8. 266- 

mentioned, 2. 119, 158, 159, I60' 

162; 4. 340, 403; 6. 13, 32, 35, 

37. 
Arnold, teacher in Warren Academv, 

8. 172. ^' 

Betsey, 4. 373. 
Capt Eben, 7. 237. 
Edward, 6. 70w,. 
Francis C, 3. 246. 
George, taken prisoner at Falmouth, 

I. 302; fined for fornication, i. 378. 
Goury, 5. 88. 
John, signed the treaty of 1717, 6. 

262. 
Deacon John, 8. 306. 
Pease, sent to Gov. Winthrop, i. 5^6. 
Peter, 4. 3i0, 341. 

Sarah, fined for fornication, I..378. 
William, purchased land of John 

May, 6. 133; built a rope-walk,. 6. 

133; sold land to the Park, street 

Proprietary, 6. 133. 
Mrs. Zeruiah, a descendent of Capt. 

Miles Standish, 2. 175. 
Capt. , of Carrytunk, visited by 

the Rev. Paul Coffin, 4. 344, 347;. 

had a fine farm, 4. 344 ; .resembled 

Esop, 4. 345. 
Greason, Robert, land granted to, i. 

244; signed the petition to > Gov. 

Bradstreet, i. 283n; captured by 

the Indians, 1.298; lived in iPre- 

sumpscot, I. 320. 
Great Bay, 4. 265. 
Androscoggin falls, 3. 323. 



116 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Great — continued. 
Androscoggin river, 2. 130; 4. 304; 

see Androscoggin river. 
Britain, the Jordan name common 
in, I. 234n; opposed the colonial 
limitation of slavery, 7. 216; her 
colonies to be subject to her gov- 
ernment, 7. 297; believed that the 
United States would stand much 
injustice, 8. 14; always strongly 
represented, 8. 14; obtained the 
islands in Passamaquoddy bay, 8. 
15; for twenty years acknowl- 
edged the claims of the United 
States, 8. 16 ; asserted her title to 
the country north of Mars Hill, 8. 
21; commenced to make aggres- 
sions, 8. 27; determined to have 
her way, 8. 65 ; changed her jjre- 
tensions, 8.66; mentioned, 1.410; 
2. 209, 283, 284; 3. 69n, 362, 373, 
395, 397, 417, 419, 421, 422, 424, 
427, 447; 4. 18, 24, 25, 80, 123, 149, 
160, 161, 257, 312, 323; 5, 358, 359, 
360, 383; 6. 28, 124, 141, 250, 251, 
253, 260, 326, 335, 336, 337, 341 ; 7. 
149, 202, 204, 205, 270, 294, 464; 8. 
6, 10, 17, 19, 20, 23, 27, 40, 44, 46, 
47, 49, 68, 74, 80, 84, 85, 86, 88, 93, 
94, 104, 130, 140n, 271, 301, 308, 
350; 9. 113, 160, 171, 224, 245, 246. 

Carrying Place, the, 7. 168, 170, 175, 
176, 195; 8.230, 231, 233. 

Chebeag, within the limits of Fal- 
mouth, I. 145; sometimes called 
Chebaccho, i. I45w; in Cumber- 
land, I. 146; conveyed to Walter 
Merry, i. 146; called Merry's is- 
land, I. 146w; conveyed to Josiah 
Willes, I. 146n; part of conveyed 
to Walter Gendall, i . 147 ; used as 
a fishing station, i. 147; part of 
granted to Wharton, 147 ; conveyed 
to the First Church of Boston, i. 
147; called Recompense island, i. 
147, 148n; part of owned by West- 
brook, I. 147; part of owned by 
the Waldos, i. 147; granted to 
Danforth and JSTowell, 147, i48n. 

Cove, I. 156. 
Falls, Saco river, 4. 276, 277, 339. 

Falls Country, 5. 96. 

Fourche, i. 460. 

Hope, the, sent to retake Pentagoet, 
7.35. 

Interval, the 4. 36. 

Island, now Newcastle, i. 214; 6. 189; 
Jlobert Jordan moved to, i. 214; 
Jordan resided at, i. 235n, 552, 
553; John Ashton moved to, 3. 82; 
Jordan escaped to, 6. 189; men- 
tioned, I. 232. 

lakes, the, 4. 114. 

meadow, i. 27n. 

Hosier's, i. 76. 

Neck, boundary <ff John Mason's 
grant, 4. 220; site of Mason's 



house at, 4. 220-221 ; Christopher 
Woolwich settled at, 4. 224; men- 
tioned, 4. 218, 225, 226. 

New England Charter, granted, 7. 
207; remarkable feature of, 7. 307- 
308, 311. 

Ossipee river, i. 3.33; 4. 276, 277, 287. 

Ox Pasture, 3. 149. 

Pond, 2.281; 3. 132, 148. 

River of Canada, 8. 317. 

Walt, a nickname of Walter Bagnall, 
3. nn. 
Greece, i. 27, 413; 2. Qa; 6. 147; 8. 

4.52. 
Greeley, the Rev. Allen, 2. 125, 126. 

Coz., 7. 237. 

Ebenezer S., 8. 65. 

Philip, 2. 182. 

Seth, 4. 336. 
Green, 4. 305, 344, 355, 378, 388, 403. 

Benjamin, 3. 375; 6. 364; 8. 162. 

island, i. 145, 151; 5. 375. 

John, lived at Newport, i,314; mar- 
ried Sarah Parrott, i. 311; signed 
the petition to Charles 11, i. 402. 
Greenbush, Maine, 7. 104. 

N. Y., 9. 183. 
Greene, Col. Christopher, short of 
provisions, i. 473; letter from Ar- 
nold, I. 475-476; to accompany 
Arnold, i. 500; at Red Bank, i. 
529-530; death of, i. 530; men- 
tioned, I. 510, 524. 

the Rev. Percival, preached at Wells, 
1.347; his salary, i. 347; gradu- 
ated from Harvard College, i.347- 

Richard, signed the petition to 
Charles 11, i. 402. 

Roscoe G., 8. 52, 168. 

, sued by Rishworth, i. 375. 

, cited, 6. 85. 

Gresnfield, 8. 441, 442, 445. 
Greenhaugh, Robert, land granted to, 

I. 244, 246. 
Greenland, the northern limits of the 
English claims, 2. 19a; the In- 
dians of speak Karalit, 4. 97 ; men- 
tioned, I. 25. 

N. H., part of Portsmouth, i. 154; 
former home of the Bracketts, i. 
154; home of the children of 
Thomas Brackett, 1.230; former 
home of Jonathan Philbrook, 2. 
205; mentioned, 2. 138, 223; 4. 
2A2n, 299. 

lane, 2.231; 9-9, 24, 65, 69. 
Greenleaf, Edmund, born in England, 
I. 352n; died at Newbury, i. 352n. 

Capt. Edmund, his daughter mar- 
ried Henry Somerby, 4. 240. 

the Hon. Jonathan, 2. 250. 

the Rev. Jonathan, preached at 
Wells, 1, 349n; biographical notice 
of, I. 351-352; mentioned, i. 326n; 
his Account of Wells, i. 336-361; 
his Ecclesiastical History cited, i. 
5, 352n; 3. Bin, 163n; 5. xviii-xix; 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



117 



6. 182^1, 184n, 193n, 194w, 199n; 8. 
157-158. 
Judith, daughter of Capt. Edmund, 
married first Henry Somerby, 4. 
240 ; second Tristram Coffin, 4. 240. 
Moses, father of Jonathan, i. 351; 
published a map of Maine, i. 5; 8, 
15, 106; mentioned, i. 5; 5. xix, 
xvi, xvii. 
Capt. Moses, 4. 378. 
the Hon. Simon, i. 351; 5. xxxix; 8. 
396. 
Greenly, Thomas, lived at Falmouth, 
I. 112; servant of Cleeves, i. 112; 
signed the submission to Mass., i. 
112; punished, i. 187. 
Greenough, Epes, 4. 205. 
Horatio, furnished a design and es- 
say for the Bunker Hill Monu- 
ment, 3. 251n. 
John, g. 64. 

Samuel, married Jane Gustin, 4. 
243n. 
Green's chapel, 6. 165. 
Greensledge, see Greenly. 
Greentown, 4. 397. 399. 
Greenville, Bernard, 7. 12dn. 
Greenwich, 4. 264. 
Greenwood, John, 4. 304, 403. 
Lucy, 4. 403. 
Yerres, 4. 403. 

Capt. , 3. 336. 

Greer, a corruption of McGregor, 6. 

6-7. 
Gregg family, 6. 11. 
the Kev. William, a teacher at Lim- 
erick, 8. 173. 
Gregoire, Bartholomew de, 6. 275. 
Maria de, naturalized, 6. 275. 
Maria Theresa de, granddaughter 
of Cadillac, 6. 275 ; reimbursed by 
Mass., 6. 275. 
Nicholas de, naturalized, 6. 275. 
Pierre de, naturalized, 6. 275. 
Gregor, a corruption of McGregor, 6. 

6-7. . 
Gregory, a corruption of McGregor, 6. 
6-7. 
XVI, Pope, 8. 140w, 493. 
George, lived at BUck Point, 3. 83. 
Col. Matthew, seized by his own 

soldiers for cruelty, 5. 395. 
Capt. William, i. 469. 
Grenville, Sir Richard, 2. 15. 
Gridley, Jeremiah, 2. 204; 6. 47n. 
Grienly, Thomas, 1. 131. 
Judge Robert C, 6. 7. 

Sergeant , i. 513. 

Griffin, John, lived at Blue Point, 3, 
83. 
Owen, sent ashore to trade, 5. 318. 
Griffith, Henry, 3. 180. 
Griffith's head, 9. 131. 
Gimes, a corruption of Graham, 6. 7. 
Grindle, Samuel, found the Castine 
coins, 6. 114-115, 125, 126n. 



Grist-mills at Barberry creek, i. 269; 
at Capisic, i. 269; at Gardiner, 2. 
283; at Limerick, i. 326, 332; at 
Long creek, i. 252ji; at Sebasti- 
cook, 4. 317; at Wells, 4. 336; of 
Gedney and Seward, 2. 179; of 
Seabury and Mitchell, 2. 180; of 
Yaughan, 8. 297. 
Griswold, Bishop, 7. 419, 432. 

Dr. ^ 4. 283n; 5. xviii. 

Grofton, 4. 295, 296. 
Grosvenor, Godfrey, 2. 122, 124, 128. 
Groton, Academy, 8. 413. 
Conn., 2. 134. 

Ellen E. K., daughter of Nathaniel, 
married F. O. J. Smith, 6. 369, 370. 
Joseph, 6. 368. 

Mary Sprague, her ancestry and con- 
nections, 6.367, 368; birth of, 6. 
367; children of, 6.368. 
Maine, 5. 285. 
Mass., I. 510; 2. 146; 4-380; 6.37, 

62n, 64n; 8.250, 412. 
Nathaniel, settled at Groton, 6. 368. 
, the Hon. Nathaniel, parents of, 6. 
367 ; birth of, 6. 367 ; one year a 
sailor, 6. .868; graduated from col- 
lege, 6. 369 ; studied law, 6. 369 
opened an office in Bath, 6. 369; 
moved to Portland, 6. 369 ; Judge 
of Probate, 6. 369; held other of- 
fices, 6. 369; his literary labors, 6. 
369-370; married, 6.370; children 
of, 6. 370; his character, 6. 370, 
371 ; death of, 6. 367, 370-371 ; men- 
tioned, 4. 227; 6. 355; his bio- 
graphical notice of the Rev. John 
W. Starman, 5. 407-411; his His- 
tory of the Churches of Bath, 
cited, 4. 217. 
William 1st, settled at Ipswich, 6. 

368. 
William 2d, ancestor of the Hon. 
Nathaniel, 6.368; with Wolfe at 
Quebec, 368; in the New York 
prison ship, 6. 368. 
William 3d, ancestry of, 6. 368; 
birth of, 6, 367 ; moved to Waldo- 
borough, 6. 367; death of, 6, 368; 
children of, 6. 368; his epitaph, 6. 
367-368. 
Grove, Mary, married Thomas Pur- 
chase, 3. 318n. 
street, i. 294. 

Grover, , 2, 253. 

Grundy, Felix, 8. 424. 
Gudding, Adam, i. 380. 
Guercheville, Marchoness de, assisted 
Jesuits, 8. 28, 322, 323; became 
the owner of Acadia, 8. 323 ; sent 
an expedition to America, 8. 323;, 
prevailed upon the queen to fit 
out a vessel to send settlers to- 
America, i, 429. 
Guernsey, 5. 26. 

Guilford, John, served in the weg: of 
the Revolution, 3. 204. 



118 



MAINE HISTOEICAL SOCIETY. 



Guiliean, 3. 380. 
Guinea, 6. 150; 7. 211, 212. 
Guinea Company, the, Duke of York 
interested in, 7. 139; incorporated, 
7. lS9n. 
Guizot, Francois P. G., his History of 

France cited, 9. 99n. 
Gulf of Maine, 8. 326. 
of Mexico, 6. 276. 

of St. Lawrence, crossed in bark 
canoes by the Micmacs, i. 412; 
John Denys drew a map of, 5. 178 ; 
a boundary of Du Mont's grant, 
7. 27; mentioned, i. 33; 7. 83. 
of Taranto, 6. 205. 
GuUison, Elihu, a garrison to be 
erected at his house, i. 296, 299; 
consulted with Major Church, i. 
296; lived at Falmouth, i. 320; see 
also Gunnison. 
Hugh, signed the petition to Crom- 
well, I. 395. 

Gumscook pond, 4. 113, 114; 8. 204n. 
Gunner's Nose, home of Robin Hood, 

2. 191. 
Gunnison, Elihu, signed the petition 
to Charles 11, i. 401; mentioned, 
4.205; 5.88, 100, 113; see GuUi- 
son. 
Guns, used by Indians, 8. 285. 
Gunsmith, wanted by the Indians, 3. 
373, 433; 4. 160; stationed at each 
fort, 8. 285. 
Guppy, Reuben, 9. 336. 
Gurdin, a spelling of Jordan, i. 549. 
Gurney, David, 2. 212. 
Gustin, Abigail, a daughter of John, 
I. 310. 
David, son of John, i. 310. 
Ebenezer, son of John, i. 310. 
Elizabeth, widow of John, i. 310. 
Jane, married Samuel Green, 4. 

243n. 
John, purchased land of Mrs. Hous- 
ing, I. I90n, 244; land granted to, 
I. 244; lived near the Presump- 
scot river, i. 244n, 310, 320; a 
native of the Isle of Jersey, i. 
244n, 3l0n; came to America, i. 
244n; lived at Reading, and was 
in King Philip's war, i. 244n; his 
name changed, i.244n,310?i; signed 
the petition to Bradstreet, i. 283n, 
SlOn; purchased land of Thomas 
Cloice, I. 310; died at Falmouth, 
I. 310; moved to Lynn, i. 310; 
land sold to, i. SlOw; married 
Eliza Brown, i. 244n, 310ti; chil- 
dren of, I. 310. 
John, son of John, i. 310. 
Samuel, son of John, i. 310. 
Sarah, daughter of John, i. 310. 
Thomas, son of John, i. 310. 
♦ Gutch, John, signed petition to Mass., 
5. 240. 
R#bert, a juror, 1. 188; lived at 



Casco bay, i. 2367i; purchased 
land of Robin Hood, 2. 193, 203 ; his 
descendents sold their land claim, 
2.202; the title derived from, 2. 

203, 204; first settler of Bath, 2. 

204, 205, 222; a minister, 2. 204; 
site of his house, 2. 204; came 
from Salem, 2.204-205; drowned, 
2. 205; mentioned, 8. 112n. 

Gutteridge, Jere., fined for being idle 
and disorderly, i. 379-380. 

Guy, George, i. 155, 180n. 
John, I. 155, 168, 216. 

Guyon, Marguerite, 7. 71n. 

Gwynn, , married Susanna Mun- 

joy, I. 256. 

Gyles, Capt. John, a government in- 
terpreter, 3. 314, 362, 381, 399, 413, 
420; a son of Thomas, 3. 314, 355; 
employed by the government, 3. 

314, 355; built Fort George, 3. 314- 

315, 355, 373; died in Boston, 3. 
314n; a large landholder, 3.355; 
chief justice, 3. 355; taken pris- 
oner, 3. 355; published a narra- 
tive of his captivity, 3. 355, 358; 
lived in Roxbury, 3-356; the first 
civil magistrate east of Pemaquid, 
5. 370n; read prayers to the sol- 
diers at Pemaquid, 6. 191; men- 
tioned, 3. 377, 402, 409, 4-33, 434; 
his narrative cited, i. 302; 3. 356. 

Margaret, daughter of Thomas, mar- 
ried Webber, 3. 314?i. 

Mary, daughter of Thomas, married 
Brewer, 3. 3147i. 

Thomas, lived at Pleasant point, 3. 
314; father of Capt. John, 3. 314, 
355; moved to Pemaquid, 3.314?i; 
killed, 3. 314n, 355; children of, 
3. 314n; a prisoner, 3. 315; his 
wife killed, 3. 315 ; an account of, 
3. 356. 

3?homas jr., son of Thomas, 3. 314n; 
died in Boston, 3. 314w; driven 
from Merrymeeting bay, 5. 265; 
settled at Pemaquid, 5. 265; com- 
plained of the people and the fort, 
5. 265-266; chief justice, 5. 265; 
mentioned, 5. 59-60, 88, 100; his 
narrative, 5. 265n; 272n. 

William, seffcled in Falmouth, 6. 12. 

see also Giles. 



Haalfe, Thomas, signed the petition 

to Mass., 5. 240. 
Habits of early settlers, i. 56. 
Hableville, Capt. Charles Flary de, 8. 

323, 327, 328. 
Hackney College, 7. 382. 
Haddock, 3. 97. 
Haddon, Conn., 2. 145. 
Hadley, 2. 145; 4. 262, 264, 293. 

John, 7. 397. 
Hague, 1. 164n; 2. 10a. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



119 



Haines, Francis, lived at Falmouth, i, 
321. 

John, letter from Sir Ferdinando 
Gorges, i . 544-545. 

Kobert, land granted to, i. 251; 
lived at Purpooduck, i. 251n, 309, 
310, 320; signed the petition to 
Bradstreet, i. 283n; married Ra- 
chel Davis, I. 309, 310; his widow 
married Wedgewood, i. 309, 310; 
his son, I. 310; lived at Hampton, 
1.310; signed the petition to 
Charles ii, i. 402. 

Thomas, lived at Casco bay, i. 114; 
consented to the agreement be- 
tweeii Tucker and Jordan, i. 131. 

Timothy, 3. 173. 

William, signed the petition to 
Charles 11, i. 402; lived at Pine 
Point, 2. 171. 

Capt. , of Popham's ship, 3. 290. 

, of Scarborough, 3. 236?i. 

Hake, 3. 97. 
Hakins, see Hawkins. 
Hakluyte, Richard, interested in pro- 
moting voyages of discovery, 2. 
20a-21a; assisted by Aldworth, 
5. 150-151, 171; prebendary of St. 
Augustine's church, 5. 152; an 
unpublished work of discovered, 
8. 507; mentioned, 5. 148, 151, 153, 
177; 7. 364; 8. iv; his voyages 
cited, 2. 14an, 15, 17a; 4. 106; 5. 
146n, 148w, 152n, 156%, 219n, 309n, 
333; 6. 175n; 7. 308n. 

Society, 3. 281, 283, 311. 
Hale, the Rev. Dr. Benjamin, 7. 418. 

Dr. Eliphalet, purchased land of 
John Tyng, 6. 132; conveyed the 
the same to Richard Codman, 6. 
132. 

Judith, died, i. 333. 

Mrs. S. J., 3. 258. 
Haliburton, Thomas C, his History 
of Nova Scotia cited, 5. 149, 174n, 
178w, lIQn, 196n; 7. 140, 146; 8. 
109; 9. 99w, 108. 
Halifax, schooners fitted from during 
the war of the Revolution, 2. 245- 
246, 247; a squadron sent from, 2. 
246; the squadron returned to, 2. 
247; an expedition attempted by 
land from, 2. 247 ; direct communi- 
cation with Quebec desired, 8. 18, 
19; formerly Chebucto, 8. 125; a 
French fleet arrived at, 8. 125; 
founded, 8. 264, 284; mentioned, 
I. 528; 3. 182; 5. 179, 421; 6. 328; 
8. 19, 104, 149, 220, 228, 263, 284, 
370, 371. 

the Duke of, a fort named for, 8. 
242^; a friend of the colonies, 8. 
242w;; died, 8. 242n. 

House, 8. 278. 

Lord, 5. 266. 
Halle, 6. 411. 



Hall, Ebenezer, 2. 180. 

the Rev. James, teacher at Canaan 
Academy, 8. 171 ; teacher at Farm- 
ington Academy, 8. 171. 

John, desired as a spy, i. 470. 

Jonathan, lived in Harwick, i. 308; 
married Hannah Bramhall, i. 308. 

Elder Joshua, formed the Penob- 
scot Circuit, 7. 228; at Frankfort, 

7. 229; as a politician, 7. 229; his 
characteristics, 7. 229; president 
of the senate, 8.394; hindered the 
regular business, 8. 394-395. 

Capt. Nathaniel, in command of the 
English forces, i. 292, 294, 296; 
bore the brunt of the battle, i. 
294; forded the creek, i. 295; list 
of his men who were killed, i. 
295w; in consultation with Major 
Church*, I. 296. 

Dr. , of Fayette, 4. 392. 

Judge , 5. xxiv. 

, the Indians complained of, 4. 

178. 
Hallom's deposition, i. 213. 
Hallon, Hannah, testimony of, i. 149. 
Hallowell, granite at, i.*325; incorpo- 
rated, 2. 285; a part of the Ken- 
nebec Purchase, 4. 46; designed 
to be a great town, 4. 46 ; brewery 
and distillery built, 4. 46; Dr. 
Vaughan settled at, 6. 90; 7. 278- 
280, 383; the spotted fever in, 6. 
90; Elder Lee preached in, 7. 227; 
the Rev. Mr. Gillet settled in, 7. 
279, 284; business increased in, 7. 
283; exports, 7. 283; prominent 
men in, 7. 284-285; newspapers 
of, 7. 284; prosperity checked, 7. 
285; Supreme Judicial Court held 
at, 7. 383; society at, 7. 383; but 
few inhabitants at, 7.383-384,384w; 
towns once included in, 7. 383- 
384; population increased, 7. 384; 
banks at, 7. 393-394; Yaughan's 
social influence, 7. 409, 415; men- 
tioned, 2. 119, 284; 4. 293, 305, 
305n, 321, 351, 355, 356, 379; 5. 
331, 423; 6. 58n, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 
64n, 65, 67, 73, 74, 90, 91, 92, 360, 
413; 7. 272, 275, 276, 277, 278, 282, 
285, 372, 379, 383, 390, 396; 400, 
405, 411; 8.180, 338,341. 

Academy, established, 8. 159, 160; 
land granted to, 8. 160; contribu- 
tions to, 8. 160-161; opened, 8. 
161 ; preceptors of, 8. 161 ; burned, 

8. 161 ; a very successful institu- 
tion, 8. 161; merged into other 
schools, 8. 162; mentioned, 7.339, 
385. 

Capt. Benjamin, at Falmouth, 5. 367 ; 
commanded the King George, 5. 
367n, 370; 6. 338; navy agent for 
Great Britain, 6. 85 ; his daughter 
married Samuel Vaughan, 6. 85; 



120 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Hallowell, Capt. Benjamin— cont'd, 
a son of William, 6. 403; married 
Mary Stocker, 6. 403 ; mentioned, 
5. Iviii, 377, 381; 8. 209n, 2Un. 
Benjamin jr., his house sacked, 5. 
Iviii; a son of Capt. Benjamin, 7. 
403; birth and death, 7. 403; prom- 
inent in Boston, 7. 403 ; one of the 
Kennebec Purchasers, 7. 403 ; mar- 
ried Rebecca Briggs, 7. 403; chil- 
dren of, 7. 403; mentioned, 5. Ixi, 
373; 7. 196. 
Benjamin 3d, son of Benjamin jr., 7. 
403; collector of customs, 7. 403, 
404; driven from Boston, 7. 403; 
died in Canada, 7. 404; children 
of, 7. 404. 
Sir Benjamin, son of Benjamin 3d, 
7. 404; an admiral under Nelson, 
7. 404. 
Classical and Scientific Academy, 8. 

162. 
Collection of Sacred music, 7. 398. 
family, first of the, in America, 7. 

403, 403n. 
High School, 8. 162. 
House, the, 7. 470. 
Lyceum, the, 7. 397. 
Robert, son of Benjamin, 5. Ixi, Ixii; 
7. 403 ; married Hannah Gardiner, 
5. Ixi, Ixii; 7. 404, 405; adminis- 
tered the estate of his father-in- 
law, 5. Ixii; father of Robert Hal- 
lowell Gardiner, 5. Ixii; navy 
agent at Portsmouth, 7. 404; col- 
lector at Boston, 7, 404; his ur- 
banity saved him from insult, 7. 
404 ; left the country and returned, 
7. 404; died at Gardiner, 7. 404; 
his son heir to Dr. Gardiner, 7. 
406 ; received a pension from Eng- 
land, 7. 406; mentioned, 5. Iviii. 
Robert jr., son of Robert, 7. 406; 
birth of, 7. 406; came to America, 
7. 406; heir to a great estate, 7. 
406; in Boston, 7. 406; at school, 
7.407; under his cousin's instruc- 
tion, 7. 407; at Derby Academy, 7. 
407 ; death of his mother, 7. 407 ; 
at Harvard College, 7. 408 ; visited 
Gen. Knox, and the Kennebec 
river, 7. 409; not disturbed by 
French infidelity, 7. 408; second 
visit to the Kennebec river, 7. 409 ; 
entered a law office, 7. 409; visited 
England, 7. 409-410; on the con- 
tinent, 7, 410; assumed the sur- 
name of Gardiner, 7. 410; see 
Gardiner. 
Sarah, daughter of Benjamin, 6. 
85; married Samuel Yaughan, 6. 
85 ; her character, 6. 85-86. 
Ward, son of Benjamin 3d, 7. 404; 
inherited his uncle's estate, 7. 
404; a benefactor of Harvard Col- 
lege, 7. 404; assumed the name of 
Nicholas Boyleston, 7. 404. 



William, first of the family in 

America, 7. 403, 403n. 
stream, 8. 101. 
Hall, the Rev. Stephen, 4. 302, 303- 
304, 308, 309, 335. 
Willard, 6. 364. 
Dr. W. L., 9. 147. 
Hall's Centennial Address, 8. 166. 

Halpes, Deacon , 2. 171. 

Halstead, , messenger of Arnold, 

1.493. 
Ham, 5. 17071 ; 7. 364. 
John, signed the petition to Brad- 
street, I. 283n. 
Hamans, William, i. 91. 

Hamblin, Dr. , of Livermore, 4. 

362, 390. 
Hambourgh Company, the, the Duke 
of York interested in, 7. 139; in- 
corporated, 7. 139n. 
Hamilton, Alexander, 6. 9Qn: 7. 163, 
270. 
Alexander, of Merrymeeting bay, 

his cattle destroyed, 8. llSii. 
family, 6. 16. 

the Marquis of, i. 33, 38?i, 81 ; 2. 42n, 
46. 
Hamlet, i. 413; 5. Ixviii. 
Hamlin, Gen. Charles, 8, 473. 
Elijah L., 8. 73, 170, 325, 477. 
the Hon. Hannibal, 8. 170, 458, 463, 
464; 9.163. 
Hammatt, Abraham, 2. 212. 
Hammond, Archelaus, 3. 180. 
Benjamin, early settler of New 

Gloucester, 2. 153. 
Edmund, signed the petition to 

Charles 11, i. 402. 
John, 4.205. 
Jonathan, had a sawmill at Wells, 

I. 269. 
Joseph, 2. 264; 3. 380, 411; 4. 205. 
Joseph jr., 4. 205. 

Richard, killed, i. 224; 2. 192; his 
trading-house attacked, 4. 222; 
accused of cheating, 4. 222; a 
maid from his house aroused the 
people, 4. 223 ; signed the petition 
to Mass., 5. 240. 
William, a representative in the 
court at Wells, i. 267; to lead the 
religious meetings at Wells, i. 
346, 373; signed the petition to 
Cromwell, i. 395. 

, erected a fort at Stinson's 

point, 2. 192. 
Hammond's garrison, 9. 133. 
Hammons, Jonathan, indicted for 

slander, i. 378. 
Hamott, Thomas, acknowledged the 

government of Mass., i. 386. 
Hampden, reason for the unusual 
form of, 9. 231; owned by Gen. 
Knox, 9. 232 ; incorporated, 9. 232 ; 
mentioned, 4. 400; 7-225; 9.230. 
Academy, incorporated, 7. 167; 
opened, 7. 167; land grant to, 7. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



121 



167 funds of, 7. 167 ; preceptors 
of, 7. 167, 168; cost of tuition, 7. 
167 ; united with the Bangor The- 
ological Seminary, 7. 168; men- 
tioned, 171, 177. 
Hampshire Association of Baptists, 
4. 353. 
county, 2. 251, 252, 253; 4. 123; 6. 

13; 8.414. 
Eng., name applied to New Hamp- 
sliire, 2. 52a. 
Hampton, home of Abraham Drake, 
1. 235, 236; home of Jacob Freeze, 
I, 310; Batchelder a minister at, 
I. 74; home of Robert Haines, i. 
809, 310 ; John Wheelwright went 
to, I. 344n; mentioned, 2. 138, 174, 
179; 3. 110, 219; 4. 242?i, 243, 264, 
279, 351; 7.262. 

, a soldier in the Black Point 

garrison, i. 227w. 
Hamweth, Thomas, submitted to the 

jurisdiction of Mass., 3. 46. 
Hanchett, Capt. Oliver, i. 475, 485, 500. 
Hancock, incorporated, 4. 79 ; land in 
granted to Mde. de Gregoire, 6. 
275. 
county, 3. 333; 6. 275; 8. 317, 319. 
John, one of the Kennebec Pur- 
chasers, 8. 208n. 
Gov. John, 2. 212, 218; 7. 328, 330, 

353; 8.283. 
street, Bangor, 7. 20; Portland, i. 

62. ' 
Thomas, 7. 196; 8. 151, 209n, 214n, 

219, 222n, 228, 283. 
William, settled at Buxton, 2. 139 ; 
came from Ireland, 2. 139. 

, of Otisfield, 4. 359, 387. 

Handel Society of Maine, 7. 398. 
Handforth, 2. 46w. 
Hanesicket bay, 2. 171. 
Hanham, Capt. Thomas, in command 
of Popham's expedition, 2. 23a; 
to meet Challong, 2. 23a; mani- 
festo concerning, 2. 2San. 
Pan-Jost, an Indian guide, i. 531. 

Hanan, Capt. , 3. 297; 5. 143, 159, 

333. 

Hanna, Mr. , i. 515n-. 

Hannibal, the, built at Newburyport, 
2. 247; commanded by the 
O'Briens, 2. 247; her cruise, 2. 
247-248; captured, 2.248. 
Hannuct, Thomas, married the Wid- 
ow Burrage, 3. 81; signed the 
submission to Mass., 3. 81. 
Hanover, the House of, 6. 7. 
Mass., 4. 272; 5. xxiii. 
N. H., 8. 420. 
Hanscom, Aaron, 3. 180. 

, of Gorham, 4. 393. 

, of Richmond's island, 4. 144, 

145. 
Hansom, Ichabod, 4. 385. 
Phineas, 4. 397. 



Happy Return, the, 5. 135. 
Harden, Ann, claimed land at New 
Dartmouth, 2. 235. 

Capt. , 7. 335. 

Harding, Grace, patentee of Lygonia, 
I. 4.5n. 
Nat., 4. 366. 
Nat., jr., 4- 366. 
Harding's, commissioners to meet at, 

1. 361. 

Hardison, John, sold land to John 
Jones, 3. 213. 

Hardwick, 4. 265. 

Hare, Charles W., married Bing- 
ham, 7. 355. 

Harfleur, 5. 178. 

Harford, Capt. Samuel, 3. 183n. 
Solomon, served in the war of the 
Revolution, 3. 203. 

Harisickles, 7. 237. 

Barker, John, 9. 372, 373. 

Harlem, Me., former name of China, 

2. 285. 
Harley, see Harlow. 
Harlow, Edmund, 2. 189. 

Edward, 7. 302. 

Capt, Henry, visited Sir Ferdinando 
Gorges, 2.25; kidnapped Indians, 

3. 301; 7. 210; his Relation cited, 
7. 304, 304n, 306. 

Suky, 4. 390. 

, of Sumner, 4. 390. 

Harmon, John, i. 267; 3. 159. 

Moses, served in the Revolution, 3. 
204. 

Pelatiah, married Rebecca Coffin, 4. 
250n. 

Samuel, sent to seek a minister, 3. 
159; meetings at his house, 3. 165; 
purchased land of Penhallow, 3. 
212 ; biographical notice of, 3. 212. 

Sarah, married Richard Jacques, 3. 
313n. 

William, to settle boundary dis- 
putes, I. 361; one of the first set- 
tlers of Wells, 1.362. 

Capt. , headed a company to 

exterminate the Indians, 2. 197; 
3. 152; massacred Indians at Som- 
erset point, 3. 313-314; subdued 
the Indians at Norridgewock, 3. 
BlBn; his daughter married Rich- 
ai'd Jacques, 3. 313n; died, 3. 313n. 
Harmony, 7. 395. 
Harndell, John, i. 189n. 

Rebecca, married James Lane, x. 
189n. 
Harnden, Samuel, 2. 218. 

Brigadier , 2. 199. 

Harnden' s fort, 2. 199. 
Harpswell, called Merriconeag, 2. 167; 
4. 331; incorporated, 2. 180; de- 
sired a clergyman, 3. 276; church 
begun at, 3. 276; the Rev. Jacob 
Bailey preached at, 3. 276; 6. 196, 
199 ; Capt. Harmon died at, 3. 313n ; 



122 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Harpswell —continued. 

Capt. Jacques died at, 3. 313n- 
314?^; deeded to Eichard Wliarton, 
3. 321; the Rev. Paul Coffin in. 4. 
331, 332; formerly Korth Yar- 
mouth, 7. 221 ; mentioned, 2. 115, 
119; 3. 152^; 7. 219, 473; 8. Ilia, 
11271. 
neck, called Merriconeag, 4. 106. 
Harrey, an Indian, 4. 155, 163. 
Harrington, name given to Bristol, 6. 
18; ceded to Montgomery, 6. 18; 
incorporated, 7. 384n ; changed to 
Augusta, 7. 384^; mentioned, 6. 
159. 
Harriseeket river, 4. 105. 
Harriseket, Indian name of Freeport, 

2. 167. 
Harris falls, 3. 322, 333. 
John, lived at Purpooduck, i. 321; 
trustee for IN^orth Yarmouth, 2. 
173. 
J. Morinson, Life and Character of 

Sir Walter Raleigh, 2. 24a, 78a. 
Mark, 4. 7. 
Merchant, 4. 298. 
Kathaniel, signed the petition to 

Mass., 5. 240. 
Samuel D., 3. 246, 247, 251. 
the Rev. Thaddeus M., 2. 11a. 
Thomas, 3. 246. 

William T., his Collection of Voy- 
ages cited, 5-15771, 195?i; his edi- 
tion of Hubbard cited, 5. 169n, 
173n, 183»i, 234n, 235n. 
Harris' hill, 2, 162. 
Harrison, William Henry, 7. 421, 459, 
463, 464; 8.45871. 

Capt. , of Fort Halifax, i. 504. 

, married Miss Noble, 8. 152. 

Harrod, John, 2. 179. 
Harrow House, 8. Ilia. 
Harry the coachman, i. 372. 
Hart, Charles Henry, 7. 473. 
Hartford, first woolen factory in 
America at, 4. 54; mentioned, 3. 
32071; 4. 57, 58, 59; s.xxix; 7.433, 
436, 437, 438, 441, 456; 8. 438, 485. 
convention, 5. xxxvii; 6. 61n; 7. 154, 

373. 
grey, cloth worn by Washington, 4. 

56. 
Maine, 4. 361, 390. 
Hartherne, see Hawthorn. 
Hartwell, Jonas, 3. 339. 
Harvy, Ren^ Just, 6. 408, 409, 411. 
Harvard, 4. 265 ; 8. 482. 
College, a professorship at endowed 
by Isaac Royall, i. 2907i; Joseph 
Willard president of, 3. 163; gave 
a title to the Rev. Paul Coffin, 4. 
256 ; the foundations of laid by the 
state, 5. xviii; the Rev. William 
Allen regent of, 5. xlvi ; the Rev. 
Ichabod Nichols a trustee of, 5. 
Hi; Albert Gallatin a teacher in, 



6.96; John Leverett president of, 

6. 321; 9. 79; the Rev. Ichabod 
Nichols a tutor in, 6. 373-374, 382, 
the doctines of Whiteiield obnox- 
ious to, 6. .382 ; Parker Cleaveland 
a tutor in, 6. 390,- the prevailing 
spirit of in 1795, 6. 387, 398-399; 

7. 408; the cross taken at Louis- 
burgh at, 8. 306n; Dr. Increase 
Mather president of, 9. 22; gradu- 
ates from, John Abbott, 5. xxli; 
the Rev. John Adams, i. 328; the 
Rev. Thomas Allen, 5. xlvi; the 
Rev. William Allen, 5. xlvi; the 
Rev. Jacob Bailey, 6. 196; 8. 210/1; 
the Rev. Benjamin Blackman, 3. 
155; Thomas Bond, 6. 647i; James 
Bridge, 6. 59 ; Timothy Boutelle, 6. 
69; John Brock, 9. 327ti; George 
Burroughs, i.217,264;3. 156;Eben- 
ezer Clapp, 6. 76; Josiah Clarke, 
I. 340; Parker Cleaveland, 6. 387, 
390; Dr. Charles Coffin, 4.241; the 
Rev. Paul Coffin, 4. 241 ; Charles 
Gushing, 6. 477i ; George Cushing, 
6. 48n; Richard Cushing, 6. 48^; 
Roland Cushing, 6. 47; William 
Cushing, 6, 44; A. R. Cutter, 2. 
186; Joseph Dane, 6. 364; G. F. 
Davis, 8. 441; Samuel Emery, i. 
340; the Rev. William Fessenden, 
4. 28971 ; James Furbish, i. 340; 
R. H. Gardiner, 5. Ixii; John Gor- 
ham, 4, 241n; Percival Greene, i. 
347; the Rev. Jonathan Green- 
leaf, 1.351; Robert Hallowell, 7. 
408; Benjamin Hasey, 4. 6; 6. 54; 
Moses Hemmenway, i. 340; Sam- 
uel Jeffards, i. 310; Edward Kent, 
8. 451; Rufus King, 3. 215; Wil- 
liam Ladd, 2.255; Enoch Lincoln, 
1. 408-409; Stephen Longfellow, 5. 
xxxii; Richard Martin, i. 347; 
John Mellen, 5. xxiii; Prentiss 
Mellen, 5. xxiii; 7. 474; Reuben 
Nason, 8. 169; the Rev. Ichabod 
Nichols, 5. li; 6.373,382; Thomas, 
Oliver, 7. 201; David Phips, 9.68; 
Spencer Phips, 9. 67; the Rev. 
Thomas Pierce, 3. 161 ; J. C. Reed, 

6. 96; the Rev. Jacob Rice, 4. 
280?i; Thomas Rice, 6. 6 2 71; 
Gideon Richardson, i. 340; Ed- 
ward Russell, 2. 165; Dr. Edward 
Russell, 2. 165; Samuel Sewell, 3. 
351; Lieut.-Col. Swan, 4. 280; the 
Rev. Joshua Swan, i. 3497i; Peter 
O. Thacher, 7, 474; George 
Vaughan, 7. 295; William 
Vaughan, 8. 295-296; Samuel 
Waldo, 9. 88; E. T. Warren, 6.64; 
the Rev. Geo. W. Wells, i. 349n; 
Nathaniel Wells, i. 340; the Rev. 
John White, 9. 62n; Benjamin 
Whitwell, 6. 66; William Willis, 

7. 474; the Rev. John Wiswell, 6. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



123 



193; mentioned, 2. va; 3. 197; 5. 
xxvii, xxix, 142, 286; 6. 61, 126n, 
188n, 403, 406, 412, 421, 425; 7. 
235n, 404, 408; 8. 151, 344, 413, 450, 
509; 9. 61. 
College Library, 4. 57, 95. 
Law School, 8. 396, 413-414. 
Harvey, Capt. Daniel, 3. 171. 
Elizabeth, mother of Nathaniel Mit- 
ton, I. 158, 206, 248; lived at Fal- 
mouth, I. 216; lived in Thomas 
Brackett's family, i. 216. 248; suld 
land to Powsland, i. 248; daugh- 
ter of Cleeves, i. 260; came from 
England, i. 260; death of, i. 260. 
Sir John, 8. 38, 69, 81. 
Judge Matthew, 5. xli. 
Peter, his Eeminiscences of Webster 
cited, 8. 163. 

Col. , 9. 194, 195. 

, married a daughter of Thad- 

deus Clarke, 1.308. 
Harwich, England, 6. 331. 

Mass., 1.308; 4.264. 
Harwood, Henry, a shoemaker, i. 216; 
land granted to, i. 244; discharged 
from Fort Loyal, i. 270; sold land 
to B. Allen, i. 270; moved to Bos- 
ton, I. 270; signed the petition to 
Gov. Bradstreet, i. 283yi; lived on 
the Neck, i. 320. 
Ensign John, slain, 4. 287. 
Thomas, signed the petition to 
Mass., 5. 240. 

Major , 2. 205, 215. 

Hasey, Benjamin, co-operate member 
of the Maine Historical Society, 
I. 11; recording secretary, i. 12 
death of, 4. 6; 6. 55; birth of, 4. 6 
graduated from college, 4. 6; 6 
54; established at Topsham, 4. 6 
6.54; studied with Judge Thach- 
er, 6. 54 ; a man of quiet habits, 
6.55. 
Haskell, Daniel, teacher at Lincoln 
Academy, 8. 166. 
Ezra, 8. 174. 
Hassang, 3. 380. 

jr., 3. 380. 
Hasted, Edward, his History of Kent 

cited, 9. SOOn. 
Hasty, Daniel, biographical notice of, 
3.211. 
John, married Lydia Libby, 3. 211. 
Joseph, served in the Continental 

Army, 3. 204. 
Kobert, 3. 211. 

William, died, 3. 211; sons of, 3. 211. 
WiUiam jr., son of William, 3. 211; 
served in the war of the Kevolu- 
tian, 3. 203 ; married Anna Clarke, 
3. 211; children of, 3. 211. 
Capt. William, 3. 151- 
Hatch, Estes, signed the treaty of 
1714, 6. 259; autograph of, 6. 259. 
Philip, signed the petition to Crom- 
well, I. 395. 



Susan H., married first to Capt. 
Tobias Lord, 8. 405; second to the 
Hon. E. E. Bourne, 8. 405. 
Hatfield, 2. 145; 4. 143, 262, 264. 
Hathon, see Hawthorn. 
Hatwell, Benjamin, petitioned to the 
general court, 1. 144. 
Widow , married Richard Mar- 
tin, I. 75. 
see Atwell. 
Havana, 2. 19. 

Haven, the Rev. Jason, 4. 268. 
the Rev. Joseph, 4. 256, 295. 
Samuel F., assistance acknowledged, 
5. 142; letters to J. W. Thornton 
cited, 5. 301-302; his Archaeology 
of the United States cited, 6. 218n. 
Haverhill, home of Tristram Coffin, 
4. 240 ; first plough used in, 4. 240 : 
destroyed, 6. 239; mentioned, 2. 
138; 4. 242n, 273,280n,389; 6.390. 
Academy, 9. 239. 
Havre de Grace, Du Monts sailed from, 

7. 249. 
Hawke, , early settler of Bakers- 
town, 2. 113. 
Hawkesmoore, 9. 58. 
Hawkins, Ernest, his Church of Eng- 
land Mission in North America 
cited, 6. 196^; his Quebec cited, 
5. 178n. 
Sir John, introduced slavery in 

America, 7. 209. 
Sir Richard, sailed for America, i. 
32; visited Yirginia, 2. 28; at 
Monhegan, 7. 320; took the 
Nachen's fishing boats, 7. 320; 
mentioned, 7. 129. 
William, 2. 260, 264. 
Hawley, the Rev. Gideon, 4. 271. 
Hawthorne, Capt. William, sent with 
troops to Maine, 5. 257; sent to 
make a -treaty with the Indians, 
5.288; mentioned, i.222n, 226; 3. 
110; 9. 363. 
Major William, held county court, 
1.170; sent to Maine, i. 226; men- 
tioned, I. 227n; 3. 53; 7. 153ii. 

Hay, Dr. , of Turner, 4. 304. 

Hayes, Francis B., 9. 70, 71. 
John, 2. 121. 

John L.,his Vindication of the rights 
of Alexander, Earl of Stirling 
cited, 7. 143)1. 
Rutherford B., 8. 288. 
William A., i.ll; 9.71. 
Hayne, Robert Young, 7. 470. 
Haynes, Francis, signed the petition 
to Gov. Bradstreet, i. 283m. 
John, 9. 319. 

Thomas, lived at Casco bay, i. 236w; 

clerk for the band of Westcus- 

tego, 1.376. 

William, lived at Casco bay, i.236n. 

Haywood, John, 3. 234, 382, 333. 

Hazard, Samuel, his State Papers 

cited, I. 25, 27, 28, 33, 34, 35, 40, 



124 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Hazard, Samuel — continued. 

41, 44, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 99, 100, 
101, 102, 103, 113, 289; 2. 42an; 3. 
284; 5. 325; 6. 174, 176, 179, 180; 
7. 143, 153; 8.341; 9. 104, 312, 313, 
314, 327. 

Hazel nuts, 3. 302. 

Hazeltine, Timothy, settled at Bux- 
ton, 2. 139; came from Bradford, 
2. 139; mentioned, 4. 244. 

Heacock, Stephen, commander of the 
Blossom, 5. 135. 

Head, see Heard. 

Heald, Bridget, daughter of Ephraim, 
4. 368. 
Bridget, wife of Ephraim, 4. 346, 

368, 369. 
Eleanor, 4. 368. 

Major Ephraim, 4. 346, 347, 368, 

369, 398, 399. 
Ephraim jr., 4. 368. 
Mehitable, 4. 368. 

Heard, Daniel, 7. 285. 
James, military officer of Kittery, 
1. 373 ; signed the petition to Crom- 
well, I. 395. 
John, sued by Godfrey, 9. S16n. 
Warwick, killed by Charles Frost, 
1.368; 3. 16. 
Hearne, Nicholas, biographical notice 

of, 3. 212. 
Heath, the Rev. Asa, 3. 165. 
Expedition, the, 7. 91n. 
Joseph, grant of land to, 2. 204; 
reason of the grant, 2. 204; men- 
tioned, 2. 205; 4. 281. 
Capt. Joseph, sent a letter to Gov. 
Dummer, 3. 407; letter in full, 3. 
408-409; destroyed the fort at 
Penobscot falls, 7. 4, 86; inter- 
rupted the negotiations for peace, 
7. 86; mentioned, 3. 433, 434, 440; 
4. 170; 7. 5. 
Lieut. William, i. 500, 524. 
Hebrew, the, i. 415. 
Hebron, 2. 127, 145; 4. 303, 304, 336, 
359, 360, 388, 389, 403; 5. xl. 
Academy, in high repute, 6. 371; 
incorporated, 8. 169; land granted 
to, 8. 169; funds raised, 8. 169; 
opened, 8. 169; preceptors of, 8. 
169, 170; benefactors of, 8. 170; 
6emi-centennial of, 8. 170; de- 
scribed, 8. 170; mentioned, 6. 369. 
Hecke welder, the Rev. John, i. 412; 
criticised, 6. 216; his Narrative of 
the United Brethren cited, 6. 213, 
216, 217, 223, 225. 
Hector, the, 8. 122. 
Hedge, the Rev. Frederic H., 6. 363. 
Heffer, Andrew, 3. 83, 232. 
Hegon, John, 3. 357. 
Heights of Abraham, i. 520; 7. 295, 
Heison, Ralph, i. 226n; 3. 110. 
Hellgate, 6.289; 7-299. 
Helms tad t, the University of, 5. 404. 



Hemmenway, the Rev. Moses, gradu- 
ated from Harvard College, i. 340; 
minister at Wells, i. 340, 348; 4. 
243; died, i. 348, 349; his long 
pastorate, i. 348; mentioned, 2. 
141, 142 ; 4. 244, 255, 256, 265, 273 ; 7. 
219; his Sermon, 4. 360, 361, -362, 
363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 372. 

Hemmingway, Charles, 5. 439. 

Hemp, 2. 98; grown in New England, 

6. 328. 

Henchman, Major , 5. 396. 

Sender, , 9. 358, 359. 

Henderson, Dunbar, erected a block- 
house near George's river, 5. 367n; 
Indians lurking around his house, 
5. 368; married the Widow Dun- 
bar, 6. 20. 

Hendricks, Capt. William, i. 500, 516, 
524. 

Hengstenberg, Ernst Wilhelm, 7. 432. 

Hening, William W., his Statistics of 
Virginia cited, 7. 129n, ISOw. 

Henniker, N. H., the Kev. Jacob Rice 
preached in, 4. 280n. 

Henrietta Maria, the province of 
Maine supposed to have been 
named for, 2. 5San; that not a 
correct statement, 3. 31n. 

Henry i, of England, 4. 239. 

II, of England, 7. 14l7i. 

III, of England, 6. 149. 

IV, of France, gave a patent to Du 
Monts, I. 25, 27; 5. 309, 322, 325; 

7. 27 ; confirmed the grant of Pon- 
trincourt, 8. 321, mentioned, g. 
97, 99. 

VI, of England, 6. 149. 

VII, of England, 2. 14a; 6. 142, 149; 
7.380; 9. 310n. 

VIII, of England, 2. 18a; 6. 150; 9. 
358. 

the Rev. Hugh, preached in Scar- 
borough, 3. 158; was a Scotchman, 
3. 159. 
John Joseph, with Arnold i, 501; 
in the exploring party under 
Steele, i. 503; born at Lancaster, 
I. 503; at Detroit, i. 503; his ex- 
perience in the wilderness, i. 503; 
joined the troops, i. 504; a bio- 
graphical notice of, i. 530-531; 
mentioned, i. 506, 507n, 508, 509, 
512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 622, 
525, 527, 528. 
of Guise, 9. 99. 

W., father of John Joseph, i. 503, 
530. 
Herbert, Simon, 8. 51. 
Hercules, the, employed at Rich- 
mond's island, i. 56; 6. 138; sent 
to England with freight, 6. 537. 
Herculesin, the, i . 234n. 
Herman, John, in the Black Point 
garrison, i. 221n\ 3. 110. 
Nat, 4. 281. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



125 



Hermans, James, fined for beating 

his wife, i. 377. 
Hermanns, the, 5. 24. 
Hermon, owned by Gen. Knox, 9. 232. 
Heron lake, 4. 108. 
Herrera, Anthony, 2. 9. 
Herrick, Benjamin, 2. 264. 
Ebenezer, 8. 174. 
Capt. Israel, 5. 367, 370. 
Jacob, 2. 117, 119, 121. 

, inn-holder at Lewiston, 4. 378, 

403 
Herrings, abundant, 3. 92; taken and 
cured on the Sebasticook, 4. 317, 
354. 
Herrin-Hog, 3-91. 
Hersey, Amos, 2. 123. 
James, 2. 125. 
Nat., 4. 363. 
Noah, 2. 114. 
Hethersaw, Kobert, indicted and 

fined, I. 372. 
Heyer, Conrad, 5. 409; death of, 6. 369. 
Heylin, Peter, his Cosmojiraphy cited, 

7. 99w, lOOnj 8. 319, 320, 331. 
Heyman, Samuel, 9. 34. 
Heyson, Matthew, in the Black Point 

garrison, i. 22Qn\ 3. 110. 
Hibbard, James, 2. 221. 

the. Rev. , 4. 330. 

Hiberniae, 6. 123, 124; see Ireland. 
Hibernia, the, commanded by Capt. 
John O'Brien, 2. 248; captured 
the Gen. Pattison, 2. 248. 
Hickford, John, lived at Black Point, 
3. 83; an extravagant story con- 
cerning, 3. 89-90. 
Hieroglyphics used by Indians, i. 425; 

on belts, i- 425-426. 
Higgins, Edmund, 3. 204. 
Deacon Edmund, 3, 212. 
Dr. Edmund, married Anne Swan- 
ton, 3. 212^ his children, 3. 212. 
e^ate, the, part of the Cammock 

patent, 3- 212. 
farm, formerly Capt Boaden's farm, 

3. 16?i, 226. 
Fergus, 3. IQn; biographical notice 

of, 3. 212. 
Philip, 2., 213^ served in the Conti- 
nental army, 2. 214. 
Capt. Samuel, 3. 212, 

Mrs. , 2. 212. 

Higginson, John, purchased land of 
Nicholas Bartlett, 1. 117; sold the 
same to John Smith, i, 117. 
Stephen, his daughter married the 
Hev. Ichabod Nichols, 5. Ivii. 

, married Dr, Nichols, 5. Ivii. 

High island, 5. 301. 

street, Bath, 2.219; Portland, 6. 132. 
Hight, George, biographical notice of, 

3. 212. 
Highways, ordered to be made, 1. 165; 
laid out, I. 242, 244; to the mill, 
I. 246; in Bath, 2. 219; Scar- 



borough presented for not mend- 
ing, 3. 78; the seashore used for, 
3. 128; obliterated in thirty years, 
3. 166-167; of the Indians, 8. 215; 
of the sea, 9. 10. 
Higon, anecdote of his son, i. 304; 
captured and sent to Falmouth, 
I. 288-289. 
Hill, Daniel, 3. 178, 180. 
Isaac, 4. 20. 

Jacob, 2. 121, 122, 126, 127. 
Japhet, 3. 178, 180. 
Jeremiah, at the battle of Bunker 

Hill, 2. 139. 
John, lived at Portsmouth, i. 230n, 
306; married Sarah Brackett, i. 
230n, 306; signed the petition to 
Charles 11, i. 402. 
John, committee on the French 

Neutrals, 6, 342, 343. 
Capt. John, 4. 138-139, 212. 
Ensign John, 3. 137. 
Gen. John, 9., 'Sin. 
the Hon. John, 3. 176n. 
Jonathan, i. 333. 

Judge , 2. 202, 218; 8. 285. 

Mark Langdon, 2. 210; 4. 7; 5. 415- 

419; 8.284. 
Obadiah, 3. 180. 
Peter, i. 541; a member of the Li- 

gonia Assembly, i. 99. 
Roger, signed the petition to Crom- 
well, 1.395. 
Samuel, 3. 180. 
Major Samuel, 2. 140. 
Thomas A., 6. 41 ; 8, 452. 
Valentine, 9. 376, 377, 379, 382. 

of Biddeford, 4. 293. 

Hiller, Joseph, signed the treaty of 
1713, 6. 254; autograph of, 6. 254. 
Joseph jr., signed the treaty of 1717, 
6. 262; autograph of, 6. 262. 

Hillman, the Rev. , of Livermore, 

4. 340. 
Hillsborough, 8. 460. 
county, 2, 144-, 145. 
Hilton, Benjamin, of Starks, 4. 312, 
343, 357, 399. 
Benjamin, of Wiscasset, captured 
by Indians, 4. 345; carried to 
Canada, 4. 345; his father and 
brother killed, 4. 345. 
Edward, sent to America by Gor- 
ges and Mason, i. 35; commenced 
a settlement at Dover, 2. 79?i; pa- 
tent granted to, 9. 366. 
Elizabeth, 4. 399. 
Francis, i. 372. 
Jonathan, 4. 397. 
Joseph, 4. 367. 
Mehitable, 4. 399. 
Susanna, 4. 343. 

William, sent as agent to America, 
I. 35; a grand juryman, i. 371; 
his wife accused of disturbing the 
peace, i. 372; commenced a settle- 



126 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETT. 



Hilton, William— continued. 

ment at Dover, 2. 79n; mentioned, 
9. 382. 

Lieut. , of Wiscasset, 4. 399. 

, of Piscataqua, 5. 205. 

Hincks, the Eev. Edward Y., 8. 417, 

420, 421. 
Hingliam, England, i. 408. 
Mass., the Phippens in, i. 113n; 
Cade and Cady a common name 
in, 1. 129; home of George Bram- 
hall, I. 307-308; home of Samuel 
Lincoln, 1.408; home of Abraham 
Jocelyn, 3. 68n; mentioned, 2. 145; 

3. 217; 4- 272, 386; 5. Ixii; 7. 407. 
Hinkley, Capt. John, killed, 2. 215. 

Miller, killed, 2. 215. 
Thomas, 9. 29. 

Judge, , 6. 72, 161. 

Hinks, John, signed the petition to 

Mass., 5. 240. 
Hinkson, Peter, in the Black Point 

garrison, i. 227w; 3. 83, 110. 
Hinsdale, 4. 202, 263, 264. 
Daniel, agent of the first woolen 

mill, 4. 54, 55, 57. 
the Eev. Ebeneser, preached to the 
Indians, 4. 141, 143. 

Col. , of Deerfield, 4. 262, 264. 

Madam , of Deerfield, 4. 263. 

Hiram, 4. 276; 6.41. 

Hiroons, 2. 67; see Hurons, the. 

Hiskett, John, 9. 64. 

Stephen, master of the Blossom, 5. 
186. 
Hispaniola, Acadians went to, 6. 343n; 

mentioned, 9. 13, 57?i. 
Historical Magazine, the, 6. 182m; 7. 
480, 481 ; 8. 404. 
Societies formed in various states, 
2. 10a; the first in the United 
States, 4. 5. 
works relating to Maine, i. 5. 
History, the beginning of the study 
of, 2. 6a; records not saved, 2. 7a; 
attempts to preserve the materials 
of, 2. 7a-9a; societies formed, 2. 
lOa-lla; how to reach a good 
understanding of, 5* 141?i; the 
object of, 7. 120; the landmarks 
of are not always startling events, 
7. 163; romance in, 8. 277. 
Hitchcock, D., on the Lord's Supper, 

4. 337. 

Richard, lived at Saco, i. 185; an 
action brought against, i. 185; 
signed the petition to Cromwell, 
I. 394. 

Dr. , 5. xviii. 

Widow , forbidden to marrv, i. 

372-373. 
Hoar, Samuel, 5. li. 
Hobbowocko, definition of, 3. 19^. 
Hobby, Wins, 2. 210. 
Hobart, Bishop, 2. 11a. 
Dudley, 2. 210. 



Hobson, John, 2. 138, 141. 

Capt , 2. 27, 29. 

Hocamock point, 7. 259. 

Hodgdon, 7. 5. 

Hodge, Dr. Charles, 6. 29. 

Michael, probably a descendant from 
Richard Tucker, i. 64n; executed 
a deed to Phineas Jones, i. 64yi, 
12871. 
Nicholas, probably a descendant 
from Richard Tucker, i. 64n. 
Hodgedon, John, died, i. 333. 
Joseph, sold land to James Mariner, 
I. 248, 313; granted land at Non- 
such point, I. 252; lived on the 
Neck, I. 321; moved to York, i. 
321. 
Hodgkin, Moses, 2. 212. 

Philip, 2. 212. 
Hodsdon, Gen. Isaac, 8. 77. 
Jer., signed the petition of 1672 to 
Mass., 5. 240. 
Hog island, given to Cleeves and 
Tucker, i. m, 150, 543; sold to 
Thomas Kimball, i. 124, 150; re- 
sold to Edward Tyng, i. 124, 150; 
within the limits of ancient Fal- 
mouth, I. 145; owned by Eunice 
Willard, i. 150; occupied by 
Philip Lewis, i. 150; origin of 
the name, i. 150?i, 151n; men- 
tioned, I. 42, 149, U9n; 2. 85n; 5. 
442; 9. 315n. 
Holbrook, Jesse, 2. 212. 
John, served in the Continental 
army, 2. 214. 

Capt. , 7. 14. 

Holden, 2. 251, 252. 

, of Otisfield, 4. 359. 

Holderness, the Earl of, 2.77; 8. 220. 
Hole, John, signed the petition to 

Charles 11, i. 401. 
Holland, many 'political treaties 
formed in, i. 403; attempt? to 
interest the English refugees in 
American colonization, 2. 41; 
coinage of found near Castine, 6. 
122; war with England declared, 

7. 140, 140?i; mentioned, 4. 4; 6. 
331, 332; 7. 25, 137, 137n, 151, 410; 

8. 200. 

the king of, 8. 46, 47, 48, 49, 53, 58, 
61, 92, 93, 100, 102, 104, 105. 

park, 8. 16; surveyed lands in Ban- 
gor, g. 232, 233; surveyed other 
towns, 9. 233. 

Mr. , I. 382. 

Hollanders, the settled on Hudson 
river, 2. 40; benfits they derived 
from colonization, 2. 60. 
Hollis, 2. 138, 140, Ul, 142; 3. 218; 4. 
104, 243, 276n, 271m; 7. 222. 

Thomas, 6, 331. 

Hollister, Edward, teacher in Lin- 
coln Academy, 8. 166. 
Holman, John, lived at Casco bay, i. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



127 



2S67i; lived at North Yarmouth 
and Purpooduck, i . 321 ; witnessed 
the signature of Bramhall, i. 556; 
lived at Holman's point, 2. 171; 
mentioned, 2. 172; 4. 339. 
Thomas, married Hannah Turner, 

1. 315; lived at Rehoboth, i. 351. 
Holman's point, now Prince's point, 

2. 171. 

Holmantown, the Rev. Paul Coffin in, 
4. 339; named for John Holman, 
4. 339. 
Holmes, Dr. Abiel, letter from John 
Farmer cited, 2. 131 ; his American 
Annals cited, 2. 82; 3. 59n; 5. 179; 
179n, 200w, 215n, 235, 281, 282n, 
292n, 296n; 6. llOii; 8. 233; 9. 
31 In, 312^1 ; ^his French Protest- 
ants, I. 277. 
Benjamin, 3. 180. 

David, killed at Falmouth, i. 295n. 
John, 4. 7; 5. xxxvii, xlii, xliii, 
xlviii; 6. 364, 365; autograph of, 
I. 307. 
Capt John, 4. 211. 

the Hon. John, corporate member 
of the Maine Historical Society, 
1. 11; first representative of Maine 
in Congress, 9. 169; mentioned, 
4. 58; 8. 16, 396, 410, 415; 9. 173. 
Mrs. John, 4. 58. 

Joseph, of Cambridge, purchased 
land of Francis Neale, i. 2b0n; 
mortgaged the same to Joshua 
Scottow, I. 250n; lived at Casco, 
I. 250n, 321. 
Joseph, of Machias, 3. 179, 180. 
Oliver Wendell, 8. 441. 
Sir Robert, drove the Dutch from 

their conquest in Africa, 7. 139. 
Samuel, 3. 180. 

Thomas, had a saw-mill at Quamp- 
hegan, i. 269. 
Holt, James, 4. 281. 
Holton, Isaac, teacher in Berwick 

Academy, 8. 162. 
Holy Cross College, 6. 203, 356, 362. 
Cross settlement, Champlain at, 7. 
251; now Neutral or De Monts'* 
island, 251; site of the first at- 
tempt to settle the coast of Maine, 
7. 251. 
League, the, 9. 99. 
Honduras, bay of, explored, 2. 14a. 
Honewell, see Hunnewell. 
Honeywell, Ambrose, signed the pe- 
tition to Mass., 5. 240. 
Richard, in the garrison at Black 
Point, i.227n; signed the petition 
to Mass., 5. 241. 
see also Hunniwell. 
Honfleur, 7. 249, 293, 314; 8. 323. 
Hood, Robin, see Robinhood. 

Thomas, 8. 476. 
Hook, 4. 305, 306. 
the, 7. 279, 281, 384n 



Hooke, Francis, lived at Saco, i- 177, 
265; appointed a justice of the 
peace, i. 177, 185; administered 
the estate of Samuel Maverick, i. 
182?^; lived at Kittery, i, 185; 
treasurer, i . 265 ; held a court at 
Wells, I. 267; abused by Joseph 
Winnock, i. 375; councelor, i. 
376, 381; magistrate for Saco, 2. 
63a; mentioned, 3. 58, 157; 9. 376. 
William, an associate, 1. 46; coun- 
selor, I. 73n, 88, 364,* 5.214; home 
of, I. SSn; married Eleanor Nor- 
ton, 2. 50; witnessed the delivery 
of the grant to, Shurt, 5. 214; 
sued by Godfrey, 9. 309n,; men- 
tioned, 9. 31471, 317. 

Alderman , 9. 314. 

Hooker, the Rev. John. 4. 262. 
Hooper, the Rev. William, 4. 303, 338; 
7. 222, 225. 

the Rev. , of Boston, 6. 192. 

, orator at Harvard College, 4. 

268. 

Squire , 5. xxiv. 

Hoosack, definition of, 4. 115. 
Hoosatunnuk, a poem by the Rev. 

William Allen, 5. xlvii. 
Hope, 4. 327ii; 9. 81. 

the, at Townshend, 6. 162. 
Hopehood, attacked Salmon Falls, i. 
297; captured and sent to Fal- 
mouth, I. 288-289. 
Hopewell,, the, commanded by Law- 
rence Sluce, 5. 136. 
Hopkins, James D., 5. xxv, xx.xiv, 

Hopkinsians, the, 4. 316, 342, 348, 368, 

399, 401 ; see Hopkintonians. 
Hopkinson, Lieut. John, 4. 245, 275, 

284, 289, 290; 5. xlviii. 
Hopkinton, 5. xxiii. 
Hopkintonians, 2. 223, 225, 226; see 

Hopkinsians. 
Hops, abundant, 3. 305, 307. 
Horkett, William, signed the petition 

to Cromwell, i. 395. 
Horkridge, Abel, signed the petition 

to Mass., 5. 241. 
Horman, Philip, lived at Falmouth, i. 

320. 
Hornby, Capt. James, married Mary 

Munjoy, i. 256. 
Home, John, i. 504. 
Horney Pond Brook, 4. 289. 
Hornibroke, John, affidavit of, 5. 62- 

63. 
Horse Beef falls, 2. 148. 
block, use of, 2. 185-186. 
neck, 2. 145. 
Horseshoe-crab shells, used in culti- 
vating maize, 7. 261. 
tails, used to tip arrows, 3. 99. 

Hosack, Dr. , 2. 11a. 

Hot spring near Jocelyn's house, 3. 

67-68. 



128 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Hough, Dr. Franklin B., discovered 
the Pemaquid Papers, 5. Ixxi his 
edition of the same, 5. 1-138; 
Pemaquid and Its Relation to Our 
Colonial History, 7. 127-164. 
Houghton, 2. 209. 

Levi, 2. 204. 

Lord, 6. 331. 

N. B., 8. 31, 40, 41, 43, 78; 9. HI. 
Hounds, used in scenting Indians, 8. 

276n. 
Hounslow, Edward, in the Black Point 
garrison, i. 227n; 3. 110. 

Houper, , 9. 351. 

House island, within the ancient lim- 
its of Falmouth, 1. 145; early used 
by fishermen, i. 151; one quarter 
owned by John Breme, i. 151; 
Simpson Penley had a right on, i. 
151; George Munjoy purchased an 
interest in, i. 151; Munjoy' s heirs 
now hold it, 1. 151; still used for 
fishing stages, i. Win-, part of 
owned by the United States, i. 
15 In; given to Mary Munjoy, i. 
255; formerly Munjoy' s island, i. 
225n, 257; mentioned, i. 42, 149, 
149n; 2. 85w. 
Houses built to preserve the archi- 
tecture of the garrison houses, 8. 
279. 
Housing, Peter, married Sarah Cloyes, 
I. 156; gave bonds for Julian 
Cloyes, I. 189; killed, i. 190n; his 
property, i. 1907i; part of his es- 
tate sold by his widow, i. 190n, 
244n; lived at Falmouth, i. 215; 
his petition cited, i. 310n,; his 
mother sold land to John Gustin, 
I. 310; connected by marriage 
with John Cloice, i. 310; lived at 
Presumpscot, i. 320. 

Peter jr., petitioned to Gov. An- 
dross, I. 190n. 

Sarah,gave evidence against Thomas 
Cloyes and Abigail Williams, i. 
189; mentioned, i. 190n. 
Houssatonnoc, 4. 129, 143. 
Houssatonnocs, the, 4. 123, 127, 133, 

137, 142. 
Houston, George Smith, 5. xxxvii. 

Samuel, 4. 324. 

Sarah, daughter of Samuel 4. 324. 

Sarah, wife of Samuel, 4. 324. 
Hovey, the Rev. Isaac, 4. 270; 7. 219. 

, of Falmouth, 3. 160n. 

Howard, Anne, married Edmund 
Gorges, 2. QQa. 

Asaph, 2. 123, 124. 

Brothers, the, 8. 275n. 

family, settled in Warren, 6. 21. 

Capt. James, in command at Fort 
Winslow, I. 503?i; 8. 283, 283n; 
became a judge, 8. 283n; men- 
tioned, 5. 417; 7. 184, 287; 8. 421, 
474. 



John, his daughter married Sir 
Edward Gorges, i. 109; 2.66a. 

Joseph, a lawyer in Limerick, i.329w. 

Judge Joseph, 4. 109, 275, 283; on 
the definition of Indian terms, 4. 
109, 110, 114-117. 

'N. G., teacher in Farmington Acad- 
emy, 8. 171. 

Robert, notary public, i. 126n; auto- 
graph of, I.. 127. 

Capt. Samuel, married Sarah Lith- 
gow, 5. 418, 421, 423; 8. 278, 283?i, 
287 ; in command at Fort Western, 
5. 366n, 368 ; his hospitality, 7. 415 ; 
a coasting captain, 8. 283n; of the 
firm of S. & W. Howard, 8. 283n; 
mentioned, 4. 283n. 

S. & W., traders at Fort Western, 8. 
283n. 

Sarah, married Thomas Bowman, 
5. 422-423. 

William, 4. 2SSn. 

Lieut. William, at Fort Halifax, 8. 
278; went on an errand to Gov. 
Pownell, 8. 28Sn; son of Capt. 
James, 8. 283n; brother of Capt. 
Samuel, 8. 283n; one of the firm 
of S. & W. Howard, 8. 283n; in 
the general court, 8. 28Sn; in the 
Bagaduce expedition, 8. 283n; 
died, 8. 283n. 

Wilson, 4. 2SSn. 

, of Canaan, 4. 370. 

, of Sebasticook, 4. 352. 

Howchins, Christian, signed the peti- 
tion to Charles 11, i. 401. 
Howe, John, 9. 3. 

Gen. Sir William, i. 521; 3. 197. 

Capt. , sent to join Col. N"oble, 

8. 128; wounded, 8. 141, 145, 146; 
treacherously killed, 8. 146; men- 
tioned, 8. 133, 136, 137, liO, 143. 
Howell, David, 2. 292; 4. 233; 8. 12. 

John, in the Black Point garrison, 
I. 227n; 3. 110; purchased the 
Shaw estate, 3. 26; lived at Black 
Point, 3. 83, 119. 

Morgan, his will proved, i. 99w; 
lived at Cape Porpus, i. lOOn, 185; 
submitted to the jurisdiction of 
Mass., I. lOOn; an action brought 
against, i.l85; appointed to set- 
tle the dispute about a boundary 
line, 1.361; a grand juryman, i, 
371; signed the petition to Crom- 
well, I. 395; mentioned, i. 99. 
Housatonick mountain, 4. 264. 
Hubbard, Dudley, 5. xxiv; 6. 364; 8. 
414. 

James 2. 119. 

Jeremiah, i. 352n; preached at 
Wells, I. 346; his salary, i. 346; 
Account of Wells, i. 336-361. 

the Rev. John, 4. 263. 

Capt. Jonas, i. 500, 525. 

Nathan, 4. 56. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



129 



Thomas, 2. 201; 4, 168. 

William, an original authority, 5. 
183; defects in his history, 5. 183; 
his map of New England lirst en- 
graved, 5. 26ln; Pemaquid on his 
map, 5. 261m; his History of New 
England cited, i. 35, 49, 144, 235; 
3. 35n, 6on, 104, 107, 111, 112, 167; 

5. 15371, 157n, 169, 173, 183, 197, 
198, 199, 204, 206, 220, 228, 234, 
235, 236, 248, 252, 252n, 310/i, 331; 

6. 231; 7. 45, 96, 96?i, 97, 100, 305, 
310, Smn, 313, 316; his Indian 
wars cited, 3. 18n. 

the Rev. William, 9. 24. 

, speaker of the House, 8. 226. 

Huddlestone, i. 504. 
Hudibras, the, an incident taken from 
an occurence in Weston's colony, 
2. 46an; cited, 7. 451. 
Hudson Charles, 8. 74. 

Jane, 4. 317. 

Polly, 4. 317. 

river, the, the destination of the 
Pilgrims, i. 33; 8. 200, 201; occu- 
pied by the Hollanders, 2. 40, 67; 
boundary of Lord Sheffield's pa- 
tent, 2. 54; value of the trade at, 
2. 6S7^ mentioned; i. 33, 528, 530- 

4. 114, 220, 285; 6. 384; 7. 153, 153n 
9. 349. 
Sally, 5. xxix. 
Samuel, 4. 317. 

Timothy, visited by Paul Coffin, 4. 
316, 350, 372; early settler of 
Winslow, 4. 317; his children 
baptized, 4. 317. 
Hudson's bay, discovered by Sebas- 
tian Cabot, 2. 15a; the country 
near called Terra Corterealis, 2. 
16a; mentioned, 4.97; 6.272; the 
Indians of and their language, 6. 
265-272. ^ ^ ' 

Bay Company, 6. 267. 
Hues, Philip, signed the petition to 

Charles 11, i. 402. 
Huggins, TuUy, 3. 212. 
Hughes, a corruption of Ap Hughes, 
6. 7. 
Edmund, 2. 194. 
Huguenot Church in Boston, 6. .384. 
Huguenots, at Falmouth, i. 276; at 
Salem, i. 211n; settled at St. 
Croix, 6. I75n; their form of 
worship, 6. 176^; with Du Monts, 
8. 320; refused to permit Jesuits 
in their ship, 8. 322; not liked by 
the kings, 9. 99; excluded from 
colonizing, 9. 100; mentioned, 9. 
101, 105. 
Hull, 2. 145, 187; 9. 30. 
Elder Elias, 7. 227. 
Isaac, of Kittery, 7. 223. 
Isaac, messenger of Arnold, i, 478. 
John, 9. 6, 30, 332; his widow mar- 

9 



ried Sir William Phipps, 2. 230; 

9. 6. 
John, diary of cited, 9. 324n, 332n. 
Mrs. John, married Sir William 

Phipps, 2. 230; 9. 6. 
Joseph, witnessed the deed of 

Gorges to Wheelwright, i. 344. 
the Rev. Joseph, disliked by Mass., 

9. 315, 315?i; lived at the Isles of 

Shoals, 9. 3l5n; sued by Godfrey, 

9. 316^, 375. 
Phineas, i. 268; 3. 235. 

Elder , 4. 375. 

Humboldt, Alexander Von, 6. 410. 

Baron William Yon, 6. 208. 
Hume, David, his History of England 

cited, 4. 90; 5. 266^2. 
Humfrey, John, letter from Sir Fer- 

dinando Gorges, i. 544-545. 
Humphreys, Catherine, 4. 309. 
Elizabeth McClintock, 4. 309. 
Jane, 4. 309. 
John, 2. 52, 57a. 
Lieut. John, i. 500, oOln, 524. 
Joseph, 4. 309. 
Moses, 2. 119. 
Robert, 2. 260, 264. 
Sam, an Indian, 6. 261. 

Gen. , 5. 323. 

the Widow , 4. 309. 

Hundred Associates, the, 9. 100. 

of Axstane, 9. 297n. 
Hungarian language, the, 9. 2QQn. 
Hunger, a remedy for, 3. 95. 
Hungerford, Sir Edmund, 7. 129^. 
Hunking, Mark, 3. 362. 
Hunnewell, Ambrose, 2. 193: k. 237n. 

240. ' 

Barnabas, 8. 52. 
family, 3. 212, 213: 
John, taken prisoner, 3. 151. 
Josiah, 3. 173. 
Richard, to be remunerated for 

maintaining Richard Moore, 3. 

78; a trustee of Scarborough, 3. 

129, 2.33; his tax of 1681, 3. 130; 

in charge of Black Point, 3. 137; 

a bitter enemy of the Indians, 3. 

144; called the Indian killer, 3. 

145; cause of his hatred, 3. 146; 

encounters with Indians, 3. 146- 

147; feared by the Indians, 3. 147; 

killed, 3. 148; mentioned, 3. 110, 

173, 212. 
Roger, death of, 3. 213. 
Roger jr., wounded at the capture 

of Louisburgh, 3. 172^, 213. 
Hunnewell' s point, Indian name of, i. 

29n; site of Popham's colony, i. 

29n; 5-336; mentioned, 2. 193: s. 

352. ^ 

Uunscomb, Tho., signed the petition 

to Charles 11, i. 401. 

Hunt, , an evil genius, 5. 268. 

Capt. Thomas, kidnapped twenty 

Indians, 2. 168; 7. 210 j carried 



130 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Hunt, Capt. Thomas — continued. 

tliem to Maligo, 7.21O; attempted 
to thwart Capt. John Smith, 7. 
323/1. 
Col. F. E., 8. 120, 120n. 

Pr. , 2. 251. 

George, signed the treaty of 1713, 

6. 256; autograph of, 6. 256. 
Mrs. F. E., 8. 120. 

Hunter, Capt. Adam, 7- 18^, 183, 184, 
193; 8. 251, 252, 255, 256n, 257- 
the Hon. R. M. T., 9. 241. 

^ of Farming ton, 4. 309. 

the sloop, prevented Arnold's cros- 
sing the river, i. .483, 484, 517; 
number of men onboard, 1.488; 
opposite Cape Rouge, i. 492, 493, 
497; her supposed destination, i. 
492-493; at Cape Sante, i. 492; 
497; returned to Quebec, 1.497, 
burned, 7. 126. 

Hunters, the, 4. 364. 

Hunting, Capt, i. 226. 

Huntington. Judge , of Connecti- 
cut, 7. 437. 

Hunton, Gov. Jonathan G., 7. 229; 8. 
46, 393, 394. 

Huntwith, 2. 77a. 

Hurl Gates, iu Sheepscott river, 6. 313. 

Hurons, the, their language dissimilar 
from other nations, i. 4l3^i; as 
traders, 2. 67; relation to the Del- 
awares, 6. 217 ; similar to the Ab- 
naki; 6. 217; had fixed villages, 6. 
218; mentioned, 4. 97; 6. 212. 

Hurts, abundant, 3. 293, 302; 5.158; 
same as wortleberries, 3. 293n. 

Huse, the Rev. Jonathan, 4. 326, 327, 
328, 329, 330, 364. 

Hussey, Stephen, claimed land at 
Sheepscot, 2. 236. 
, of Buckfield, 4. 390. 

Husted, the Rev. John B., preached 
in Bath, 2. 228. 

Huston, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 19. 

Hutchings, Charles, 9. 159. 
in the war of 1812, 9. 162. 
Lieut. IS'athaniel, i. 501 n. 
William, the last Revolutionary 
pensioner in New England, 9. 159, 
164; father of, 9. 159; birth of, 9. 
159; moved to Penobscot, g. 159, 
161; compelled to assist the 
British, 9. 160 ; fled to Kew Castle, 
9. 160; entered the army, 9. 160; 
mustered out but re-enlisted, g. 
160-161; pension granted to, 9. 
161; a methodist, 9. 161-162; his 
occupation, 9. 161 ; firm for the 
North in the Rebellion, 9. 162 ; an 
ovation to in Bangor, 9. 162-163; 
retained his mental faculties, 9. 
163; death of, 9. 159, 163; funeral 
of, 9. 163 ; remarks upon, 9. 163- 
165; Memoir of by Joseph Wil- 
liamson, 9. 157-165; mentioned, 
6. 126. 



Hutchinson, Ann, sister of John 
Wheelwright, 1.341; wife of Wil. 
liam, I. 341w; her maiden name, 
341n; went to Rhode Island, i- 
341n. 

Edward, son of Samuel, i. 341n; 
went to England, i. 342n. 

Edward, son of William, land at 
Wells granted to, i. 340-341, 352; 
a I'elative of Ann, i. 341, 341?i; his 
father, i. 342?i; date of his birth, 
I. 342?i; a speculator, i. 342n; 
prominent in the affairs of Mass., 
1 . 34271 ; his name not on the reords 
of Wells, I. 355; death of, i.342n. 

Eliakim, 4. 228; 8. 264; 9. 68. 

Elisha, speaker of the Mass. assem- 
bly, I. 266n, 267; married, 4. 411. 

Capt. Elisha, threatened the set- 
tlers of New Dartmouth, 5. 97-98; 
claimed land at Pemaquid, 5. 264. 

Mary, married the Rev. John Wheel- 
wright, i,Mln. 

Richard, son of Susannah, 1.3417?; 
went to England, i. S42n. 

Samuel, son of Susannah, i. 34l7i; a 
scholar in Boston, i. 342n. 

Susannah, came to Boston, i. 341n; 
her children, i. 341?2; died in 
Wells, I. 342n. 

Col. Thomas, one of the Fejepscot 
proprietors, 3. 321; in the expe- 
dition of 1707, against Port Royal, 
7. 77; mentioned, 6. 15. 

Gov. Thomas, a grandson of Elisha, 
4. 411; his house sacked, 5. Iviii; 
mentioned, 4. 145, 145?i, 148, 149, 
153, 154n, 155, 157, 161, 164, 166; 
5.386; 7. 216; his Collection of 
Papers relating to Mass. Bay Col- 
ony cited, I. 95, 174, 180, 182, 291, 
293, 296; 3. 11m, 153, 284n, 285, 
286n; 4. 220; 5. 228n, 232, 250n, 
251^1, 256n, 264n, 265w, 26771, 268n; 
7. 55n; 9. 326yi, 327n, 330n; his 
History of the Province of Mass. 
cited, I. 27, 28, 35, 49, 78, 79, 98, 
221, 229, 287; 2. 135, 168; 3. 63n, 
65n, 250n; 5. 186n, 190n, 220n, 
256w, 266;i, 269n, 275n, 278n, 281n, 
282?i, 283n, 285, 286n, 289n, 291n, 
295n, 296n, 299n; 6. 112n; 7. 29, 
29w, 46n, 61n, 63w, 68n, 75n, 76n, 
78w, 85m, 86W, 145n; 8. 192w, 302; 
9. 3, 36, 38, 48, 53, 54, 55m. 

William, son of Samuel, i. 341m; 
came to Boston, i. 341m; married 
Ann Marberry, i. 341m; a magis- 
trate, I. 342n; death of, i. 342m; 
his son, I. 342m. 

Judge ; sent a Pine Tree Shil- 
ling to England, 6. 119. 

the Rev. , 4. 385, 388. 

the Rev. , of Dover, 6. 286. 

Hyde, Anne, married James, Duke . 
of York, 7. 143; her two daugh- 
ters became queens, 7. 143. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



131 



Sir Edward, biographical notice of, 

7. 141n. 
Laurence, 7. 1417^. 
Zina, 2. 205, 212; death of, 6. 355. 

Quartermaster , i. 500. 

Hyler's cove, 6. 300. 
Hyppocrase, the tax of in 1674, 5. 250; 
near Booth Bay, 5, 250/i. 

Ic,e trade, 7* 414. 

Illinois, 4, 13; 5. 325n; 6. 64, 7. 369. 
Indians, 6. 217. 

Ilsley Henry, i. 118. 

Capt. Isaac, 4. 243; to build Fort 
Western, 7. 196-197; 8. 226/i; 
wages of, 8. 226n; article of agree- 
ment, 8. 226n; as a scout, 8, 226^; 
at the seige of Louisburgh, 8. 
226n; death of, 8, 226w. 

Immigration to Falmouth, i.276; of 
the Scotch-Irish to New Eno^land, 

6. 1-37. 

Imperial Post, the, extracts from, 6. 
325, 331. 

Inaugural address of William Willis, 
5. xvii-lxviii. 

Independence, war for, 4. 250; acts 
that led to it, 7. 162; see War of 
the Revolution. 

Independency, date of its origin, 6. 24. 

Independents, not favorable to Epis- 
copacy, 6. 27. 

India, Sebastian Cabot's proposed 
route to, 2. 14tt. 

Indiana, 8. 80. 

Indian affairs, council minutes con- 
cerning, 6. 91-93. 
confer-ence of 1752, 8. 21 In. 
corn, see corn and maize, 
deeds to F. Small, i. 118; prevailed 
over those given by the Duke of 
York, 2. 235; interfered with 
those of the Kennebec Purchase 
and Waldo Patent, 2. 237. 
grammar, 4. 96; see Eliot, John, 
killer, a nickname of Richard Hun- 

newell, 3. 145. 
life, fascination for it, 7. 113. 
pensioners, 8. 21 In. 

Indians, refused to adopt the manners 
of civilization, i. 8; became de- 
based, I. 8; interest taken in all 
that relates to their character, i. 
8-9; their hostilities fatal to the 
records, i. 98; the names which 
they gave to the territory pre- 
vailed over those given by the 
colonists, I. 65n; 2. 35a; g. 213; 
their name for the present state 
of Maine, i. 17a; the names given 
by them generally significant, 3. 
312; dress of, 2. 96; 7. 133, 133n 
their manners and customs, i. 211 

7. 342, 343; not to be trusted, 2 
239; superstitions, 5. 175; 7. 258 
had some show of religion, i. 229 



2. 94, 95; 3, 95, 96n, 99n; 7. 342; 
their intercourse with the cath- 
olic priests, i. 229; 2. 196; 6. 194; 
8. 276; firm to Catholicism, i. 446; 
8. 143-144; favored by the French, 
2.62; 5. 175; the result of the 
Catholic and Protestant influence, 
I. 446; 2. 148; French influence 
over, I. 287, 287n, 288, 434, 436, 
441-442; 2. 168, 272; 3. 134-135, 
150, 151, 152, 169-170; 4. 14, 73, 
74, 152; 5. 141, 175, 176, 242, 256, 
267, 281, 296; 6. 220; 7. 45, 66, 81, 
82, 83, 116; 8. 144, 298; 9. 42; the 
ability of the French to enter 
their mode of life, i.404; courted 
by Jesuits, i. 431, 435-436; 5. 175, 
176, 242, 278, 284; 6. 236; 7.45, 58, 
82; similarity and dissimilarity 
among, i. 413n; better than their 
French teachers, 5. 175, 242; de- 
bauched by Jesuits, 5. 242; used 
belts as tokens, i. 425; Rale lived 
with them, i. 442; called canni- 
bals, 2. 32a; mode of their burial 
of the dead, 2. 167; 3-95-96, lOOn; 
5. 188n-189n; had but little learn- 
ing, 3. 96; those of Maine and 
Massachusetts compared, 2. 271; 
their idea of landed property, 2. 
272-273, 5. 193; 9. 79; deeds from 
made void, 2. 273; described by 
Jocelyu, 3. 93-94; described by 
Champlain, 3. 99; described by 
Smith, 6. 232; knighted, 3. 99; 
names of some in Scarborough, 

3. 101; supposed to be natural 
swimmers, 3. 103; fleet footed, 3. 
109; good marksmen, 5. 242; 
those who met Columbus com- 
pared to those who met G-osnold, 
5. 143; whites married among, 7'. 
46 ; how their lands were acquired, 
5. 168-169, 193; the worst portion 
of their history charged to the 
English and French, 5. 194; the 
Pilgrims dealt fairly with them, 5. 
198; sold into slavery, 5. 251; 7. 
211; value of their trails, 5.325, 
325n; extent of their trails, 5. 327^ 
329 ; the Kennebec their highway, 
7. 215; the tribes of, countedi 
larger than they were, 6. 209; 
really only five nations in New 
England and Acadia, 6.211; de- 
grees of relationship among, ©. 
217; early intercourse with limit- 
ed to trade, 6. 231; taught at 
Boston, 6. 2S6; at Martha's Vine- 
yard, 6. 288 ; taught by the French 
to establish permanent villages, 7. 
22; their names confused by the 
early whites, 7. 100; guns used by, 
7. 113; 8. 285; division of time, 7] 
341-349; possibly knew the earth's 
movements, 7. 343; had some 



132 



MAINE HISTOKICAL SOCIETY. 



Indi ans — continued. 

knowledge of astronomy, 7,343; 
their observations depended on 
the moon, 7.344-346; seasons and 
months, 7. 344-345; days and 
weeks, 7. 347-348; always on good 
terms with the Acadians, 8. 143, 
144; only left their names behind, 
9. 213; Governor Lincoln's re- 
marks upon, I. 404, 405, 406; lan- 
guage of, remarks upon their lan- 
guage, I. 412-427; 2. 97; 4- 98; 6. 
222; beauties of, i. 415; used 
hieroglyphics, i. 425; 7-392-393; 
changes of, 1.426-427; difficulties 
in the study of, 4. 95, 96; aids in 
the study of, 4. 96; classed under 
four families, 4-97; the Lord's 
Prayer in, 5. 427-428; not in its 
infancy, 6.222; history of, aston- 
ished at the sight of a ship, 7. 
331 I33n; early trade with, 2. 28(x; 
3. 10; 5. 168; 6. 208, 231; 7. 320; 
(1605) shown in France, 5. 178; 1605, 
kidnapped and carried to Eu- 
rope, I. 109; 2. 17, 22a, 72a; 3. 297, 
301 ; 5.l44,144n, 157, 349, 350; 6.314; 
7. 134, 209, 210, 293; at the relig- 
ious worship of Weymouth, 6. 175, 
175n, 177n; could speak English 
words, 7. 134?? ; given to Gorges, 
2. 22a; 5. 157; in Gorges' family, 
2. 31a-32a; their reports of the 
country influenced Gorges, 2. 
22a-23a; assisted Gorges, 2.33a; 
returned on the ship with Oh al- 
longe, 2. 23a; accompanied Gil- 
bert to America, 2. 28a; traded 
with the expedition sent out by 
the Plymouth Company, 2. 2Sa; 
5. 168; hostile to the early colo- 
nists, 2.31a; 5.164-165; as guides, 
2. 31a-32a; distrusted, 3. 297, 298; 
visited the colonists at Sabino, 3. 
301; 7. 301; visited Sagadahoc, 3. 
302, 303; 6. 177; 7. 301; gave 
Champlain an account of the St. 
Lawrence, 7. 259, 260; did not 
live on the coast, 7.259,263; 
(1607) attended preaching at Sagada- 
(1614) hoc, 1607, 6. 177; captured, 
1614, and sold into slavery, 2. 
(1621) 168; traffic, 1621, with the Pil- 
grims, 7. 30; 8. 201, 202; dis- 
couraged Levett from making 
(1623) settlements, 1623, 2. 48a-49a, 
50a; visited Casco Bay, 2. 49a; 
traded at Pemaquid, 5. 168; 
(1625) sold land, 1625, to John Brown, 
9- 122, 123; Bagnall, 1628, trad- 
ed with, I. 151; ammunition 
(1636) sold to, 7. 31 ; 1636, those guilty 
of annoying the English to be 
killed, I. 84-85; 3. 37; to receive 
pay for injury done them by the 
(1640) English, 1. 85; 1640, conveyed 



land to the settlers of Wells, i. 
1.340,357,359; a noted chief 

(1641) at Wells, i. 340; 1641, owned as 
slaves by Gov. Winthrop, 7. 211 ; 

(1642) endeavored to dissuade Field, 
1642, in his journey to the 
White Mountains, 9. 209 ; name 

(1657-8) of those living near the moun- 
tains, 9.212; 1657, the earliest 
deed from, i. 118; 1658, had 
cleared land on the Ammon cog- 
gen river, i. 119; sold Jewell's 
island to Donnell, i. 148; John 
(1659) Brock sent in 1659, to preach 
(1666) among, 9. 327; deed to George 
Munjoy, 1666, 1.553; forboding 

(1674) of war, 1674, 5. 250; causes as- 
signed for the war, 5. 251 ; trade 
with at Pemaquid restricted, 8. 
186; assisted by the French, 5. 

(1675) 242, 251 ; attempt to disarm 
them, I. 210; first blood shed, 

I. 211; all restraint removed, i. 
211-212; first visitation of their 
revenge i. 212; war begun on the 
Kennebec, i. 223-224; 3. 103; 
killed Wakeley, i,212; withdrew 
to a distant place, i.214; attacked 
Saco but driven away, i. 213; 3. 
104; at Black Point, i. 213, 226, 
229; 3. 78, 104, 106, 108, 110-111; 
raid on Scarborough, i. 213; raid 
on Falmouth, i. 214; 6. 146, 147; 
caused the death of Edward 
Hutchinson, i. 342; broke up the 
settlement at Sheepscot, 2. 231; 
attacked Phillips' Garrison, 3. 104; 
killed Kobert Nichols, 3. 104; at- 
tacked Alger's house, 3.104; at- 
tacked Kittery, 3. 107; at Deer- 
field, 4. 262; scattered at the 
approach of the Mass. troops, 3. 
108; burned Jordan's house, 6. 
146-147, 189; the government 
proposed to attack, i. 214-215; 
sued for peace, i. 215; 3. Ill, 123; 
tribes engaged in the war, i. 215- 
218; the treaty not satisfactory, 
3.111-112; sold into slavery, 5. 
251 ; warned by Earthy, 5. 251- 
252 ; assisted by the government at 
Albany, 5. 257, 258; war re- 

(1676) sumed, 1676, i. 218; depreda- 
tions of, 1. 219, 223, 224; cap- 
tured the fort at Arrowsic, i. 224; 
repulsed at Jewell's island, i. 
224-225; soldiers sent against, i. 
226; assaulted Black Point, i. 226, 
229; captured a vessel at Bich- 
raond's island, i. 227; reason for 
their success, i. 228; had less 
fighting men than the English, i. 
229; killed Munjoy, 1. 258; de- 
stroyed settlements above Swan 
island, 2. 279; killed Kobert Cor- 
bin, 1, 121; drove Purchase from 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



133 



Pejepscot, 3. 318; drove Cooke 
from the Kennebec, 5. 23 7n; sold 
into slavery, 5. 251; jealous, 5. 
251 ; sale of ammunition forbidden, 
5. 252, 253; depredations in Dev- 
onshire county, 5. 253; assisted 
by the French, 5. 256, 2b6n; 
treacherously slain, 6. 237; at- 

(1677) tacked Black Point, 1677, 3. 112 ; 
repulsed, 3. 112-113; attacked 

and killed Swett, 3. 113; retired, 
3. 113; friendly Indians sent 
against, 3. 107, 113; number slain, 
3. 114; peace with, 5. 259; captives 
returned, 5. 259-260; checked by 
Andros, i. 230; trade at Pema- 
quid, 5. 15-16; trade with re- 
stricted, 5. 18, 19-23, 33, 35-36, 37, 
260; 8. 186; laws of Kew York 
concerning, 5. 19, 22, 260; to 

(1678) receive, 1678, a corn tribute, 3. 
102; proposals for a peace, i. 

230; peace concluded, i. 241; 3. 

115; 5-27; hostilities renewed, i. 

275, 277, 281, 287, 288; cause of 

(1679) the war of 1679; i. 287; per- 
suaded to exterminate the 

English, I. 287-288; promised 

French assistance, 1.288; number 

of, 1 . 288 ; order for restraining, 

5. 43, 48; trouble, 1681, from 

(1681) feared, 5. 48; the revenue re- 
ceived from the trade with to 
be applied to Fort Loyal, i. 

(1682) 265-266; purchased, 1682, liquor 
from Seacomb, i. 259; drove, 

(1683) 1683, John PhilHps from Fal- 
jnouth, 1. 121 ; affidavits concern- 
ing, 5. 60-65; assisted by the 
French, $.63; trade with restrict- 
ed, 5. 75; traded with smug- 

(1685) glers, 8. 187; attacked, 1685, 
North Yarmouth, 3. 135; de- 
plorable condition of the peo- 

(1686) pie, 3. 138-139; over-run Booth 
Bay, 1686, 6. 155; seized at Saco, 

(1688) I. 288; sent to Falmouth, 1. 
288; troops sent against, 1.288; 

unsuccessful attack upon Gendall, 
I. 289; first blood shed, i. 289; 
Gendall killed, i. 289; prisoners 
taken, i. 289; Andros' proclama- 
tion concerning, i. 290; joined 
by the French, i. 291; 5-267; cap- 
tured Pemaquid, i. 291, 436; 6. 
283; 7. 156, 159,341; 8.186; at- 
tempt to blow up a fort, 3. 320n; 
considered Andros their friend, 
5. 268; Andros in conference with, 
7. 55; did not drink brandy at 
Pemaquid, 7. 341; number of, 

(1689) 1689, in Mass., i. 286n; attacked 
'Baco, I. 291; friendly ones acci- 
dentally attacked, i. 292, 294, 296, 
804; Church sent against, 1.292, 
293; prize offered for each one 



^ killed, I. 293; at Peak's island, i. 
293; at Palmer's island, i. 293n; 
prepared to attack Church, i. 
293-294; repulsed, i. 294-295; 3. 
135-136; number of killed, i. 294; 
fled to the forest, i. 296; de- 
stroyed Dover, 3. 135; destroyed 
Sheepscot, 3. 135; destroyed the 
garrison at Falmouth, 3. 137; 
killed Thomas Gyles, 3. 314n,, 355; 
at Pemaquid, 3. 314n; 5. 272; col- 
lision at North Yarmouth, 7.57; 
carried to Fort Loyal, 7. 57; cap- 
tured Fort William Henry, 7. 159; 
killed Patishall, 8. 194n; re- 

(1690) newed, 1690, their depredations, 
1 . 297 ; destroyed Schenectady, 

I. 297; 7. 59; 9. 26; Salmon Falls 
village destroyed, i. 297; 9-27; 
killed Thaddeus Clarke, i. 299; 
captured Fort Loyal, i. 299; 3. 
137; unsuccessfully attacked the 
friendly Indians, i. 304; killed 
John Freeze, i. 310; flight of the 
people at Scarborough, 3. 137-138; 
Falmouth destroyed by, 6. 191 ; 9. 
27 ; supposed to have been as- 

(1691) sisted by St. Castine, 7. 61 ; at- 
tacked, 1691, Storer's garrison, 

7. 115-116; defeated, 7. 116; in- 
stigated by the French, 7. 116; a 
time to try men's souls, 7. 118- 
119; attack upon Wells, 5. 133; 
sued for peace, 5. 281 ; afraid of 

(1692) Sir William Phipps, 2. 239; Maj. 
Church, 1692, sent against, 5. 

330-331; killed Capt. Chubb, 7. 

65-66; overawed by Fort William 

Henry, 9. 62; swore allegiance to 

William and Mary, 9. 42 ; signed, 

(1693) 1693, the treaty with Phipps, 2. 
239 ; 5. 283 ; promised to forsake 

the French, 5. 283; broke the 
treaty, 5. 283-284; under the gov- 
ernment of France, 5. 286, 295; 

(1695) obliged, 1695, to be peaceable, 
5.287; fatal distemper among, 

5. 287; in prison at Boston, 5. 287- 

288; treachery of the English, 5. 

292-293; at Pemaquid, 1696, 2. 

(1696) 240; 5. 134, 283, 284-285, 287; 

(1697) unsuccessful preparations to, 
1697, attack the English, 7. 5; 

(1699) made, 1699, a peace with the 
settlers, i. 434; 3. 139; to be 
used by Canada against the En- 
glish, 6. 238; grants to, 6. 238- 

(1702) 239; pledged, 1702, not to take 
part in Queen Anne's war, 3. 

(1703) 140; broke the pledge, 3. 140; 
attacked, 1703, Casco, 3- 140;, 

attacked Wells, 3. 140; attacked 
Black Point, 3. 140-141; led bf 
Beaubasin, 3. 140-141; attempted! 
undermining, 3. 140;. retreat of, 
3. 141-142; Pine and Hunnewell's. 



134 



MAI^E HISTOEICAL SOCIETY. 



Indians — continued. 

power against, 3. 144-147; afraid 
of Hunnewell, 3. 1^7; killed Hnn- 
newell, 3. 148; on friendly terms 
with the English, 3. 148; captured 
a sloop, 3. 345 ; captured Wil- 
(1704) liams, 4. 262; destroyed, 1704, 
Deerfield, 6. 239; destroyed 
Haverhill, 6. 239; St. Castine in- 
vested with authority over, 7. 
(1713) 81; treaty of, 1713, 6. 250-253; 
(1717) destroyed, 1717, the house of 
Elkins, 2. 205; conference with 
the whites, 3. 351 ; sued for peace, 
3. 362; assisted by the French, 3. 
370; desired a trading house, 3. 
372, 384; wanted an interpreter, 
3. 372; wanted a locksmith, 3. 
372; desired supplies, 3. 374; 

(1719) denied, 1719, the right of the 
Sagamores to convey lands, 

(1720) 9- 79; depredations, 1720, re- 
newed, 3. 149-150; influenced 

by Kalle, 3. 150; objected to the 
building of a fort on the Kenne- 
bec, 3. 352; objected to further 
settlements, 3. 352, 388, 389; 
boundary line proposed, 3. 352; 
charters obliged the civilization 
of, 3. 352; to be persuaded to be 

(1721) friendly to the English, 3. 353; 
attacked, 1721, at Norridge- 

wock, 2. 196-197; destroyed at 
the Kennebec, 2. 197-198; confer- 
ence with Penhallow, 7. 83; 

(1722) threatened the English, 7. 84; 
war, 1722, declared, 3. 150; 8. 

114n: attacked Black Point, 3. 
150; burned Brunswick, 2. 197; 3. 
313, 313n; 6. 16; massacre of, 3. 
313; captured families at Merry- 
meeting bay, 6. 16; at George- 
town, 6. 16; hostilities begun, 8. 
114n, lion; at Merrvmeeting, 

(1723) 8. 115n, 284; attacks, 1723, upon 
the seaboard settlements, 3. 

150; people taken prisoners or 
killed at Scarborough, 3. 151 ; their 
place of rendezvous. 3. 313; met 
and massacred, 3.313-314; Fort 
Richmond built as a check to, 8. 
206; built a village at Penob- 

(1724) scot falls, 7.5; four companies, 
1724, sent against, 3. 152; their 
condition in New France, 6. 239- 

(1725) 240; treaty of, 1725, executed, 
3. 152, 169; 5. 37271 ; objected, 

(1726) 1726, to settlements east of the 
Pemaquid, and north of Arrow- 
sic, 3. 388, 389; disputes with to 
be settled by arbitration, 3. 393; 

hindered the settlement of 

.(1727) Thomas ton and Warren, 9. 79- 

80; letter, 1727, to Gov. Dum- 

mer, 3. 407-408; answer to the 

same, 3.410-411; want a gun- 



(1735) smith, 3. 433; treaty of 1735, 4. 

(1741) 123-124; people of Maine, 1741, 

(1742) afraid of, 8. 241 ; captured, 1742, 

(1744) prisoners at Swan island, 4. 380; 
captured, 1744, prisoners at 

(1745) Keen and Concord, 6. 241 ; war 
of 1745 declared, 3. 170; 8. 123; 
petty depredations, 3, 170; 

(1746) bounty offered for scalps, 3. 
170n; attacked, 1746, Gorham, 

2. 147; 8. 276n; destroyed Waldo- 
borough, 5. 403; to co-operate 
with the French at the attack of 
Annapolis, 8. 126; withDePtam- 

(1747) zay, 8. 130, 132; depredations, 
1747, at Scarborough, 3. 170; 

attacked Noble at Minas, 8. 139; 

143; moved towards Falmouth, 3. 

171 ; only waylaid travelers, 3. 

(1748) 173; peace, 1748, concluded, 3. 

(1749) 175; killed, 1749, Smith, a Ger- 
man, 7. 326-327; treaty of 1749, 

(1750) 4. 145-149; attacked Fort Rich- 

(1751) mond, 1750; 8. 212; treaty con- 

(1752) eluded, 1751, 8. 213; treaty of 
1752, 4. 168-184; want a gun- 
smith, 4. 182; their fishing dis- 
turbed, 4. 177, 178; complained 

of English hunters, 4. 178; want 

(1754) a bridge, 4. 181 ; Fort Halifax, 
1754, built to awe them, i. 460; 

8. 273; attacked a party at Fort 
Halifax, 7. 171-172; 8. 243, 270; 
formed a design with the French 
to attack the fort, 7. 169, 184; en- 
couraged to capture prisoners for 
ransom, 7. 170; dogs used as spies 
against, 7. 327; threats of, 8. 216, 
225; engage to break up JEnglish 
settlements, 8. 220-221; objected 
to the building of Fort Halifax, 

(1755) 8. 243; war, 1755, declared, 8. 
271 ; intended to attack the peo- 
ple on the Kennebec, 7. 186; 

burned a house at Frankfort, 8. 

(1756)267; captured, 1756, Benjamin 

Hilton, 4. 345 ; attack fishermen, 

(1757) 8. 271; acknowledge, 1757, al- 
legiance to Quebec, 8. 215 ; the 

(1758) Kennebec their highway, 8. 215 ; 
unsuccessfully, 1758, attack 
Fort George, 5. 367n; pretend, 

(1759) 1759, to desire a treaty, 5. 369; 
would not acknowledge George 

II, as king, 5. 372; attacked by 
Cargill, 5. 369; detected in steal- 
ing provisions, 5, 373-374; Pow- 
nall's speech to, 5. 376-377; 

(1760) made, 1760, a wilderness of 
Maine, 4. 73; assisted by the 

French, 4. 73 ; diminished and dis- 
couraged, 4. 74; attacked New 

Gloucester, 2. 152; end qf their 
(1764) united efforts, 2. 199; had, 1764, 

a conference with Mitchell, 8. 

9 ; showed the correct Eiver St. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



135 



(1766) Croix, 8. 9; depredations, 1766, 
at Bath, 2. 206; accompanied 
Montressor, i. 448, 450, 451, 454, 
(1775)459, 462; held the Penobscot 
territory, 1775, with tenacity, 7. 
7; their claims recognized, 7. 7; 
treaty with Mass., 7. 7-8; settle- 
ment of their country, 7. 8; with 
Arnold, i. 469, 480, 488, 515, 524; 
eml^raced the king's side, 7. 204; 
(1781) raid, 1781, on Bethel, 9- 213; 
(1786) Mass. sent a commission to ob- 
tain concessions from, 7. 8; con- 
ference with, 7. 8-11, 13-18; later 
controversy, 7-19; relinquish, 
(1797) 1797, land to Mass., 7. 19; 
(1818) claimed title to timber land, 
1818, 7. 19; released all the Pe- 
(1820) nobscot territory, 7. 20; Maine, 
(1862) 1820, resumed the treaty of, 7. 
20; suffering, 1862, among, 7. 
348-349; mentioned, 3. 355, 358; 

4. 290, 307, 308, 312, 325, 338, 348; 

5. 168; 6. 17, 131; 7. 25, 56n, 57, 
57>i, 63; 8. 215, 227, 230, 231, 276, 
276n, 282; 9. 2, 7, 18, 19; of Hud- 
son's bay and their language, 7. 
265-272. History of the Christian 
Indians, see Gookin, and see ab-- 
origin es. 

India street, Portland, formerly King's 
street, i . 242 ; called Broad street, i . 
243?i, 279 ; owners of lo^s bounded 
by, I. 246, 247; only place of busi- 
ness, I. 279; home of Peter Mor- 
rell, I. 313;*home of Jonathan 
Otis, I. 314n; mentioned, i. 246, 
253, 300n; 7. 59. 

Indian terms and English definitions, 
5. 425-429. 
tribes, see Abenaquis, Algonquins, 
Almonchiquoes, Amalingans, 
Amelecites, Ammariscoggins, 
Amonoscoggins,Anaseganticooks, 
Androscoggins, Armonchiquois, 
Arresagunticooks, Assagunti- 
cooks, Assinee-Poetuc, A u y- 
oummowetts, Bashabas, Cagna- 
wagas, Cannibas Cape Sables, 
Cascoes, Cherokees, Chippeways, 
Cowasacks, Delawares, Essegon- 
tegogs, Esquimaux, Etchemins, 
Five Nations, Houssatonnacs, 
Hurons, Illinois, Iroquois, Kani- 
bals,, Kanibas, E:enabes, Kenne- 
becs, Kinibekki, Lenape, Lenapis, 
Lenni-Lenape, Linnopee, Louis, 
Island, Machias, Mahigans, Ma- 
licites, Maquas, Mareschites, Mas- 
sachisans, Massachusetts, Men- 
gwe, Men of the East, Micmacs, 
Mohawks, Mohees, Monhegans, 
Montagnaises, Montagrets, Nar- 
ragansetts, Naudawissees, Ne- 
heth-aw-a, Norridgewocks, Ochi- 
pawas, Oldtown, Openangos, Os- 



sipees, Otchebwe, Owenagungas,. 
Paegan, Papinachis, Paquakigs, 
Passamaquoddy, Pawkunnaw- 
kuts, Pennatuckets, Pennecooks, 
Pequakets, Pequods, Piquackets, 
Quoddies, Sacoes, St. Francis, St. 
Johns, Saquenets, Scatacooks, 
Scantacooks, Seconets, Senecas, 
Shawanoes, Six Nations, Soccokis, 
Sockhigones, Sokokies, Souhe- 
gans, Souriquois, Suriquois, Sus- 
see, Sybayks, Tarrentines, TJnna- 
goungos, Wabanaki, Wabenakies, 
Wambesitts, Wampanoags, Wan- 
banaghi, Wanbanakkie, Wapan- 
ack, Wawenocks, Wepanachki, 
Weweenocks, Woenoeks, Wowe- 
nocks, 
treaties in full, of 1717, 3- 361-365; 
of 1726, 3. 377-345; of 1727, 3. 
407-447; see also under treaties, 
troubles of 1702-1704, Papers Re- 
lating to, 3. 343-350. 
wars of 1675-6, 2. 79, 83, 102, 183, 
210; 4. 222, 223, 411 ; 6. 146; of 1680, ' 
6. 132; of 1689, i. 287; 6. 132; of 
1721,2.196; of 1722, 6. 16; of 1753- 
4, 5.421, 423; 7. 327; of 1760, 2. 
183; History of see Hubbard. 
Indies, the, 2. 13a, 18; 5. 309; 6. 120n. 
Industry, 7. 277, 285. 
Ingalls, Henry, i. 243, 246- 

Dr. Theodore, 6. 355, 373. 
Ingersoll, Abigail, daughter of John, 
I. 311; married a Blacey, i. 312. 
Benjamin, son of Joseph, i. 311; 
returned to Falmouth, i . 311 ; sold 
land to Phineas Jones, i. 311; 
moved to Yarmouth, i. 311. 
Charles Jered, 8. 88. 
Daniel, sold land to Moses Pearson, 
1.246,311; a son of George, i. 
311; a shipwright, 1. 311; lived 
on Willow street, i. 311; moved 
to Boston, I. 311. 
Deborah, daughter of John, i. 311; 
date of her birth, i. 311; married 
Benjamin Larrabee, i. 311. 
Deborah, widow of John, i. 311. 
Elisha, son of John, i. 311; moved 

to Falmouth, i. 311. 
Ephraim, i. 311. 
Elizabeth, two children of George 

of the same name, i. 311. 
Elizabeth, wife of George, i. 311. 
family, moved to Salem, i. 200n. 
George, lived at Falmouth, i. 112, 
114, 185, 197; signed the submis- 
sion to Mass., I. 112; birth of, i. 
113, 311; date of his arrival not 
known, i. 113; as a witness, i. 
121; purchased land of Cleeves, i. 
121-122, 243; signed the petition 
to the king, i. 180, 402; action 
brought against, 1. 185; took an 
inventory of Skellings' estate, i. 



136 



MAINE HISTOKICAL SOCIETY. 



IngersoU, George — continued. 

194; a juror, i. 197; military of- 
ficer of Falmouth, i. 197; father 
of George jr., i. 205, 246; built a 
sawmill, i.205; arrived too late 
to rescue Thomas Wakelej, i. 212, 
213; lived at Capisic, i. 213, 216, 
321; his house burned, i. 214; 
his son killed, i. 214; moved to 
Salem, i. 217, 311; land granted 
to, I. 242, 252; had a corn mill at 
Capisic, I. 243n; had a mill at 
Barberry Creek, i. 243n, 269; 
selectman of Falmouth, i. 245, 
324; his land sold by his son, i. 
246; urged the government to 
send assistance to Casco, i. 292; 
in consultation with Major 
Church, I. 296; troops stationed 
near his house, i. 298; probably 
descended from Richard of Salem, 
1. 311 ; lived at Gloucester, i. 311 ; 
children of, 1.311; sold land to 
Timothy Lindall, i.311; date of 
his death unknown, i. 311; fur- 
nished boards for the meeting 
house, I. 323; mentioned, i. 123, 
204,253; 3-70, 120, 121. 
George jr., son of George, i. 204, 
205, 311; had a grist mill, i. 205; 
had a house at Capisic, i. 204, 205, 
216, 321; killed, 1.217; petitioned 
to the general court, i. 253; con- 
veyed his interest in the sawmill 
to Silvanus Davis, i.253; brother- 
in-law of John N'icholson, i. 322 
George 3d, a shipwright, i. 311; 
lived in Boston, i.311; returned 
to Falmouth, i. 311; died in Bos- 
ton, I. 311; lived at one time at 
Stroudwater, i. 311; father of 
David, 1.311. 
Joel, son of Samuel, i. 312. 
John, settled on the IS'eck, i. 155- 
156; a witness against Jordan, i. 
172; signed the petition to the 
king, I. 180; settled between the 
Round Marsh and Capisic, i. 205; 
purchased land of George Munjoy, 
I. 205; at Capisic, i. 216, 242, 311, 
321; land granted to, 1.242; pe- 
titioned to the general court, i. 
253; conveyed his interest in the 
sawmill to Silvanus Davis, x. 253; 
John Corney lived with, i. 308; 
moved to Kittery, i. 311; died, i. 
311; children of, 1.311; furnished 
boards for a meeting house, i. 
323; mentioned, i. 249. 
John jr., I. 311. 

Joseph, land belonging to in pos- 
session of Anthony Brackett, i. 
154; settled on the Neck, i. 155- 
156; married, i. 154, 312; land 
granted to, i. 243; signed petition 
to Gov. Bradstreet, i. 283n; a son 



of George, i. 311, 312; received a 
grant from Danforth, i. 312; died 
at Gloucester, i. 312; signed the 
petition to Charles ii, i. 402; men- 
tioned, I. 204. 
Judith, wife of Samuel, i. 312. 
Mary, daughter of John, married 

Low, I. 311. 
Nathaniel, i. 311. 
Rachel, daughter of John, i. 311; 

married John Chapman, i. 311. 
Richard, probably the ancestor of 
the Maine Ingersolls, i. 311; sent 
to Salem, i. 113, 311. 
Samuel, land granted to, i. 243; 
John Coney lived with, i. 308; a 
son of George, i.311; sold land 
to Mary Sargent, i. 311; lived at 
Stroudwater, i.311; date of his 
death unknown, 1.311; in King 
Philip' s war , 1 . 312 ; a shipwright, 
in Gloucester, i.312; his sons, i. 
312; lived at Capisic, i.321; men- 
tioned, I, 246, 255, 315. 
Samuel jr., married in Gloucester, 
1.312. 
Ingles, Elizabeth, married Benjamin 
Bream, i. 252?^. 
Jane, married John Smith, i. 2527i. 
Joanna, married James Grant, i. 
252?i. 

, lived at Boston, i. 252n; a 

master mariner, i. 252?i; died, i. 
252w; children of, i.252?i; land at 
Nonsuch Point granted to, i. 252. 
Ingraham, Abigail, €. 338. 
Beniali, early settler of Augusta, 8. 
338; his daughter married Capt. 
Seth Williams, 8. 338. 
Joseph H., purchased land of Wil- 
liam Tyng, 6. 133; opened State 
Street, 6. 133; built a fine house, 
6. 133. 
Zilpha, married Capt. Seth Williams, 
8. 338. 
Ingram, Samuel D., 8. 425. 
Inhabitants of Casco in 1632, i.55; 
1658, I. 105, 130, 141, 144, 155, 180; 
1675, I. 215, 236, 283, 319; names 
of, I. 76, 236, 319; of Bath, 2.220; 
of Belgium, 4. 12 ; of Black Point, 
3. 67; of Connecticut, 4. 12; of 
Fryeburgh in 1768, 4. 282; of 
Great Britain, 4. 12; of Maine, 4. 
11-12, 13; of Massachusetts, 4. 
12, 13; of New Jersey, 4. 12; of 
New York, 4. 12-13; of Rhode Is- 
land, 4. 12; see also families. 
Inman, Ralph, 9. 93. 
Inner Temple, the, 6. 49. 
Inns at Black Point kept by David 
Ring, 3. 221, 222; site of, 3. 222; 
frolic at, 3. 222; at Gardiner, 7. 
414; see Ordinary. 
Instructions for the settlement of 
Pemaquid, 5. 76-81 ; to Capt. Man- 
ning as sub-collector, 5. 120-125. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



137 



Intemperance, four men fined for, i, 
84, 551-552; tended to overthrow 
trade, 2. 43; in early Maine, 4. 
23; much abated, 7. 274. 

Intervals, the, called the meadovrs, 4. 
262. 

Ipswich, home of Nicholas Farley, i. 
246; home of Lawrence Davis, i. 
309; home of James Davis, i. 309 : 
home of Thomas Wells, i. 354; 
John Cogswell settled at, 5. 218; 
John Dean settled at, 6. 864; men- 
tioned, I. 39; 2. 138, 141; 3. 153n, 
207, 219; 4. 242n, 273, 354; 5, 183, 
198; 6. 364, 367, 368, 384; 7. 203, 
237; 8.279; 9.88. 

Iracoyce, see Iroquoise. 

Ireland, Thaddeus Clarke supposed 
to have been born in, i. 155, 308; 
the Jordan name common in, i. 
234n; Peter Bowdoin lived in, i. 
276; some of the early settlers of 
Limerick came from, i. 327; prot- 
estants settled in, 6.5-6; coloni- 
zation of occasioned by Stuart 
persecution, 7. 7-8; improved by 
the Scotch immigration, 7. 8; 
royalty jealous of, 7. 8; industry 
in restricted, 7. 8, 9; annual emi- 
gration from to America, 6. 10; 
people from the north of arrived 
in Maine, 6. 21, 22; the Presby- 
terian population of in 1734, 6. 
28; mentioned, 2. 204, 243, 257, 
261, 265n, 284; 3. 208, 212, 217, 
220, 227, 232, 325, 327, 373, 396, 
397, 417, 421, 422, 424, 447; 4. 123, 
160, 161; 5. 5, 26, 49, 113, 125, 150, 
207, 358, 421; 6. 4, 11, 15, 18, 25, 
26, 27 32, 4Sn, 58n, 124, 139, 141, 
157, 167, 250, 260; 7. 204, 283, 334, 
367, 406; 8. 110, llln, 114, 284; 9. 
225, 245. 
Maine, 6. 15. 

Ireland's History of Kent cited, 9. 298. 

Irish, the, placed under English legis- 
lative dependence, 6. 8; hated by 
England, 6. 13; settled in Maine, 
6.3; 8. 151, 298. 
James, 8. 30, 72. 

, married Mary P. Phinney, 2. 

148. 

Iron in New England, 2. 98. 

refinery in North Yarmouth, 2. 181. 

Iroquois, the language of dissimilar 
from that of other Indians, i. 4lSn; 
the Abnakis feared an attack from, 
I. 433; Three Elvers defended 
from, I. 435; their country called 
Laconia, 2. 66 ; conquered by the 
Algonquins and French, 2. 67; 
their totemship, 6. 263; clans 
among, 6. 263; still one band, 6. 
263; Cadillac among, 6. 276; at- 
tempted to reach Canada, 6. 281 ; 
opposed by the Abnaki, 6. 281; 



favored by New York, 6. 281 ; sub- 
dued, 7.42; mentioned, 4. 97, 114, 
5. 175; 6.212, 240. 
Lake of the, see Lake of the Iro- 
quois. 

Irving, Washington, 2. 187, 

Isabella of Castile, 6. 120n. 

Island of Cape Breton, included 
in Sir William Alexander's grant, 

1. 34; passed into the hands of 
the French, 8. 313; mentioned, 8. 
116, 117?i, 125, 127. 

of Damariscove, Jno. Sellman lived 
on, 8. 193; claimed by Patishall, 

8. 193-194. 

of Flores, 3. 290. 

of Grand Menan, 4. 43. 

of Manhattan, 5. 8. 

of St. Croix, Du Monts passed a 

winter at, 2. 20a; mentioned, 7. 

252, 255, 257. 
of St. George, named by Weymouth, 

2. 22a. 

of St. Johns, 8. 135. 
Islands of Errus, 9. 367. 

of Maine, within the limits of Fal- 
mouth, I. 45, 145, 152; in Casco 
bay to pay tax to Falmouth, i. 
152; sold to Mass., 2. 258, 261; 
used as fishing stations, 3. 9-10. 
Isle axi Haut, see Isle Haute. 

aux Corneilles, Champlain at, 7. 257; 
origin of the name, 7. 257. 

aux Margos, Champlain at, 7. 250; 
origin of the name, 7. 250; now 
Wolves, 7, 250. 
Isleboro, islands of, 5. 347. 
Isle de Bacchus, 1', Champlain at, 7. 
260, 265; origin of the name, 7. 
260; now Eichmond's island, 7. 
260. 

de la torture, 7. 257. 

Haute, 7. 98n, 253, 255, 263, 265. 

of Assumption, 8. 319. 

of Capawocke, 2. 258, 261. 

of Jersey, i. 244. 

of Ehe, 7.32; 9. 101. 

of St. John the Baptist, now Ortel- 
ius, 2. 76a. 

of Shoales, Levett at, i.42n; 2.48a, 
79; 5.167; ships at, i. 55; pre- 
sented for not attending to the 
order of the court, i. 184-185; 
belonged to the Province of 
Maine, 2. 70; described, 2. 79 
half of sold to Mass., 2. 258, 261 

9. 315, 31591 ; fishing business at. 
4. 23 ; part of annexed to Kittery, 
4. 204 ; unprofitable, 4. 204 ; Mass, 
claimed jurisdiction over, 6. 181 
Cutt engaged in fishing at, 8. 294 
controversy concerning, 9. 315 
the people of royalists, g. 315n 
home of Joseph Hull, 9. 315n 
Hull's controversy with Godfrey, 
9. 316n; the Eev. John Brook 



138 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Isle of Shoales — continued. 

preached at, g. 328w; mentioned, 
5. 167; 7.262. 
of the Desert Mountain, so named 
by Champlain, 7.28; the Jesuits 
made a harbor at, 7. 28; see 
Mount Desert, 
of Wight, 2. 27, 
Percee, 7. 49. 

Isles Rangees, Les, named by Cham- 
plain, 7. 252. 

Israelites, the, 3. 853; 6. 2.37. 

Italy, 4. 11; 7. 410; 8. 351; 9.245, 246. 

Iteansir, 6. 253 ; signum of, 6. 255. 

Ives, the Rev. Alfred E., 9. 163. 

Jackman, Elizabeth, married Dr. 

Cleaveland, 6. 385. 
Jackoit, 6. 258; signum of 6. 256. 
Jackson, 9. 214. 
Andrew, 6. 75; 7. 459, 465; 8. 47, 
102, 347, 348, 350, 352, 355, 370, 
414, 415, 423, 4.35, 436; 9. 175, 176. 
Benjamin, deputy for Gov. Phipps, 

9. 48-49, 50. 
Charles, 6. 364. 
Dr. Charles T., 6. 347; his Geology 

of Maine cited, 5. I76n, 189^. 
Eleanor, widow of John, 3. 74, 288; 

married Jonas Bailey, 3. 74. 
Henry, 4.6; 8. 16. 
John, early settler of Blue Point, 3, 
74, 83, 232; his widow married 
Jonas Bailey, 74. 
the Rev. Lemuel, 4. 355. 
Party, the vote of in Minot, 2. 128, 

129. 
Robert, 9. 305n. 
Sarah, 4. 265. 

, of Newberry, i. 468. 

, tutor, 4. 265. 

Jackson's Landing, 9. 132-133, 153. 
Jacob family in the witchcraft tragedy, 
I. 246. 
John, land granted to, i. 244; lived 

at Cohasset, i. 246n. 
Nathaniel, land granted to, i. 244, 
246. 

, killed, 4. 287. 

Jacques, Lieut. Richard, killed Ralle, 
1. 412ii; 2. 198; 3. 152n, SISti; mar- 
ried Sarah Harmon, 3. 3l3n; 
wounded, 3. 313w; died, 3. 3l4ji; 
came from Newbury, 3. 3i4n, 
Jaffrie, Diggerie, signed the petition 

to Charles 11, i. 402. 
Jail at Casco, 1. 166; Fort Loyal to be 

used as one, i. 270-271. 
Jakins, a guide for Arnold, i. 510. 
Jamaica, i.551; 3. 167; 5- 134; 6. 100; 

9. 13, 350. 
Jamblln, the Rev. Robert, his assist- 
ance acknowledged, 9. 298n, 300w, 
335n. 
James i, gave a grant to the Plymouth 
Company, i. 32; 3, 265-266,274; 



7. 27, 129n; 8. 200; 9. 225; gave 
grant to Sir William Alexander, 
I. 33; 6. 336; 7. 27; 9. 100; coins 
of his reign found at Richmond's 
island, i. 43; 6. 130; his patent 
for New England the civil basis 
of all subsequent patents, i. 78; 
restored Sir Ferdinando Gorges 
to office, I. 109; became king, 2. 
15, 16; compared to Solomon, 2. 
16; his right to give the charter 
disputed, 2. 41a; dismissed the 
parliament, 2. 41a; granted the 
Sheepscot country in the patent 
to North and South Virginia, 4. 
221 ; present at a meeting of the 
Plymouth Company, 5-169; letter 
from George Popham to, 5. 357- 
360; desired to repeople Ulster 
with Protestants, 6. 5 ; subscribed 
to the Scotch creed, 6. 25 ; granted 
the first charter to New England, 
7. 27; mentioned, i. 61, 541; 2. 
15, 32a, 46, 77a, 78a, 91, 96, 265; 
5. 145, 179; 6. 131, 139, 140, 141n, 
142, 146, 149, 150, 176, 186; 7.28, 
31, 139n, 295, 303; 8. '403; 9. 369. 
11, deposed, 2. 65a; 7. 58; 9. 14; re- 
ceived a grant from the king, 5. 
235; extent of grant, 5. 235; on 
good terms with the French, 5, 
257; appointed Andros governor 
of New England, 5. 264-265; his 
bitter hatred towards Mass., 5. 
265; a traitor to England, 5. 266; 
capable of any crime, 5. 266; plot- 
ted to introduce papacy in Eng- 
land, 5. 266, 273n; intended to es- 
tablish papacy in New England, 

5. 273n; made a treasonable offer 
to Sir William Phipps, 5. 281 
made a claim to Acadia, 7. 50 
proclaimed king in Boston, 7. 53 
hatred for in New England, 7. 53- 
54; left a series of manuscript 
volumes, 7. 144n; became king, 
7. 150, 158; adverse to popular 
rights, 7. 158, 159; fled from Eng- 
land, 7. 159; gave no further help 
to Phipps, 9. 14; desired Phipps 
to enter the navy, 9. 19, 22; of- 
fered Phipps the governorship, 9. 
26; mentioned, 2. 232; 3.355; 4. 
222; 5. 113, 125, 128, 265, 267, 272; 

6. 7; 9. 11, 52, 57?i; see York, the 
Duke of. 

James vi, of Scotland, 2. 15; 6. 141; 
see James i. 

Andrews' island, people fled to, i. 
220; now called Bangs island, i. 
22071 ; provisions to be sent to^ i. 
222n,. 
Jameson, Robert, 6, 409, 410. 

the Rev. Thomas, 3. 162n. 

William, signed the petition to Gov. 
Bradstreet, i.283yi; settled at Fal- 
mouth, 6. 12. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



139 



James river, 7. 303. 
the, Capt. Taylor master of, 5.217w; 
brought Eichard Mather to New 
England, 5. 217n. 
Jamestown, Maine, 5. 125. 
Yirginia, stores captured at Port 
Royal carried to, i. 27;' Capt. 
Newport at, 5. 334; mentioned, 7. 
303; 8. 820, 329; 9. 3037?. 
James, William, lived at Purpooduck, 
1.321. 
William, lived at Sheepscot, 2. 233; 
land granted to, 2. 235; swore 
fealty to the Duke of York, 4. 
221 ; signed the petition to Mass., 
5. 240; mentioned, 2. 194. 
Jane, an Indian, her declaration, 3. 
27-28. 
the, arrived at Boston, i. 189; car- 
ried wine to Pentagoet, 7. 50. 
Jane's gully, 3. 164n. 
point, 3. 101, 147. 
spring, 3. 101. 
Japanese, the, 6. 223. 
Jaques, see Jacques. 
Jarvis, Leonard, i. 11; 7. 474. 
Jay, 2. 163;, 4. 339, 340, 341, 363. 
John, 6. 335; 7. 163, 270; 8. 10, 11, 

12. 
point, 2. 167; 3-323; 4-109. 
Jay's treaty, 2. 294; 8. 12, 16. 
Jean, Augustine, see Gustin, John. 
Jefferds, Francis, i. 249; 3. 160n. 
the Rev. Samuel, died, 1.348, 349; 
graduated from Harvard College, 

1. 340; minister at Wells, i. 340, 
349; 5. hv. 

]Sir. , of Falmouth, 3. 160n; 7. 

221. 

Jefferies, David, owned the land now 
covered by Bath. 2. 202; brought 
an action to obtain his land, 2. 
202; one of the Pejepscot pro- 
prietors, 3. 321; 7. 196; 8. 209n. 
Francis, i. 321. 

Jefferson, the people of refused to 
compromise with the Kennebec 
Purchasers, 2. 291 ; ordered to re- 
linquish their rights to the state, 

2. 292; mentioned, 9. 134. 
Thomas, the author of article viii, 

in the constitution of Maine, 7. 
241; mentioned, i. 408; 5. 149; 
6. 53, 87, 96n, 359; 7.413; 8.11, 
97,98, 299; 9. 173, 245, 246. 

the Rev. Thomas, preached at Scar- 
borough, 3. 161; dismissed, 3. 161. 
Jeffrey, 5. Ivn. 

George, 3. 380, 412; 6. 255; auto- 
graph of 6. 255. 

, sold land to Capt. Davis 4. 

230. 
Jeffreys, George, Lord, 5. 268. 

Gregory, signed the petition to 
Cromwell, i. 395. 

V8 Col. Donnel, 8. 219n. 

William, 2. 47n, 48, 49. 



Jeffry, James, signed the treaty of 

1713, 6. 256; autograph of, 6. 256. 
Jefts, John, killed, 4. 287. 

Jekell, John, signed the treaty of 

1714, 6. 258; autograph of, 6. 258. 
Jenkings, Stephen, signed the peti- 
tion to Charles 11, i. 402. 

Jenkins, Jabez, signed the petition to 
Charles 11, i. 402. 

the Rev. Dr. , of Philadelphia, 

7. 402. 
Jenks, Jeremiah, 3. 179. 

the Rev. Wilham, preached in Bath, 
2. 227; a professor in Bowdoin 
College, 2. 227; his opinion of site 
of Popham's colony, 3. 285; his 
memoir of Dr. Abiel Holmes, 2. 
11a; 8. 180. 
Jennens, Abraham, one of the pat- 
entees of New England, 5. 169; 
one of the first to establish a fish- 
ing plantation, 5. 169; purchased 
land, 5. 170, 190; commenced a 
plantation at Monhegan, i. 56; 5. 
170; otherwise connected with 
the history of Maine, 5. 170; 
father-in-law of Moses Goodyear, 
I. 56n; 5. 170, 170n; sold Monhe- 
gan to Alworth and Elbridge, 5. 
171; received a deed from the 
Council of Plymouth, 5. 185 ; sent 
John Brown to America, 5. 191. 
Ambrose, one of the patentees of 
New England, 5. 169; one of the 
first to establish a fishing planta- 
tion, 5. 169. 
Judith, married Moses Goodyear, 5. 
170, 170n. 
Jenner, the Rev. Thomas, preached 
at Saco, I. 161n, 545,547; 3-11; 
asked to get a minister for Casco, 
1. 16171 ; meddled with the Church 
of England, i. 545; letter to John 
Winthrop, i. 547; 3- lO-H. 1^^; 
arrived at Saco, i. 547n; came 
from Roxbury, i. 547ti; moved to 
Weymouth, i.547w; a representa- 
tive I, 547; returned to England, 
i.547n; accused Cleeves of for- 
gery, 3. 40; autograph of, 1.544. 
Jenners, Thomas, proprietor at 
Pemaquid, 5. 302. 
Jenness, John S., his Isles of Shoals 

cited, 9. 31 5w. 
Jennings, see Jennens. 
Jeremy Squam, definition of, 4. 189- 
190. 
Squam bay, 3. 300n. 
Squam island, 4. 330, 331. 
Jerking venison, mode of, i. 509w. 
Jerseys, the, 5, 132. 
Jersey, the prison ship, 2. 248. 
Jerusalem, 9. 335. 

Jessepick, Sir Thomas Gates at, 2. 20. 
Jesuit College at Rome, 8. 503. 
Relations, the, cited, 7. 26n, 44w, 
UOn. 



140 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOOIETT. 



Jesuits, the, sent to Port Koyal, i. 
26; 7. 28; 8. 321, 322; moved to 
Mount Mansell, i. 26-27, 26n; 7. 
28; dislodged by Argall, i. 27; 
did not agree with Poutrincourt, 
I. 429; 9. 98: followed by others, 
I. 429-430; landed at the Penob- 
scot and Kidesquit, i. 340-340^1 ; 
8. 323; courted the friendship of 
the Indians, i. 431; converted 
Memberton, i. 431; their policy, 
I. 432; influenced the Indians 
against the English, 2. 168, 169, 
196; 5. 175, 251, 256/1, 284; 6. 234; 
7.45, 58-59; 8. 298; among the 
Mohawks, 5. 91 ; debased religion, 
5. 175, I76n, 177, 242; became the 
heads of Indian tribes, 5. 175; 
character of, 5. 175-176, 176yi; 
awakened the Indians to war, 5. 
1761 carried captives to Virginia, 
5. 179; their infamy, 5. 194, 299; 
secured the confessions of Indians 
before battle, 5. 272; consecrated 
the tomahawk that was to exter- 
minate the English, 5. 278; led 
the Indians at the destruction of 
the Fort at Pemaquid, 5. 272; 
named the Cannabas, 5.327; trans- 
lated the Lord's prayer, 5. 427; 
among the ISTorridgewocks, 6. 234 ; 
in constant communication with 
the Indians of Maine, 6. 236; 
spiritual and temporal advisers 
of the Indians, 6. 238; sent to 
Detroit, 6. 276; dispersed, 7.28; 
protected by Taratonan, 7. 44; 
one with Col. Dongan, 7. 48; scat- 
tered over New France, 7. 58; 
jealous of Protestants, 7. 58, 59; 
stimulated the French governors 
against the English, 7. 58; the 
only instructors in Canada, 7. 59; 
obtained the election of Fronte- 
nac as governor, 7. 59; great in- 
fluence over the Indians, 7. 82; 
met Bashaba, 7. 97, 98; tried to 
prevent the Indians from meeting 
Shirley, 7. 168; their influence 
over the king of France, 8. 321- 
322; at Port Royal, 8. 822; Bian- 
court opposed their meddling, 8. 
322; sent to Kadesquit, 8. 323; 
mentioned, 5. 141; 9. 103. 

Jesus Christ claimed as a Frenchman, 
I. 28771. 

Jewell, George, lived at Saco, x. 148; 
^ave his name to Jewell's island, 
I. 148; died, I. 148. 
Richard, signed the petition to 
Charles 11, i. 401. 

Jewell's island, within the limits of 
ancient Falmouth, i. 145; some- 
times called DonnelVs island, i. 
145; purchased by Henry Don- 
nell, I. 148; used as a fishing 



place, I. 148, 309; origin of the 
name, i. 148; granted to John 
Tyng, 1. 148; attacked by Indians, 

1. 224; occupied by Donnell, i, 
309-320. 

Jewett, Aaron, sent to obtain a min- 
ister, 3. 159; erected a mill 3. 
167; biographical notice of, 3. 213. 
the Hon. A. G., 8. 472, 473. 
the Rev. Caleb, 2. 147. 

, of Cape Ann, 4. 322. 

Jewett's neck, 5. 49. 

Jews, 6. 147; on Rhdoe Island, 4. 269; 

6. 288. 
Jhone, of Casco bay, gave a deed to 

George Munjoy, i. 553, 
Jo, a Pigwacket Indian, 4. 158. 
Job, Colonel, an Indian, taken pris- 
oner 7. 326; died, 7.326. 
Jobe, M., patent granted to, 9. 365. 
Jocelyn, Abigail, 3. 68n,. 
Abraham, brother of Henry, 3. 67; 
lived at Black Point, 3-67; land 
granted to, 3. 67; conveyed land 
to Scottow, 3. 67, 68, 116; site of 
his house, 3. 67-68; grant from 
Cleeves, 3. 68; moved to Boston, 
3. 68; his children, 3. 68n; lived 
at Hingham, 3. 68n; overseer for 
Scottow, 3. 116. 
Abraham, son of Abraham, 3. 68n 
Anna, daughter of Henry, 3. 68n. 
Anne (Tyrrell), 9. 312n. 
Charles, son of Henry, 3. 68n. 
Henry 1st, father of Sir Thomas, 9. 

312. 
Henry 2d, son of Sir Thomas, i. 88n; 

2. mn; 3. 25n, 33; 9. Sl2n; the 
date of his arrival in New England, 

3. 34; moved to Black Point, 3. 
13, 30, 35, 35n; the principal man 
of the place, 3. 30, 35-36; site of 
his house, 3. 107, 157; engaged 
in exploring the country, 2. 68; 3. 

34, Sin ; intended to settle at New- 
ichwannock, 3. 35; received a 
deed from Cammock, i. 47; 3. 
230 ; took possession, i . 47 ; resided 
with Cammock, 3. 35; married 
Margaret Cammock, i. 47-48; 3. 
13, 35; legatee of Cammock, 3, 
13, 35, 231 ; conveyed land to Scot- 
tow, I. 48; grants to settlers, 3. 

35, 35n, 68, 68n, 76, 77, 78, 231- 
232; 5. 95, 96; visited by his 
brother John, i. 50, 76; 3. 85, 88, 
90; 9.209; lived at Black Point, 
I. 50, 62n, 158n, 173, 175, 177, 198- 
199, 199n, 220, 226; 2. 78a, 79a; 3. 
322n; 9. 209; at Piscataqua, i. 
52n; 3. 13; in the case of Cleeves 
vs. Winter, i. 54, 535; his depo- 
sition concerning Cleeves, i. 61- 
62; came from Piscataqua, i. 02n; 
agent for Gorges and Mason, i. 
62n, 548; 3. 34, 39; at Saco, i. 62n, 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



141 



541; counselor, i. 73n, 84; 3. 37; 
commissioner, i. 88, 106, 159, 175, 
364, 366, 367, 388, 389; 2. 232; 3. 
23, 86, 37, 42, 44, 45, 48, 49; 5. 236; 
supported the title of Gorges i, 
95; deputy governor, i. 95, 368; 

2. 79a; 3. 49; opposed the en- 
croachments of Mass., I. 102, 137, 
170, 183, 196, 198; 3. 39, 40, 44, 
45, 51 ; summoned to appear at 
court, I. 102, 171; 3-44,45; dis- 
charged, 3. 45; not allowed to 
hold a court, 3, 48; invested with 
magistratial powers, i. 107; 2. 
63a, 79a; 3-48, 56; accused Thorp 
of preaching unsound doctrines, 
I. 161n; 3. 154; deputy for {Scar- 
borough, I. 163; 3. 55; held a 
court at Scarborough, i. 163; an 
associate, i. 164, 165; refused to 
take oath of ofl0.ce, 1. 167 ; a justice 
of the peace, 1. 177, 183n, 185, 190; 

3. 56; 5. 36, 38, 39; 6. 36; sub- 
mitted to the jurisdiction of Mass., 
I. 183, 196, 386; 3. 46; reason for 
his submission, 3. 41; protested 
against the resumption of Mass. 
jurisdiction, i. 196; 3. 50-5J ; did 
not conceal his dishke of Mass., 
3. 50-51; imprisoned, i. 196^; 
not to be presented, 3. 54; sus- 
tained great losses, i. 196-197, 
200; accused of renouncing the 
authority of Mass., 3. 55; dis- 
appeared from civil aftairs, 1. 198; 
3. 65, 109w; cause of his opposi- 
tion to Mass., 1. 198; embarrassed, 
I. 198; mortgaged his property, 
I. 198; driven from Black Point, 
I. 198-199, 199)i, 226; went to 
Pemaquid, i. 199n; 3. 65; 5.236^; 
held office under Andros, i. 199n; 
died, I. 199w; date and place of 
his death uncertain, 3. 109w; en- 
gaged in the settlement on the 
Sheepscot, i. 199n; no record of 
his issue, i. 199ji; autograph of, 
I. 199n; appealed to for help, i. 
220; sent Burroughs' letter to 
Pendleton, i, 222n; surrendered 
Black Point to Mugg, i. 226; 3. 
108 ; treacherously left by the set- 
tlers, 3, 108; why he was deserted, 
3. 109; letter to Scottow, 3. 109; 
councelor, i. 346, 376; at Cleeves, 
court, I. 547; demanded by what 
right Cleeves held a court, i. 548; 
ordered Cleeves to submit to the 
authority of Gorges, i. 548; a rep- 
resentative for Gorges, i , 548 ; ac- 
cused of trying to murder the 
people of Lygonia, i. 549; judge, 
3^ 41, 49; his character, 3. 42, 44, 
45, 65; his services for Mass., 3. 
48; held three oflBlces at one time, 
5. 49; sustained by the people, 3. 



51-52; to administer oaths, 3. 57; 
met the Mass. commissioners, 3. 
58, 59, 60; too mild to cope with 
Mass., 3. 61-62; turned off the 
bench, 3. 63, QSn; went to Ply- 
mouth, 3.60, 108-109; overseer of 
Giles Koberts' will, 3. 77; Rich- 
ard Moore his tenant, 3. 77; sold 
land to Sheldon, 3. 78 ; leased the 
farm of Burroughs, 3. 81; his 
house a garrison, 3. 107, 110; 
erected a corn mill at Black Point, 
3. 167; lease to Bartlett, 3. 231- 
232; arrested Purchase, 3. 322, 
332 ; appointed by the New York 
government to settle the disputes 
of the fishermen, 5. 17-18; to give 
advice concerning the Indians, 5. 
31 ; letter from Brockholls, 5. 58- 
59; asked to settle at Pemaquid, 
5. 259; mentioned, i. 31, 94, 98, 
99, 132, 534; 3. 63n, 67, 74n, 112; 
5. 32, 44, 49, 67, m; 9. 3l3n, 355, 
363. 
Henry 3d, son of Abraham, i. 199w; 
married Abigail Stockbridge, i. 
199w; 3. 68n; children of, i. 199n; 
lived at Scituate, 3. 68n. 
Henry 4th, son of Henry 3d, 3. 68n. 
Jabez, 3. 68n. 
Jemima, 3. QSn. 

John, visited his brother Henry, i. 
50, 76w, 173; 2. 64a; 9. 209; at 
Black Point, 3. 13, 36, 85, 86, 87, 
90; son of Sir Thomas, i. 88?i; his 
account of the dissatisfaction in 
Maine, i. 177)1; at Boston, 3. 90, 
98; improbable stories told by, 3. 
87-89, 90, 91-92; at Richmond's 
island, 3. 90; some allowance to 
be made for his statements, i. 
197; his credulity, 3. 92-93; his 
descriptions of the Indians, 3. 93- 
96 ; on the customs of the people, 
3. 97 ; returned to England, i. 550n; 
3. 98; time taken to make the 
voyage, 3. 98; 5. 234; his opinion 
of Boston, 5. 233; a naturalist, g. 
210; Longfellow's notice of, 9. 210; 
visited the White Mountains, 9. 
210-211; mentioned, 5. 33; his ac- 
count of Two Voyages to New Eng- 
land, a rare book, 3. 85n; the 
value of, 3. 85, 90; cited, i.29, 31, 
50, 55, 57, 58, 83, 158, 173-174, 
184, 196-197, 200, 202, 550-552; 2. 
50, 64, 72, 78; 3. 19-20, 19n, 29, 36, 
37, 59, 63, 72, 85, 86, 103, 142, 143, 
157, 167; 4- 23; 5. 188, 232, 235; 
6.183, 185; 7. 145n; 8. 310; 9. 209, 
313, 313/1. 
Joseph, 3. 68n. 
Keziah, 3. 68n. 
Mary, 3. 68n. 
Nathaniel, 3. QSn. 
Kebecca, 3. 68w. 



142 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Jocelyn — continued. 

Thomas, 3. 68n. 

Sir Thomas, deputy governor, i. 
73/1 ; commissioner, i. 88; 2. 59a; 
declined an office, i. 88; never 
visited America, i. 88^1; father of 
Henry and John, i. 88w; 2. 78a; 
3. 25/1, 33; to organize a govern- 
ment for Maine, 2. 78a; 3. 34; 
lived in Kent, 3. 33-34; at the 
head of Gorges' government, 9. 
312, 312/1 ; biographical notice of, 
9. 312w-313?i; mentioned, 2. 68/i; 

3. Un. 

Jocelyn' s hill, owned by Abraham 
Jocelyn, 3. 27, 67; now Scottow's 
hill, 3. 67. 

Johanna, the, 8. 192. 

John, a prisoner among the Indians, 

4. 155. 

I, of England, 7. 380. 

IV, of Portugal, 6. 122, 122n. 

Augustin, see Gustin, John. 

Capt. 3. 407, 408, 410, 411, 412. 

Sheepscot, 3. 390, 

the, I. 277m. 

the, arrived at Salem with French 
Protestants, i. 277n. 

the Baptist, 4. 149. 
Johnson, the Rev. Alfred, 2. 113, 115. 

Benjamin, 2. 128. 

Edward, justice of the peace, 1. 177; 
to inquire into the state of Fort 
Loyal, 1 . 266n ; a deputy, i . 367 ; re- 
corder, I. 371; signed the petition 
to Cromwell, 1.394; a magistrate, 
2. 63a; mentioned, 9. 382. 

Edward, of Woburn, his Wonder 
Working Providence cited, 2. 7, 
50; 5- 144/1. 

father-in-law of Stephen Grindle, 6. 
115. 

Francis, i. 64n, 381; 5. 88. 

Ichabod, killed, 4. 287. 

Capt. Isaac, 2. 133 ; 5. 314/i. 

John, 8. 20. 

Gen. John, 9. 191, 192, 193, 196, 197. 

Jotlian, 5. 319/1. 

Margaret, 2. 204. 

Samuel, 9. 7. 

Samuel, m.d., 5. 302. 

the Rev. Samuel, Account of the 
Settlements on the Sheepscot 
river, 2. 229-232. 

Sarah, married to Jonathan Green- 
leaf, I. 352n. 

Phineas, preceptor at Hampden 
Academy, 8. 167-168; his salary, 
8. 167. 

Thomas, 8. 519n; engraved a map 
for the Plymouth Company, 8. 124. 

Col. , 9. 193. 

Madam , 4. 332. 

,5.141,199. 

Johnston, a name given to Pemaquid, 
5.162; 6. 23. 



a Scotch family, 6. 16. 

Alexander, on the Sheepscot farms, 
9. 127-155. 

John, History of Bristol, Bremen 
and Pemaquid cited, 5. 271 /i; 7. 
132n, 135?i; 8. 185 /i, 188/i, 194n; 
his John Pierce, clothworker, 
and the Plymouth Patent, 9. 115- 
125. 

Nathaniel, 8. 460. 

Sarah, married Edward Kent, 8. 

460; death of, 8. 461. 

Jonas, the, belonged to Poutrincourt, 

7. 264; her coming announced, 7. 

264. 

Jones, Benjamin, deposition of, 8. 301. 

Daniel, 4. 261, 262. 

family, the, i. 128/1, 305. 

the Rev. Elijah, 2. 124, 125, 127, 128. 

Ephraim, land granted to, 2. 281. 

Capt. Ichabod, 2. 243; 3. 180; 4. 351. 

Isaac, came to Falmouth*, i. 259; 
purchased land of Thomas Cloice, 
I. 259. 

Israel, 8. 9. 

John, of England, married the 
granddaughter of Jeremiah Riggs, 
I. 206. 

John, of Falmouth, purchased land 
of Thomas Cloice, i. 259; lived on 
the Neck, 1.259, 321. 

John, prepared a map of the Ken- 
nebec river, 4. 43, 45; employed 
by the Plymouth Company, 4. 43 ; 
lived at Pownalboro, 4. 43^ im- 
prisoned for being a royalist, 4. 
43; escaped to Quebec, 4. 43; 
made a major, 4. 43 ; took Charles 
Gushing prisoner, 4. 43, 45; re- 
turned to Kennebec, 4. 43 ; died 
at Augusta, 4. 43, 45; his personal 
appearance, 4. 45; his nickname, 
4. 45; his character, 4. 45. 

John, of Scarborough, 3. 221 ; bi- 
ographical notice of, 3. 213. 

John C, 3. 180. 

Joseph, 8. 301. 

Nathan, 8. 9, 10. 

Nathaniel, i. 128?i. 

Phineas, married Hodge, i. 

64/1 ; received a deed from M. 
Hodge, I. 64/1, 128/i; purchased 
land of Benjamin Ingersoll, i. 311 ; 
a surveyor, 3. 169n. 

Simeon, 2. 125. 

Stephen, 3. 179; 7. 356. 

Thomas, signed the petition to 
Cromwell, i. 395. 

Thomas, died on shipboard, 3. 86. 

Capt. Thomas, of the Mayflower, 
bribed, 8. 201. 

William, of Portsmouth, furnished 
supplies for Machias, 3. 178. 

William, a printer, 2. 75. 

Sir William, i.418; his opinion of 
• Gox^ges' and Mason's patent, i. 49. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



143 



Lieut , 8, 136, 140n. 

Major , of Canaan, 4. 295. 

, of Boston, 2. 243. 

, of Macliias, 6. 103. 

the Misses, of Portland, 6. 132-133. 

, cousin of the Rev. Paul Coffin, 

267. 
Jones' eddy on the Kennebec, by R. 
H. Gardiner, 4. 41-49; attempt to 
build a city at, 4-43; a map of 
made by John Jones, 4. 43, 45; 
designed to be a seaport, 4. 46; 
agent resided at, 4. 46 ; business 
people not attracted to, 4. 47; 
passed out of the hands of the 
Yaughan family, 4. 47; attempt 
to make it a place of entry, 5. 
331; wharf built at, 7. 281; men- 
tioned, 2. 213,*216. 
Jonny Mack's hill, 4. 276. 

Jordain, , 5- 40, 42-43. 

Jordaine, a former way of spelling 

Jordan, i. 234?i. 
Jordan, a familiar name in Great 
Britain, i, 234w; different ways of 
spelling it, i. 234^. 
Dominicus 1st, conveyed Great 
Chebeag to Walter Gendall, i, 
142, 147; a son of Robert, i. 232, 
312; lands conveyed to in his 
father's will, i. 232, 552; killed, 
I. 234, 312; his family carried to 
Canada, i.234, 312; married Han- 
nah Tristram, i. 234, 312; his de- 
scendants, I. 234, 312; his family 
the only'one who remain in Maine, 
i.235n; trustee for Falmouth, i. 
271, 554, 555; lived at Spurwink, 
I. 321; signed the petition to 
Charles 11, i. 402; his garrison, 3. 
137^; mentioned, 4. 147, 148. 
Dominicus 2d, carried a prisoner to 
Canada, i. 234, 312; escaped, i. 
234, 312; an important man in his 
town, I. 234, 312; died, i. 234; a 
son of Dominicus, i. 312; date of 
his birth, i. 312; resided at Trois 
Rivieres, i.312; ancestor of many 
now living, 1.312; compromised 
the Jordan claim, i. 142. 
Dominicus 3d, land in Spurwink 
still owned by, i. 233-234; his 
nickname, 1.233, 235; died, i. 234. 
Dominicus 4th, death of, i. 235n; 
his children, i. 235n; married 
Susanna Simonton, I. 235n. . 
Elizabeth, daughter of Dominicus, 
married Humphrey Scammon, i. 
312; her posterity, i. 313. 
Elizabeth, wife of Robert, conveyed 

land to Robert Elliot, i. 235. 
Hannah, daughter of Dominicus, 
married Joseph Calef, i. 312; 3. 
209. 
Hannah, wife of Dominicus, taken 
captive, i. 812; returned, i. 312. 



Jedediah, land conveyed to in his 
father's will, i. 232, 552-553; a 
son of Robert, i. 232, 321; lived 
at Spurwink, i. 321. 
Jeremiah 1st, conveyed Great Che- 
beag to Walter Gendall, i. 147; a 
son of Robert, i. 232; signed the 
petition to Charles 11, i. 402; be- 
quests in his father's will, i. 553. 
Jeremiah 2d, i. 233n. 
John, received Richmond's island 
from his father, i. 41w; a son of 
Robert, i. 232; married Elizabeth 
Stileman, i. 233 ; a justice at Pem- 
aquid, i. 235n, 351, 552; resided 
at Richmond's island, i. 235n; 
signed the petition to Bradstreet, 
I. 283n; lived at Spurwink, i. 321 ; 
signed the petition to Charles 11, 
1. 402 ; bequest in his father's will, 
I. 552. 
Mary Ann, carried into captivity, i. 
312; named Arabella, 1.312; mar- 
ried and never returned, i. 312. 
Nathaniel, settled in Falmouth, i. 

312; his estate divided, i. 313. 
proprietors, i. 48, 48-49, 56, 57. 
Robert, of Melcomb, married a Fitz- 

pen, I. llSn, 234n. 
Robert, son of Robert of Melcomb, 

married a Cokers, i. 234n. 
Robert, of Maine, deeded Rich- 
mond's island to his son, i. 41; 
his daughter-in-law is supposed 
to have destroyed the Trelayney 
papers, i.49n; arrived in America, 
I. 58, 234n; 6.182; successor to 
Gibson, i. 58; 6. 182; land award- 
ed to, I. 58; married a daughter 
of John Winter, i. 58, 232; 6. 138; 
his testimony relating to Mac- 
worth, I. 70n; controversy con- 
cerning the title of Fore river, i. 
74; referee in the case of Cleeves 
V8, Winter, i. 74, 234w; executor 
of the estate of John Winter, i. 
98, 2S2n, 535, 538; opposed the 
encroachments of Mass., i. 102, 
137, 170; 3. 44, 45; summoned to 
appear before the commissioners, 
3. 44, 45; committed to prison, i. 
102, 6. 185 ; to appear at the York 
court, I. 102, 171; lived in Fal- 
mouth and Spurwink, i. 105, 114, 
180/1, 216, 385; 3. 44; 6. 138; sub- 
mitted to the jurisdiction of Mass., 
I. 105, 183, 386; court held at his 
house, I. 105, 133, 385; 3. 16, 45- 
46; a commissioner, 1. 106, 159, 
164, 175, 388, 389; 2. 232-233; 3. 
23 ; 5. 236 ; had magisterial powers, 
I. 107; 2. 64a; an Episcopalian, i. 
108, 232, 235n, 262; 3. 21, 64; 8. 
294n; censured for exercising his 
religion, 1. 108, 161-162, 198, 262; 
conveyed land to Joseph Phippen 



144 



MAINE HISTOEICAL SOCIETY. 



Jordan, Robert — continued. 

and Sampson Penley, i. 130; one 
of the chief proprietors on Casco 
river, i. 130; conveyed land to 
Thomas Staniford and Ralph 
Turner, i . 130 ; held land at Spur- 
wink, I. 130; desired to extend 
his posessions, i. 130; involved in 
a quarrel with Cleeves, 1. 130, 132; 
authorized to occupy land on the 
Presurapscot, i. 130; address to 
the people of Casco, i. 130-131; 
covenant made with John Phil- 
lips, I. 131; a witness against 
Cleeves, i. 132; Mitton conveyed 
land to, I. 132; Cleeves brought 
an action against, i. 132, 138, 193; 
basis of the case, i. 132; judg- 
ment rendered for, 1. 133; did not 
appear at the general court, i. 
134; Cleeves' second petition 
against, i. 134-137; result un- 
known, I. 137; set up a govern- 
ment in the name of Gorges, i. 
137; his conti'oversy inconven- 
ienced the people, 1. 140-141; sold 
land to Geo. Munjoy and ]S"icholas 
Mitton, I. 141-142; never occu- 
pied land north of the Fore river, 
I. 142; autograph of, i. 142, 233w, 
fled from Falmouth, i. 142; his 
controversies revived by his grand- 
children, 1. 142; his sons conveyed 
Great Chebeag to Walter Gendall, 
I. 147; accused John Thorpe of 
preaching unsound doctrine, i. 
161n; 3. 154; 6. 189; imprisoned 
for baptising children, 1. 162, 181; 
3.44; 8. 294?i; discharged, 3. 45; 
held a court at Scarborough, i, 
163; an associate, i. 164; charges 
against, i. 172; violent opposition 
to, 1. 172; commissioned by Arch- 
dale, I. 175; 3. 22; justice of the 
peace, i. 177, lS2n; lived at Rich- 
mond's island, i. 177; 6. 138; vis- 
ited by James Michimore, i. 189; 
refused to conform to the laws of 
Mass., I. 198; ordered to appear 
at court for performing the mar- 
riage ceremony, i. 198; his house 
burned, i. 214; 6. 146-147, 189; 
moved to Great island, i. 214; 6. 
189; his family at Piscataqua, i. 
217; did not return to Falmouth, 
I. 232; died at Portsmouth, i. 
232; 6. 189; his will, i. 232, 552; 
his children, i. 232, 235?i, 312, 321; 
his character and influence, i. 232- 
233; 6. 184-185, 190; birth of, i. 
234?i; a surety for Purchase, i. 
234n; his petition given in full, i. 
535 ; report concerning the same, 
I. 536; result of, 1.540-541; his 
inventory of goods at Richmond's 
island and Spurwink, i. 540 j the 



injunction of Cleeves, 1.548; ac- 
cused of non-puritanism, i. 549; 
place where he lived, i. 552; 6. 
188; preached at Spurwink, 3. 21, 
64; called to account, 3. 64; 6. 185- 
186; troubled Henry Watts, 3. 21- 
22; judge in Lygonia, 3. 41; con- 
veyed land to Madiver, 3. 74 ; to 
McKinney, 3.83n; to Dearing, 3. 
209; his daughter married Joseph 
Calfe, 3.209; his baptismal font, 5. 
174; 6. 186n; a friend of Eldridge, 

5. 230; asked to settle at Pem- 
aquid, 5. 259; 6. 189; probably 
ordained at Exeter, 6. 182 ; a wel- 
comed laborer, 6. 183; sectarian 
spirit strong against, 6. 186, 187- 
188; relieved by the order of 
Charles 11, 6. 188; extent of his 
ministerial care, 6. 188; only min- 
ister in Portland, 6. 189; men- 
tioned, I. 76, 98, 99; 2. 67; 5. 170, 

6. 192; 7. 220. 

Robert jr., son of Robert, i. 232, 
321; lived at Spurwink, i. 32; 
conveyed land to Nathaniel Fryer, 
I. 233; lived at Great island, i. 
235n; gave a deed to Robert El- 
liott, I. 235n; mentioned, i. 232; 
552. 

Roger, 4. 385^ 

Samuel, son Of Dominicus, i. 312; 
his posterity still in Maine, i. 313. 

Samuel, son of Robert, i. 232, 321; 
conveyed Great Chebeag to Wal- 
ter Gendall, 1. 147; lived at Spur- 
wink, I. 321; signed the petition 
to Charles 11, i. 402; bequests in 
his father's will, i. 552, 553. 

Samuel, interpreter, 3. 362, 372, 373^ 
381, 399, 413, 420; preferred by 
the Indians, 3. 381; signed the 
treaty of 1717, 6. 262; autograph 
of, 6. 262. 

Sarah, widow of Robert, land con- 
veyed to in her husband's will, i. 
232, 552; lived at Newcastle, i. 
234n; tax paid, 1.323. 

Mrs. Sarah, of Cape Elizabeth, mar- 
ried Bildad Arnold, 4. 355. 

Col. Tristram, lived at Saco, 2. 138; 
came from Buxton, 2. 138. 

Dr. , married Sarah Bartlett, 4. 

355. 

Miss , of Biddeford, 4. 270. 

Widow , of Otisfield, 4. 359. 

Jordan's claim, i. 56, 57. 

point, called Machegonne, i. 65n; 
called Meeting-house point, i. 
244ii. 

T^v^f^^^^* I former ways of spelling 

Joseline, see Jocelyn. 
Jose, Martin, biographical notice of, 
3. 213. 



INBEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



145 



Martin jr., 3. 213. 
Joseph, belonged to the Penobscots, 

5. 371; signum of, 6. 256, 258; an 
Indian, 4. 172, 175; 6. 253. 

Maria, an Indian, 5. 371, 375. 

Joslin, see Jocelyn. 

Joslyn Joseph, teacher at Monmouth 
Academy, 8. 174. 
see Jocelyn. 

Josselyn, Abraham, a blacksmith at 
Scituate, i. 199n. 
see Jocelyn. 

Joubert, Sergeant , 8. 327 

Jourdaine, John, 5. 33. 

Jourdan, Gapt. Henry, 9. 355. 
Thomas, 9. S6'6. 

Journal of Attack upon the Ships 
and Troops of G-en. McLean and 
Capt. Mowatt, 7. 121-126; Journal 
of a Tour from Buxton to Pigg- 
wacket, 4. 275; Journal of a Tour 
from Hanover, 4. 293; Journal of 
a Tour from Wells to the Con- 
necticut river, 4. 261; Journal of 
a Tour to Rhode Island, 4. 267; 
Journal of a Voyage from Boston 
to the Penobscot river, 5. 363. 
of mineralogy, 6. 408. 
of the Mass. House of Represent- 
atives, extracts from, 7, 171-172. 

Jubartes, i.30. 

Judith, the, 7. 320. 

Jummaway, 3, 408. 

Junia, a slave who served in the War 
of the Revolution, 3. 204. 

Junkins House, the, 8. 279. 

Jurisdiction of Mass. over Maine, i. 
152; 3. 33, 42-44, 43^, 43-44, 45, 
46, 46-48, 71, 72, 317, 330; 5. 242; 
7. 202; see also Maine and Mass. 

Jurymen, pay of, i. 163; millage al- 
lovred, I. 373. 

Justes, 5. 88. 

Kadesquit, a Jesuit mission founded 
at, I. 430n; novp^ Bangor, i. 430n; 

7. 27; the Sagamore of, 7. 97, 98, 
100; destination of a colony under 
La Saussaye, 8. 323; mentioned, 

8. 324, 325; see also Kenduskeag. 
Kalar, , married the llev. J. W. 

Starman, 5. 410. 
Kalm, cited, 5. 175n. 
Kamiskwawangachit, definition of, 6. 

213; the village of, 6. 213. 

Kane, , of Sheepscot, 9. 132. 

Kanebekky river, see Kennebec. 

Kane's point, 9. 132. 

Kanibals, the, same as the Abnakis, 

6. 212. 
Kanibas, the, 6. 212. 
Kansas river, 4. 114. 

Kaxalit, the language of the Esqui- 
maux and Indians of Greenland, 
4. 97. \ 

Kaskabi, the French name for Fal- 
mouth, 7. 59. 
10 



Katahdin, definition of, 4. 115, 190, 192 ; 

see Mount Katahdin. 
Kathai, 2. 76a; see Cathay. 
Kauder, the Rev. Charles, letter of 

cited, 6. 224?i. 
Kavanagh, the Hon. Edward, son of 
James, 6. 74; admitted to the 
bar, 6. 74; educated at Catholic 
colleges, 6. 74-75; character of, 
6. 75; held public offices, 6. 75; 
death of 6. 75; mentioned, 2. 232; 
6.73; 8.86, 87, 89, 459. 
James, 6. 74. 
Kayne, 3. xv. 

Kearsarge, definition of, 4. 190. 
Kebec, Indian name of Quebec, 4. 105. 
Kedgwick river, 8. 72. 
Keeftakescoods, 3. 4:j9. 
Keene, Betsey, 4. 361. 
captives taken at, 6. 241. 
Nathaniel, 4. 205, 361. 
Keets, the Rev. Augustus, preached 
at Waldoborough, 4. 329 ; a Dutch- 
man, 4.329; his learning and ac- 
cent, 4. 329. 
Keith, the Rev. Ephraim, preached at 
North Yarmouth, 2. 187. 
Mellicent, married Benjamin Parris, 
5. x\n. 

Dr. , 2. 123. 

Kellegewidgewock, the Indian name of 

Blue Hill, 4. 105. 
Kelley, Deborah, 4. 281, 
Hannah, 4. 281. 
Joseph H., 4. 281. 

Patrick, his Cambrist cited, 6. 124n. 

Roger, I. 556. 

Kellogg, Joseph, an interpreter, 4. 

124, 125, 142; tlie trading house 

at Fort Dummsr in his care, 4. 

129, 131. ' ^ 

the Rev. ., of Falmouth, 5, liii. 

Kelson, John, 5. 89. 

Mr. , 8. 192. 

Kempton, Ensign Caesar, see Knapton. 
Ken, John, signed the petition to 

Charles li, i. 402. 
Kenabes, the, 4. 96, 103. 
Kend.il Green, 5. 203; 8. 427. 
Kendall, Amos, 8, 414, 415, 427. 

M ijor . of Fairasld, 4. 372, 380, 

401. 
Kendall's mills, 4. 372. 
Kenduskeag, a Jesuit mission estab- 
lished at, I. 43 Jn; definition of, 
4-105; mentioned, 8. 323; see also 
Kadesquit. 
bridge, 8. 451. 
point, 7. 20. 

river, 4. 108; 5. 382ri; 7. 98, 254; 9. 
223. ' ^ 

Kenebas, Indian name of the Kenne- 
bec river, 4. 103. 
Kenebeha-sis, definition of, 4. 190. 
Kenibek river, see Kennebec river. 
Kenibequ^, the, 7. 293n; see Kennebec 
river. 



146 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Kennebec, definition of, 4. 115,- 190. 

and Portland Railroad, 5. 323; 7. 
466; 8.349, 371. 

arsenal, 8. 341. 

bar, the, 8. 339, 343. 

company, 4. 43. 

county, deserted by whites, 2. 196; 
placed by royal authority under 
the government of Mass., 2. 196; 
forces from at the attack upon 
Castine, 2. 215; furnished masts 
for the British navy, 2. 215; pop- 
ulation of, 4. 33; John Jones 
lived in 4. 43; incorporated in, 6. 
54, 59; condition of in 1808, 9. 
174; mentioned, 3. 362, 373, 434; 
4. 45; 5. Ixiii, 418, 419n; 6. 41, 44, 
61, 63, 81; 7. 422; 8. 30, 287-288, 
390, 394; 9. 171, 176, 200; Early 
lawyers of, by Frederic Allen, 6. 
39-81. 

district, 7. 458, 469, 470. 

expedition, 8.245/1. 

falls, called Caritunk, 4. 105 ; called 
Skowhegan, 4. 110. 

grant occupied by the Canibas, 8. 
205-206; leased and then sold, 8. 
206; title laid dormant, 8.206; see 
also Kennebec Purchase. 

Indians, expedition to be sent 
against, 3. 351; opposed the erec- 
tion of forts and the encroach- 
ments of the whites, 3. 351-352; 
cost of the expedition against, 3. 
352; attempts to make them 
friendly to the English, 3. 352, 
mentioned, 5. 91; 6. 260, 261; 7. 
5; Memorial Relating to, by Sam- 
uel Sewall, 3. 351-353. 

Journal, cited, 7. 468; 8. 58, 4.58. 

Patent, part of given to Sir William 
Alexander, 4. 221; boundary of, 
8. 203-204, 204n; mentioned, i. 
40, 79; 5. 198. 

Proprietors, the, sold land to David 
Jeffries, 2. 202 ; Bridge and Wil- 
liams agents for, 6. 59; 8. 341- 
342; 8.114, 341-342. 

Purchase, owned by David Jeffries, 
2. 202; extent of, 2. 203, 275, 276; 
sold to Boies, Tyng, Brattle and 
Winslow, 2. 203; price paid for, 
2. 203; company formed, 2. 203; 
the Indian titles interfered with, 
2. 237; obtained by Grovernor 
Bradford, 2. 275; sold to the Ply- 
mouth Company, 2. 275; forts 
built, 2. 275; attempted govern- 
ment of, 2. 275; monopoly of fish- 
ing and trading, 2. 275; leased, 2. 
275-276; sold, 2. 276; sometimes 
called the Plymouth Company, 2. 
276; 8. 210; incorporated, 2. 270; 
8- 209-210; boundaries settled, 2. 
276, 277; prejudice against, 2. 
277 ; regular meetings of the com- 



pany, 2. 277; 8. 206-207, 208, 208n; 
condition of the company and the 
country, 2. 277-278; their efforts 
judicious and unremitting, 2. 278 ; 
the prosperity of the country due 
to their efforts, 2. 278, 279; build- 
ings erected, 2. 279; management 
of assumed by Dr. Uardiner, 2. 
279, 282, 283; difficulty of obtain- 
ing settlers, 2. 279-280; induced 
Germans to settled at Dresden, 2. 
280 ; conditions offered to settlers, 
2. 280-281, 282, 284; Indians hin- 
dered the settlers, 2. 282; 8. 206; 
built a barrack and block-house, 
2. 282; granted land to Dr. Gar- 
diner, 2. 282, 283; other grants, 2, 
283; lands to be laid out, 2. 284, 
285 ; 8. 209 ; advertised in Europe 
for settlers, 2. 284; trouble oc- 
casioned by the conveyances of 
Gardiner, 2. 286; meetings sus- 
pended, 2. 286; settled the bound- 
ary with Mass., 2. 286-287; land 
occupied by intruders, 2. 288; op- 
posed by squatters, 2. 288, 289, 
290 ; applied to the legislature for 
aid, 2. 288-289, 290-291 ; made set- 
tlements with several towns, 2. 
291; controversy settled by the 
state, 2. 292; land divided among 
tlie proprietors, 2. 293 ; a benefit 
to the state of Maine, 2. 294; in- 
cluded the present town of Hal- 
lo well, 4. 46; Benjamin Hallowell 
one of the purchasers, 7. 403; 
purchased of the Plymouth Com- 
pany, 8. 206; title laid dormant, 
8. 206 ; heirs to prove their owner- 
ship, 8. 208n; first purchase, 8. 
208n; increase of value, 2. 208/i; 
headquarters of, 8. 210. 210n, 21 Iw; 
Bridge and Williams agents of, 8. 
341, 342, 343, 344; the remaining 
interest owned by Reuel Williams, 
8. 344; mentioned, 2.286; 7.422; 
History of, by Robert H. Gardi- 
ner, 2. 269-294. 
river, a boundary of Acadia, i. 25n; 
5. 177, 330; 6.3,3n,4; 7.101,101n; 
8. 189n, 317; a boundary of the 
English territory, i. 28, 184; 2. 
70; explored by Pring, i. 28; 6. 
297; a settlement made at the 
mouth of, I. 29; 2. 189; 4. 218; 
trade on, i. 40, 55, 79; 2. 192, 200; 
7. 26; 8. 201, 202; a boundary of 
Way's grant, i. 40n, 80n; land on 
the east side of granted to Ply- 
mouth Colony, I. 44, 79; 2. 203, 
269, 275; 8. 203; boundary of the 
grant to Gorges and Mason, i. 79, 
81, 86; 2. 52a; 3. 30, 31; James 
Parke lived near, i. 114; people 
on informed of the outbreak of 
King Philip's war, 1.210; Indians 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



147 



profjeed to, i. 223; people of the 
name of Davis living near, i» 252n; 
Silvan us Davis lived near, i, 258; 
land near to be surveyed, i. 279; 
visited by Major Church, i» 296: 
3. 136; John Parke a large land- 
holder on the, 3. 302, 317; Thomas 
Webber lived near, 3. 317; a high- 
vray for the Indians, 3, 333; 8» 215, 
235; visited by Biart, i, 429; 6* 
208; the first regular settled mis- 
sionary at, I. 433; Bigot at, i. 434; 
Norridgewock situated on, 1.437; 
a church near the rapids of, i. 437 ; 
different names given to different 
parts of, I. 456, 456?i; 2. 27a; 4. 
103, 106, 112-114; Arnold led his 
troops through the vrilds of, i. 
447, 470, 494, 502; 4. 78; boundary 
of Norumbega, 2. 17a; the expe- 
dition of the Plymouth Coihpany 
arrived at, 2, 27a; fishing at the 
mouth of, 2. 48a, 192; settlement 
at commenced by John Parker, 2, 
190; land on claimed by Eobin- 
hood, 2. 191; skirmishes of In- 
dians on, 2. 196; the end of the 
united efforts of the Indians at, 

2. 199; boundary of the grant to 
Plymouth Colony, 2, 203, 269; Sir 
William Phipps born near, 2. 230; 
5. 224; settled as a boundary of 
the Kennebec Purchase, 2, 276; 
both sides of claimed by the Ken- 
nebec Purchase, 2.277; the house 
nearest to the head of, 2. 279 ; a 
sloop running to, 2. 282; 4. 46; 
the Indians excited against the 
settlers of, 3. 103; settlements on 
destroyed, 3. 107; supposed to 
have been explored by Weymouth, 

3. 281; 5. 346, 347; 7. 26; 9. 132ii; 
supposed not to have been ex- 
plored by Weymouth, 5. 250, 293, 
294, 298; visited by the Rev. Wil- 
liam Jenks, 3. 285; the natural 
features of changed by a dam, 3. 
SOin; Christopher Lawrence the 
first settler on, 3. 317; a boundary 
of Wharton's grant, 3. 325, 326; 
the trading house not to be 
moved, 3. SSS; attempts made to 
improve, 4. 43; John Jones made 
a map of, 4. 43; Wiscasset the 
seaport of, 4. 45; coasters from 
Boston to, 4. 46; supposed to be 
the SasancB, 4. 110; name of its 
mouth, 4. 112-113, 113-114; names 
of the ponds above, 4. 113, 114; a 
boundary of Alexander's grant, 

4. 221; 8. 143; a boundary of the 
Duke of York's territory, 5. 60; 
7. 47; AUerton's traders at, 5. 
204; John Brown moved to, 5. 
224; a Romish altar on the banks 
of, 5. 295; the French built a 



church and fort on, 5. 297; 7. 167; 
177; Du Monts set up a cross on, 
5. 322; how and in what way did 
Du Monts reach it, 5. 329; routes 
taken to reach, 5. 330, 331 ; Lith- 
gow in command of the forts on, 
5. 417; adventurers and cultiva- 
tors invited to, 6. 5; examined 
by Robert Temple, 6. 15; Scotch- 
Irish settled on, 6. 15; a boundary 
of the Sagadahoc territory, 6. 18; 
the home of the Abnaki, 6. 281; 
Capt Popham at, 6. 297; 7. 27; 
the tides of, 6. 304; Indian village 
on, 7. 4; land east of claimed by 
both the English and French, 7. 
26; Sir Edmund Andros at, 7. 54; 
the English ordered a fort built 
near, 7. 167-168, 195; Cushnoc 
the head of the navigation of, 7. 
168; garrison on, 8. 123, 1237i, 124; 
9. 87; Plymouth Colony desired a 
part of the trade at, 8. 203; site 
of the Plymouth trading house, 
I. 203; mentioned, i.31, 40^, 158n, 
181, I88n, 236/1, 256ri, 288, 290, 302, 
460, 461, 466, 499, 502, 504, 505, 
511, 513; 2. 31a, 35a, 85n, 86n, 152, 
193, 196, 204, 206, 207, 210, 213, 
215, 218, 220, 235, 239, 241, 258, 
261, 271, 275, 277, 283, 284, 293, 
294; 3. 82n, 276, 286, 300n, 301, 
304w, 311, 313, 316, 324, 329, 331, 
332, 346, 356, 369, 433, 434; 4.5, 
13, 14, 15, 69, 72, 73, 86, 96, 103, 
105, 107, 108, 109, 112, 117, 306, 
312, 313, 317, 331, 345, 346, 350, 

354, 373, 375, 377, 380; 5. xx, xxi, 
lix, Ix, 2, 6, 27, 60, 63, 72, 80, 81, 
87, 88, 103, 122, 126, 198, 224, 229, 
237n, 249, 253, 254, 259/1, 261, 266, 
283, 288, 327, 328, 329, 330, 335, 
336, 338, 343, 346, 347, 349, 350, 

355, 359/1, 370/1, 421; 6. 32, 33, 35, 
45, 48, 52, 60, 176, 176n, 178. 195, 
195J2, 196, 207, 208, 210, 213' 214, 
218, 240, 241, 243, 250, 252, 253, 
260, 281, 298, 303, 304, 306, 309, 
314, 360, 370; 7. 4, 31, 127, 155, 
158, 167, 169, 170, 171, 175, 177, 
178, 190, 193, 195, 196, 197, 198, 
198^, 203, 256, 259, 261, 262, 263, 
265, 277, 278, 283, 293n, 299, 302, 
304, 310, 314, 341, 348, 349, 354, 
359, 383, 385, 389, 390, 391, 408," 
409, 410, 412, 415, 416, 417, 424, 
425; 8. 21, 22, 25, 6Q, 110, llOn, 
111, lUa, lUn, 112n, 113n, 119/?, 
123, 124, 184, 185, 186, 203, 204, 
204/1, 205n, 209n, 213, 215, 216, 
218, 220, 221, 223, 224, 226n, 228, 
229*1, 230, 231, 233, 235, 237, 238, 
239, 243, 250n, 261, 266, 266n, 267, 
278, 318, 341, 344, 345, 355, 369, 
370,371,390; 9-4,5,7,41,61,161/ 
209,367. ' » » » 



148 



MAINE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



Kennebec — continued, 
row, Hallowell. 6. 63. 
settlement, mails sent to, 2.219; Mr. 
Macclenaghan at, 3. 274; an In- 
dian town, 5. 156n; tax of 1674, 5. 
249; on Hubbard's map, 5. 261n; 
the Pilgrims obtained a charter 
to the country, 7. 29; formerly a 
part of Hallowell, 7. 384; common 
schools in, 8. 158; mentioned, 4. 
36; 5. 239, 240, 249; 6. 90; 8. Ilia; 
9. 202. 
tract, 7. 359. 

valley, the garden of Maine, 4. 32 ; 
mentioned, 8. 341. 
Kennebehike, a name for the Kenne- 
bec river, 2. 203. 
Kennebis, an Indian Sachem, 2. 204. 
Kennebunk, definition of, 4. 115. 
accused of not attending to the 
king's business, i. 184; presented 
for not attending to the court's 
order, i. 185; formerly a part of 
Wells, I. 336, 350, 350^; 6. 364; a 
church started at, i. 349; pastors 
of the church at, i. 349-350; cen- 
sus of, I. 35071 ; the people of re- 
quired to bring their children for 
baptism, i. 354, 366; a sloop cap- 
tured at, 3. 348; no fort at, 5-396; 
Stephen Thatcher moved to 6. 
359; the Hon. Joseph Dane opened 
an office in, 6. 364; the Larrabee 
garrison in, 7. 116; the largest 
building ever built in, 6, 117 ; men- 
tioned, I. 340, 358, 359, 362, 866; 
3. 428, 430, 436, 439; 4. 19, 241, 
259, 308, 372; 6. 41, 359, 364, 379; 
7. 8, 220, 235; 8, 387, 388, 389, 390, 
392, 393, 398, 403; the History of, 
see Bourne, 
mill, I. 268. 
Kennebunkport, people from settle in 
Limerick, i. 327; lumber business 
at, I, 330, 331; formerly Cape 
Porpois, I. 362; 2. 80. 
Kennebunk Post, 2. 142; 7, 220. 
river, claimed as a boundary of 
Wells, I. 361; mentioned, i, 89, 
342- 

Kennedy, Capt. , captured. 6- 242. 

, of the census bureau, 4. 18, 

Kenney, Samuel, 3. 180. 
I&ent, 2. 78a; 3- ^'^-34, 34n; 9. 297, 
298, 301, 333, 369, 373. 
county, England, i. 95n, 113n; 3- 

68; 5- 129. 
county, N- B., 8. 38, 41. 
Chancellor, 8. 45L 
Charlotte, daughter of Edward, 8, 
460; married, 8.4^0; died, 8. 460. 
the Hon. Edward, parents of, 8.450; 
birth of, 8. 450; graduated from 
college, 8. 450*451; admitted to 
the bar, 8. 451 ; visited and then 
opened an office in Bangor, 8. 451, 
452; run a fire engine, 8. 452; in- 



terested in the Greek struggle, 8. 
452-453 ; a counselor, 8. 453 ; law 
partnership formed, 8. 453 ; held 
town offices, 8. 453, 455 ; a rep're- 
sentative, 8. 453, 454; opposed the 
annexation of Argyle, 8. 454; 
oration at Bangor, 8. 455 ; quota- 
tion from his inaugural, 8. 455 ; 
nominated for governor, 8. 456; 
elected governor, 8. 456, 457 ; war 
upon the returns, 8. 456; his in- 
augural, 8.457; elected a second 
time, 8. 458 ; his name in a dog- 
geral song, 8. 458?i; out of office, 
8. 459; a commissioner to settle 
the boundary dispute, 8. 459; re- 
sumed his law practice, 8. 459; a 
consul, 8. 459; formed a new part- 
nership, 8. 459; judge of the su- 
preme court, 8. 459 ; left the bench, 
8. 460; in Europe, 8. 460; the last 
public position he held, 8. 460; 
married first Sarah Johnston, 8. 
460; second, Abby A. Kockwood, 
8. 461 ; children of, 8. 460, 461 ; 
death of, 8.460,470; universally 
beloved, 8. 449; character of, 8. 
461-464, 469, 476-478; anecdotes 
of, 8. 464-468; his physique, 8. 
468, 479; A. W. Paine' s eulogy, 8. 
470-471; W. H.McCrellis' eulogy, 
8. 471-472; S. H. Blake on, 8. 472; 
A. G. Jewett on, 8. 472-473; Gen. 
Hamlin on, 8.473; Judge Rice on, 
8. 473; Judge Howard on, 8. 474; 
F. A. Pike on, 8.474; Judge Ap- 
pleton on, 8. 474-475 ; Israel Wash- 
burn on, 8. 475-478; J. F. Talbot 
on, 8. 478-480; mentioned, 6. 73; 
8. 4, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 70, 71. 72, 
73, 83, 84, 85, 89, 398, 410, 432; 
Memoir of, by the Hon. John E. 
Godfrey, 8. 449-480. 

George, 8. 450, 459. 

James, 8. 460. 

John, 8. 450. 

Kitty, 8. 460. 

Col. William, 8. 450. 

William Austin, 8. 450. 
Kentucky, 4. 59; 5. xxxvii; 6.411; 8. 

80. 
Kerdoormeorp, Capt. Brown killed at, 

2. 278. 

Ketangheanycke, an Indian town, 5. 
156n. 

Ketchum, the Eev. Joel, moved to 
Bakerstown, 2. 114. 

Khan of Tartary, the, Columbus ex- 
pected to meet him, 2. 14a. 

Kidd, Capt. William, 9. 10. 

Kidder, Frederic, on the Abnaki In- 
dians, 6. 229-244; his Eastern 
Maine cited, 7- In. 

Kidderminster, y. 381. 

Kilborn, Ivory, biographical notice of, 

3. 213. 
Kilboum, , 2. 291. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



149 



KiU-devil, a cant name for rum, i. 77; 

3-90. 
Killingby, 2. 146. 
Killock's meadow, 4. 276. 
Killpatrick family, tlie, 6. 21. 
Kilton William, letter of, 3. 21n. 
Kimball, David, 4. 317. 
Eleanor, 4. 317. 
the Hon. Increase, 8. 398. 
James, 4. 372. 
Olive, 4. 317. 
Richard, 2. 219. 

Thomas, purchased Hog island, i. 
124, 150; sold the same to Thomas 
Tyng, I. 124, 150. 

Deacon , of Bethel, 4. 339. 

the Rev. , 4- 330. 

Kimball's mills, 4. 281 n. 

tavern, 4. 267. 
Kinebequi, to be called the county of 
Canada, i.34n. 
river, 5. 6; 8. 184; see Kennebec 
river. 
Kineo, definition of 4. 105. 
bay, I. 456n, 466. 
lake, I. 456n. 
mountain, 4. 105. 
King, Alexander, 6. 342. 
Ann, 6. 342. 

Betsey, daughter of Richard, 3. 215. 
Betty, daughter of John, 6. 342. 
Charles, 6. 342. 

Cyrus, son of Richard, 3. 215; a 
noted jurist, 3. 215; married Han- 
nah Storer, 3- 215 ; mentioned, 4. 
6; 6.364. 
David, 3. 215. 

Dorcas, a daughter of Richard, 3. 
215; married Joseph Leland, 3. 
215. 
Edward, 2. 175. 
family, the, 4. 89. 

George, the, a provincial sloop, 5. 
366n; commanded by Capt. Hal- 
lo well, 5. 366n; 6.338; mentioned, 

5. 368, 374, 375, 379, 384ii, 385, 
385^1 ; 9.92. 

Icliabod, 2. 115. 

in council, the, 8. 2l9n. 

Isabella, 3. 215. 

John, a French neutral, 3. 176n; 5. 

342. 
Jonathan, signed the treaty of 1713, 

6. 255 ; autograph of, 6. 255. 
Joseph, 6. 342. 

Josiah, 3. 215. 
Margaret, 6. 342. 

Mary, daughter of Richard, 3. 214; 

married Robert Southgate, 3. 214. 
Paul, 6. 342. 
Paulina, daughter of Richard, 3. 

215 ; married Dr. Aaron Porter, 3. 

215. 
I'hilip's war, commenced, i. 210; 4. 

222; Samuel IngersoU served in, 

I. 312; one man to every twenty 



killed in 4. 73; eighty murdered 
in three months, 4. 73; first out- 
break of, 4. 222; Maine overrun 
by Indians, 4. 222-223; places de- 
, stroyed, 4. 223 ; statistics of losses 
4. 223 ; John Brown driven from 
Pemaquid, 4. 231 ; John Taylor in, 
4. 232 ; the people who fought in 
given townships in Maine, 4, 242, 
242n; Gov. Andros not displeased 
at, 5. 2.58, 268; Indians attacked 
the house of Robert Jordan, 6. 
189; the Indians supplied by Que- 
bec, 6. 236-237; Indians slaugh- 
tered at Chocheco, 6. 237; nearly 
all the Indians of New England 
involved in, 6. 237; the Indians 
looked to the French for protec- 
tion, 6. 237-238; death of King 
Philip, 6, 238 ; Pemaquid attacked, 
7. 156; mentioned, 2.171, 179; 3. 
78, 116, 126, 315, 318; 4. 224; 5. 
187,2.52; 9-78,213. 

Richard, signed the petition to 
Charles 11 i. 401. 

Richard, of Scarborough, suspected 
of toryism, 2. 150; 3. 190; verses 
of, 3. 163n; correspondence with 
Shirley, 3. 172; disgraceful attack 
upon, 3. 182-184; the rioters cap- 
tured, 3. 184; a dealer in foreign 
goods, 3. 182; fled for his life, 3. 
183; poem by 3- 184-185; never 
used stamped paper, 3. 185; let- 
ters of, 3. 185n; sent lumber to 
Salem and Boston, 3. 190; met by 
a mob, 3. 191-192; his opinion of 
the war of the Revolution, 3. 191n; 
his death, 3. 193, 195; true cause 
of his death, 3. 193; opposed Gor- 
ham, 3. 193; had in. hand a bill 
for the relief of the town, 3. 193- 
194; biographical notice of, 3. 213- 
215; children of, 3- 214-215; his 
address to the people of Scar- 
borough, 3. 237; mentioned, 3. 
181, 200, 208. 

Richard jr., married Hannah Larra- 
bee, 3. 215. 

Rufus, one of the founders of the 
New York Historical Society, 2. 
11a; a son of Richard, 3. 214, 215; 
biographical notice of, 3.215; let- 
ters to Dr. Southworth cited, 3. 
191 w, 196n, 200n; suspected of 
toryism, 3. 199 ; candidate for pres- 
ident, 5. xxxvii; mentioned, 3. 
197n; 4- 6. 

Sarah, 6.^342. 

street, Boston, 8. 210/1, 211n; g,76; 
in Portland, now India street, i.. 
242; the meeting-house near,.i. 
249; mentioned, 5. 443, 443tt. 

Capt. William, 3. 215. 

Gen. William, 2. 205, 212; 7- 356, 
857, 358; a corporate member of. 



150 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



King, Gen William — continued. 

the Maine Historical Society, i. 
11; a son of Richard, 3. 215; first 
governor of Maine, 4. 6, "In; men- 
tioned, I. 409; 2. 210, 219; 5. xli, 
xlii ; 6. 68, 72; 7. 21, 241, 242, 275; 
8. 27, 410; 9, 175. 
William's war, called Castine's war, 
6,"ll2; occasioned by, the English, 
6. 112; Castine excited the In- 
dians, 6. 112; mentioned, 4. 227; 
6, 125; 7. 114. 
Kingiield, 7. 357. 
Kingsbury, Andrew, 4. 56. 
Henry, married Julia Bourne, 8. 388. 
Sanford, corporate member of the 
Maine Historical Society, i. 11; 
born at Claremont, 6. 68; grad- 
uated from college, 6. 68; prac- 
ticed at Gardiner, 6. 68; judge 
and bank president, 6. 68; held 
public offices, 6. 68-69; death of, 
6. 69; mentioned, 6. 71; 8. 394, 
895. 
King's chapel, Boston, 6. 51; 8. 151, 
152, 222/1, 225n, 263, 264; 9-91, 93. 
college, 6. 273, 362. 
dock, 2. 215. 
highway, the, the oldest road in the 

state, 9. 142, 150, 151. 
letter of approbation, the, 5. 275w. 
the, 4. 89. 
Kingston, Canada, 7. 408. 
Mass., 2.145; 4.265, 272. 
N. H., 3. 164; 4. 242, 267, 273, 313. 
Kinibekki Indians, 6. 5. 
Kinnebec river, 5. 27; see Kennebec 

river. 
Kinney, the Rev. Aaron preached at 
Bath, 2. 223. 
William, 7* 284. 

Kinne, , teacher at Hallowell 

Academy, 8. 161. 
Kinne' s arithmetic, 8. 161, 180. 
Kinsly, Martin, 4. 7. 
Kinsman, the Rev. Ebenezer, preached 
at Limerick, i. 328; lost his chil- 
dren, I. 333 
Kip, Bishop W. J., 7. 433. 
Leonard, 7. 433. 

Sophia, daughter of Leonard, mar- 
ried the Rev. George Burgess, 7. 
433. 
Kireberuit, 6. 253. 

Kirk, David, Champlain surrendered 
to, 5. 196; his patent violated by 
the king, 5. 231 ; a French hugue- 
not, 9. 101; became an English 
subject, 9. 101; sent to capture 
New France, 9. 101-102; captured 
French ships, g. 102, 103; com- 
;pelled the surrender of Quebec, 9. 
102; left a Scotch colony at Port 
Royal, g. 102; disclosed the plans 
' of Alexander, g. 103. 
Kirkland, the Rev. John T., 2. 11a; 5. 
Hi; 6.399; 7.414. 



Kirkwood, Capt. Alexander, biograph- 
ical notice of, 3-215-216; married 
Mary Prout, 3. 221. 

Kirkwood's neck, 3. 215. 

Kirwan, Richard, 6. 409. 

Kissuragunnit, 6. 259. 

Kitteridge, Elizabeth W., daughter of 
Br. George G., married the Hon. 
Nathaniel Groton, 6. 370. 
Dr. George G., 6. 370. 
Jonathan, killed, 4. 287. 

Kittery, home of William Hooke, i. 
88; Champernoon lived at, i. 88«, 
176,230; 3.54-55; formerly a part 
of Piscatequa, i.94; svbmittcd to 
the jurisdiction of Mass., i. 102, 
103, 385, 386; 3. 43; 9-321 ; Francis 
Small moved to, i. 119; John 
Phillips died in, 1. 121, 217; home 
of John Graves, 1. 157, 260; home 
of Nicholas Shapleigh, 1. 159, 170, 
2.30, 553; home of Alexander 
Shapleigh, i. 163n; distance from 
York, I. 165; home of Francis 
Morgan, 1. 167; home of R. Cutts, 
1. 177; home of Francis Hooke, i. 
182n, 185; presented for not at- 
tending to the order of the court, 
1. 184-185; home of Roger Plais- 
ted, I. 197; home of Joseph 
Trickey, 1.208; the militia in, i. 
229; home of Christopher Mitch- 
ell, I. 230/1, 306; complained of 
the taxes, i. 240; furnished two 
men for Fort Loyal, i. 266; saw- 
mill at, I. 268, 269; formerly led 
in the lumber business, i. 269; 
formerly included Eliot, Berwick 
and South Berwick, 1.269; 4. 200; 
John Ingersoll moved to, i.3ll; 
home of Bragdon, i.315; home of 
Hugh Tucker, i. 315; people from 
settled at Limerick, i. 327; mil- 
itary officers of elected,! . 369, 373 ; 
presented for not attending to the 
children, i . 380 ; sent a petition to 
Cromwell, 1.392; the most pros- 
perous of the towns of Maine, i 
650; Champernoon and Cutts 
magistrates for, 2. 63a; Joseph 
Curtis the high sheriff of, 3. 21/a; 
home of Daniel Fogg, 3. 78; for- 
mer home of Roger Dearing jr., 3. 
83; Indians captured at, 3. 107; 
the Rev. A. W. Fisk preached at, 
3. 162; John King sent to, 3. 176m; 
the memorial of 1751, 4. 195-205; 
tax of 1734, 4. 197; tax of 1743, 4. 
197; tax of 1761, 4. 197; petitioned 
for a reduced taxation, 1751, 4. 
199-205; the topography of, 4. 
199; poor soil, 4. 199-200; fishing 
poor, 4. 200; had no marketable 
produce, 4. 200 ; little ship-build- 
ing, 4. 201; compared to other 
towns, 4. 201-203; a very poor 
place, 4. 203 ; part of the Isle of 



IKDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



151 



Shoals annexed to, 4. 204; taxes 
of compared to other places, 4. 
204-205 ; Simon Frost a represen- 
tative from, 4. 210, 229; the first 
church in, 5. liv; the Eev. John 
Newmarch settled in, 5. liv; 
church built, 6. 200; end of church 
service at, 6. 200; French neutrals 
in, 6. 842; Baptists in, 7. 221, 224; 
Elder Screven called to preach in, 
7. 223; mentioned, i. 105, 106; 2. 
237; 3. 46, 51, 179, ISO, 208, 213, 
225, 321; 4. 14, 75; 5. xx; 7. 220, 
225, 277; 8. 294, 295, 298. 

point, 7. 213; 8. 116. 
Knapp, George Christian, 8. 486. 
Knapton, Ensign Csesar, in command 
at Pemaquid, 5. 17, 19, 24; letters 
to from Brockholls, 5. 24-28, 81- 
82 ; commissioned as Justice of the 
Peace, 5. 38; sent to Pemaquid, 
7. 157; mentioned, 5. 11, 12, 30, 
86, 38, 40, 41, 42, 259. 
Kneeland, John proprietor at Pema- 
quid, 5. 302. 

Prudence, proprietor at Pemaquid, 
5. 302. 

, of Otisfield, 4. 338. 

Kneller, Sir Godfrey, 7. 234w. 
Knight, Elizabeth, daughter of Na- 
than, married Eben Sevey, 3. 216. 

Ezekiel, resided at Wells, 1. 170, 197, 
862; an associate, i. 170, 197; 
ordered to lead religious meetings 
at Wells, I. 346, 356, 373; accepted 
the Rigby grant, i. 355-356; a 
man of note, i. 356; commissioner, 
I. 360, 361 ; grand juryman, i. 371 ; 
signed the petition to Cromwell, 
I. 395. 

George, lived at Black Point, 3. 83. 
■ Hannah, daughter of Nathan, mar- 
ried John Sellea, 3. 216. 

John, 4. 281. 

Margaret, daughter of Nathan, mar- 
ried Alex Roberts, 3. 216. 

Martha, daughter of Nathan, mar- 
ried John Elder, 3. 216. 

Mary, daughter of Nathan, married 
John Crockett, 3. 216. 

Nathan, biographical notice of, 3. 
216. 

Nathaniel, 3. 216. 

Robert, action brought against for 
molestation, i. 369; signed the 
petition to Cromwell, i. 395; 
signed the petition to the general 
court, 9. 382. 

Sarah, daughter of Nathan, married 
Anthony Brackett, 3. 216. 

Stephen, 4. 281. 

Susanna, 4. 281. 

Westbrook, 3. 216. 

, married Sarah Coffin, 4. 207. 

Knighted Indian, a, 3. 99. 
Knowels, Seth, 3. 246, 251, 252. 



Knox county, i. 45; 9. 77, 226. 

Gen. Henry, letter to from Wash- 
ington, 4. 59; his house, 4. 326, 
327; 5. 367n; contracted for land 
in Maine, 7. 354; lacked funds 
but was sanguine, 7. 354; married 
into the Waldo family, 7. 354; the 
Waldo patent assigned to, 7. 354 ; 
conveyed land to Bingham, 7.354; 
married Lucy Flucker, 9. 90, 227 ; 
effected a consolidation of his 
wife's shares in the Waldo patent, 
9. 90, 227 ; a member of Washing- 
ton's cabinet, 9. 227, 231; estab- 
lished his home at Thomaston, g. 
227 ; his claim settled by the state, 
9. 229-230; became the owner of 
four towns, 9. 232 ; sold land to 
Benjamin Bussey, 9. 233; men- 
tioned, I. 502n; 4. 51, 56, 6S^ 89, 
323; 5. 382n; 6.301; 7. 408; 8. 7, 
10, 166, 31 7 ; 9. 231 ; his manuscripts 
cited, 7. 201 ; 9. 93. 
Mrs. Gen. Henry, her kindred es- 
tranged and tories, 9. 90 ; obtained 
a high position, 9. 90; mentioned, 
4. 59, 327. 
island, 4. 324. 

John, a pupil of Calvin, 6. 24; com- 
posed his first book of discipline, 
6. 24; impressed the Scotch, 6. 7-8. 

Kock's Hydrarchos Sillimanni ex- 
posed, 7. 397-398. 

Kohl, Dr. A. G , 8. iv, 507. 

Ktaadin, definition of, 4. 105, 109. 

Kynybequy river, 2. 258; see Kenne- 
bec river. 

Labbe, Reginald, 3. 69n. 
Yda, 3. 69^1. 
see Libby. 

Lablane, Paul, 3. 176n. 

Labocree, 7. 116, 118. 

Labrador, discovered by Cabot, 2. 15a; 
named by Cortereal, 2. 16a; Fro- 
bisher at, 6. 175n; religious ser- 
vice early held at, 6. 175n; home 
of the Esquimaux, 8. 339; men- 
tioned, 4. 97. 

Laby, a way of spelling Libby, 3. 69. 

Lacadie, see Acadia. 

La Chasse, Pere, , 7. 58, 83-84, 89. 

Lacombe, 9. 290. 

Laconia, granted to G orges and Mason, 

2. 52a; 3. 30; extent of, 2. 52a, 66; 
part of granted to others, 2. 52a; 

3. 31-32; origin of the name, 2. 
66; 3. 80; 5. xxi; called the 
country of the Iroquois, 2. 66; 
climate of, 2. 66; lake and river 
of, 2. 67; explored by Jocelyn, 2. 
68n; a part of Maine, 69; settlers 
sent to, 3. 30-31 ; divided between 
Gorges and Mason, 3. 81; men- 
tioned, 9. 306, 346. 

Company, i. 46w, 47n; 9. 306, 306n. 
patents, the, i. 36; 2. 79n; 9. 806. 



152 



MAINE HISTOBICAJi SOCIETY. 



La Corne, Pierre de 8. 140, 141 145. 
Ladd, William, biographical notice of, 
2. 255-256; moved to Minot, 2. 
122; mentioned, 2. 125, 128; An- 
nals of Bakerstown, Poland and 
Minot, 2. 110-130. 
Laet, Jean de, 2. 9. 
La Fayette, Marquis de, present at 
the laying of the corner stone of 
Bunker Hill, 3. 250; visited Maine, 
5. xliii; mentioned, 2. 214; 6.355; 
8. 264. 
La Have, fort built at, 7. 33; now 

Liverpool, 7. 33. 
La Hontan, Armand Louis de Delon- 
darce. Baron de, on the Algon- 
quin language, 1.413; his travels 
in Canada cited, 4. 97; 5. 271, 
272n; 6. 4, 46, llln, 211, 212, 222, 
223, 225; 7. 41n, 48, 70, lOln; an 
error in, 6. 212, 223. 
Laight Street Church, K. Y., 8. 486. 

Laird, Mr. , 8. 148, 149. 

Lake, Anne, married first the Kev. 
John Cotton, 5. 253; second, Dr. 
Mather, 5. 253. 

Benjamin, taken prisoner by the In- 
dians, 2. 182. 

Sir Bibye, claimed land on the Ken- 
nebec, 5. 253-254. 

Champlain, called Erocois and Iro- 
quois lake, 2. 66^ 78a; 3. 34n; 
Henry Jocelyn employed to dis- 
cover it, 2. 78a; 3. 34n; men- 
tioned, I. 496, 500; 6. 210, 384; 8. 
349; 9. 183, 184; see Lake of the 
Iroquois. 

Cheputnecook, 8. 106. 

Conesus, i. 531. 

Sir Edward, 5. 254. 

George, 4. 284n; 6. 242. 

Megantic, i. 449, 456, 463, 495. 

of the Iroquois, to be searched for 
by Cleeves, i. 67; Neale attempt- 
ed to find, 2. 67, 6Sn; see Lake 
Champlain. 

of the Woods, 4. 97. 

Ontario, 9. 187, 1S8. 

Original, i. 465. 

Pohenagomock, 8. 101. 

Kichard, 5. 253. 

Capt. Thomas, killed, i. 224, 253; 2. 
192; 5. 253; purchased part of 
Reskeagan island, 2. 191, 192; had 
a fort at Arrowsick, 2. 192; held 
a court at Pemaquid, 5. 250; 
lived in Boston, 5. 253; a conspic- 
uous victim of the Indian war, 5. 
253; a son of Richard, 5. 253; 
married Mary Goodyear, 5.2.53; 
children of, 5. 253-254; his title 
faulty, 8. 207; mentioned, 3. 330: 
7. 153n. 

Thomas jr., controversy with the 
Kennebec Purchasers, 2. 276; a 
son of Capt. Thomas, 5.253; heir 



of Sir Edward, 5. 253-254; father 
of Sir Bigby, 5. 254. 
TJmbagog, 9. 213. 
Wallahgesque-ga-mook, 4, 111. 
Winnepisseogge, i. 100; 6. 185. 
La Mananthe, 6. 281,286; see Man- 
hattan. 
Lamb, Capt. John, i. 523, 524, 525. 
Lambard, Joseph. 2. 216. 

Capt. Luke, served in the Revolu- 
tion, 2. 214; in command of the 
Diligence, 2. 247; mentioned, 2. 
216, 219. 
Lambert, Gideon, 4. 377, 403. 
Lambert's Hotel, 7. 20. 
Lambton, John, signed the treaty of 
1714, 6. 258; autograph of, 6. 258. 
La Montagrets, the number of, i. 288. 

La Motte, Lieut. , 8. 327. 

Lamprey river, 3. 439. 
Lancaster, 2. 146; 5. xxiii. 
county, England, i. 355n. 
county, Penn., i. 500, 503, 530. 
Ezekiel, 4. 307, 342, 365. 
the Rev. Thomas, preached at 
Scarborough, 3. 161; 6. 33; his 
long pastorate^ 3. 161; death of, 
3. 161; a trustee of Bowdoin Col- 
lege, 3. 161; mentioned, 3. 162n, 
205; 4.307; 7. 220. 
Land Bar, Montressor at, i. 466. 
company, the, 8. 282. 
of the Twenty Associates, 9. 81. 
Landing at Cape Ann, the, cited, 5. 
169n, 182n, 185?i, 207n. 
the, at Blue Point, 3. 82, 104. 
road, the, 3. 220. 
Lane, Daniel, 2. Ill, 112. 
Dorcas, married Thomas Wharff, i, 

209. 
Isaac, 4. 7. 

James, lived at Casco bay, 1. 114, 
236n; moved to North Yarmouth, 
I. 188; 2. 171; a juror, i. 188; an 
assurety of James Mosier, i. lS9n; 
came from Maiden, i. 189n; lived 
at Newport, i. 189n; married Re- 
becca Harndell, i. lS9n; his son, 
1. 189n; lived in Gloucester, 2. 171. 
John, son of James, moved to 
Long Island, 1. 189«.; signed the 
petition to Bradstreet, i. 2SSn; 
married a daughter of John Wal- 
lis, I. 317; lived at Purpooduck, 

1. 317, 321. 

Joshua, supposed to have been 
drowned, 1. 189; deposition of, i. 
146%; signed the petition to Brad- 
street, 1. 283?i; lived at Back cove, 
1.321. 

Mrs. S. E., 8. 152. 

Capt. , the Indians dissatisfied 

with, 3.374; at Port Halifax, 8. 
256n; Capt. Lithgow complained 
of, 7. 256n, 257. 
Lane's island, an Indian burying place, 

2. 167. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



153 



La Keve's Catalogue of Knights, 

cited, 9. 18-19. 
Langdon, Paul, teacher at Fryehurg 
Academy, 8. 163; his salary, 8. 
163. 
the Rev. Samuel, 7. 220. 
Timothy, an early lawyer of Maine, 
4. 16. 
Lange, John, 5. 88. 
Langmaid, Henry, lived at Falmouth, 
I. 321; signed the petition to 
Bradstreet, i. 283ti. 
Language of the Abnaquis, by C. E. 
Potter, 4. 185-193; by William 
Willis, 4. 95-117. 
of the Indians, remarks on, i. 412- 
427; changes in the language of 
all nations, i. 426; difficult to 
study that of the Indians, 4. 95, 
96; aids in the study of, 4. 96 
classed under four families, 4. 97 , 
Halle's remarks on, 4. 08; the 
grammatical system of different 
from others, 9. 264; the synopsis 
of, see Gallatin, Albert. 
Langworth, Francis,, 9. 373, 374. 
Lapthorne, Stephen, settled at Black 
Point, 3. 15, 38n; a tenant of Cam- 
mock, 3. 15; warned off by John 
Winter, 3. 15. 
Larebenuit, 6. 261. 

Larkham, the Rev. Thomas, contro- 
versy with Gibson, 6. 181 ; obliged 
to leave Mass., 6. 182. 
Larkrow, Abraham, signed the peti- 
tion to Mass., 5. 241. 
Larrabee, Anthony, killed, 3. 150, 152, 
216. 
Benjamin, married Deborah Inger- 
soll, 1.311; mentioned, 2. 171, 173. 
Capt. Benjamin, son of Thomas, 3. 
152, 216; at the destruction of 
Norridgewock, 3. 152; his age at 
that time, 3. 152; saw Ralle but 
did not kill him, 3. 152 ; the grand- 
father of Joseph, 3. 216; men- 
tioned, 3. 199. 
Major Benjamin, served in the war 

of the Revolution, 3. 203. 
Garrison, the, described, 7. 116-117; 

a night attack prevented, 7. 118. 
Hannah, married Richard King jr., 

3. 215. 
Isaac, lived at Falmouth, i. 321; 

moved to Machias, 3. 178, 180. 
Capt. John, moved from Lynn to 
Scarborough, 3. 139; in command 
at Black Point, 3. 141; refused 
to capitulate, 3. 141 ; biographical 
notice of, 3, 216; mentioned, 3. 
149, 166. 
Joseph, grandson of Benjamin, 3. 

216. 
Samuel, 2.173; 3. 178. 
Stephen, built a garrison at Wells, 
7. 216, 217; a man of vigilence, 7, 
^18. 



Thomas, killed, 3. 150, 152, 216; 
site of his house, 3. 150/i; chil- 
dren of, 3. 216; mentioned, 3-166, 
173. 
William B., 2. 212. 

La Saussaye Sieur, surrendered St. 
Sauveur, i. 431; sent with an ex- 
pedition to America, 8. 323 ; men- 
tioned, 8. 326, 327, 329. 

L' Atrereel, Indian conference at, 8. 9. 

L' Tete, harbor of, 8. 9. 

Lathrope, the Rev John, 5. lii. 
the Rev. Joseph, his warning to 
churches, 4. 335, 336. 

La Tour, Charles de, his messenger 
assisted by Shurt, 5. 220; estab- 
lished at the River St. John, 6. 
110; 9. 110; claimed the govern- 
ment of Acadia, 6. 110; 9. 102-103; 
quarreled with D' Aulney, 6. 110; 
a son of Claud, 9. 97 ; frequently 
confounded with his father, 9. 
97; probably with Poutrincourt, 
9. 98; at Port Royal, 9. 98; age at 
that time, 9. 98 ; a friend of Bien- 
court, 9. 98 ; left in charge of af- 
fairs, 9. 98-99, 102; sent a memo- 
rial tio the king, 9. 102-103; en- 
rolled as a knight, 9. 101; never 
accepted the title, 9. 104; would 
not co-operate with his father, 9. 
105-106; the surrender of his 
fort demanded, 9. 106-107; his 
father surrendered to him, 9. 107- 
108; commended, 9. 108; govern- 
or of Acadia, 9. 109; of service to 
the Scotch, 9. 109; built his father 
a house,, g. 110; mentioned, 7. 31, 
46. 
Claud de, prominent in the history 
of Acadia, 9. 97 ; frequently con- 
founded with Charles, 9. 97; un- 
certain that he sailed with Du 
Monts, 9. 98; at Port Royal, 9. 98; 
from Champagne, 9: 99; a Prot- 
estant, 9. 99, 103; a poor mason, 
9. 99, 99n; his descendants claimed 
large tracts of land, 9. 99; the 
claims doubtful, 9. 99-100; his 
true name, 9. 100; first prominent 
notice of, 9. 100; taken prisoner 
by Kirk, 9. 101, 103; acquainted 
with the plan of Alexander, 9. 
103; wished to save Acadia for 
the Jesuits, 9. 103; well received 
in England, 9, 103; joined in 
English colonization, 9. 103-104; 
married, 9. 103; a knight, 9. 104; 
sailed for America, 9. 105 ; deman- 
ded the surrender of the fort, g. 
107; fort surrendered, 9. 107-108; 
nobility of his character, g. 107; 
built a fort at Granville, 9. 108; 
gave an account of the condition 
of Port Royal, 9. 109; in com- 
mand at St. John, g» 110; pur- 
chased rights of Sir William 



154 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 



La Tour, Claud de — continued. 

Alexander, 9. Ill; sale doubted, 
9. 112; grant to Pentagoet, 9. 112, 
112n; may have had conflicting 
claims -with D' Aulney, 9. 112; 
nothing definite known of him 
after 1635, 9. 112; no evidence 
that he made any claim west of 
the St. Croix, 9. 112; severe criti- 
cism of him not justified, 9. 112; 
mentioned, 7. 33; Memoir of by 
John E. Godfrey, 9. 95-113. 
Laud, William, a modern Pharaoh, 5. 
217 ; a ruler in the council, 5. 221 ; 
his hatred of Puritanism, 5. 221- 
222 ; the people of ISTew England 
strong against, 5.222; his deeds 
justified by the acts of Mass., 6, 
187; mentioned, 5. 233, 273; 6. 
26; 9. 311n. 

Laughton, , sold Indians into 

slavery, 5. 251, 253. 
Laurens, Henry, 6. 87. 
Laurent, a hostage at Fort St. George, 
5.369; belonged to the Penobscot 
tribe, 5. 370-371; sent with Car- 
gill to find canoes, 5-373; men- 
tioned, 5. 375. 
Lauverjait, Pere, 7. 83, 86, 88, 89; let- 

ter of cited, 7. 6. 
Laverdiere, C. H., his edition of 
Cham plain's journal cited, 7. 245. 
Law books, few in use in 1799, 6. 54. 
schools, none in Maine before 1820, 
8. 179. 

Capt. , I. 524. 

Lawrence, 8. 139. 
Abbott, 8. 89. 

Amos, interested in the building of 
Bunker Hill Monument, 3. 252, 
255n, 262-263, 262n, 265w, 266-267, 
268. 
Gov. Charles, 8. 149, 221, 223, 244, 
246, 262, 263, letter from Gov. 
Shirley, 8. 222n. 
Hepzibah, ne4 Munjoy, married 

Stephen Cross, i. 257, 313. 
Robert 1st, built a stone house, i. 

247; killed, 1.247- 
Robert 2d, married Hepzibah Mor- 
timore, i. 247, 257, 313; a guar- 
dian of Hepzibah Munjoy, i, 257; 
improved the farm of his wife, i. 
257, 258; a trustee for Falmouth, 
I. 271, 554; opposed the survey of 
land by Clements, i . 275 ; leader in 
the opposition to Gov. Andross, i. 
280; complained of Davis for tres- 
pass and lowering the value of 
his land, i. 280; arrested for 
scandal, I. 281; the basis of his 
land claim, i. 281 ; land confirmed 
by Davis, i. 282, 282m; commis- 
sioner, I. 284; appealed to Brad- 
etreet, i. 283-284; answered by 
Davis, 1.284; his answer to Davis, 



285 ; had private motives against 
Davis, 1.285; urged the govern- 
ment to send assistance to Casco, 
I. 292; in command of a garrison, 
I. 296; consulted with Major 
Church, I. 296; troops stationed 
at his house, 1.398, 313; his house 
the scene of the Indian attack, i. 
299n; mortally wounded, i. 302, 
SI 3; his disputed land claim set- 
tled by his death, i. 313; bis origin 
unknown, i. 313; left no issue, i. 
313; had a house on Munjoy' s 
Hill, I. 313; lived on the Neck, i. 
321. 
Lieut. Thomas, petition to the gen- 
eral court, 8. 250)1. 

Mr. , 5. 37. 

Lawson, Christopher, punished for 

contempt, i. 374; first settler on 

the Kennebec, 3. 317; employed 

by Thomas Purchase, 3. 317. 

Lawson' s Plantation, 2. 204. 

Lawyers, early of Maine, 4. 16; of 

Portland, 5. xxvi, xxxiv. 
Lay ordination performed in Gorham, 

2. 147. 
Layer, 3. xvi. 
Layton, Jno., signed the petiton to 

Mass., 5. 240. 
Lazarus, an Indian living in Bakers- 
town, 2. 112. 
Leach, the Rev. Giles, preached in 
Wells, I. Udn, 
see Leech. 
Leaden plate, the, 9. 224. 
Leader, George, grand juryman, i. 
371; his servant to be punished 
for insubordination, i. 371. 
Richard, agent for Mass., in England, 
I. lOln; 9. 339, 344. 
Learned, Major David, 4. 362, 391. 

Mrs. David, 4. 391. 
Lease of Gorges to Cleeves and Tuck- 
er, I. 61, 543. 
Leatherby, Stephen, signed the peti- 
tion to Charles 11, i.402. 

Leathers, , married Abigail 

Thomas, 3. 315n. 

Leavett, , in the expedition 

against Port Royal, 7. 77. 
Leavitt, Abraham, suspected of being 
a tory, 3. 199; biographical notice 
of, 3. 217; mentioned, 3. 139n. 
Deacon John, biographical notice 

of. 3. 217. 
Leavitt, Samuel, 4. 244. 

, of Turner, 4. 304. 

Lebanon, 4- 6, 111, 271; 6. .358; 7. 219, 
Lebbee, I a way of spelling Libby, 3. 
Lebby, J 69. 
Leblanc, John, 6. 342. 
Joseph, 6. 342. 
Madlin, 6. 342. 
Margaret, 6. 342. 
Mary, 6. 342, 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



155 



Oliver, 6. 342. 

Paul, a French neutral, 6. 342. 
Eose, 6. 342. 
Samuel, 6. 342. 
Tittium, 6. 342. 
Le Bretton, Philp, see Bretton, Philip. 
Lechford, Thomas, his Plain Dealing 
or News from New England cited, 
3. IhZn. 
Lechmere, Thomas, signed the treaty 
of 1713, 6. 254; autograph of, 6. 
254. 
Lieut. , killed, 8. 136; men- 
tioned, 8. 1.33, 136, 140n. 
Le Creux, Fran^'ois, map of, 6. 210, 

212, 213. 
Lee, 4. 290. 
Elizabeth, married the Kev. Thomas 

Allen, 5. xlvi. 
Elder Jesse, first in New England, 
7. 227; in Maine, 7. 227; his 
character and abilities, 7. 228; 
published a history of the Meth- 
odists, 7. 228. 
John, 7. 13. ^ 
the Rev. Jonathan, first minster in 

Salisbury, 5. xlvi. 
the parish of, 9. 302. 
Robert, 2. 260, 264. 
the Hon. Silas, practiced in Wis- 
casset, 6. 52; married a daughter 
of George Thatcher, 6. 52; Judge 
of Probate, 6. 53; district attor- 
ney and member of congress, 6. 
53 ; death of, 6. 53 ; character and 
personal appearance, 6. 53; men- 
tioned, 4. 330, 330n; 5. xxiii, xxv; 
6. 41, 55. 
William, signed the petition to 
Mass., 5. 241. 

Mrs. , ransomed, i. 293. 

the Rev. , of N. Yineyard, 4. 

335, 395. 
Lee's grant incorporated with Nor- 
Leech, Mark, 4. 359. 

the Rev. , of Raymond ton, 4. 

301, 385. 
Leeds, 4. 305n; 6. 73. 

way, 4. 338. 
Leeman's island, 9. 133, 141. 
Leg dollar, 6. 134. 

Legard, Thomas, signed the treaty of 
1714, 6. 2.59; autograph of, 6. 259. 
Leicester, 3. 223, 224. 

academy, 6. 70n. 
Leighes, 3. xv. 

Leighton, Charles, 3, 266, 268. 
John, lived at Saco, i. 185, 188; an 
action brought against, i. 185; a 
juror, 1. 188; signed the petition 
to Cromwell, 1. 394; 4. 205; signed 
the treaty of 1713, 6. 255; auto- 
graph of, 6. 255. 
William, 4. 205. 

Leisner, Capt. , 5. 368. 

Leistner, Charles, agent for Gen. 
Waldo, 6. 323. 



Le Jeune, Pere Paul, 7. 44w, 58. 
Leland, Joseph, married Dorcas King, 
3. 215. 

Le Londre, Pere , 6. 225. 

Le Moine, Pere , baptized Indian 

skeletons, 5. 175. 
, of Dieppe, 8. 329. 

Lemont, Capt. Benjamin, served in 
the Continental army, 2. 214; 
mentioned, 2. 212, 218; g. 160. 
David, 2. 214. 
James, 2. 213, 225. 
Capt. John, ser\ied in the Continen- 
tal army, 2. 214; mentioned, 2. 
208, 211, 213. 
Thomas, served in the Continental 
army, 2. 214. 

Lenape, the, same as the Delawares, 
4.97; a widely spoken language, 
4. 97; in possession of a large 
territory, 4. 97; called Algon- 
quins and Wapanachki, 4. 97; see 
Lenni-Lenape. 
Lenapis, the, 6. 217. 

Lennepe, 5. 405, 407. 

Lenni-Lenape, the, same as Algon- 
quins, i. 412; their language ex- 
tolled, 1.413; the origin of their 
language unknown, i.427; same 
as the Delawares, 4. 97; called 
grandfathers, 6. 216; supposed 
definition of their name, 6. 216- 
217; mentioned, 6. 223, 272; 9. 
285; see Lenape. 

Lenox, James, 5. 440. 
Thomas, 8. 183n. 

the Duke of, one of the Ply- 
mouth Company, i, 32, 38w; 2. 
40a; his share in the Council of 
New England, 2. 54; death of, i. 
81; mentioned, 2. 42n, 46. 

Lenthall, Edmund, married Susannah 
Brereton, 2. 46w. 
Mary, heiress of Sir William 

Prereton, 2. 46n; married 

Levett, 2. 46w. 

Leonard, Daniel, 7. 201. 

Leominster, 6. 69n, 70n. 

Leonidas, 7. 116. 

Leopold, Emperor, 7. 41, 46. 

Lermond, Mary, married Cyrus Eaton, 
7. 491. 

Lescarbot, Marc, fund of valuable in- 
formation in his works, i. 404; 
companion of Du Monts, 6. 175n; 
speaks of early religious services, 
6. 175n; called a chaplain, 6. 175n; 
on his way to America, 7.264; 
his Histoire de la Nouvelle 
France cited, i. 26n, 430; 2. 9; 7. 
102, 245, 264, 265. 

Lesley, the Rev. , of Ipswich, 4. 

273. 

Lesueur, P., his Dictionary de Racines 
Abnakises cited, 9. 263. 

Lett, 7. 79, 79n, 80n. 



156 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIEOPY, 



Letters from the general court to 
Casco, I. 240; from Gorges to 
Vines and others, i. 544-500; from 
George Popham to James i, 5. 
357-360; from Eishworth to Endi- 
cott, I. 396; from Washington to 
Knox, 4. 49-63 ; of Arnold on his 
expedition to Canada, i. 447-498; 
of Jacob Bailey on the destruc- 
tion of Falmouth, 5. 437-450. 

Lettres Edifiantes cited, i. 420. 

Leucht, Mr. , 6. 325. 

Levant, 7. 225. 

Leverett, John, sent by Mass. to 
Maine, i. 176; 5. 186; Muscongus 
granted to, 9. 77, 78, 225, 267; ex- 
tent of the grant, 9. 77, 225-226; 
became sole proprietor, 9. 78; 
death of, 9. 78, 226; his heirs, 9. 
78; Gen. Knox, in possession of 
his grant, 9. 227; presented a pe- 
tition to Mass. general court for 
the people of Maine, g. 326 ; agent 
of Mass. in England, 9-323-324; 
able to ward off investigation, 9. 
326, 327; contrast of his position 
in twenty-two months, 9. 3^9, 330 ; 
dared not avow himself as agent 
for Mass., 9. 330, 331, 352-353; 
sought to escape a mean position, 
9. 331-332; licensed to go to New 
England, 9. 332w; at Boston, 9. 
SS2n; mentioned, 5. 231; 6.321; 
9. 79, 125, 352, .363; purchased the 
claim of Spencer Phips, 9. 79; 
associated with others in the ten 
and thirty proprietors, 6. 321 ; 9. 
79. 
Thomas, one of the grantees of the 
Muscongus patent, i. 45, 79; 6. 
321; became the sole propretor, 
6,321; his heirs, 6.321. 

Leveretts, the, 5. 304. 

Levett, Capt. Christopher, counselor 
for Gorges, i. 34n; 2. 43a, 45a, 
48a, 49a; visited the coast of 
Maine, i. 34n; 2. 48a; land granted 
to, I. 42n; 5. 167; 9. 367; at the 
Isle of Shoals, i. 42;^; 2. 48a, 79; 
5. 167; at Piscataqua, i.42n; 2. 
48a, 80 ; at Pemaquid, i . 42n ; at 
York, I. 42n; left for England, i. 
42n; his settlement broken up, i. 
42n ; attempt to settle in Portland 
harbor, 1. 51yi; built pai't of a 
stone house at Peak's island, i. 
149w; 2. 89; but little known of 
him, 2. iva; met Robert Gorges, 
2. 45a, 79, 80; at Cape Manwagen, 
2. 48a, 86; 5. 168; the Indians 
discouraged his making a settle- 
ment, 2. 48a-49a; member of the 
Plymouth Company, 2. 49a; 5. 
167, 168; at Casco, 2. 49a; selected 
a place for his settlement and 
called it York, 3. 49a j at Panna- 



way, 2. 79; at Agamenticus, 2. 
80; at Cape Porpus, 2. 80; at Saco, 
2. 81-82, 83; saw the White 
Mountains, 2. 84; gave his name 
to a river, 2. 84, 85; met a saga- 
more, 2. 85-86, 87; 5. 168, 187; de- 
sired to trade with Samoset, 2. 
87-88; traded with Indians, 2. 91; 
liked by the Indians, 2. 92; from 
Somersetshire, 5. 167; found 
many ships fishing on the coast, 
5. 168; compared to Samoset, 5. 
188; mentioned, i. 353; 2. 93; his 
Voyage to New England written 
and published, 2. 48,49a; rarity 
of the same, 2. 49a, 74; value of, 

2. 49a; editions of, 2. 49a; com- 
pared to Robinson Cruso, 5. 167 ; 
cited, I. 34w, 55^i, I49n, 553; 2. 76- 
109; 3.9. 

, claimed land belonging to 

Brercton, 2, A6n. 
Levett' s river, 2. 84, 85. 
Lewis, Alonzo, his History of Lynn 
cited, 5. 198^, 22Sn. 
and Bonython patent, the, granted, 

3. 17; conditions of the grant, 3. 
17; Watts and Foxwell sent to, 3. 
17, 18; the title under dispute, 
3.22. 

Ann, married James Rose, 1.261, 
314. 

Major Archelaus, 6. 365. 

Ellinor, wife of John, i. 191; wit^ 
ness against George Lewis, 1. 191. 

George, testimony against Winter, 
I. 72; probably came from Scitu- 
ate, I. 75; received a grant from 
Cleeves and Tucker, i. 75, 118; 
grant extended, i. 75; died, i. 75, 
260; lived at Ealmouth, i. 105, 
114, 216; submitted to the juris- 
diction of Mass., I. 105, 386; a 
biographical notice of, i. 113ii; 
lived at Casco, 1. 117; his mark, 
1. 126; petitioned to have the con- 
troversy between Cleeves and 
Jordan settled, i. 141; constable, 
I. 159; signed the petition to the 
king, 1. 180; lived at Scarborough, 
I. 191; accused of crimes and 
gave a bond for good behavior, i, 
191 ; his daughter married Thomas 
Skillings, 1.195, 308; his children 
conveyed land to Richard Sea- 
comb, I. 259, 279; deposition con- 
cerning, i . 260-261 ; lived at Back 
Cove, I. 260, 321; his children, i. 
261 ; his daughter married James 
Ross, I. 314; his statement con- 
cerning Robert Nash, 1.383; men- 
tioned I. 121, 122, 123, 221. 

Hannah, maried James Darling, i. 
261. 

Job, built a garrison, 3- 314; 8. 123, 
123n, 124; his petition to Gov. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



157 



Shirley, 8. 123, 123n; a resident 
of Boston, 8. 124; one of the Pe- 
jepscot Company, 8. 124; site of 
his fort, 8. 124; lived at Augusta, 
8. 124; mentioned, 4. 164, 166. 

John lived at Falmouth, i. 112, 114, 
216; grant to, I. 75, 113; signed 
the submission to Mass., 1. 112; a 
son of George, i. 113, 117, 261; 
at Scituate, i. 113; Cleeves con- 
veyed land to, 1. 117; situation of 
the same, i. 117; conveyed the 
same to Nathaniel Wallis, 1. 118; 
260n, 261 ; signed the petition to 
the king, 1. 180; a witness against 
George Lewis, i. 191; did not re- 
turn to Falmouth after the In- 
dian war, I. 250; mentioned, i. 
123. 

Jothan, married Mary, widow of 
Thomas Skillings, i. 195n, 261. 

Lathrop, surveyed the Waldo pa- 
tent, 9. 229. 

the Hon. Lathrop, 7. 21, 390. 

Mary, married first Thomas Skil- 
lings, 1. 195,261; second, Wilkins, 
and third, Jothan Lewis, i. 195, 
261; lived at Salem, i. 261. 

Gen. Morgan, 9. 185, 186. 

Philip, lived on Hog island, 1. 150 : 
settled at Back Cove, i. 155-156, 
321; surety for George Lewis, i. 
191; son of George, i. 261; wit- 
nessed the deed to George Mun- 
joy, I. 553; mentioned, i. 216; 3. 
322, 322n. 

Richard, deposition of, 3. 332-333. 

Susannah, married Thomas Cloice, 
1.261, 308. 

the, 5. 135. 

Thomas, land granted to, i. 44, 79; 
3. 17; 9- 366; died, i. 44; at the 
first court held in Maine, i. 84; 
lived at Winter Harbor, i. 84n; 
ordered to appear at court, i. 85; 
witnessed the signature of Mac- 
worth, I. 544; commissioner, 3, 
36; mentioned, 3. 18; 5. 26. 

Col. , 9. 199, 200. 

Major , of Gorham, 4. 374. 

Widow , of Limerick, died, i. 

333. 
Lewis' Neck, named for George 

Lewis, I, 123. 
Lewiston, 4. 27, 305, 355, 378, 382, 403; 
7.273; 8.369. 

falls, I. 4071 ; 2. 130; 3. 322; 4. 95, 108- 
Lewscomb, Syma, signed the petition 

to Mass., 5. 241. 
Lexington, 2. 146; 4. 79; 6. 366; 7. 
357; 9- QS. * 

battle of, the, its effect upon the 
people of Bath, 2. 215; news of 
carried to Machias, 2. 243; effect 
of on the people of Scai^borough, 
3. 195-190; influenced Benjamin 
Eaton, 7, 487. 



Ley den, i.33; 6. 24. 
Lezart, Peter, 8. 51, 60. 
Libbee, a way of spelling Libby, 3. 69. 
Libby, different ways of spelling the 
name, 3. 69. 

Alison, served in the war of the 
Revolution, 3. 204. 

Anthony, in the garrison at Black 
Point, I. 227n; 3. 110; lived at 
Falmouth, 3. 321; moved to Ports- 
mouth, 3. 321; a relative of An 
thony Brackett, 3. 321; Bramhall 
his assurety, 3. 556; a son of John, 
3. 69; to assist in the erection of 
a fort, 3. 132. 

Mrs. Anthony, reminiscences of, q. 
174. ' "^ 

Daniel, son of John, 3. 69, 70. 

David, garrison of, 3. 170; moved 
to Machias, 3. 178; mentioned, <». 
171n, 180, 236. 

Ebenezer, moved to Machias, ^. 179 
180. ^ ' 

Edmund, served in the war of the 
Revolution, 3. 204. 

Elias, a leader of the Free-will Bap- 
tists, i. 328. 

Ephraim, 4. 205. 

family, the, 3. 217. 

genealogy, the, a complicated af- 
fair, 3. 217. 

George, moved to Machias, ^. 178 
180. ' 

Hall, 3. 181. 

Henry, signed the petition to 
Charles II, i. 402; 3. 129n; a son 
of John, 3. 69, 140n; moved to 
Scarborough, 3. 139-140; his sons, 
3. 140n; biographical notice of, 3. 
216-217. ^ 

Jacob, 3. 180. 

James, son of Henry, 3. 140n, 166, 
Zi. <. 

James, son of John, 3. 69; in the 
garrison at Black Point, i. 227n; 
3. 110; in command of the gar- 
rison, 3. 149; mentioned, 3. 166, 

James, served in the war of the 
Revolution, 3. 204. 

John 1st, the first of the name in 
New England, 3. 68, 69, 70; came 
from Broadstairs, 3, 68; deed to 
from Jocelyn, 3. 68, 68n; site of 
his house, 3. 6S; supposed to 
have been a man of wealth, 3. 69 
his ancestry, 3. 69n; died, 3. 69' 
children of, 3. 69, 216; his will' 
3. 70; his barn burned, 3. 119- his 
tax of 1681, 3. 130; mentioned, 3. 
74, 78, 81, 110, 119, 140n. 

John 2d, son of Henry, 3. 140n, 217- 
moved to Scarborough, 3. 'l40»' 
called Black John, 3. 140w, 149- 
mentioned, 3. 166. ' 

John 3d, son of John, 3. 69; in the 



158 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Libby, John, 3d — continued. 

garrison at Black Point, i. 227n; 

3. 110; mentioned, 3. 166, 173, 236." 
Jonathan, his cattle marked, 3, 143. 
Jonathan, served in the war of the 

Kevolution, 3. 203. 
Joseph, moved to Machias, 3. 179, 

180. 
Josiah, 3. 180. 
Lydia, daughter of Seth, married 

John Hasty, 3. 211. 
Lydia, vrife of Seth, 3. 211. 
Matthew, son of John, 3. 69, 70; 

marsh at Black Point granted to, 

3. 130; mentioned, 3. 166, 217. 
Noah, 3. 173. 
Eeuben, 3. 180. 
Eobert, 3. 204. 
Samuel, son of Henry, moved to 

Scarborough, 3. 140n, 217; in the 

garrison at Black Point, i.221n; 

3. 110; mentioned, 3. 180. 
Samuel, son of John, 3. 69; in the 

Black Point garrison, 3. 110; 

meetings held at his house, 3. 159; 

mentioned, 3. 166. 
Sarah, 3. 180. 
Seth, 3. 211. 
Simeon, served in the war of the 

Revolution, 3. 204. 
Thomas, grant to, 3. 180; served in 

the war of the Revolution, 3. 204; 

mentioned, 3. 201. 
Thomas, of Prout's Neck, 3. 216. 
Timothy, moved to Machias, 3. 178, 

180. 
William, 3. 166, 217. 
Zebulon, served in the war of the 

Revolution, 3. 204. 

Widow , died, i. 333. 

Libby' s river, 3. 68, 78. 
Liberty, g. 81. 

poles, 3. 206, 206ri. 

the, commanded by O'Brien, 2. 245, 

246, 247; captured the Margaretta 

and Diligence, 2. 245-246; com- 
missioned by Mass., 2. 246. 
Library of an early lawyer, 4. 15-16. 
Licences for taking up land in Maine, 

5. 107-110. 
Lientot, Madam de, i. 433. * 
Ligonia, see Lyconia. 
Limbo, an African, 4. 2S8n. 
Lime, made at Thomaston, 4. 326 ; 9. 

85; made at St. Georges, 5. 375^i; 

6.20. 
Limerick Academy, incorporated, 8. 

13; grants to, 8. 173; opened, 8. 

173; teachers of, 8. 173; closed, 8. 

174. 
Ireland, the name of given to a 

town in Maine, i. 327; mentioned, 

I. 35571. 
Maine, Charles Freeman preached 

in, I. 326, 327; the churches of, i. 

328, 332; education in, i. 329, 329?i, 



331 ; occupation of the people of, 
I. 329-330; trade at, i. 331; cli- 
mate of, 332; deaths at, i. 332, 
333; account of, i. 333, 334; In- 
dian remains in, i. 333; face of 
the country, i.333; morals of, i» 
334; account of by Charles Free- 
man, I. 325-835. 
Limington, 4. 276^1. 
Lincoln, 3. 205n. 

Abraham, 7. 274 ; 8. 450. 

Academy, incorporated, 8. 166; 
grants to, 8. 166 ; funds raised for, 
8. 166; building erected, 8. 166; 
teachers of, 8. 166; large attend- 
ance, 8. 167. 

Advertiser, 6. 293. 

and Kennebec Society for removing 
obstructions from the Kennebec, 
8. 344. 

Gen. Benjamin, 7. 8, 10, 14, 16; 8. 
7, 10; 9. 180, 181. 

the Countess of, 3. 318^; 5. 171. 

county, first church in, 2. 220; 
courthouse built, 2. 279; had no 
clergyman, 3. 275; established, 5. 
Ix; 6. 43, 44-45; 8. 285; public 
building built by the Plymouth 
Company, 5. Ix; boundary of, 6. 
43; Pownalborough the shire 
town of, 6. 43; mentioned, 2. 217; 
3. 334; 4. 15, 16, 45, 78, 321; 5. 
xxi, XXV, Ixii, 154^, 230, 370n, 418, 
419, 422; 6. 3n, 41, 46, 47yi, 52, 54, 
57, 59, 67, 72ii, 81, 310, 369, 370; 7. 
104, 286; 8. 152, 161, 204^, 208n, 
209n, 219n, 283, 299, 317; 9-226; 
Commissioners Report of cited, 5. 
188?i, 194n, 23071 ; Early Lawyers 
of, see Allen, Frederick. 

Daniel Waldo, i. 409. 

Earl of, his daughter married 
Robert Gorges, i. 109; 2. 47a. 

Gov. Enoch, a corporate member of 
the Maine Historical Society, i. 
11 ; extracts from his manuscripts, 
1.403-446; omitted no means to 
acquire knowledge, i. 404, 406; 
his productions impressed with 
benevolence, i. 404-405, 406; ma- 
terials for publication, i. 405; 
later years given to the work, i. 
406; his study described, i.406; 
his character, i. 406-407; bio- 
graphical notice of, i. 408-411; 
elected governor, 8. 31; men- 
tioned, I. 12; 4. 7, 99; 5. xix, 
xxxvii; 6. 71; 8. 4, 32, 34, 35, 37, 
38, 39, 40, 44, 45, 393, 410, 478. 

Gen. Benjamin, explored the state 
lands, 7. 354. 

Dr. Isaac, i. 11; 6. 358. 

Gov. Levi, i. 408; 5. li; 7. 408. 

the Hon. Levi, father of Enoch and 
Levi, 1.408. 

Papers, the, cited, 5. 327/1. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



159 



Rachel, married Col. Boutelle, 6. 

69n. 
Samuel, came to America, i. 408; 
lived at Hingham, i. 408; an- 
cestor of Gov. Enoch, i. 408. 

Col. , 8. 227, 228. 

Dr. , 5. xviii. 

Zadock, 2. 213, 
Lincolnshire, 5. 2.53; 6. 179. 
Patent, i? 45, 79; 9. 77; see Mus- 
congus grant. 
Lincolnville, formerly Duck- trap, 4. 

324n; called Canaan, 7. 334. 
Lindall, Timothy, i. 311. 
Linnopee, same as Delawares, 4. 115; 
meaning of the word, 4. 115; see 
Lenni Lenape. 
Linn-Lithgow estate, 5. 422. 
Linen, bounty paid on, 2. 183. 
Lions in Maine, i. 76; 3. 89. 
Liquors, price of, i. 71, 72; Scottow 
licensed to sell, i. 201, 259; 3. 126; 
Silvanus Davis licensed to sell, i. 
279; Munjoy and Seacomb li- 
censed, I. 259; illegal sale of, i. 
259 ; law restricting the sale of, i . 
381; 3. 36; 5. 76, 122, 123, 124; 
sale to the Indians caused trouble, 
3. 134; court called to prevent, 3. 
134; not to be sold during the 
conference of 1726, 3. 281 ; sold in 
Canaan, 4. 370. 
Lisbon, Maine, 5. 335; 6. 75. 

Portugal, I. 551; 7. 474. 
Liscomb, William, lived at Black 

Point, 3. 83. 
Liston, Robert, 8. 106. 
Litchfield, Rev. Joseph, 7. 220. 
Literary institution of New Hampton, 
9. 240. 
miscellany, the, 6. 399, 403. 
Lithgoe, / different ways of spelling 
Lithgood, ( Lithgow, 8. 284. 
Lithgow, Alfred (>., married Miss 
Theobald, 7. 422; mentioned, 5. 
418; 8.287. 
Arthur, a son of William, 5. 418, 
422; 8. 287; held various offices, 
5. 418; died at Charlestown, 5. 
418; married Martha Bridge, 5. 
418, 422; 8. 288; children of, 5. 
422; 8. 288; endeavored to estab- 
lish a claim to the Linn-Lithgow 
estate, 5. 422; engaged in trade, 
8. 287; a sheriff, 8. 287; moved tc/ 
Boston, 8. 288. 
Arthur jr., lived in, 5. 422; 8. 288. 
Benjamin, 9. 201. 
burial ground, 8. 286, 287. 
Caroline, married Richard Devans, 

5. 422. 
Charles, 5. 423. 

Charlotte, daughter of Capt. Wil- 
liam, 5. 418, 423; 8. 287; died un- 
married, 8. 287. 



family, 4. 78 ; genealogical notice of, 
5.413-423; 8. IbSn. 

Frances, daughter of Arthur jr., 5. 
422 ; 8. 288 ; married John Payson, 
7.422; 8.288. 

James Noble, son of William, 5. 
418, 422: 8. 287; a lawyer, 5-418; 
marled Ann Gardiner, 5. 418, 422; 
children of, 5. 418, 422; 8. 287; 
death of, 5. 418; lived at Dresden, 
8. 287. 

Jane, daughter of William, 5. 418, 
423; 8.287; engaged to Rowland 
Cushing, 5. 418; died unmarried, 
5. 418; 8. 287. 

Llewellyn W-, son of James; 5. 418; 
422 ; 8. 287 ; married Mary Bow- 
man, 5. 422-423; had no children, 
5.423; date of his birth, 5. 423; 
died, 8. 287; mentioned, 8. 283; 
Letter on the Lithgow Genealogy, 
5. 421-423; mistake made by, 8. 
284. 

Louisa, daughter of James Noble, 
5. 418, 423; married Col. Edward 

' Wilhams, 5. 418, 423; died, 5-423. 

Mary, daughter of Arthur, married 
to Charles Devens, 5. 422; 8. 288. 

Mary, daughter of William, 5. 418, 
423; 8.287; married Major James 
Davidson, 5. 418, 423; 8. 287. 

Nancy, daughter of William, 5. 418, 
423; died young, 5. 418. 

Robert, lived in Ireland and Scot- 
land, 5. 421; 8. 114, 283-284; came 
to America, 5. 421 ; 8. 284; did not 
go to Halifax, 8. 284; father of 
William, 5. 421; probably came 
in Temple's ship, 8. 284. 

Capt. Robert, son of Capt. William, 
8. 287; served in the war of the 
Revolution, 8. 287; lost at sea, 5. 
418, 421; 8.287. 

Sarah, daughter of William, 5. 418, 
423; 8. 277, 278, 287; married 
Capt. Samuel Howard, 5. 418, 423, 
8. 278, 287; her descendents now 
living, 5. 423; admired by Aaron 
Burr, 8. 277 ; the tradition doubted, 
8. 277; a woman of beauty, 8. 278; 
mentioned, 8. 150, 151, 152. 

Sarah, wife of Capt. William, 8. 286. 

Susannah, daughter of William, 5. 
418; married the Rev. John Mur- 
ray, 5.418,423; 6. 164; 8.287. 

Capt. William, birth of, 5. 421; a 
son of Robert, 8. 284; lived at 
Topsham, 8. 284; fled to Bruns- 
wick, 8. 284; settled at George- 
town, 5. 413, 417; 8. 112n, 114; 
his residence, 8. 112; had com- 
mand of several forts in Maine, 5. 
417; married Sarah Noble, 5. 417; 
8. 150, 152, 153, 285 ; possessed a 
handsome property, 5. 417, 423; 



160 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Litligow, Capt. William — continaed. 
held public offices, 5. 417, 423; 8. 
285; a gunsmith, 8. 284-285; fa- 
miliar with the language of the 
Indians, 8. 285; in command at 
Fort Kichraond, 8. 206w, 235, 285; 
liked by the Indians, 4. 160, 181; 
informed Shirley of the French 
encroachments, 8. 215 ; instructed 
to enlist a company, 7. 167; in 
command at Fort Halifax, 8. 238, 
240, Smn; criticised, 8. 238, 246; 
to impress men, 8. 243, 245, 250, 
270; hindered by the snow, 8. 
241 n, 247; instructed to give con- 
stant information concerning the 
Indians, 7. 178 ; to be superseded 
by Preble, 8. 245 ; to strengthen 
the fort, 8. 246; letters to Shirley, 

7. 177, 179; attended to the re- 
pairs of Fort Halifax, 8. 179; 280. 
281; made a journey to Fort 
Western, 7. 150-179; route to 
Shirley, 8.246-249; acknowledged 
the arrival of the stores, 7. 182; 
wrote to Shirley, 8. 250; boats to 
be sent to, 8. 256 ; complained of 
his officers, 8. 256n; desired to 
move his family to Fort Halifax, 
7-185; letter to Shirley, 8. 257; 
to consult with Cushing, 7. 185; 
enlarged Fort Halifax, 7. 186, 187- 
188; 8. 280, 281; completed the 
barracks, 8. 267; sent furs to 
Wheelwright, 8. 268; his plans 
for completing the fort, 8. 258- 
260, 261, 283; plans considered, 8. 
261-262; plans approved, 7. 188; 

8. 262, 271 ; desired to know about 
his plans, 8. 265; to reduce his 
force, 7. 190; desired assistance, 
8. 269; desired to discharge a 
part of his soldiers, 7. 192; 8. 
267, 270; to give information con- 
cerning needed repairs at the fort, 
7. 174; to enlist men, 8.267; re- 
ported the depredations of the 
Indians, 8. 267; the impressed 
soldiers desired to be discharged, 
7, 197; boats decayed, 7. 198; to 
employ scouts, 7. 198; judge of 
the Court of Common Pleas, 8. 
152, 283, 286; built his house, 3. 
277; an Episcopalian, 8.112; death 
of, 5. 417; his correct age, 8. 285, 
286; his gravestone, 8. 286; chil- 
dren of, 5. 418-419, 421-423; 8. 
285, 287; mentioned, 2. 218; 4. 
145, 147, 160, 164, 166, 168, 169, 
171, 172, 175, 176, 182, 184; 5. 
368; 6. 52; 7. 152, 177, 184; 8. 
249n, 262, 277, 278, 283n, 284, 289; 
his deposition cited, 3.312n, 319m, 
323?i; 4. 112-113; 8. 204n, 206n. 

Gen. William, first lawyer beyond 
Dresden, 4. 16; 5. 419, 422; first 



United States district attorney in 
Maine, 5. 415; a son of William, 

5. 419; 6. 52; 8.287; served in the 
war of the Revolution, 5. 419; 6. 
52; 8.287; held public offices, 5. 
419; 8. 287; engaged to Mary 
Deering, 5? 419, 422; death of, 5. 
419; 6.52; 8.287; his hand-writ- 
ing, 5. 419n; engaged in the Perrin 
case, 6. 49-50; practised in Au- 
gusta, 6. 52; major-general of the 
militia, 6. 52; his likeness in 
Trumbull's picture, 8. 287; men- 
tioned, 2. 218; 6. 164; 8. 160. 

William 3d, son of Arthur, 5. 422; 

his daughter married Tolman 

Willey, 5. 422. 

, married Tolman Willey, 5. 422. 

Little Androscoggin river, 2. 113, 130, 

157, 160; 3. 322; 4. 303, 304, 350. 
Cambridge, 6.89; 7.382. 
Chebeag, owned by the Waldos, i. 

147; granted to Silvanus Davis, i. 

147. 
Compton, I. 154?i, 157, 200n; 2. 145; 

4.269, 270; 6. 56n. 
the Rev. Daniel, married Sarah 

Coffin, 3. 241 ; preached at Wells, 

4. 242, 243; commissioner, 7. 11; 

letter to Major Treat, 7. 11-12; 

speech to the Indians, 7. 16, 17- 

18; mentioned, 2. 141, 142; 4-244, 

255, 256, 261, 273, 293, 294, 299; 7. 

8, 10, 11, 13, 15, 18, 220. 
the Rev. David, pastor at Kenne- 

bunk, 1.349; had a colleague, i. 

349-350. 
Eliza, married David Coffin, 4. 249?i. 
Falls, 4. 330. 
Harbor, 5. 203; 9. 306n. 
Josiah, 2. 128; 3. 334. 
Mosiers, i. 76. 

Ossipee river, i- 333, 334; 4- 276, 277. 
Otis, his state of trade in the north- 
ern colonies cited, 8. 135w. 
river, 2. 84, 140, 148. 
river falls, 5. 335. 
Dr. Timothy, 2. 153. 
Valentine, teacher at Brighton, 8. 

173. 
William, signed the treaty of 1717, 

6. 261 ; autograph of, 6. 261. 
Capt. , 7. 237. 

York, 9. 188. 
Littleboro, 4. 305, 336. 
Littlecote, 2. 25a. 

Littlefield, Anthony, had a sawmill at 
Wells, I. 268; settled at Wells, i. 
362. 
Edmund, to settle the dispute about 
a boundary line, i. 361 ; early set- 
tler of Wells, 1.362. 
Francis, came from England, i.345; 
settled at Wells, i. 345, 362; 
supposed to be dead and his 
brother named Francis, i. 345; 
his descendants numerous, i. 345. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



161 



Francis 2d, came from England, i. 
345; met his brother of the same 
name, i. 345; settled in Wells, i. 
345, 362 ; his descendants, i , 345 ; 
ordered to provide scales and 
weights for his mill, i. 379 
farm, 3. 235. 
Joseph, had a sawmill at Wells, i. 

268. 
Thomas, early settler of Weils, i. 
362 ; signed the petition to Charles 
II, 1.402. 
Littleton, 2. 146. 

Livermore, the Rev. Paul Coffin in, 4. 
338; Baptists and Methodists in, 

4. 340, 362, 391 ; number of fam- 
, ilies in, 4. 340-341, 362; six twins 

in, 4. 362; mentioned, 2. 163; 4. 
304, 337, 339, 350, 360, 361, 362, 
363, 390, 391, 392. 
the Rev. Isaac, preached in Bath, 2. 
223. 

, 4. 340, 363, 392. 

Liverpool, England, 4. 18. 
N. S., fort built at, 7. 33; called La 
Have, 7. 33; now Port Rossignol, 
7. 250; Bu Monts at, 7. 250. 
Livingston, Brockholst, one of the 
founders of the N. Y. Historical 
Society, 2. 11a. 
Edward, letter to Gov. Smith, 8. 
53, 54; his obsequiousness, 8. 54- 
55, 56; commissioner, 8. 57; his 
edition of laws cited, 5. 4n. 
Col. L., I. 521, 529. 
Major Robert, military agent to 
Quebec, ^. 79, 79ii; a guest of St. 
* Castine, 7. 79; journeyed with 
Castine to Quebec, 7. 79-81; St. 
Castine saved his life, 7. 80; men- 
tioned, 7. 163. 

, 5. xxxvii. 

Lixon, Peter, signed the petition to 

Charles 11, i. 401. 
Lizard, the, i. 483, 484, 488, 518. 
Lloyd, David, his sneer concerning 
Popham, 2. 26a; his State Wor- 
thies cited, 2. 26an. 
Joseph, signed the treaty of 1713, 

6. 254; autograph of, 6. 254. 
Lobsters in Casco bay, i. 181. 
Lock, the Rev. Edward, 4. 382, 394. 

, of Chester, 4. 333, 347. 

Thomas, signed the petition to Mass., 
Lock's History of Canada cited, 6. 
317. 

5. 240. 

Locke, John L., 6. 360; his translation 
of Gen. Waldo's circular, 6. 319- 
332. 
Elder Simon, preached at Lyman, 

7. 222, 225. 

John, signed the petition to Mass., 
5. 240. 
Lockhart, Capt, George, in command 
at Falmouth, i. 290; left the fort, 

11 



1. 284n, 292; 5. 395; suspicions 
entertained against, 5. 291n; ex- 
onerated, 5. 29lw. 

Locksmith, wanted by the Indians, q. 

373, 433. 
Loire river, 3. 287; 3. 320. 
Lombard, street, g. 58. 
the Rev. , preached in Gorham, 

2. 147. 

London, Smith's description of New 
England published in, i. 31 ; ships 
sailed from, i. 32, ISdn; 7. 298; 
home of John Beaucliamp, i.45; 
Samuel Andrews a citizen of, i. 
69, 117, 305 ; home of John Gorges, 
I. 108n; home of Richard Hutch- 
inson, I. 342n; the archives of ex- 
amined, 2. JOa; the merchants of 
interested in American coloniza- 
tion, 2. 20a, 35a; 7. 316, 321; a 
severe winter at, 2. 29a; not a 
good place to sail from, 2. 35a-36a ; 
the merchants of assisted the 
Plymouth colonists, 2. 44a; citi- 
zens of to receive a grant of land, 

3. 31-32; the American residents 
of asked to aid in building Bun- 
ker Hill Monument, 3. 248; home 
of John Pierce, 4. 'Zi8; Indians 
shown in 5. 144n, 178; first Pres- 
byterian church in, 6. 28; men- 
tioned, I. 38n, 52w, 81, 99; 2.8, 11, 
25, 42a, 47, 64an, 66, 68a, 76a, 179, 
2 to, 294; 3. 20, 21^, 86, 86n, 98, 
153n, 218, 226, 289, 301, 308, 311, 
329,335,340; 4-17,18; 5. xln, 26, 
147, 148n, 152n, 153ji, 165?i, 169, 
182, 195, 201, 217, 231, 247^, 248, 
251, 358, 398, 440; 6. 85, 86, 87, 
321,327; 7. 137, 202, 294, 301, 307, 
315, 319, 355, 358, 364, 380, ^383, 
409; 8. 135n, 229n, 263, 295, 307, 
309; g. 18, 25, 33, 40n, 56, 58, 83, 
86, 115, 117, 297, 302, 303, 304, 
306, 318, 323, 324, 326, 329, 329n, 
330, 331, 332, 352. 

Bridge, 2. 85; g. 304, 331. 

Chronicle, the, 8. 62. 

Company, procured a charter, i. 28; 
planted a colony in Virginia, 2. 
27a; formed, 3. 289; 5-332; bound- 
ary of, 5. 332; commenced colo- 
nizing, 5. 323; called the South 
Virginia Company, 5. 332n; sent 
a ship under Newport to Virginia, 
5. 334; Capt. John Smith in the 
employ of, 7. 315, 316; mentioned, 
7.27. 

Times, the, 7. 448. 

Tower of, 2. 45, 51. 
Londonderry county, 5. 5. 

Ireland, 2. 139; 6. 5. 

Maine, 2. 221; 5. 404; 6. 31, 36. 

N. H., 6. 12, 16. 

Presbytery, 6. 36, 8. 486. 



162 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Long Asliton, home of Sir Ferdinando 
Gorges, 2. 26a; mentioned, 1. 109, 

2. 66a, 72a. 

Creek, Thomas Skillings' farm near, 
I. 195, 204, 205, 314-315; early 
settlers near, i. 206; sawmill 
erected on, i. 252, 317; land near 
confirmed to Mary Munjoy, i. 255, 
257; Samuel Webber's mill at, i. 
269; ferry near, i. 278; Isaac Da- 
vis lived near, i. 309; mentioned, 

3. 222. 

Island, Maine, part of Alexander's 
grant, i. 34n; 5. 2; 7. 143; within 
the limits of ancient Falmouth, 7. 
145; occupied by John Sears, 7. 
148; sold to Isaac Walker, and 
later to Richard Russell, 7. 148; 
confirmed to John Russell, 7. 148; 
conveyed to John Smith, 7. 148; 
called Smith's island, 7. 148; 
proved to be an island, 2. 31 n; 
Thomas Gyles lived at, 3. 356; 
given to the Duke of York, 5.2; 
7. 139; Cadillac's account of, 6. 
289; land titles in traced to from 
the Earl of Stirling, 7. 144; men- 
tioned, I. 149; 4.324; 5.313, 385n; 
7. 151. 

Island, K. Y., home of John Lane, 

1. 18971 ; expedition against, i. 
501 ; William Stark killed at, 4. 288 ; 
proved to be an island, 2. 31n; 
mentioned, 5. xln; 6. 286, 288. 

Island Historical Society, 7. 484. 
Island Sound, the first navigator to 

sail through, 2. 31/i; mentioned, 

8,25. 
lane, Boston, 6. 12. 
meadow, 4. 143, 144, 181, 262. 
parliament, the, Kigby a member of, 

3.32. 
rapids, the, i. 450. 
Reach, home of the Elkins, 2. 205; 

the settlement at progressed, 2. 

206 ; petitioned to be incorporated, 

2. 206-207; poverty of the parish, 
2. 207; organized, 2. 208; church 
built, 2. 208; engaged in ship 
building, 2. 208-209; first school- 
house in, 2. 211 ; number of dwell- 
ing-houses in, 2. 212; sent a de- 
tatchment to drive the British 
from Jones' eddy, 2. 218, 214; in- 
corporated, 2. 217; only one fam- 
ily there in 1728, 2. 279; men- 
tioned, 8. llln, 112, 112ji; see 
Bath. 

Reach river, 4. 331. 

wharf, Boston, 8. 242; a battery 

built at, 8. 125. 
wharf, Newport, 4. 269. 
Longfellow II. W., his notice of Joce- 

lyn, 9. 210; mentioned, 7.41,45; 

8.440; 9.255; Evangeline cited, 5. 

xxii; Morituri Salutamus cited, 



8. 441; Psalm of Life cited, 5. 
Ixviii. 

Jonathan, 3. 179. 

Kathan, 3. 180; 4.354. 

Stephen 1st, first of the name in 
Maine, 5. xxxii; a school teacher, 
5. xxxii prominent in town affairs, 
5. xxxii. 

Stephen 2d, death of, 5. xxxii. 

Stephen 3d, corporate member of 
the Maine Historical Society, i, 
11; birth of, i. xxxi; ancestry, i. 
xxxii; at Harvard College, i. 
xxxiii-xxxiv; admitted to the 
bar, I . xxxiv ; a successful lawyer, 
I. XXXV ; character of, i. xxxvi; 
as a politician, i. xxxvi-xxxvii ; 
edited the Maine and Mass. re- 
ports, I. xxxviii; received a de- 
gree from Bowdoin College, i. 
xxxviii; married Zilpah Wads- 
worth, I. xxxviii; children of, i. 
xxxviii; death of, i. xxxix; men- 
tioned, 3. 184; 4. 7, 9; 5. xvii, xxiii, 
XXV, xxvi, lii; 7- 408. 

William, settled at Byefield, 5. xxxii, 
married Anne Sewall, 5. xxxii. 
Longfellows, the, 4. 255. 
Longworth, Nicholas, 8. 340n. 
Loosop, 4. 347. 

Lord, Abraham, signed the petition 
to Charles 11, i. 401; 3. 200. 

Capt. Ivory, marrred Olive Bourne, 
8. 388. 

the Hon. John, bequest to Berwick 
Academy, 8. 162. 

Kathaniel, signed the petition to 
Cromwell, i. 395; signed the pe? 
tition to Charles 11, i. 401. 

the Rev. Nathaniel, preached at 
Wells, I. .350; 7. 222, 225; moved 
to Berwick, i. 350. , 

the Rev. Dr. Nathaniel, graduated 
from Berwick Academy, 8, 163; 
president of Dartmouth College, 
8. 163. 

Protector, his aid sought by Rigby, 
I. 97/1. 

Mrs. Susan H., married the Hon. E. 
E. Bourne, 8. 405. 

Capt. Tobias, married Susan H. 
Hatch, 8. 405. 

William, death of, 8. 408. 
Lords of trade, Andros' report to, 5. 
273-274; Randolph's report to, 5. 
275n; mentioned, 5. 296; 9. HI. 
Lord's Prayer, the, in the Indian lan- 
guage, 5. 427-428. 
Loreau, Charles de, 7. 61. 
Loring B., 2. 121. 

Judge Edward G., 8. 451. 

John, 7. 237. 

the Rev. Levi, 2. 142; 4. 248, 259. 

the Rev. Nicholas, 2. 187. 

Richmond, 2. 171. 

Mrs. Richmond, 7. 237. 



IKDEX TO COLLECTIOlSrS* 



163 



Laron, tspeaker for the Indians, 3. 394, 
482; alias Saguaarum, 3. 416,419, 
422, 426, 487; his mark, 3. 419; 
tried to prevent the peace of 1749, 
4. 148, 151, 152; mentioned, 3. 380, 
386, 412. 
Francis jr., 3, 380, 382, 398. 

Lor or, 3. 412. 

Loshtock river, 4. 105. 

Lossing, Benson, his Field Book cited, 
9. 33, 

Lothrop, the Rev. J., 4. 262. 

Lotteries, to raise funds for a bridge, 

2. 219; to sell land in Maine and 
pay the debt of Mass., 7. 353-354; 
mentioned, 8. 164. 

Loueridge, William, 5. 57. 
Loughborough, Lord, 7. 201. 
Louis, an Indian, 3. 380; 4. 169, 171, 
173, 174, 178, 179, 180, 182, 184. 

island Indians, 6. 211. 

Philippe, 8. 492. 

XIII, I. 428; 6. 117; 7. 28; g. 99, 102, 

XIV, knighted an Indian, 3. 99; gave 
a grant to Du Monts, 5. 177; really- 
ruled Kew England, 5. 266; in- 
trigued with the Stuarts, 5.268; 
coins of his reign found, 6. 117, 
118; called the Great, 6. 117^; be- 
came king, 6,111n; had the long- 
est reign in history, 6. 117n; gave 
a grant to Cadillac, 6. 275 ; men- 
tioned, 5, 272, 273; 6. 363; 7. 41, 
47, 136; 8.219; 9. Ill, 212. 

Louisburg, soldiers at Scarborough, 

3. 172^1, 173; English to settle at, 
3. iT^n; Seth Fogg at, 3. 211; 
Nicholas Hearne killed at, 3. 212; 
Roger Hunniwell wounded at, 3. 
213; Samuel Milliken lost at, 3, 
219; a New Hampshire regiment 
at, 3. 219; Col. Meserve at, 3.219; 
Capt. Sanders at, 5. 370; 8. 228; 
G-en. Waldo at, 5. 382^^,; obnoxious 
to the colonies, 8. 16; a refuge 
for French cruisers, 8. 116; an ex- 
pedition planned against, 8. 116; 
captnred, 2. 208; 3. 172, 212; 8. 
120, 306-307; caused the French 
to fear that they would lose Can- 
ada, 8. 124; a fleet sent to recap- 
ture, 8. 125; fleet disabled, 8. 125- 
126; Capt. Thomas Perkins at, 8. 
128; Capt. James Noble died at, 
8. 152; Capt. Ilsley at, 8. 226ri; 
the key to the St. Lawrence river, 
8. 302; Warren governor of, 8. 
312n; the Gibraltar of America, 8. 
313; 9. 82; returned to the French, 
8.313; Europe astonished at the 
surrender of, 3. 176; 9.82; men- 
tioned, 2. 186; 8. 123. 124, 127, 
147n, 295, 302, 303, 305, 307, 309, 
812; 9. 83, 9L 

expedition, the, Col. Arthur Ifoble 



in, 8. llOn; the Rev. William Len- 
ichanin, 8. llOn; the expedition 
proposed, 8. 116; orders for the 
capture, 8. 1 16; Belknap's opinion 
of the orders, 8. 116; private 
reason for the expedition, 8. 117n; 
death of James Noble, 8. 118; 
vessel sent to cut off ships, 8. 119; 
troops sent, 8. 119; Pepperell's 
first dispatch, 8, 119, ll9n; im- 
possible to carry out the orders, 
8, 119, 119it; hardships of the 
soldiers, 8. 120, 120n,; captured, 
8, 120; troops detained as a gar- 
rison, 8. 122; caused the rise in 
the price of wheat, 8. 122-123; 
the French awakened to their 
danger, 8. 124; Belknap the chief 
authority, 8. 302; tinged with 
religious romance, 8. 306; prayers 
for its success, 8. 306; a thanks- 
giving sermon, 8. 306n; cross 
taken from, now at Harvard Col- 
lege, 8. 306n; Pepperell com- 
mander, 9. 82; Waldo a brigadier- 
general, 9. 82; mentioned, 8. 
294. . ' 

the seige of, 7. 214, 325; 8. 115, 117, 
245>i; 9. 224. 

Louisiana, 5. xxxvii; 6. QQ: 9. 245 
246. ' 

Louvois, Francois M. L., 7. 47. 

Loveitt, Thomas, i. 321. 

Lovejoy, Daniel, 4. 373. 
Elizabeth, married Capt. H. Y. 

Brown, 4. 280n. 
Samuel, 4. 364. 

, 4- 383. 

, of Sidney, 4. 373, 374, 402. 

Love joy's narrows, 8. 345. 

Lovelace, Gov. Francis, his letters to 
Pemaquid, 5. 6-8, 247-248; fled 
to England, 5. 248; mentioned, 7. 
156; 8. 186. ' ^ 

Lovell, Capt. .John, 2. 161; 3, 152; see 
Love well. 

Loveren, William, signed the petition 
to Mass., 5. 240 

Lovering, William, 2. 235; 5. 57, 88, 
100. ' ' 

Lovewell, Daniel, 4. 362. 
Capt. John, site of his battle, 4. 286; 
centenary observances of his bat- 
tle, I. 409; 4. 2S6n killed, 4. 287; 
had an Indian for a decoy, 4. 
290; how his men were attacked, 
4. 291 ; see also Lovell. 

LovewelPs battle, a bloody fight, 4. 
74, 275^; 9. 212; men slain at, 4. 
287; called the fight at Piffg- 
whacket, 4. 290. 
brook, 2. 161. 

pond, swans found in, 4. 275 ; men- 
tioned, I. 409; 4. 116, 286, 287. 
war, 6. 16; 7. 116; 8. lUw, 114. 

Lovis, an Indian, 3. 412. 



164 



MAINE HISTOEICAL SOCIETY. 



Low, , married Deborah Ingersoll, 

i.3n. 
countries, 3. 287. 

Mrs. , of Sidney, 4. 375. 

Lowder, Col. Jonathan, 7. 13. 

Capt. Samuel, 9. 233. 
Lowell, 6. 379, 395n. 
Abner, 7. 284. 
Dr. Charles, 7. 408. 
John, I. 243, 246; 7. 354, 409. 
Lower Canada, 8. 350. 
Corner, Buxton, 4. 244. 
Pyreness, 7. 41. 
Lowther, Col. Jonathan, wrote the 
treaty of 1775, 7. 7; formerly gun- 
ner at Fort Pownall, 7. 7-8. 
Lowville, 7, 127. 

Loyalists, to be settled in New Ire- 
land, 7. 201 ; mentioned, 6. 354. 
Loyd, James, 8. 190. 
Loyola, Ignatius, 5. 175; formed the 
society of Jesuits, 8. 321 ; projects 
of, 8. 321. 
Lubec, 6. 95, 358, 372. 
Lubby, a mode of spelling Libby, 3. 

69, 130 
Lucas, William, tax paid to Falmouth, 

I. 323. 
Luce, Daniel, 4. 396. 
Luche, 7. 432. 
Ludden, Jacob, 8. 59. 
Ludgate, 2. 60a, 71a; 9. 3-32, 333, 359. 
Lues, a way of spelling Lewis, i. 141. 
Luis, Thomas, a commissioner, i.364. 
Luke, Thomas, patentee of Lygonia, 

I. 45}^. 
Lukeford, John, i. 544. 
Lumber, as a current medium, 3, 167- 
168; exported, 2.209; 4. 23; sent 
to Boston, 5. 299. 
business flourishing, i. 250^, 276, 
278; Kittery a leader in, 1.269; 
petition to the general court for 
permission to cut, i. 270n; at 
Limerick, i. 330; at Wells, i. 339; 
at Scarborough, 3. 167 ; at Machias, 
3. 179; at Dunstan, 3. 213; early in 
Maine, 4. 22; extinct during 
Queen Anne's war, 4. 74; ruined, 
5. 275. 
Lunenburg, 4. 371. 
Lunt, Benjamin, 4. 347. 

Joshua, 4. 347. 
Lursignam, Cadet de, 8. 140. 
Luscome,Goodman, in the garrison at 

Black Point, i. 227n; 3. 110. 
Lusher, Edward, held a county court, 

Eleazer, i. 176; 3. 53. 
Lusmore, James, signed the treaty of 
1713, 6. 256 ; autograph of, 6. 256. 
1. 170. 
Luther, Hofrath, 6. 325. 

Martin, 4. 71, 253. 
Lutherens in Waldobrough, 5. 404, 

405, 406. 
Lutterell, Francis, 9. 358. 



Luxton, George, sold brandy to Win- 
ter, I. 71, 72. 
Luzmore, Capt. James, 6. 14; 8. 114. 
Lybby, a mode of spelling Libby, 3. 69. 
Lybian coasts, 7. 133. 
Lydians, the, tirst adopted metallic 

currency, 6. 147. 
Lygonia, extent of, i. 45, 80, 97; pat- 
entees of, 1 . 45n, 80 ; the assem- 
bly of awarded property to 
Jordan, i. 58; purchased by Rig- 
by, 1.90; Cleeves a deputy gov- 
ernor, I. 90, 91, 97, 146, 150; 3. 
22; Rigby's patent to declared 
valid, I. 96; Mass. ordered to 
compel obedience in, i. 96; dis- 
putes about the boundary of, i. 
96; difficult to comprehend why 
Gorges' title was not good, i. 96- 
97; Rigby asked the Lord Pro- 
tector to aid him in settling, i. 
97n; separated from the Province 
of Maine, i. 98; what is known of 
its government, i. 99; letter to 
the assembly of, 1.90-100; Cleeves 
as agent went to Boston, 1. 102- 
103; Edward Rigby the agent of 
in England, i. 103; court of, i. 
540; the people of met at Casco, 
1.547; desired assistance, i.549; 
letter from the governor of Mass. 
to, I. 550; Richard Foxwell a 
member of the general assembly, 
3. 19; Henry Watts a member of 
the assembly of, 3-22; settlements 
comprised in the province of, 3. 
2Sn; Rigby's government estab- 
lished in, 3. 41; officers of, 3. 41; 
became the propei^ty of Edward 
I^igby? 3- 42; destruction in, 3. 
42, 43; named by Alexander Rig- 
by, 5. xx.i; mentioned, i. 93, 94, 
98,535, 540'; 8.390; 9.346. 
Patent, i. 80. 
Lyman, 2. 142; 4. 243; 7. 222, 225. 
Asa, teacher at the Saco Academy, 

8. 174. 
the Rev. Asa, preached at Bath, 2. 

226. 
Isaac, 7. 220; 8.391. 
Theodore jr., 3. 245, 246. 

Dr. , of Wells, 4. 267. 

Lyme, 6. 32. 

Lynde, Samuel, signed the treaty of 
1713, 6. 254; autograph of, 6. 
254. 
Lynde' s island, 2. 283. 
Lyndhurst, Lord, 7. 234. 
Lynn, home of John Blaney, i. 40; 
Batchelder a minister at, i. 74; 
former home of Richard Seacomb, 
I. 259; John Gustin moved to, i. 
310; people from settled at Scar- 
borough, 3. 139; mentioned, 2. 
144; 3. 216, 217, 820; 5. 223, 370n; 
7. 227. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



165 



David, tried for the murder of Paul 

Chad wick, 7-387; 9-204. 
Nathaniel, tried for the murder of 
Paul Chadwick, 7. 387; 9. 204. 
Lyon, the Rev. James, 7. 220. 

Capt. , 2. 248. 

Lyson, Daniel, his Magna Britannia 
cited, 2. 25771,. 

Macauley, Thomas Babington, 4. 90; 
his History of England cited, 6. 
124, 12bn; 7. 136^1. 

Maccabees, 6. 147. 

Macclenaghan, the Rev. William, or- 
dained, 2. 220; his salary, 2. 221; 
recommended as a preacher, 3- 
274; officiated at Georgetown, 2. 
220, 221; 3- 274)i, 275; at Kenne- 
bec, 3. 274; 4. 195; his report, 
3. 274-275; moved to Pennsyl- 
vania! 3. 275; 6. 33; at Cape 
Elizabeth, 3. 275n; 6.32; 6xcited 
a religious controversy, 3. 275n; 
moved to Chelsea, 3. 275n; 6. 32; 
where he preached in Bath, 3. 277 ; 
became an Episcopalian, 6. 33; 
195, 196; at Fort Richmond, 6. 
195; labors of, 6. 195-196; his 
character, 6. 196; chaplain to 
Waldo's regiment, 8- 131; see Mc- 
Lenichon, Rev. William. 

MacCulloch, Dr. John, 6. 411. 

McCannon, a corruption of McKinnon, 

McClanethan, see Macclenaghan. 
McClean, Col. Allen, determined to 
attack Arnold, i. 484, 488; the 
number of men in his regiment, i. 
488; reinforced Quebec, i. 517; 
fired on a flag of truce, i. 518-519. 

M'Cleland, Lieut. , i. 516. 

McClintock, a Scotch-Irish name, 4. 
14; 6. 19. 
Elizabeth, 4. 309. 
Jane, 4. 309. 
William, served at Pemaquid, 5. 303. 

McClough, , married a daughter 

of Samuel Baker, 2. 178- 

Mrs. , 2. 182. 

McClure, Thomas, 5. 303. 
McCobb, a Scotch-Irish name, 6- 19. 
Denny, married Miss Groton, 6. 368. 
James, settled at Arrowsic, 2. 202; 
land granted to, 2. 283; Booth 
Bay ceded to, 6. 18; led the im- 
migration to Booth Bay, 6. 19. 
Capt. Samuel, his company to be 
sent forward, i. 468; in command 
of troops sent to Cambridge, 2. 
214; led the immigration to Booth 
Bay, 6. 19; date of his birth and 
death, 6. 19; mentioned, i. 500, 
513; 2. 215; 9. 160. 
William, 6. 19. 

Judge , 5. 417. 

McCoomb, Col. , 9- 185. 



McCormic, James, condemned for 
murder, i. 467, 503; sent to New- 
buryport, I. 467; lived at North 
Yarmouth, i. 467; reprimanded, 
1-503. 

McCraken family, settled at Warren, 
6.21. 

McCrillis, William H., 8. 471. 

McCuUoch, the Hon. Hugh, 8. 398. 

McDaniel, Capt. Timothy, served in 
the war of the Revolution, 3. 203; 
the only man that took a paper 
at Black Point, 3. 205; read his 
paper on the meeting house steps, 
3. 205; biographical notice of, 3. 
217; married Lydia Prout, 3. 218; 
mentioned, 3. 188, 198. 

McDonald clan, 6. 5. 
John, a lawyer at Limerick, i.329n. 
, settled at Falmouth, 6. 12 

McDuffie, , 7. 464. 

Macedon, 6. 147, 148. 

McFadden, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 16. 

McFarland, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 19. 
Andrew, 6. 158. 

Capt. Ephraim, gave land to Ber- 
wick Academy, 8. 172. 
Walter, an Indian interpreter, 4. 
169, 370, 373; signed Pownall's 
certificate of possession, 6- 338. 
William, 4- 148. 

, tutor at Harvard College, 4. 

295. 

McGaw, the Hon. Jacob, corporate 
member of the Maine Historical 
Society, i- 11 ; mentioned, 4. 279?t; 
6- 358; 8. 452; letter of cited, 6. 
108-109. 
Thomas, 8. 476. 

McGlathey, , of Camden, 4. 325, 

326. 

McGowen, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 16. 

McGregor, the Rev. David, settled in 
New Hampshire, 6. 11, 12; men- 
tioned, 6. 13, 36 ; sermon of cited, 
6.9. 
Rob Roy, 6. 7. 

McGregors, the, to be exterminated, 
6- 6; sought a refuge in Ireland, 
6- 6; the descendants bear dif- 
ferent names, 6. 6-7. 

McGuyer, John, to accompany Arnold 
to Quebec, i. 500. 

Machagony, see Machegonne. 

Machegonne, Indian name of Jordan's 
point, I. 65?i; to be called Sto- 
gummor, i. 65; now Portland, i. 
59, 62; definition of, i. 59n, 60n; 
4. 105; mentioned, i. 68, 68n, 112, 
541, 543. 

Machias, home of the O'Briens, 2. 
242; the people of opposed to the 
English government, 2. 243; 7. 
204; ordered to take down the 
liberty pole, 2. 243; sent to Pleas- 
ant river for help, 2. 244; drove 



166 



MAINU HISTOEICAL SOCIETT. 



Macliias — continued. 

the Margaretta down the river, 2. 
244; gave chase to the vessel, 2. 
245; notified of the approach of 
two armed schooners, 2. 246 ; sent 
a report of captures to Water- 
town, 2. 246 ; erected breastworks, 
2. 246; origin of the settlement 
of, 3. 177-178, 181 ; early settlers 
of, 3. 178, 179-180; 4. 78; mill 
erected at, 3. 178, 179; George 
Libby gave land to, 3. 181 ; Brit- 
ish armed vessel captured near, 3. 
211; the Indian name of, 4. 106; 
privateers captured at, 4. 351 ; Al- 
lerton's traders at, 5. 204; 7-31; 
French settlement at, 6. 3 ; Cadil- 
lac's account of, 6. 279; called 
Majais, 6. 279, 279n; fort at, 7. 
204; common schools in, 8. 158; 
mentioned, 3. 207, 211, 220, 223; 
6. 103, 234, 280, 286; 7. 220; 8. 163, 
164, 165, 330,478; 9. 112. 

Association, 3. 211. 

bay, 2. 245. 

Indians, same as Penobscots, 6. 234; 
embraced the cause of the col- 
onies, 7. 204; mentioned, 3. 357; 

5. 371 ; 7- 63. 
port, 3. 179. 
river, 7. 265. 

Union, the, cited, 6. 126%. 
Mclntire, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 19. 
house, the, 8. 279. 
the Hon. Rufus, 8. 75. 
McKean, a corruption of McKinnon, 
6.7. 
James, 6. 36. 
McKeen, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 11, 
19. 
John, his exertions in behalf of the 
Maine Historical Society, i. 5; his 
conclusion that Weymouth as- 
cended the Androscoggin, 3. 281; 
Prof. P. A. Chadbourne's letter to, 

6. 349; mentioned, 3. 325?i; 5. xx, 
214?i, 292ft; 6. 160, Win, 378; 8. 
21 In; Account of the Early Set- 
tlements on the Sagadahock, 3. 
311-324; Remarks on the Voyage 
of Weymouth, 5. 307-338; the 
same cited, 5. 346, 348, 349, 350; 
6.294,309, 310, 311, 313, 314; 7. 
134n. 

Dr. Joseph, preceptor at Berwick 
Academy, 8. 162; preached in 
Beverly, 7. 372 ; became president 
of Bowdoin College, 6. 358; 7. 
872; 8.162,176; died, 8. 177; men- 
tioned, 2. 226; 4. 258; 6. 359; 7. 
414; 8.180. 

Br. , of Topsham, 6. 162. 

Miss , 5. 214n. 

, 6. 12. 

McKene, Isaac, $. 173. 



McKenna, a corruption of McKinnbn, 

6.7. 
McKenney, Abner, served in the war 
of the Revolution, 3. 204. 
Isaac, served in the war of the 

Revolution, 3. 204. 
James, served in the war of the 

Revolution, 3. 204. 
John, lived at Black Point, 3. 83; 
deed to from Robert Jordan, 3. 
SZn. 
Joseph, served in the war of the 

Revolution, 3. 204. 
William, served in the war of the 
Revolution, 3. 203. 

McKenzie, Midshipman , taken 

prisoner, i. 517. 
Mackey's island, to be called jNTewton, 
I. 69; within the ancient limits of 
Falmouth, i. 145; origin of the 
name, i. 145^; called Macworth's 
island, i. 145%. 
point, bones found on, i.69w; to be 
called Newton, i. 69n. 
Mackfarland, William, 4. 148. 

see also McFarland. 
Mackie, Dr. Andrew, 7. 430. 
Mary, daughter of Andrew, married 
Thomas Burgess, 7. 430. 
Macinaw, called Missilimakinack, 6. 

276. 
MacKinnon, the Rev. Colin, 6. 224. 
McKinstry family, 6, 7; 7. 481. 
the Rev. John, settled at Sutton, 6. 
13, 31; moved to Ellington, 6. 31 ; 
death of, 6. 31 ; came to America, 
I. 473; near Worcester, 7. 473. 
Mary, 8. 473. 

Dr. , son of the Rev. John, 7. 

473; moved to Taunton, 7. 473; 
surgeon-general under Gage, 7. 
473; died, 7. 474. 
McKonkey, John, i. 503, 505, 510. 
McKoy, William, i. 525. 
Mack, the Rev. Wilder B., preached 

at Bath, 2. 228. 
McLanathan, see Macclenaghan. 
McLane, Louis, 5. xxxvii; 8. 57. 
William, an early settler of Kew 
Gloucester, 2. 153. 
McLaughlan, James, 8. 52, 66, 70, 761 
McLaughlin, Robert, came from Ire- 
land, 3. 217. 
Robert 2d, son of William, 3. 217. 
Samuel, son of William, moved to 

Camden, 3. 217. 
William, came from Ireland, 3. 217; 

his sons, 3. 217. 
William jr., served in the war of the 
Revolution, 3. 204; a son of Wil- 
liam, 3, 217. 
McLean, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 19. 
the Rev. Alexander, preached in 
Bristol, 4. 330, 335; 6. 35; death 
of 6, 35. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



167 



family settled in Warren, 6. 21. 
Brigadier-General , 7. 121. 

McLellan, a Scotch-Irisli name, 6. 16. 
Brice, 4- 371, 400, 401. 
Hugh, an early settler of Gorliam, 
2. 148-149. 

McLellan's wharf, 2. 209. 

MeLenichon, the Rev. William, pur- 
chased land of Col. Noble, 8. 110; 
conditions of the sale, 8. 112-113; 
biographical notice of, 8. UCtj, 
llln; mentioned, 8. Ill, 112n, 118, 
131 ; see also Macclenaghan. 

McLinichon, William jr., 8. Uln. 

Maclure, William, 6. 408, 412. 

McMillan, Gen. John, married Mehit- 
able Osgood, 4. 278n. 

McMuUen, John, 4. 276. 

McNeil, Lieut. , 7. 126. 

McNice, a corruption of McNish, 6. 7. 

McNish, corruptions of the name, 6, 7. 

McNutt, Col. , the supposed au- 
thor of Considerations on the 
Sovereignty, Independence, Trade 
and Fisheries of New Ireland, 7. 
205. 

Macomb, Gen. , 8. 70. 

Macomber, Elder Job, preached at 
Bowdoinham, 7. 222, 226. 

Macon, Abner, killed, 8. 267. 

McPherson, Capt. John, aid to Mont- 
,gomery, i. 522, 523. 

McPhiel, Col. , 7. 126. 

Mc's hill, 4. 276. 

Macworth, Arthur, gave possession 
of territory to Cleeves and Tucker, 
I. m, 69, 544; settled on the Pre- 
sumpscot, 1.68; his deed to Vines, 
I. 68, 128; came to Saco, i. 69; 
married the widow of Samuel 
Adams, i. 69, 305; probably pre- 
viously married, i. 69; died, i.69, 
70n, 157; 3-44; his children, i. 
69; his sons died without issue, i. 
69-70; deathof his wife, 1.70; his 
name extinct but his descendants 
numerous, i. 70; lived upon his 
grant till his death, i. 70; testi- 
mony relating to, i. 70n; his wife 
to administer his estate, i. 70n; 
charged Winter with irregular 
dealings, 1.71-72; George Lewis 
in his employ, i. 72; a referee in 
the case of Cleeves m. Winter, i. 
74; appointed a commissioner, i. 
91; refused to act, i. 91; sup- 
ported Vines, i.92; lived at Casco, 
I. 94»i; his house, 1. 101; opposed 
the encroachments of Mass., 1. 102 ; 
3. 44; his land divided among his 
children, i. 128; his daughter 
Sarah married Abraham Adams, 
I. 128; his daughter Rebecca 
married Nathaniel Wharff, i. 128, 
208; lived on Mackey's island, i. 
145w.; magistrate, 1.367; head of 



the opposers of Rigby, i. 549^; 
mentioned, i. 76, 88, 91, 94, 99, 
133. 
Arthur jr., i. 69. 

Mrs. Jane, moved to Boston, i. 70, 
128-129, 217; death of, i. 70, 250; 
to administer her husband's es- 
tate, I. 70n; date of her will, i. 
70n; bequests in her will, i. 70n; 
children baptized in her house, i. 
108, 162; 8. 294??; submitted to 
the jurisdiction of Mass., i. 112; 
the mother of James Andrews, i. 
112; her daughter married, 1. 113- 
114; conveyed land to Nathaniel 
Wharff, 1. 114; lived at Falmouth, 
I. 114, 215; consented to the 
agreement between Jordan and 
Tucker, i. 131; her petition to 
the general court, i. 144; men- 
tioned, I. 130, 133, 208, 217. 
John, son of Arthur, i. 69; signed 
the petition to Charles 11, i. 402. 
Rebecca, married Nathaniel Wharff, 
I. 70n, 113-114, 128, 208; married 
William Rogers, i. 70n; her son, 
I. 70n; married Abraham Adams, 
I. 70n, 128. 
Macworth' s point, called Newton, i. 

69, 114. 
Madamascontee, definition of, 4. 379; 

now Damariscotta, 4. 379. 
Madawaska, definition of, 4. 115; in- 
corporated, 8. 51, 53; town meet- 
ing of interrupted, 8. 51 ; elected 
a representative, 8. 51 ; people in 
arrested, 8. 52; Livingston in, 8. 
53, 55; mentioned, 4. 86, 106; 8. 
5, 27, 53, 60, 85. 
county, 8. 104. 

river, 8. 29, 30, 39, 40, 44, 49, 65; 9. 
171. 
Madefer, see Madiver. 
Madeira, i. 56, 551; 3- 98; 4-23. 
Madison, Major George, 9. 199, 200. 
James, 6. 359. 
the, 9. 185. 
Madiver, Joel, land granted to, i.206, 
207, 251; lived near the Fore 
river, i. 216; lived at Purpooduck, 
I. 251, 321; signed the petition to 
Bradstreet, i. 283n. 
Joel jr., lived at Falmouth, i. 321. 
Michael, lived at Falmouth, i. 155, 
I80n; father of Joel, i. 206; ex- 
changed farms with Gendall, i. 
232; 3. 75; acknowledged the 
government of Mass., i. 386; 3. 
46; settled at Black Point, 3. 74; 
land granted to, 3. 74, 75; reason 
for the graat, 3. 74-75; trouble 
with John Tenney, 3. 75; ScottoW 
conveyed land to, 3. 75; called 
** Old Madiver," 3. 75. 
Madockawando, chief of the Penob- 
scots, I. 215 J agreed to a peace, i. 



168 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Madockawando — continued. 

228; a powerful chief, i. 229; in 
command of the Indians, i. 298, 
301; dead, i.304; 3.139; 7-66,67, 
75; to receive an annual tribute 
of a peck of corn, 3. 102; father- 
in-law of St. Castine, 3. 134; 6. 
Ill, 283; attempted negotiations 
with John Eathey, 5. 252; his 
sister entertained by Andros, 5. 
268; given ammunition, 5. 268; 
delivered prisoners at Pemaquid, 
5. 283; at the capture of Pema- 
quid, 5. 283; a friend of St. Cas- 
tine, 7. 44, 45; frequently in 
Quebec, 7. 44; his clan, 7. 44; 
character of, 7. 45, 69; met An- 
dros, 7. 55, 55n; notice sent to St. 
Castine, 7. 55, 55/? ; visited Boston, 
7. 56; predicted the war, 7. 58; 
led his tribe against Falmouth, 7. 
59; friendly to the English, 7. 61; 
disinclined towards tlie French, 
7. 69; sold land to Gov. Phipps, 9. 
69; the Indians denied his right 
to sell, 9. 79; mentioned, 5. 28, 
219n. 

Madrid, 3. 339. 

Maductic falls, 4. 106. 

Madusnekeag river, 4. 106. 

Madwichig, 3. 357- 

Magahunta, the Indian devil, 4. 379. 

Maganumbee, ? 4. 155, 163, 164; his 

Magawombee ) mark, 3. 420. 

Magaquodavic river, 8. 7, 8, 11, 13, 14, 
15. 

Magawok bay, 4. 106. 

Magdalen College, i. 59w. 
island, 9. 101. 

Maggacadava river, sometimes called 
the St. Croix, 8. 10. 

Magistrates for the province and towns, 
I. 159, 163. 

Magna Britannia, 2. 257w ; see Lysons, 
Daniel. 

Magnse Britanniae, 4. 123; 6. 124; see 
Great Britain. 

Magna GrsBcia, 6. 205. 

Magnalia Christi America, see Mather, 
- Cotton, I. 153-154. 

Magnesia, found in Limerick, i. 326. 

Magouwandock, 3. 412. 

Magyar language, the, 9. 266n. 

Mahigans, the, 7. 101. 

Mahogany Jones, a nickname of John 
Jones, 4. 45. 

Mahotiwormet, Indian name of Robin 
Hood, 2. 190. 

Maidens, the, a nickname given to the 
French soldiers, 7. 42. 

Maijard, Pere, 6. 225. 

Maillard, Abb^ , manuscript of 

cited, I. 422. 

Mails, service at Bath, 2. 219; delayed 
hve weeks, 3. 205n; the first reg- 
ular to Scarborough, 3. 205n; 



twice a week on horseback to 
Bath, 5. Ixvi; regular in 1753 from 
Boston to Philadelphia, 6. 328; 
how carried from Portland to 
Winthrop in 1799, 7. 273 ; uncertain 
at the Bay of Fundy, 8. 128. 

Mainard, Pere , 6. 215. 

Maine, ancient dominions of, see 
Sewall,Rufus K. 

Central Railroad, 8. 205ri, 210n, 280. 

Charitable School, 8. 177, 178. 

Charitable Society, 8. 168. 

district of, 7. 400, 401. 

early documents relating to cited, i. 
SSn. 

ecclesiastical sketches of, see Green- 
leaf, Moses. 

educational institutions of while a 
district of Mass., by the Rev. J. T. 
Champlin, 8. 155-180. 

genealogical record cited, 9. SOSn. 

Historical Society, corporate mem- 
bers of, 1. 11; 8.410; act of in- 
corporation, I. 10, 11-12; 2. 12a- 
13a; 4. 6; 5. xviii; 6. 358; 8. 346, 
410; organized, i.l2; first olB&cers 
of, 1. 12, 17; 4. 6; constitution and 
by-laws, 1. 13-15; members of, i. 
16; Popham celebration, i. 29n; 
the David Sewall manuscript pre- 
sented to, 1. 363; services rendered 
by, 2. 13a; possess Strachey's 
History of Travel, 3. 281 ; received 
a copy of Popham' s letter to 
James i, 5. 343 ; at work on the 
Documentary History of the State, 
7. 364; obtained copies of docu- 
ments in the archives of Europe, 
7. 364; proceedings of, 6. 353-374; 

7. 361-495; moved to Portland, 8. 
iii; to have two series of publi- 
cations, 8. iii, iv; the duty of, 8. 
293, 294; 9. 169; sent a greeting 
to the Hon, Peleg Sprague, 8. 212; 
mentioned, 3. 312?z, 314w, 321, 
323n, 339, 358; 4- 59, 67, 95, 230, 
233, 235; 5. 141, 143n, 144n; 6. 85, 
205, 244; 7. 360, 378, 379, 422, 455, 
457, 473n, 480, 481, 482, 494; 8. 
113/1, 123, 183n, 274w, 282n, 294, 
325, 344, 346, 404, 406, 410, 481, 
507; publications of cited, i.34n, 
40n, 43n, 447i, 240; 2. 42w, 49w, 80, 
130, 151, 237; 3. 35w, 47n, 59n, 211, 
273, 277; 5. xix, 1, 2, 3, 157n, 158n, 
160, 164n, 167n, 173n, 186w, 188n, 
2l4n, 223m, 224w, 291n, 372%; 6. 78, 
176/1, 180w, 183, 189n, 195?i, 305; 
7.3n,67i, 58/1, 95, 301n, 313/i, 315n; 

8. iv, llln, 112n, 184w, 185n, 191n, 
199, 204n, 273, 283, 332 ; 9. 7-8, 261, 
277/1, 326n. 

the History of, see Sullivan and 

Williamson. 
Insane Hospital, 8. 357. 
John, lived at Maine's point, 1. 114; 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



169 



lived at Westcustogo, 1. 185, 188; 
at Casco Bay, i. 236n; at Foreside, 
2. 171, 172; see also Mayne. 

Literary and Theological Institution 
chartered, 8. 177, 178; early pro- 
moters of, 8. 178; opened, 8. 178; 
closed, 8. 178-179. 

Medical School, 5. xviii; 6. 413. 

Missionary Society, 7. 377, 378. 

province of, few books published in, 
1.5; the history of enlightened by 
the Maine Historical Society, 2. 
ISa; obscurity of the early history 
of, 5. i ; will occupy a prominent 
place in history, 2. 13a; has the 
precedence in the English coloni- 
zation of America, 7. 403; called 
Mavoosham, 2. 17a; 4. 106; early 
ruler of, 2. 18a; origin of the de- 
pendence of upon the government 
of New York, 5. 1-2; list of grants 
in, I. 79; 9. 365-368; boundary of, 
2. 257-258, 271; why the early 
settlers did not succeed, 2. 270, 
271, 273; the character of the set- 
tlers compared with those of 
Mass., 2. 270-271; 3. 29; 4. 70, 71, 
72, 80; 5. xxi, xxii, 3-4, 179; cus- 
toms of the settlers, 3. 97; largely 
settled by people from Mass., i. 
161, 4. 69; 6. 4, 5; 8.439; Shap- 
leigh a prominent man in the af- 
fairs of, 1. 163 ?2; expenses incurred 
in settling, i. 272n; 2. 61a; the 
Flanders or Belgium of America, 

1. 403; Catholic missions among 
the Indians of, i. 428-446; first 
Indian convert in, i.431; the In- 
dians of firm Catholics, i. 445; 
the French the cause of the crim- 
son pages in the early history of, 
5. 175; distinctly Episcopalian, 5. 
175, 221; 6. 179-180, 183; great 
variety of sources for the popula- 
tion of, 6. 3-4; but little attention 
paid in early days to the schools, 
7. 273; early fishing on the coast 

of, 7. 133; 9. 78; coast of first 
(1603) brought into notice, 1603, i. 25; 

4. 67; Champlain and Du Monts 
on the coast of, i, 25-26; 3. 99; 7. 
249; penetrated by the French, 

5. 325; first attempt to settle, i. 
(1605) 28; 2. 20a; 4. 13, 68; Weymouth, 

1605, made a voyage to, 2. 22a; 
7. 209, 295; carried captives to 
England, 7. 209; (see under In- 
dians); Bashaba early noticed in 
the annals of, 7. 95 ; brought, 1606, 
to the notice of the English, i. 28; 
Gorges the original proprietor of, 

2. 26a, 266; Gorges the founder 
of, 2. 73a; a friend to the colonists 
of, 5. 216; her indebtedness to 
Gorges, 2. 73a, 74a; the native 
places of the pioneers of, 6. 179; 



the Mary and John, 1607, arrived 

at, 2. 27a; supposed site of the 

colony, 2. 27a-28a; measures taken 

to explore, 2.28a; 1607, in a state 

(1607) of incipiency, 4. 70; Champlain' s 

(1613) map of the coast of published, 

1613, 7. 249; Capt. John Smith, 

1614, on the coast of, 7. 135; 
(1620) Pemaquid, 1620, not a part of, 

7. 310; suffered by the perplex- 

(1622) ity of the grants, 1622, 2. 52a; 

(1623) visited by Levett, 1623, i. 34; 
2. 49a; few settlers on the coast 

of, 2. 50a; a favorite resort for 
fishermen, 3. 9; no fishing ves- 

(1624) sels on the coast of, 1624, 3. 9; 

(1625) the Dutch attempted to settle, 
1625, 4. 218; 6. 2Sn; John Brown 
acquired a title in, 7. 135; fort 

(1630) built in, 1630, 7. 135; first per- 
manent settlement in, 1631, i- 
35, 37n, 46; time of but little note 
but of future value, 5. 219; 

(1632) Godfrey established in, 1632, i. 
46n, 47n, 183n; the colonies 
gradually united, 5. 215 ; divis- 

(1635) ion of the patentees, 1635, 1.8I, 
89; Gorges' charter confirmedi, 

2. 58a; so named by Gorges, 2. 
58a, 70; 8. 184; origin of the name, 
2. 58an,; 3. 31^; 5. xxi; Captain 
Gorges governor of, 2. 50n; 3. 31; 
rent demanded by Gorges, 2. 70- 
71; called New Somersetshire, i. 
65; 3. 31; George Cleeves ac- 

(1636) quired a title to, 1636, i. 65; 
first general jurisdiction of, 2. 

53a; first organized government 
of, 6. 179; the service of the 
Church of England authorized 
(1638) in, 6. 183; John Jocelyn in. 
1638, I. 50; cattle scarce in, 3- 
72w; injured by Laud, 5. 221; de, 
pendent on England, 5. 221-222; 
compared to Mass., 5. 227-228; 
Gorges charter to, i. 109; 4. 69; 
(1639)8. 151; Richard Vines, 1639, 
governor of, 2. 79a; the govern- 
ment of based on Anglo-Saxon 
forms, 2. 59a; mode of, govern- 
ment by T. Gorges, i. Tdn; 2. 
(1640) 59a-60a, 55-57; Gorges, 1640, 
made lord proprietor, 9. 312; 
Thomas Josselyn to organize the 
government, 2. 59a, 64a, 78a; first 
court held, 1.88; Gorges' atten- 
tion called from, 2. 60a; Mass. 
took possession of, 2. 60a; 3. 33; 
resistance to Mass., 2. 60a, 272; 
pretext for the usurpation of 
Mass., 2. 60n, 61a, 272; 3. 33; g. 
319-320; Mass. not guilty of 
usurpation, 5. 228; Gorges' court 
established, i. 73, 88; the people 
of appealed to Mass. to settle the 
confusion, 1. 140; prizes offered 



170 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Maine— continued . 

for killing wolves, i. 366; children 

to be baptized, i. 366; the first 

Puritan minister in, i . 547 ; 3. 153 ; 

clergymen wanted, 3. 153; first 

(1644) trial for murder in, 1644, 3. 16n; 
William Waldern, 1645, the re- 

(1645) corder of, i. 368; Henry Josse- 
lyn governor of, 2. 79a ; the set- 
tlements disturbed by war, 3. 

(1646) 169, 171w; g. 316, 317; John 
Bonython, 1646, declared an 
outlaw, I. 368; second trial for 

(1647) murder, 3. 16; taxes levied, 
1647, I. 368; Lygonia separated 

from, I. 98; the people of the 

western part form a combination 
(1649) for their government, 1649, i. 

98; Godfrey governor of, i. 47, 

183; 9. 319; Mass. sent commis- 
(1652) sioners to treat with the people 

of, 1652, 2. 61a; 3. 43; Godfrey 
refused to confer with the com- 
missioners, 2. 61a-62a; cau»e of 
the dislike to Mass., 2. 62a-63a; 
the people under two govern- 
ments, 2. 62a; obliged to submit 
to Mass., I. 98, 100; 3. 33, 43-44, 

45, 46; 6. 185; 7. 151-152; the 
(1656) people, 1656, petitioned to 

Cromwell, i. 392-395, 397^; 

underhanded work of Mass., 9. 

(1658) 326; part of called Yorkshire, 
I. 106; Mass., 1658, held posses- 
sion of the western parts, i. 107; 

the people hostile to Mass., i. 

(1659) 107, 240; laxity of the morals 
in, 1659, I. 158, 190, 192; free- 
dom of speech in, 3. 23; state 

(1661) of the traveling in, 1661, 1. 165; 

(1662) party spirit high, 1662, i. 170, 

(1663) 182, 196, 240; influence of the 
laws upon, 1663, i. l62; the 

Earl of Stirling's right sold to 

the Duke of York, 5. 2; appealed 

to the crown, 1664, to settle 

(1664) disputes, i. 173, 176, 240, 400- 
401; visited by commissioners, 

1664, I. 173; 3. 56; 5. 235; Arch- 
dale in, 1. 173: Mass. ordered not 
to meddle with the affairs of, i. 
175, 176; 3. 56; the first map of 
made, i. 175; the authority of 
Gorges denied, i. 176; the people 
of set up their own government, 
I. 177; address to the king, i, 
"178-179; the people desired the 
protection of Mass., i. 181; 3. 58, 
62, 63-64; 5. 235; the towns scat- 
tered, I. 181, 211-212, 228; the 
middle classes satisfied with 
Mass., 1. 182; given to the Duke 
of York, 8. 184; the authority 

(1665) of Mass., 1665, denied, i. 183, 
184; commissioners sent by the 

king, 2. 63a J 4. 220; the govern- 



ment by the commissioners es- 
tablished, I. 195; magistrates ap- 
pointed, 2. 63a-64a; declared to 
be the property of Gorges, 2. 
(1666) 60a, 70; 3. 33, 50; 6. 188; com- 
missioners appointed, 1666, for 
the eastern parts, i, 376; the 

(1668) people appeal to Mass., 1668, 
to settle their confusion, 1. 196; 

3. 58; end of the government by 
the king's commissioners, i. 195; 
general submission to Mass., i. 
197, 198, 385, 386; the elective 
franchise established, i.201; peo- 
ple divided in regard to the juris- 
diction of Mass., 3. 64; the set- 
tlements increased in import- 

(1669) ance, 3. 64; highways, 1669. 
ordered to be laid out, i. 165; 

(1670) Josselyn's account of, 1670, i. 
550-552; division among the 

people, I. 551; 3. 96; 5. 234; sup- 
plied with goods by Mass., i. 551 ; 
the coast a refuge for fugitives 
from justice, 5. 234; the best 
work upon the history of the 

(1671) time, 5. 234n; the government, 

1671, topsy-turvey, 3. 98; 5. 223- 
237; people ordered to provide 
means of defense, 3. 102; the only 

record of punishment of Quak- 

(1672) ers, 3. 71 ; the eastern boundary, 

1672, established, i. 202; con- 
dition of, 5. 238-239, 242; petition 
to Mass., 5. 239-241 ; varying ter- 
ritorial name, 5.242; peacefully 

(1674) acknowledged the government, 
1674, of Mass., 5. 248; the first 

attempt to govern by law, 5. 250; 
not imprudent in zeal of Chris- 
tianizing, 5. 251 ; prevented from 
becoming a part of Canada, 5. 

(1675) 257; the militia of, i. 228, 229w; 
settlers exposed to the hostile 

Indians, 3. 102; relief sent by 

Mass., 3. 107; condition of during 

King Philip's war, 4. 73, 222; 

(1676) the authority of Mass., 1676, 
annulled, i. 238; restored to 

the heirs of Gorges and Mason, i. 
238; Pemaquid the foremost 

(1677) settlement, 1677, in the prov- 
ince, 5. 261n Andros ordered 

the people not to fortify their 
houses, 5. 269; purchased of 
Gorges by Mass., i. 238-239; 2. 
64a, 257, 261, 264, 266; 3. 33, 65, 
129; 4. 70; 7, 160, 211; price paid, 
i,239n; 2. 64a, 257, 261, 264, 266; 
3. 33, 65n; the king displeased at 
the purchase, 3, 65; question of 
raising money for the war, i. 

(1678) 239; legally transferred, 1678, 
to Mass., 2. 65a; deed from 

Gorges to Usher, a. 257-260; deed 
from Usher to Mass., 2. 261-264; 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



171 



government formed, i. 240; 2. 

65a; Mass. purchased what she 

had previously held by injus- 

(1680) tice, 4. 70; Thomas Danfoith, 

1680, appointed president, i. 
240; 2.65a; 3. 129; first general 
assembly, i. 240, 241; 3. 129; 
jurisdiction assumed at York, 3. 
129; the people dissatisfied, i. 
240; address to the people, i. 240- 

241; petition to Charles 11, i. 

(1681) 400-401; 3. 129; the Assembly, 

1681, applied to Mass. for se- 
curity, I. 205 ; committee appoint- 
ed to inquire into the state of, i. 

265; Baptists first appear, 8. 

(1682) 221; sawmills in, 1682, i. 268- 
269 ; the only record of religious 
persecution, 7. 224; land titles, 

(1684)1684, confirmed, i. 271-272; 
repose of the people interrupted, 
I. 273; affairs conducted with in- 
difference, I. 273; local govern- 
ment ceased, i. 274; land owners 
required to obtain new patents, 

(1687) I. 274; the quitrents, 1687, 
produce dissatisfaction, i. 272- 

273; people opposed to the new 
survey of the lands, i. 274-275, 
280; the people advised to sub- 
mit to the new order, i . 274, 282 ; 

(1688) outbreak of Indian hostilities, 
1688, 1.288; troops sent to, i. 

289, 290; largely deserted, 7. 54; 

Andros paid a visit to, 7. 54; 

Mass. not over anxious for the 

(1689) safety of the people, 1689, 7. 
Ill; by a charter consolidated 

(1691) with Mass., 1691, 7. 211; 8. 157; 

established as a district, 8. 157; 

population of, 8. 157; nearly 
(1693) depopulated, 1693, 5. 283n; the 
(1696) deplorable condition of, 1696, 

3. 138-139; commissioners ap- 
(1700) pointed to settle the land claims 

in, 2. 234; opinion of Richard 

West on the king's right to the 
(1718) woods of, 1718, 2.265-268; the 

forest opened to the settlers by 

the capture of Quebec, 4. 75; 
(1734) Scotch-Irish first arrived at, 6. 

11; tax of 1734, 4. 197; Quakers 

(1740) in, 1740, 7. 220-221; alarmed by 

(1741) the Spanish war, 1741, 8. 211; 
(1743) tax of 1743, 4. 197; Germans ar- 
rived at, 1753, 6. 23 ; large Scotch 

emigration, 6. 23 ; a stronghold of 
the Presbyterians, 6.32; by the 

(1759) fall of Quebec, 1759, the French 
lost their possession of, 7. 248; 

(1760) the chief townships of, 1760, 4. 
75; distribution of French 

Neutrals in, 3. 176w; 6.339-343; 
slavery crept in, 7. 213, 215; rela- 
tive rank of the towns, 3. 176n; 
new names appeared, 4. 78; Prot- 
estants arrived, 4. 78; settlers en- 



couraged by Mass., 4. 78; em* 

(1761) braced York county, 6. 43; tax 

(1762) of 1761, 4. 197; drought of 1762, 

(1763) 3, 177; revival of Episcopalian- 

(1764) ism, 1763, 7. 220; population, 
(1700) 1764, 7.215; number of lawyers 
(1774) in, 1770, 8. 157; the condition 

(1783) and the work of the slaves, 1774, 
7. 215 ; Baptists, 1683, numerous, 
7. 221-222; the number of in- 

(1784) corporated towns, 1784, 7. 219; 
local resident ministers, 7. 219; 

first appearance of the Method- 
ists, 7.226; progress scarcely im^ 
peded by the war of the Revolu- 
tion, 4. 78; land titles embar- 
rassed, 7. 353; lottery established 
to sell lands, 7. 353-354; state 
lands explored, 7. 354; towns 

(1789) incorporated, 1789, 4. 79; prog- 
ress of, 4. 79-80; temporarily 
checked, 4. 80; Elder Jesse Lee 

(1790) in, 1790,7.227; the population, 

(1791) 1791, 8.157; Hallo well Academy 
incorporated, 8. 160; the peo- 

(1797) pie, 1797, lacked good Christian • 

education, 4. 356; the number 

(1800) of lawyers, 1800, 8. 157; the 

(1804) landholders' troubles settled, 

(1807) 1804, 2. 292; bitter pohtical 

(1820) strife, 1807, 7. 356; separated 

from Mass., 1820, i. 274; 2. 123; 

3. 65; 7. 21, 419; 8. 157, 177, 391 ; 

9. 175; number of lawyers, 1820, 

8. 157; number of clerg:ymen, 8. 
157-158; few educated natives, 8. 
158; education in, 7.274; 8.158; 
academies incorporated, 8. 160; 
no olden time in the history of, 4. 
75 ; dates of the establishment of 
churches in, 5. liv-lv; 7. 219, 220, 
221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226-227; 
had no laws relating to slavery, 7. 
211; mentioned, i. 21, 49, 81, 302, 
401, 403, 414, 420, 426, 435, 541; 2. 

9, 242; 3. 51, 87, 89, 230, 233, 325, 
332; 4. 249, 257, 284?i, 321, 411, 
413; 5. liii, 2, 6, 352, 399; 6. 34, 
99n, 132, 156, 160, 207, 275, 343n, 
357, 359; 7. 43, 45n, 95, 114, 131, 
203, 223, 227, 228, 255n, 274, 286, 
294, 308n, 325, 359, 385, 387, 404, 
405, 406, 410, 417; 8. 157, 190, 287, 
294, 349; 9. 34, 35, 38, 76, 81, 82, 
209, 225, 233, 262, 300, 304, 3l5n, 
327, 333, 334, 335, 338, 342, 346, 
354, 355 ; see Maine, state of. 

the Provincial Council of, 2. 50. 

Reports, 8. 342, 348, 397, 416, 469, 
470. 

Slavery in, by Joseph Williamson, 
7. 207-216. 

state of, the first period of the his- 
tory of, 4. 68-72; second period 
of the history of, 4, 72-77; third 
period of the history of, 4- 78- 



172 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Maine — continued. 

(1820) 87; became an independent 
state, 1820, 4. 25, 78, 80; 5. xviii; 
6. 64n, 66, 68, 71, 72, 201; 8.27, 
177; her tonnage, 4. 25; Lin- 
(1827) coin became governor of, 1827, 
I. 409; Lincoln's important 
work in, i. 414; her present 
strength partly owing to the ex- 
ertions of the Kennebec Pur- 
chasers, 2. 294; developing her 
resources, 4. 11-12; average dura- 
tion of life in, 4. 17; the census 
(1855)3of 1855, 4. 19; soil of, 4. 20; 
valuation of real estate in, 4. 22 ; 
her early vessels of small tonnage, 
4-24; a leader in ship building, 
4. 25; manufactures in, 4. 27; 
moving with rapid strides, 4. 28; 
youngest of the Atlantic states, 

4. 67; character of her people, 4. 
76-77, 80, 81, 82, 83; settled by 
Massachusetts and New Hamp- 
shire, 4. 80; Paul Coffin's remarks 
on, 4. 404-405 ; last great land con- 
troversy settled, 4. 233; took 
prompt measures to promote 
morality and learning, 5. xvii, 
xviii; had formerly but little in- 
terest in historical research, 5. 
xviii; has a broad field for his- 
torical inquiry, 5. xx; the number 

of settled ministers of 1856 

(1856) compared to 1792, 5. Iv; the 

Lithgow family prominent in, 

5. 415; the first United States 
district attorney in, 5. 415 ; ceded 
territory to the United States, 6. 
73 ; renewed the Indian treaty, 7. 
20; formerly under the dominion 
of France, 7. 248 ; the locality of 
first occupied, 8. 317 ; the Ashbur- 
ton treaty a sacrifice to, 8. 6, 15 ; 
the St. Croix the true boundary 
of, 8. 11; islands conceded to, 8. 
15; exercised jurisdiction over 
territory that was disputed by 
Great JBritain, 8. 16, 17; gave 
grants in this territory, 8. 16-17; 
the commissioners had no right 
to cede any part of to England, 8. 
18; bounded on the north by the 
St. Lawrence river, 8. 23; desired 
the eastern line established, 8. 
28, 30; the United States had no 
right to yield any part of to any 
sovereignty, 8. 33, 34-35, 37, 48; 
the threatened treaty jeopardized 
her, 8. 35-36; her dominion no 
subject of partition, 8. 36; dis- 
turbed by encroachments, 8. 37, 
38, 41; not well treated, 8. 39; 
the United States convinced of 
her rights, 8. 40, 45-46, 48-49; 
would not submit to the conven- 
tion, 8. 49; asked to keep quiet, 



8.49-50, 69, 350; her answer, 8. 
50 ; to submit to the conventional 
line, 8. 61; her interests disre- 
garded, 8. 62; joint owner of wild 
lands, 8. 62?i; to demand her 
rights, 8. 63-64; asked aid of the 
general government, 8. 77; her 
action approved by the country, 
8. 80; forced to assent to the 
treaty, 8. 89-90, 92-93; the com- 
pensation received, 8. 102, 105; 

, without a governor, 8. 394; not 
jealous of Mass., 8. 438-439; the 
oldest road in, 9. 142, 151; her 
first representative to Congress, 
9. 169; should give honor to Mass., 
4. 81 ; her history yet to be made, 
4. 90; mentioned, 2. 131, 148, 151, 
153, 157, 165; 3. 241; 4. 68, 98, 
281n, 289n, 387 Ji; 5. xxxiv, xxxv, 
xxxvii, xxxviii, xl, Ivi, 174n, 313, 
355, 403; 6. 36, 69, 75, 126w, 209, 
218, 232, 233, 234, 271, 272, 310, 
336, 354, 357, 360, 365, 373; 7. 22, 
104, 110, 225, 364, 419; 8. 18, 21, 
27, 29, 31, 32, 34, 39, 40, 41, 42, 44, 
45, 48, 54, 62, 66, 67, 69, 70, 71, 
74, 75, 78, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 
92, 94, 95, 101, 102, 103, 105, 342, 
358, 411, 433, 438, 450, 458w, 459, 
478; 9. 71, 72, 91, 122, 130, 171, 
174, 175, 204, 242, 248. 
street, i. 316; 6. 132. 

Maines, Mr. , killed, 2. 182. 

Mrs. , wounded, 2. 182. 

Maine's point, Richard Bray lived on, 

1. 114; a town to be laid out on, 

2. 172; land included in, 2. 172. 
Maintenon, Madam de, 7. 67- 
Mair point, 3. 329; see Mare point. 
Maize, Champlain described the cul- 
tivation of, 7. 260; called wheat 
of India, 7. 261 ; see corn. 

Maja Bagaduce, see Major Bagaduce. 

Majabagwaduce point, 4. 324, .324n. 

Majais, Cadillac's account of, 6. 279; 
same as Machias, 6. 279w, 280. 

Majechewsett bay, 2. 43; see Massa- 
chusetts bay. 

Majo Londo, the Indian devil, 4. 
107. 

Major Bagaduce, contracted to Baga- 
duce, 6. 107, 108; the site of Cas- 
tine, 6. 107; the definition of not 
known, 6. 107; mentioned, 6. 316; 
7. 12, 18; see Bagaduce. 
R H., 7. 318n. 

Makakes, the, see Maquas, the. 

Makesheft, the, 9. .337. 

Malacites, the, 6. 232, 236. 

Malaga, Indians sold as slaves in, 2. 
29, 168; 7.210. 

Malcom, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 16. 
family, the, 6. 23; 8. 115. 
Michael, 8. llln. 

Maiden, England, 3. xvi. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



173 



Mass., I. 156n, 189/i, 225n; 2. 144; 3. 

155; 4,299. 
, servant of the Earl of Warwick, 

3. XV. 

Maligo, see Malaga. 
Mallebarre, a boundary of Acadia, 5. 
325; nov7 Cape Cape Cod, 5-325, 
329; 8. 321; Du Monts at, 5-329; 
8. 321. 
Mallery, William, 9. 304n-305n. 
Mallet, Hosea, 5. 277. 
Sir John, 7. 129?^. 

Maloon, , taken prisoner, 2. 206; 

sold, 2. 206; escaped to Boston, 2. 
206. 
Malta, Paul ChadwiCk killed at, 2. 
289; 7. 387; the name changed, 2. 
291*,, 7. 388; the people of settled 
with the Kennebec Purchasers, 2. 
291; 7.33, 388; 9. 202. 
Mamderroquid, 3. 413. 
Mamercquenet, 3. 357. 
Mammouth cave, 6. 411, 

Manach, M. , on the beauties of 

the Indian language, i. 413. 
Mananas island, 4. 106. 
Manawormet, 2. 92. 
Manchester, England, 4. 18. 
Mass., 4. 231. 
N. H., 4. 189; 6.236. 
Manessumet, sold land to Thomas 

Stevens, 3. 315. 
Mangee, | country comprised in, 2. 
Mangi, ] 76a. 
Mangum, W. P., 8. 424. 
Manhaden, 4. 106. 

Manham, Samuel, killed Madam Bear- 
ing, 3. 151. 
Manhattan island, settled by the 
Dutch, 2. 31w; called Mananthe, 
6. 281. 
Manida, carried to England by Wey- 
mouth, 2. 17. 
Manir, John, letter to from Arnold, 

1.469. 
Manitou, the Grood Spirit of the In- 
dians, 4. 107. 
Maulers, J., signed the treaty of 1714, 

6. 258; autograph of, 6. 258. 
Mann, Ariel, corporate member of 
the Maine Historical Society, i. 
11. 

Dr. ^ 5. xviii. 

Obadiah, 4. 359, 386. 
Percy, 7. 284. 
Manneerhowan, 3. 440. 
Manning, Capt. Nicholas, cliief magis- 
trate of York, I. 279; ordered a 
survey made, i. 279; a judge of 
the court in Cornwall, i. 279n; 
troubled the people of New Dart- 
mouth, 5, 99, 264; commissioned 
as captain, 5. 100-101; justice of 
the peace, 5. 113, 115, 117; sub- 
collector, 5. 120-125; complained 
of, 7. 158; mentioned, 4. 226; 5. 
88. 



Miss , married Dr. Vaughan, 6. 

86. 
Capt. Joseph, letter of cited, 6. 108. 

, 6. 89. 

Mansell, Sir Robert, the present Mt. 

Desert named for, i. 26n. 
Mansfield, 2. 145; 5. xxx; 6. 76?z. 
John B., 5. 303. 
Lord, 6. 49. 

William, signed the petition to 
Brads treet, i. 283n; lived in Fal- 
mouth, 1. 321 ; signed the petition 
to Charles 11, i. 402. 
Mansion House, Bath, 2.220; 3.277. 
Mantawassuc, the, 7. 5. 
Manthane, the Isle of, seen by Cham- 
plain, 7. 250; now the Isle of 
Menan, 7. 250. 
Manthoumermer, visited by Cham- 
plain, 7. 258. 
Mantor, James, 4. 311. 
Manufacturers, American, remarks on 
by Augustus C. Robbins, 4. 53-61. 
Maple, prevalent in Limerick, i.327; 
sugar and molasses made from, 4. 
282, 339. 
Juice cove, 6. 300, 316. 
Maquas, friends of the English, 5. 
276; presents sent to, 5. 276; at- 
tempt to form an alliance with, 
against the eastern Indians, 5. 
278; mentioned, 5. 31, 40, 42, 43, 
92, 93. 
Maranocook pond, 4. 107. ' 
Marathon, 3. '2(50. 
Marberry, Ann, married to William 

Hutchinson, i. 341^. 
Marblehead, home of Nicholas Baker, 
I. 209; home of Jolm Ash ton, 3. 
21^, 25, 82; Robert Nichols jr. 
moved to, 3. 104; Mrs. Alger 
moved to, 3. 105; mentioned, 2. 
144; 3. 346; 4. 192; 7.88; 9. 179. 
March, Mons. Corte de, i. 301. 

John, served in the war of the Rev- 
olution, 3. 203. 
Capt. John, sent to ascertain the 
designs of the French, 5. 284; 
met Bomazeen, 5. 284; considered 
the Indians as rebels, 5.286; re- 
signed his command at Pemaquid, 
5. 290; in command of the expe- 
dition against Port Royal, 7. 76; 
censured for his failure, 7. 76; 
mentioned, 3. .345, 348. 
Samuel, 3. 201; served in the war 
of the Revolution, 3. 203. 

Col. , of Greenland, 4. 299. 

Marchebagyduce, definition of, 6. 108. 
Marchin, Indian chief, 7. 259, 262. 
Marcy, the Hon. W. L., 9. 243. 
Marden, Stephen, 4. 320, 352. 
Mareagit, an Indian, 4. 159. 
Mare point, treaty concluded at, i. 
304; a part of Brunswick, 2. 180; 
home of Purchase, 3. 329; men- 
tioned, a. 179; 3. 317; 8. 211%. 



174 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Mareschites, the, 6. 212. 
Mareuso, an Indian, 4. 159. 
Margaritta, the, comnjanded by Moore, 

2. 243; expected to attack Ma- 
chias, 2. 244; driven down the 
river, 2. 244; captured, 2. 245; 
number of killed and wounded, 2. 
245, 249n; mentioned, 2. 246. 

Margery, the, employed at Kichmond's 
island, i. 56; 6. 138; arrived in 
America, i. 284n; sent with freight 
to England, i. 537. 

Maria, Joseph, a Penobscot Indian, 5. 
371, 375. 
de Medici, queen regent, i. 424; 7. 
28; forced Pontrincourt to take 
Biard to America, i. 428; aided 
in fitting out a vessel for Ameri- 
ca, 1.429; 8.322,323. 

Marin ell, see Mariner. 

Mariner, James, came from Dover, i. 
313; lived on the Neck, i. 313, 
321; Hodgsdon deeded land to, i. 
248, 313; date of his birth, i. 313; 
lived at Boston, 1.313; his pos- 
terity, I. 313. 

Mariners' church, the, Boston, i. 352/1. 

Marion , in command at St. John's 

river, 7. 340. 

Maritime and Inland Discovery cited, 
5. 145n. 

Mariumptioook river, the, 8. 30. 

Marks, of Arexus, 3. 420; Stephen 
Batson, i. 358; Cuncasepot, 4. 135; 
Laron, 3. 419; Maganumbee, 3. 
420; Naunaune, 4. 135; Perepole, 

3. 333; Philemon Pockmart, i. 
358; Ramanasche, 1.358; Samoset, 
5. 188n, 192; Sanquaarum, 3. 419; 
Sasagahaway, i..S58; Umpecheny, 
4.135; Unnongoit, 5. 192; Will 
Warden, i. 358; Wauntauga, 4. 
1.S5; Wenemouett, 3. 378, 405; 
Francois Xavier, 3. 420; see also 
signums. 

William, lived at Sheepscot, 2. 233; 
swore fealty to the Duke of York, 

4. 221. 
Marlborough, 2. 146; 4- l^l- 
Marley, 7. 359. 

Marney, 3. xvi. 

Maroonscook pond, 4. 113, 114; 8. 
205n. 

Marot, Capt., , 9. 108, 109, 110. 

Marquette, Pere Jacques la, 6. 219. 
Marquoit, i. 114; 2. 167; 3- 320ri, 329, 
330, 331, 332, 374; 4. 106. 

bay, 2,167; 3-317; 4-105. 
Marsequunt, 4. 140. 
Marsh, , of Vassalboro, 4. 383. 

the Rev. , 7. 235. 

island, i. 145, 152; 7. 79n. 

point, 7. 79n. 

Samuel and Son, 4. 55. 
Marsh's mountain, 6. 301. 
Marshall, John, signed the petition 



to Bradstreet, i. 2SSn; lived at 
Falmouth, i. 321. 
John, chief justice, 5. xlviii. 
Capt. Samuel, 2. 133. 
Marshall's cove, 6. 316. 
Marshfield, John Bourne a resident 
of, 1 . 150 ; John Rouse a resident 
of, I. 150; Theodosius Moore a 
resident of, i. 556; mentioned, 2. 
145, 175; 3. 160^; 4-272; 6.76^, 
367; 7. 190; 8. 281, 28U, 2S2n. 
Mars Hill, the northwest angle of 
Nova Scotia, 8. 20-21; not correct 
to be claimed as the angle, 8. 22, 
25-26, 26 ; mentioned, 8. 6Q, 83. 
Marshpee, 4. 271. 

Mars ton, Ephraim, lived it Falmouth, 
I. 246n, 321; moved to Salem, i. 
246n; signed the petition to Gov. 
Bradstreet, i. 283. 
George, 2. 205. 

John, land granted to, i. 242: land 
sold to Samuel Moody, i. 246. 

Mr. , 4. 243^. 

Martel, , 8. 330. 

Marten, the Rev. Richard, preached 
at Wells, I. 347; a schoolmaster, 
I. 347; his salary, 1. 347; gradu- 
ated from Harvard College, i. 347. 
skins, the trade in prohibited, 2. 
34a; purchased by John Smith, 
5. 162. 
Martha's Yineyard, people from in 
Maine, 4. 311; the Earl of Stir- 
ling's right in sold to the Duke 
of York, 5. 2; New York to send 
a commission to, 5. 35 ; Indians 
taken catpive at, 5. 144^; called 
Martinvigners, 6. 288; Cadillac's 
account of, 6. 288 ; Indians of, 6. 
228; the land titles in traced from 
the Earl of Stirling, 7. 144; men- 
tioned, 2. 25; 4. 328, 334; 7. 274; 
8. 128. 
Martin, Capt. C, 5. 314n. 
Dorothy, conveyed her property to 

Robert Martin, i. 208. 
John Lewis, 5. 325. 
Louis Henri, his History of France 

cited, 7. 42, 42n. 
Lydia, married to Robert Corbin, i. 

121, 207. 
Mary, widow of Robert, died, i. 

207w. 
Mary, seduced by Michael Mitton, 
I. 158; executed for infanticide, 
I. 158, 207. 
Peter, signed the treaty of 1713, 6, 

255 ; autograph of, 6. 255. 
Raphael, 8. 51. 

Richard, married the Widow At- 
well, I. 75, 114; 121, 207; lived at 
Falmouth, i. 105, 114; signed the 
submission to Mass., i. 105, 386; 
his daughter married Robert Cor- 
bin, X. 121; autograph of, i. 125; 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



175 



consented to the agreement be- 
tween Jordan and Tucker, i. 13 L; 
petitioned to the general court, i. 
144; his children under Mitton's 
care, i. 158; signed the petition 
to the king, i. 180; Winthrop's 
account of, i. 207; lived on the 
Presumpscot, i.207; death of, i. 
207; his will, 1.207-208; reported 
the loss of Falmouth at Boston, 

1. 30371 ; mentioned, i. 119, 122; 
123, 141. 

Kichard, of Portsmouth, letter to 
Gen. Dennison, i. 222-223. 

William, 7. 197. 

the Rev. , of Sterlings, 4. 393. 

, with Arnold, i. 526. 

Martin's cove, i. 114. 

point I. 75, 114. 
Martinic island, 5. 385, 3857i. 
Martinique, 7. 474. 
Martinvigners, Cadillac's account of, 

6. 288; same as Martha's Vine- 
yard, 6, 288. 

Martyn, Victor, 3. 380. 

Martyr, Peter, cited, a. 15a; visited 

by Cabot, 2. 15a-16a. 
Mary, the, 5-384; 9.49. 
and John, the, one of the ships sent 

out by the Plymouth Company, 

2. 27a; sent out by Popham, 3. 
292; commanded by Raleigh Gil- 
bert, 3. 292; 5. 351; in distress, 3. 
300; returned to England with re- 
port of the colonists, 3. 308; 7. 
303; sailed from Plymouth, 5. 351 ; 

7. 294; at Seguin, 7. 301; men- 
tioned, 5. 158w; 7. 306. 

Queen of England, no interest in 
her discoveries during her reign, 
2. 18a; mentioned, 2. 196; 4. 71; 
7. 143; 9.332. 

Stuart, 6. 140^; 9. 300. 
Maryland, the Scotch-Irish in, 6. 9, 
29; coinage of, 6. 118; had a pro- 
prietary government, 7. 154; men- 
tioned,' 2. 74a; 4. 18; 6.75; 7.139; 
8.80. 

Historical Society, 2. 24an; 4. 5. 
Mascarene, Gov. Paul, signed the 
treaty of 1714, 6. 258; autograph 
of, 6. 258; governor of Nova Sco- 
tia, 8. 126; proposed to dislodge 
De Ramzay, 8. 126; planned to 
secure the allegiance of the Aca- 
dians, 8. 126, 133; sent Capt. 
Howe to join Col. Noble, 8. 128; 
letters of, 8. 130-131, 138; belonged 
to the regular army, 8. 133; vmen- 
tioned, 3. 379, 380, 381, 382, 395, 
397, 399, 402, 410, 412, 419, 421, 
435; 8.224, 226n, 241, 254. 
liashamee river, 4. 296. 
Mason, E., 2. 119. 

James, son of John, 2., 234; his 
daughter married Elias Mulford, 
2. 234. 



James, of New Darmouth, 4. 231. 
Jeremiah, 8. 363. 

John, killed in the battle at Fal- 
mouth, I. 29572. 
Capt. John, associated with Sir Wil- 
liam Alexander, i. 34; 2. 47; re- 
ceived a grant from the Plymouth 
Company, i. 35, 79; 3-30; extent 
of the prant, i. 35; the same ex- 
tended, I. 35; division of the 
grant, i. 35; 2. 54; 3-34; 9.309, 
309n; received a new grant, i. 35; 
his territory granted to others by 
the Plymouth Company, i. 49; 
received a grant to both sides of 
the Piscataqua, i. 49-50; 3. 31; 9. 
366; Josslyn his agent, i. 62n; 3. 
34; his New Hampshire grant 
conveyed no right to sovereignty, 
I. 78; extent of his territory, i. 
81; his zeal, i. 83; sent William 
Brackett to Piscataqua, i. 155n; 
his heirs held the attention of 
the king, i. 167; the province re- 
stored to his heirs, i. 238; re- 
ceived grant of Laconia, 2. 52a; 
extent of grant, 2. 52a; separated 
his business transactions from 
Gorges, 2. 52a; received a- separate 
patent, 2. 52a; extent of his terri- 
tory, 2. 52a; named New Hamp- 
shire, 2. 52a; 3. 31; employed 
Josselyn to discover Lake Cham- 
plain, 2. 67, 68n, 78a; governor of 
New Foundland, 2. 47; returned 
to, sent carpenters and cattle to 
America, 2. 50n; 9. 308?i; letter 
from Gorges cited, 2. 50n; David 
Thompson his agent, 2. 79; Capt. 
Cammock his agent, 3. 12; gave 
a grant to Cammock, 3. 12 ; William 
Sevey in his employ, 3. 223; died, 
I. 83; 2. .50n, 54a; 3. 34, 35; his 
widow settled his estates, 2. 50n; 
mentioned, 2. 61 an, 67; 3. 34^1 ; 5. 
xxi, 198; 9. 306, 309, 3lln. 
John, of Agawam, patent granted 

to, 9. 366. 
Capt. John, of Mass., 2. 133. 
John, of Sheepscot, grant to from 
Robinhood, 2. 232, 233; 4. 219, 
231; 9. 133; the commissioners 
of the Duke of York met at his 
house, 2. 232; 4. 220; 8. 185; 9. 
151; the deed from Robinhood 
given in full, 2. 233-234; resided 
at Sheepscot, 2. 233; his wife's 
land claim, 2. 234; the Sheepscot 
records began at his house, 4. 210, 
214; site of his house, 4. 214, 220; 
9. 151; remains of his house of 
stone, 4. 214; 9. 136n; took a deed 
from the Indians, 4-219; claims 
of his heirs, 4. 231; swore fealty 
to the Duke of York, 4. 221 ; men- 
tioned, 2. 236; 4. 231; 5. 236; 8. 
183n. 



176 



MAINE HISTORICAL. SOCIETY. 



Mason, the Hon. John, married Susan 
Powell, 7. 234n. 

Mrs. Capt. John, sent Francis Kor- 
ton as her attorney to America, 2. 
50; settled her husband's estate, 
2. 50n. 

the Rev. John, select remains of, 4. 
336. 

John Y., 9. 243. 

Joseph, 9. 355. 

Mary, daughter of James, married 
Elias Mulford, 2. 234; her land 
claim, 4. 231. 

Robert, i. 47; 9. 331, 346, 353. 

Samuel, g. 29. 

Thomas, land granted to, i. 243; 
lived at Salem, i. 246; sold his 
land to Peter Morrill, i. 246, 313. 

title, I. 4171. 

the Rev. William, 9. 161. 

Lieut, , sent out to capture pi- 
rates, 5. 206. 
Mason's Neck, 5. 49. 

patent, 7. 152. 
Masonia, i. 81. 
Massabesec, derivation of, 4. 190. . 

pond, 4. 107. 

Massachisans, the, 2. 62. 

Massachusetts archives, arranged by 

Felt, 2.47a; cited, 7. 50w, 55^,, 61n, 

eSn, 70n; 8. 121n, 249?i, 258; 9. 

11, 28, 49, 3l8n, 344, 374, 377, 380. 

Baptist Educational Society, 8. 178. 

bay, called Boston bay, 2. 43a; 
lands on belonged to Sir Ferdi- 
nando Gorges, 2. 56a, 57a; Robert 
Gorges at, 2. 43; Trelawny re- 
ceived a grant to lands on, 5. 
170n; mentioned, i. 36; 6. 232; 7. 
101, 262. 

Bay Colony and the Prqvince of, the 
Indian name of, 9. 226n; the most 
powerful of the early settlements, 

1, 50; the intolerance of, i. 102, 
107-108, 162, 164w, 203, 355, .360; 

2. 56a; 3. 44, 64, 154; 6. 181, 185, 
186, 187; 7. 148, 160-161; 8. 294n; 
cause of the hostility of Maine 
towards, 1.107-108; acts concern- 
ing claims, i. lAln; the extension 
of her laws benelicitory to Maine, 
I. 152; Maine largely settled by 
people from, i. 161; 5. 4, 5; 8. 
439; the paradise of New England, 
8. 98; why early attempts to set- 
tle in were successful^ 2. 269, 270, 
271; impatient of restraint, 4. 70; 
the foundation of Republican 
ideas, 5. 149; vindication of her 
rights to self government, 5. 227- 
229; struggled to root out cavaliers 
from Maine, 5. 228-229; the cur- 
rency of, 6. 118, 118n; Laud jus- 
tified by the acts of, 6. 187 ; the 
policy of her government not bad, 
7. 160-161 ; limits of her boundary 



by the charter, 7. 201; early 

slavery in, 7. 210-211; looked to 

for leaders, 9.2; a small party 

(1602) of Europeans, 1602, settled in, 
2. 20a; Martin Pring in the 

(1603) coast of, 1603, 2. 21a; Cape 
Ann the first permanent occu- 
pation in, 5. 168n; part of the 

(1622) territory within, 1622, the grant 
to Robert Gorges, i. 109; 2. 
(1628) 43an, 41 n; patent, 1628, granted 
to, 9. 866 ; great danger feared 
if she became a free state, 9. 
368 ; the early mortality, 1630,in, 
(1630) >. 31aw; Sir Christopher Gar- 
diner fled from, 3. 317; took 
(1632) action, 1632, in regard to the 
murder of Bagnall, i. 54; the 
success of awakened the interest 
of the public, 2. 53^; fitted out 
an expedition, 1633, to intercept 
a pirate, i.42; 5. 206; thrust out 

(1635) tenants, 1635, 1. 82; the king 
urged to revoke the charter of, 

I. 83; the good will of Gorges 
towards, 2. 55a; the jealousy 
towards Gorges unjustifiable, 2. 
55a-56a; indebted to Gorges, 2. 
65a; assisted the French, 5. 215- 
216; would not assist Plymouth, 
7. 34, 36, 37; warned of the French 
encroachments, 7. 36; treachery 
towards Plymouth, 7.37; claimed 
jurisdiction over Connecticut, 7. 

(1636) 152, 152n; laid, 1636, the found- 
ation of Harvard College, 5. 
xvii-xviii; John Wheelwright, 

(1637) 1637, banished from, i. 355; as- 
sisted by Godfrey in holding, 

(1638) 1638, her charter, 9. 311-312; 
ignored his assistance, 9. 31 In, 

(1640) 312n; first legislation, 1640 
concerning the acknowledge- 
ment of deeds, 5. 195; assumed 

(1641) jurisdiction over Maine, 1641, 2. 
60a; pretext for the same, 2. 

60a-61a; 3. 33; New Hampshire 

claimed to be within her limits, 

2. 61a; people from settle in 

(1642) New Hampshire, 2. 61a; Gib> 
son, 1642, obnoxious to, i. .59; 

6. 181 ; ordered the murder, 1643, 
of Miantonomo, 2. 168; neutral 

(1644) in the strife, 1644, between 
Cleeves and Yines, i. 92, 94, 96; 
in favor of Rigby, i. 92; Cleeves, 

(1645) 1645, appealed to, i. 91, 92, 92- 
93, 549-5.50; quarreled with Dr. 

Childs, I. 95n; 7. 146, 146n; con- 
troversy with Godfrey, 9. 315; 

(1646) Cleeves' 1646, second appeal to, 
I. 95; as an arbitrator, i. 95, 

96; ordei*ed to assist Rigby, i. 96; 
controversy with Child and Mav- 
erick, 7. 146, 146h; her power de- 
pendent on her charter, 7. 146-147 ; 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



177 



Maverick alienated from, 7. 147; 

penal laws against Baptists, 7. 

(1647)223; George Munjoy, 1647, 

made a freeman, i. 153: under- 

(1652) took, 1652, the establishment 
of a claim to Casco Bay, i. 100, 

102; 4. 70; g. 319-320; secretly 
cherished hopes of extending her 
jurisdiction, 3. 42-43; the people 
of Maine obliged to submit to her 
jurisdiction, i. 98, 104, 105; 3. 33; 
43-44, 45, 46; submission of Kit- 
tery, i. 102, 105, 385; 3. 43; 9. 
321 ; submission of Gorgiana, i. 
102, 105; 3. 43; submission of 
York, 9. 321 ; resisted by Godfrey, 
1. 101; 2.61^/; 3.33; 9-321; emis- 
sion of currency, 6. 118, 119n, 136; 
coining forbidden, 6. 119; sub- 

(1653) mission of Saco, 1653, i. lOOw, 
165, 385; 3. 43; submission of 

Cape Porpus, i. lOOw, 102, 105; 3. 
43; submission of Wells, i. lOOn, 
102, 165, 345-385; 3. 43; gave a 
charter to Wells, i, 360; extent 
of country claimed by, 3. 4.'U; 
leaders of the opposition to 3. 44, 
44n; declared John Bonython, 

(1654) 1654, a rebel, 3. 19; petition of 
Edward Godfrey to, i. 390-391; 

alarmed by Godfrey's movements, 
9. 323-326; sent John Leverett, 

(1655) .1655, as agent to England, 9. 
323-324, 24n; Cleeves' protest 

in behalf of Lygonia, 1. 102 ; feared 
dissatisfaction in England, i. 103; 
Godfrey joined with others 
against, g. 329, 330n; Leverett 
dared not avow his mission, 9. 
330, 331, 352-353; the people of 

(1656) Maine, 1656, desired her juris- 
diction, I. 103; 5. 228; named 

(1658) Falmouth, 1658, i.65; submis- 
sion of Falmouth, i. 70^, 132, 
384; form of and the signers of 
the submission, i. 105; articles of 
agreement, i. 105-106; held pos- 
session of the province with the 
exception of three years till Maine 
became a state, i. 107; cause of 
Maine's dislike to, 1. 107-108; sent 
commissioners to Maine, 3. 45; 
acts of the commissioners, i. 
(1659)386-387; 3-47-48; sent magis- 
trates, 1659, to hold a court, i. 
159; attempted to reform the 
morals of Maine, 1.I6I; proposed 
to extend her jurisdiction to the 
Hudson, 7. 153, 154, 154n; sum- 
(1660) moned Jordan^ 1660, to appear 
at court for exercising his re- 
ligion, I. 108, 161-162; 2. 62a, 63a; 
6. 185 ; the governor called a rogue, 
2. 63a; the partisans of Gorges 
still opposed, 3. 50; gave Maine 
four years of peace, 3. 60; con- 
12 



(1661) sidered, 1661, herself a free 
state, 7. 149; always ready to 

govern herself and her neighbors, 
7. 152; resisted by Jordan and 

(1662) Jocelyn, 1662, i. 137, 167, 170; 
3. 50; the people divided in re- 

(1663) gard to the jurisdiction of, 1668, 
I. 170, 173,182; 3-50,53; 5-228; 

proclamation to the people, 3.52- 
53; obliged to be concilitory, i. 
173; ordered all the islands in 
Casco bay to pay charges to Fal- 
mouth, I. 152; Dummer the agent 
lor, I. 398; the enemies of sent, 

(1664) 1664, commissioners to Eng- 
land, I. 173-174; called an 

usurper, i. 174; 3. S'.^; 9. 320; not 
an usurper, 5. 2:^8, 238; ordered 
to restore territory to Gorges, i. 
174, 175, 23S; 2.63a; 3. 50; 6.188; 
tried to hold her jurisdiction, i. 
174-175; refused to surrender the 
territory, i. 174; 2. 6'Sa; reason 
for holding jurisdiction, i. 175- 
176, 176-177; 3-50; 4. 70; 5. 234; 
Henry Watts dissatisfied, 3. 24; 
rebuked for disloyalty, 3. 56; her 
influence over Maine, 5. 235, 236; 
a letter on the misrule of, 7. 148, 
154; insulted the English flag, 7. 
148; rejoiced at the death of 
Charles i, 7. 148-149; jealous of 
Maverick, 7. 154; the general 
court practically her government, 
7. 155; employed a surveyor, 

(1665) 1665, to find the northern bound- 
ary, I. 176; ordered to be more 

liberal, i. 162; dissatisfaction in 
Maine, i. 176; her fiiends join 
tlie dissatisfied, i. 178-179; 181; 
return of her commissioners, i. 
181; the middle class satisfied, i. 
182 ; engrossed all tlie New Eng- 
land trade, 5. 232, 232n, 234; the 
Baptists well established in, 7. 
223; her authority suspended, 
(1668) I. 184 appealed to by Maine 
for help, 1668, i. 196; 5. 235, 
238; sent commissioners to Maine, 
I. 196; 2. 64a; held a court at 
York, I. 196; 2. 64a; opposed by 
Jocelyn and others, i. 196; com- 
missioners triumph, i. 196, 197; 
did not employ force, i. 197; ac- 
cused of employing force, 2. 65a; 
4. 70; general submissi(m to, i. 
197-198, 385; government estab- 
lished, I. 200; gave elective 
(1670) franchise, 1670, to people of 
Maine, i. 201; the merchants of 
supplied Maine, i. 551; poor fish 
sent to, I. 551; people of Maine 
desired her jurisdiction, i. 203; 
(1672) boundaries, 1672, to be found, 
I. 202, 353-354; petition of peo- 
ple of Maine to, 5. 239-241; strug- 



178 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Massachusetts Bay Colony and the 
Province of — continued, 
gled with the crown for the juris- 
diction, 5. 242; the jurisdiction 
(16V4) established, 1674, i. 203; took 
possession of Pemaquid, 5. 8; 
Pemaquid asked for a settled 
government, 8. 186; held court at 
Pemaquid, 5. 248; commisson to 
hold a court, 5. 249-250; 8. 186; 
5,249-250; 8.186; hated by the 
Stuarts, 8. 187; made prepar- 

(1675) ations, 1675, to carry the war 
into the enemy's country, i. 

214-215 ; Edward Hutchinson 

prominent in the affairs of, i . 342n ; 

commissioned Capt. Lake to hold 

a court, 5. 250; took measures, 

(1676) 1676, to assist the people of 
Maine, i. 226; sent as agent to 

England to defend her right of 
jurisdiction, i. 238; 3. 64; her 
jurisdiction annulled, i. 238; a 
refuge fO|r the people of Maine, 4. 
73; 5. 277; Andros desired the 
refugees to come to ISTew York, 
5. 255; opposed Andros, 5. 255- 

256, 256w; hated the French, 5. 
2o6n; disliked by Charles 11, 5. 
257; 8. 187; prevented Maine from 
becoming apart of Canada, 5. 257; 
abused by Andros, 5. 257-258, 260, 

268-269, 274, 279/1; took meas- 

(1677) ures to secure the Province of 
Maine, 1677, i. 238; 3. 33; ac- 
cused of neglecting Maine, 5. 258; 
first to send aid to Maine, 5. 258- 
259; an attempt made to exclude 
the trade with Pemaquid from, 5. 
259; hated by James 11, 5. 265; 8. 
187; Andros govenor of, 5. 265; a 
natural alliance with Pemaquid, 
5. 266; purchased Maine from 
Gorges, i. 109, 238-239; 2. 64a, 

257, 260, 261-264, 266; 3- '^'^, ^5, 
129; 4. 70; 7. 160, 211; price paid, 
I. 239, 239/1 ; 2. 64a, 261, 264, 266; 
3. 33, 65, 65ji; the contention of 
the authorities caused the sale, i. 
109; 2. 272; John Usher agent 
for, 2. 257, 266; the purchase of- 
fered England, 1.239; 3. 65; ques- 
tion concerning the raising 

(1679) money for the war, i. 239; sep- 
arated, 1679, from New Hamp- 

(1680) shire, 8. 295; appointed, 1680, 
Thomas Danforth deputy gov- 
ernor of Maine, 1.240, 254; 2. 65a, 
172; 3. 129; the lease to John 

Oldman interfered with, 2. 47 ?i; 

(1681) appeal of Maine, 1681, for fur- 
ther security, i. 265; partly sup- 
ported Fort Koyal, i. 266; took 
measures to settle land titles, i. 

271; 4. 227, 228; North Yar- 
(1082) mouth, 1682, not within the 



limits of, I. 270; confirmed the 

(1683) grant of Great Chebeag, 1683, 
to Wharton, i. 147; her author- 
ity considered paramount, 8. 

(1684) 158; dissolution of her charter, 
1684, I. 273; tax to be paid by 
Scarborough, 3. 130; royal or- 

(1686) der, 1686, for the surrender of 

(1687) Pemaquid, 5-130-131; quitrent, 
1687, troubles, i. 272; ordered 

(1688) roads to be laid out, 1688, i. 279; 
her right to confirm titles doubt- 
ed, 1.281; sent men to protect 
Scarborough, 3. 186; sent men 
and friendly Indians to the relief 
of Maine, 3. 107, 135-136; troops 
withdrawn, 3. 136; busy with the 
excitement of seizing Andros, 3. 
136; answer of her agents to the 
complaint of Andros, 5. 389-399; 
the aggressor in King William's 

war, 6.. 112; the first of the 
(1690) Bowdoin family in, 1690, 1.277; 

trade with Falmouth, i. 278; 
approved the plan to capture Can- 
ada, 5. 281 ; not over anxious for 
the safety of Maine, 7. Ill ; issued 
bills of credit, 9. 33 ; Plymouth 
opposed being uuder the govern- 
ment of, 2. 42fm; all New England 
said to center at, 2. 42an; held 
the jurisdiction of Kennebec by 
royal autliority, 2. 196; received 
a charter from William and Mary, 

8. 157 ; the laws of used in Maine, 
(1691)8. 158; William Phipps, 1691, 

arrived as governor of, 2. 65a, 
207, 239; incorporated, 2.267; the 

witchcraft delusion, 7. 115; gave 

(1700) a grant to Baker, 1700, 2. Ill; 
appointed a committee to ex- 
amine land claims, 2. 234; acts 
concerning the Pejepscot propri- 
etors, 2. 277; advised to rebuild 

the fort at Pemaquid, 5. 296; 

(1701) Indian deeds declared, 1701, 
void, 2. 273; countenanced 

(1705) slavery, 1705, 7. 211-212; sent 
(1707) an expedition against, 1707, 
Port Royal, 7. 79; dissatisfied 
at the result, 7. 70; opinions 
(1721) concerning the arrest, 1721, of 
(1723) Castine, 7. 84, 85; built, 1723, 
(1729) Fort Richmond, 8. 206; Belcher, 
1729, governor of, 3. 335; at- 
tempt to separate Sagadahock 
from, 6. 18; protested against 
Dunbar's usurpation, 6. 19; Waldo 
sent as a special representative of, 
6. 19; appointed commissioners 
(1733) to lay out the JSTarragansett, 
1733, townships, 2. 136-137; 
Nova Scotia under the govern- 
(1643) ment of, 1643, 8. 301; sent 
(1646) troops, 1646, to Crown Point, 9. 
(1754) 82; to build a fort at, 1754, Ti- 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



179 



conic, 2. 282; in charge of the 
(1755) expelled, 1755, Acadians, 6.341; 

number of Acadians sent to, 6. 
(1763) 343n ; granted twelve townships, 

176:5, on the Penobscot, 7. 202, 
(1770) 204; petition from Machias, 
(1773) 1770, 3, 179; condition of the 

slaves, 1773, in, 7. 215; first de- 
cisive movement for the abolition 

of slaves, 7. 215-216; troops of 
(1775) with Arnold, 1775, i. 500, 521; 

commissioned the Diligence and 
Liberty, 2, 247; made a treaty 

with the Indians, 7« 8; ordered 
(1779) an expedition against, 1779, 

Castine, 2. 215; mentioned, i. 
40, 41, 64ii, 77, 78, 105, 112, 113, 120, 
128n, 142, 170, 178, 179, 190n, 290n, 
302, 314, 317, Uln, 327n, 352, 387, 
893, 394, 400, 501n, 544; 2, 9, 35a, 
44, 46^1, 41n, 49n, 74a, 133, 145, 
154, 172, 212, 243, 281, 285; 3. 18, 
23, 49, 82, 97, 102, 108, 109, 114, 
126, 207, 213, 223, 224, 225, 227, 
233, 234, 235, 274, 314n, 317, 318, 
S20ri, 331, 344, 347, 351, 355, 359, 
362, 373, 377, 380, 381, 382, 383, 
385, 386, 388, 395, 396, 399, 407, 
411, 414, 416, 417, 420, 421, 422, 
424, 435, 445, 446; 4, 6S, 72, 75, 
89, 123, 145, 145n, 160, 161, 162, 
1(>4, 168, 184, 210, 277, 245, 280^1, 
284?^, 289n, 411; 5, xx. xxi, xxii, 
xxiii, xl, xIm, xlvi, Iviii, 6, 15, 194, 
220, 228, 225, 232, 246, 264, 276n, 
365, 382?i, 383, 421, 439; 6. 45, 46, 
47w, bin, 60, 64w, 70n, 119, 119n, 
132, 179, 240, 241, 250, 251, 260, 
825, 327, 331, 332, 336, 337, 364, 
867, 368; 7. 16, 109, 115, 131, 195, 
205, 212, 220, 234, 247, 255n, 308n; 

8. 9, 10, 12, 126, 131, 138, 150, 190n, 
212, 218, 2l9?i, 22Qn, 242w, 261, 263, 
282)1, 303, 309, 320, 338; 9. 4, 29, 
85, 44, 63, 78, 81, 82, 160, 319, 323, 
827, 328-329, 334, 343, 347, 354, 
255, 362, 366, 367, 368. 

court, the, 6. 135. 

Charitable Mechanic's Association, 

3. 264, 265, 266, 267, 268. 
Charters, 3. 129; 7. 160, 201; 8. 297; 

9. 21, 22, 25, 311, 322, 340, 356, 
363. 

Colonial Records, i. 54, 101, 102, 
104, 105, 108, 162, 174, 175, 176; 2. 
264; 5. 226n, 228ji, 247w, 248, 250, 
257, 259, 260, 387; 7. 146, 149, 153; 
8.266; 9.321, 323, 376, 382. 

Company, purchased land of 
Thomas Purchase, i. 40n; pro- 
cured a charter of the Plymouth 
Company, i. 41; mentioned, i. 
113. 

Cbnventiott of 1780, 6. 385. 

Bles, cited, i. 94, 95, 104, 182, 141, 
145, 270, 273, 277, 279, 282, 301, 



303, 384; 2. 174; 3. 63, 73, 109, 
126, 138, ' 

Gazette, the, cited, 6. 168. 
General court, 3. 81, 199; 5, 3, 226, 
365; 6, 48n, 50, 51, 156/i, 162, 168, 
186; 7.15, 16, 17, 145n, 149n, 152, 
153, 155, 156. 
Hall, Bowdoin College, 8. 176. 
Historical Society, 5, 326n; 7. 484 
488?i, 494; g. 69; the first histor- 
ical society formed in America, 2. 
10a; 4. 5; list of the founders of, 
2. 11a; the library, of, 5. 153n, 
163n, 165t? ; publications of cited, 
I. 5, 34, 39, 43?i, 9Sn, 264, 277, 
286n, 288, 291, 336n, 363/1, 544; 2. 
11a, 46a?i, 49a?i, bban, 76a, 131; 3. 
21w, 74, 85n, 115n, 117n, 123, 124n, 
281, 285, 300, 3l8n; 5. xixn, 183n, 
20()w, 22Sn, 2Un, 235n, 310, 384n; 
6. 175n, 176n, l77n, 178n; 7. 37>i, 
95n, 98W, 99^, lOOw, lOln, 132n, 
134n, 135n, 156n, 488/i, 490n: 8. 
119n; 8. 19, 305^, 309n, 310n, 3l4n, 
317n, 336, 356. 
History of, see Barry, J. S., 6. 119n. 
house of representatives, 8. 122, 127, 

153. 
Indians, 2. 62; 3. 99; 6. 212; 9. 276, 

277. 
jurisdiction of, 3. 50, 51-52, 52-53, 
53, 54, 54-55, 56, 58, 59, 60, 61-62, 
63, 64, 65, 75-76, 129. 
land office, 5. 303. 
patentees, i. 78. 

patents, see Massachusetts charters. 
Province of, see Massachusetts Bay 

Colony, 
reports, 8. 342, 343. 
State of, separated from Maine, i. 
274; 2.123; 3.65; 4-78,80; 6.64, 
66, 68, 71, 72, 201; 7. 21, 419; 8. 
391 ; 9. 175 ; ordered the searching 
of the archives of London and 
Paris, 2. 10a; representatives to 
from Minot, 2. 120, 121, 122; set- 
tled the boundary of the Kenne- 
bec Purchasers, 2. 286-287; gave 
money toward the building of 
Bunker Hill Monument, 3. 243, 
249; ship building in, 4. 26; ton- 
nage of, 4. 25 ; impressed by the 
ideas of the early settlers, 4. 71 ; 
issued copper coinage, 6* 136; re- 
imbursed Mme. de Gregoir^, 6. 
275; naturalized the Gregoir^ 
children, 6. 275; her (»riginal east- 
erly boundary constituted the 
boundary of the United States, 6. 
335; sent commissioners to ob- 
tain a concession of territory from 
the Indians, 7. 8; the boundary 
of undefined, 7. 202; in a poor 
condition at the end of the Rev^ 
olution, 7. 353; government ot^ 
ganized, 7. 358; held the title to. 



180 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Massachusetts, State of— continued, 
lands in Maine, 7. 35.S ; established 
a land lottery, 7. 353-354; com- 
plained of British encroachments, 
8. 7 ; her eastern boundary authen- 
ticated, 8. 23; sold land in the 
disputed territory, 8. 30 ; yielded 
no soil or jurisdiction when she 
entered the Union, 8. 36; a joint 
owner with Maine of the wild 
lands, 8. 62w; to cooperate with 
Maine, 8. 64; came to action, 8. 
74, 80; ^laine not jealous of, 8. 
438-439; mentioned,' i. 25; 2. 42n, 
113, 115, 143, 145, 146, 149, 154, 
165, 184, 187, 190, 225, 275, 294; 3. 
271, 281; 4. 9, 96, 249n, 278n; 5. 
XXV, XX vi, xli, xlii, xlv, li, lii, Ivw, 
141, 418, 443; 6. 17, 36, 37, 45, 46, 
48n, 49, 61w, 63, 65, 69, 70, 71, 72yi, 
' 76, 76n, 99n, 113, 358, 363, 364, 
366, 373, 374, 383, 400, 412; 7. 11, 
20, 21, 104, 20s, 227, 270, 274, 368, 
369, 371, 380, 390, 405, 419, 429, 
430, 436, 437, 439, 440, 441, 400, 
462, 463, 465, 469, 473, 474, 484, 
487, 490, 493, 494, 495; 8. 4, 5, 6, 
28, 29, 30, 37, 40, 41, 42, 44, 45, 66, 
'73, 74, 87, 89, 90, 157, 342, 346, 
389, 411, 412, 413, 438, 441, 450, 
451, 481, 483; 9. 173, 174, 175, 176, 
203, 224, 231, 233, 240, 248. 
Supreme Court, the, 8. 288. 
the sloop, commanded by Capt. 
Sanders. 5. 370; 8. 228n: men- 
tioned, 5. :.7'), 380, 381, 385; 6. 
338; 8.224, 238; 9-93. 

Massacre of St. Bartholomew, 9. 99. 

Massakiga, an Indian town, 5. 156n. 

Massapesauke, 4. 190. 

Massasoit, 5. 187. 

Massechewset, see Massachusetts. 

Masse, Edemond, sent to Port Royal, 
I. 26, 428; assisted by Mde. 
Guercheville, 26n; not well re- 
ceived, 1.429; sick, i. 429; anec- 
dote of, I. 429; met Quantin and 
du Thet, 1.429; caused Member- 
ton to be moved to Port Royal, i. 
431-432 ; set out for Kadesquit, 8. 
323; mentioned, 8. 322, 329. 

Massillon, Jean Batiste, 7. 448. 

Masts, sent from Maine to England, 2. 
157; 5. 298n; used for the British 
navy, 2. 160, 215; 3. 188; 4. 24; 8. 
297; 9. 80; the king's right to cut 
them in the woods of Maine, 2. 
265; Col. Thomas a shipper of, 3. 
227; abundance of, 3. 307; cut in 
Clinton, 4. 317; in New Dart- 
mouth, 5. 100: from Mount Des- 
ert, 6. 280; mentioned, 5. 320; 7. 
204. 

Matabeunk river, 4. 107. 

Matchebiguatus, a distinguished lo- 
cality in the history of Maine, 6. 
107; contracted to Bagaduce, 6. 



107; site of Castine, 6. 107; 7. 4; 
g. 266n; definition of not known, 
6. 107; mentioned in a deed from 
Winslow to Winthrop. 6. 107 ; not 
named in St. Castine' s documents, 
6. 107; definition of, 6. 108, 108- 
109, 109n; mentioned, 7. 25; see 
Biguatus. 

Matchegon, name of the end of Port- 
land, 6. 109n. 

Mateknando, at the capture of Pema- 
quid, 6. 283; a son in France, 6. 
283; father-in-law of St. Castine, 
6. 2S3n. 

Materials for the History of Fort 
Halifax, by Joseph Williamson, 7. 
165-168. 

Mather, Rev, Cotton, grandson of 
Richard, 2. 54a; his picture in 
New Vineyard, 4.31I ; enlightened 
the ministry on New England af- 
fairs, 5. 282; a friend of Sir Wil- 
liam Phips, 9. 2; his father's col- 
league, 9. 2, 22; literature owes 
much to him, 9. 2-3; the origin- 
ator of the mordern abuse of, 9. 
20; upon the witchcraft delusion, 
9. 36, 37w, 38; death of, 9. 3; men- 
tioned, 6. 191, 231; 9. 50, 51, 53, 
54, 55w, 65; his Indian Wars cited, 
3. 137, 138; 5. 253n; his Magnalia 
Christi Americana cited, i. 153- 
154, 211, 213, 250, 287, 291, 297, 
299, 304; 2. 131; 3. 100«, 103; 4. 
216-217, 223; 5. 176n, 199n, 204?i, 
217n, 223, 267w, 268n, 269n, 271/1, 
273n, 275n, 277n, 278, 278n, 281 n, 
282n, 28Sn, 292w, 296n; 9. 4, 20, 27; 
his Sir William Phips criticised, 
9. 2, 20, 21; published, 9. 3; pref- 
ace and dedication of, 9. 3-4; the 
opening part described, 9. 4-5; 
cited, 2, 230; 5. 273w; 9- 6, T, 10, 
11, 15, 17, 18, 19, 24, 32, 33, 35, 37, 
39, 40, 48, 54-55, 58, 64, 134; his 
Wonders of the Invisible World 
cited, 1.263. 
the Rev. Increase, married Anne 
Cotton, nee Lake, 5. 253; his opin- 
ion of Gov. Andros, 7. 56; men- 
tioned, 5. 217, 276n, 277n; 9. 2, 22, 
26, 33, 34, 35, 37, 44, 54, 61. 
the Rev. Nathaniel, 9. 3. 
the Rev. Richard, met by Gorges, 5. 
216-217; came to America, 5. 217ii; 
at Monhegan, 5. 219; his journal 
cited, 2. 54a; 5. 21 7n, 218n, 253n. 

Mathers, the, have no paralell in 
Maine, 4. 75. 

Matinicus island, fishing and trading 
post early established at, 8. 296, 
303; occupied by the French, 8. 
310; situation of, 8. 811; Col. 
Church at, 8. 311 ; mentioned, 2. 
35a; 3. 295n; 4- 105; 8.2^1,299, 
309, 310. 
river, 8. 185. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



181 



Mattanawcook island, 7. 104. 

Mattawamkeag, a place of rendezvous, 
7. 4; a French fort at, 7. 4; men- 
tioned, 7. 10)1. 
river, 8. 81. 

Mattheur, Thomas, 5. 25. 

Matthew, the, Cabot's ship, 2. 15a; at 
New Foundland, 5. 148. 

Matthews, Asa, teacher in Hampden 
academy, 8. 168. 
Edward, 7. 458. 
John, served in the war of the Kev- 

oliition, 3. 204. 
Master, 2. 27. 

Maud, , bound for Mass. and vis- 
ited by Gorges, 2. 55a. 

Maurault, L'Abbe, his Histoire des 
Abenaquit> cited, 9. 2Q'Sn. 

Maurepas, Jean F. P., Comte de, 7. 92. 

Maurick, a spelling of Merrick, 7. 380. 

Mavai acke, Antipas, a grand juryman, 
I. 371. 

Maverick, Elias, paid for the capture 
of Dixy Bull, 5. 206n. 
Samuel, an associate with Edward 
Godfrey, i.46; a commissioner, i. 
173,398; 5-233; 7-150; at Piscat- 
aqua, 7. 173; in Boston, 7. 182n; 
his later history unknown, 7. 182n ; 
his widow married William Brad- 
bury, 7. 182n; married a daughter 
of the Rev. John Wheelwrigjht, 7. 
182w; a counselor, 7. 376; in Eng- 
land, 7. 398; sent to capture 
Dixie Bull, 5. 206; branded with 
infamy, 5.232n; his autograph, 5. 
233; his character, 5-233; 7. 210; 
settled at Noddle's island, 7. 145, 
210; a hospitable and important 
man, 7. 145; an Episcopalian but 
liberal, 7- 145-146; Noddle's island 
granted to, 7- 145n; disliked by 
his neighbors, 7. 146; in a con- 
troversy with Mass. Bay Colony, 
7- 146, I46n; alienated from Mass., 
7. 147; in Virginia, 7. 147; prob- 
ably in New Netherlands, 7. 147; 
corresponded with Clarendon, 7. 
147, 147n; his letters result in the 
reduction of New Netherland, 7. 
147-148, 150; his letters upon the 
misrule of Mass., 7. 148, 154; the 
remedies he proposed, 7. 149; 
perhaps he first suggested the 
consolidation of the New England 
colonies, 7. 149-150; his motives, 
7. 150; a royal commissioner, 7. 
154; regarded with jealousy, 7. 
154; Clarendon's letter of advice, 
7. 154-155; visited the eastern 
parts, 7. 155 ; had a house in New 
York, 7. 155n; last notice of, 7. 
165n; his measures carried into 
effect, 7. 158-159; owned slaves, 
7. 210; death of, i. lS2n; 7. 156n; 
mentioned, 1. 185; 9. 358. 



Mavoshen, the Indian name of Maine, 

2. 17a; 4. 106. 
Mawchick chammy, definition of, 5, 

187, 187n. 

Mawooshen, name given to the coast 
of New England, 5- 155n. 
the sagamore of, 6. 156; 7. 98. 

Maxwell, Alexander, accused of in- 
subordination, I. 370-371; his 
punishment, i. 371. 
the Rev. , of Warren, 4. 269- 

May, , 5. 29. 

Hezekiah, preached at Bath, 2. 226. 
John, purchased land of Reed, 6. 
133; conveyed the same to Wil- 
liam Gray, 6. 133. 

Mayflower, the, 5- 199; 7. 30, 247; 8. 
200, 223, 289; g. 118, 164, 805. 

Mayhew, Jonathan, a surveyor, 8. 16. 
Jonathan, 5. 177. 194; his journal 

cited, 5- 176, 177n. 
Br. , 6. 384n. 

Maylem, Joseph, lived in Boston, i. 
306; married Keziah Brackett, i. 
306. 

Maynard, John, letter from Arnold, i. 
469. 
, of Carrytunk, 4- 399. 

Mayne, John, lived at North Yar- 
mouth, I- 188; a juror, 1. 188; see 
also Maine, John. 

Mayre, John, lived at Black Point, 3. 
83. 
Richard, lived at Black Point, 3. 83- 

Mead, the Rev. Matthew, 9. 3. 

Meadow Brook, 4. 230. 

Meadows, the, called the intervals, 4. 
262. 

Meal sent from England to Pemaquid, 
5. 204. 

Means family, posterity of, 6. 11, 12. 
Robert, settled in Falmouth, 6. 12; 
married a daughter of John Arm- 
strong, 6. 12. 

Mechimore, James, lived at Black 
Point, 3. 83. 

Mechisses, the Indian name of Ma- 
chias, 4- 106. 

Medawaska, village of, 8. 65. 

Medfield, 2- 145. 

Medford, home of Royall, i. 236n, 
390n; Arnold at, i- 502; bricks 
brought from, 2- 201; mentioned, 
2. 144, 184, 187; 5-422. 

Medical lectures at Fryeburg Acad- 
emy, 8- 164, 194. 
school, established, 5- xviii ; 8. 179. 

Mediterranean sea, the, 8. 24. 

Medockewando, 3. 390, 412. 

Medoctec, an Indian village, 6. 240; 7. 
5; situation of, 7. 5. 

Medomak river, 4. 106; 6. 313; 7. 132. 

Meductic rapids, 8. 15. 

Meduncook, now Camden, 4. 326; 
mentioned, 4. 106, 329. 

Medunkaunk river, 4. 106. 



1^2 



MAINE HISTOBICAIi SOCIETT. 



Meduxnekeag river, 8. 21. 
Medway, 5. Ivn. 

Meecombe, an Indian town, 6. 156n. 
Meesee Contee, Indian name of Farm- 
ington falls, 4. 31n, 105 ; formerly 
a fishing place, 4. Bin. 
Meeting-house, at Pleasant cove, 8. 
llln, 112. 
poiiit, formerly Jordan's point, i. 
24471. 
Meganaraoumba, 3. 380. 
Megantic lake, i. 456, 464; 4. 106. 
Meganumbe, 3. 412, 416, 422, 426; sig- 

nam of 6. 262. 
Megays, 8. 330. 
Megeis, 8. 330. 
Megguire, John, an early settler in 

New Gloucester, 2. 153, 155. 
Meguncook pond, 4. 106. 
Megunnaway, a notorious rogue, i. 
220; shot Thomas Brackett, i. 
220 ; probably an instigator of the 
Indians, i. 220. 
Megunticook, 4. 106; definition of, 4. 

379. 
Meigs, Ansel, tried for the murder of 
Paul Chadwick, 7. 387; 9. 204. 
Jabez, tried for the murder of Paul 

Chadwick, 7. 387 389; 9. 204. 
Major Keturn J., letter from Ar- 
nold, 1.479; to pay the officers, i. 
479; on the staff of Arnold, i 500; 
biographical notice of, i, 601; his 
journal published, i. 501; men- 
tioned, I. 501, 509, 510, 511, 512, 
514,521, 524,528. 
Mejebiguyduce, see Biguatus. 
Melcomb, i. 113n, 234ri. 
Mellen, Frederick, 5. xxix-xxx. 
Grenville, 5. xxix. 
Henry, 5. xxiii, xxiv. 
the Rev. John, 5. xxiii. 
the Hon. Prentiss, corporate mem- 
ber of the Maine Historical Soci- 
ety, 1. 11 ; treasurer of the Society, 
I. 12; birth of. 5. xxiii; as a law 
student, 5. xxiii ; moved to Bridge 
water, 5. xxiv; settledat Bidde— 
ford, 5. xxiv; had a large practice, 
5. XXV ; moved to Portland, 5. xxv; 
chief justice, 5. xxv, xxvi; his 
legal powers, 5. xxvi; in political 
affairs, 5. xxvi, xxviii, xxix; hon- 
orary degrees conferred upon, 5. 
xxvii; edited the Maine reports, 
5. xxvii; his character, 5. xxviii, 
xxix, xxx-xxxi; married Sally 
Hudson, 5. xxix; children of, 5. 
xxix; death of, 5.xxx; purchased 
land of Preble, 6. 133; his house 
now owned by Fessenden, 6. 133; 
defended the murderers of Paul 
Chadwick, 7, 387 ; compiled books 
of sacred music, 7. 398; graduated 
from Harvard College, 7. 474; a 
law partner of William Willis, 7, 



474; mentioned, 4. 6, 7, 9; s.xvii, 
xxii, xxxvii, xxxix, lii; 6. 364; 7. 
398, 474; 8.396, 410,450. 
Thomas, 5. xxiii. 
Melvin, Eleazer, land granted to, 2. 

281. 
Memberton, his son a guide for Father 
Masse, i. 429; converted to Chris- 
tianity, I. 431; his great age, i. 
431; a revered character, i. 431; 
moved to Port Eoyal, 1.431-432; 
death of, i. 432; his desire to be 
buried among his kindred not 
fulfilled, I. 432. 
Meramarecquonareb, 3. 439. 
Memorial Hall, Waterville, 8. 178. 
History of Boston cited, 9. 31 In. 
of Kittery, 4. 195-205. 
of the Popham celebration cited, 7. 

132^. 
Relating to the Kennebec Indians, 
by Samuel Sewall, 3. 351-353. 
Memorials of the English and French 
Commissioners respecting the 
Limits of Nova Scotia cited, i. 28. 
Memoir of Col. Benjamin Burton, by 
Joseph Williamson, 7. 323-335. 
of Cabot, see Biddle. 
of the Rev. Paul Coffin, by Cyrus 

Woodman, 4. 235-259. 
of the Rev. John Murray, by the 

Rev. A. G. Yermilye, 6. 153-170. 
of Benjamin Vaughan, by the Hon. 
Ric ard H. Gardiner, 6. 82-92. 
Memoirs of Charles i, see Aiken, Lucy. 

of the American Academy, 6. 404. 
Menan, isle of, seen by Champlain, 7. 
2.50; called Manthane, 7. 250; 
mentioned, 7. 257 ; 8. .323. 
Menawormet, visited Levett, 2. 87- 

Mendal, , of Fairfield, 4. 372. 

Mendowett, 3. 412. 

Mendum, Mary, presented for slander, 
9. 384. 
Robert, signed the petition to Crom- 
well, I. 395; a grand juryman, i. 
371. 

Mrs. , as a witness in a divorce 

case, I. 370. 
Menees, a corruption of McNish, 6. 7. 
Menepessunk, Indian name of a con- 
stellation, 7. 343. 
Mener, Thomas, 5. 57. 
Mengwe, the, 6.216, 217. 
Meniceneag, Indian name of Harps- 
well, 2. 167. 
Menickoe, i, 69. 
Meniguen, Cadillac's account of, 6. 

283 ; now Monhegan, 6. 283. 
Menness, 3. 347. 

Menneval, M. de, governor of Acadia, 
6. 51 ; to build a fort at Pentagoet, 
6. 52 ; his advice to St. Castine, 6. 52. 
Men of the East, the, 4. 97. 
Menon, Charles de, 6. 363 ; 7. 33. 
Count Julius de, 6. 362. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS* 



183 



Mercer, Thomas, lived at Slieepscot, 

2. 238, 286; swore fealty to the 

Duke of York, 4. 221; conveyed 

land to W. Wilcott, 4. 233. 

Mercer's Company, the, 9.805n. 

Merchandise, the kinds of sent to 

England, i. 57. 
Merchant, George, i. 508, 518. 
Merchant's Row, 9. 76. 

Mercier, , i. 517. 

Mercy, the Rev. Bradford, preached 

in Boston, 2. 226. 
Mereman, a, in Casco bay, i. 77; 3- ^^' 
Meric, ) a mode of spelling Merrick, 
Merick, ] 8. 380. 
Merocomecook, definition of, 4. 879; 
now Rocomeco, 4. 379. 
point, 4. 340. 
Merriam, the Rev. Matthew, 2. 228; 7. 

220. 
Merrick family, of Welsh origin, 7. 380 ; 
former ways of spelling, 8. 380. 
Sir Gilly, in charge of Essex House, 
2. 70a; executed for treason, 2. 
71a; 7.880-381; his descendants, 
7. 380. 
Harriet, 7. 884, 396. 
John 1st, came to America with the 

Vaughans, 6. 89; married 

Yaughan, 6. 80; father of John, 7. 
380; birth and death of, 7. 380; 
his widow married William Rob- 
erts, 7. 381. 
John jr., corporate member of the 
Maine Historical Society, i. 11; 
his ancestry, 7. 880-381; birth of, 
7. 380; a stepson of William Hob- 
erts, 7. 381; destined for the min- 
istry, 7. 381; in school, 7. 381; 
studied theology, 7. 882; in- 
fluenced by Belsham, 7. 882; 
preached as a licentiate, 7. 382; 
tutor in the family of Benjamin 
Vaughan, 7. 382; came to America, 
7. 882; his characteristics, 7. 382- 
888. 395-396, 399-402; preached 
in Boston, 7. 388; relinquished 
preaching, 7. 388; visited Eng- 
land, 7. 383; married Rebecca 
Vaughan, 7. 282, 382, 883; settled 
at Hallo well, 7-282, 383, 884, 384ti; 
paid visits in a canoe, 7. 384; be- 
came interested in public affairs, 
7. 385-386, 394; a good short- 
hand reporter, 7. 887 ; one of the 
commissioners on laying out a 
road from Kennebec to Chaudier, 
7. 889-390; drew up the report, 7. 
390; left to proceed alone, 7. 391; 
his return, 7- 392-393; cashier of 
the Hallowell bank, 7. 898-894; 
interested in the developments of 
Dover, 7- 394-395; attorney for 
Harmony, 7. 395; death of his 
wife, 7. 396; had a scientiiac im- 
ptUhe, 7. 396-397; a warm friend 



of Prof. Cleaveland, 7. 397; en- 
joyed the company of men of the 
medical and legal professions, 7. 
398; a musician, 7. 898-399; com- 
piled a book of sacred music, 7. 
398; an elocutionist, 7. 399; his 
power of dropping hints to the 
young, 7. 400; never was unjust, 
7. 401; excelled in many manly 
sports, 7. 402; his personal ap- 
pearance, 7. 402; death of, 7. 288, 
379, 396; character of, 7. 282; 
children of, 7. 396; mentioned, 6. 
358; 7.415; 8.387. 
Mary, widow of John, 7.88!; mar- 
ried William Roberts, 7. 881. 
Samuel Yaughan, 7. 881, 896. 
Merriconeag, incorporated, 2. 180; 
separated from North Yarmouth, 
2. 187; deeded to Richard Whar- 
ton, 3. 321; now Harpswell, 4. 
331; mentioned, 2. 171, 178, 218. 
neck, Indian name of Harpswell 
neck, 4. 106. 
Merrill, the Rev. Daniel, 8. 178. 
Ezekiel, 4. 360. 
the Rev. Josiah G., 2. 125. 
Lucy, 4. 360. 

the Rev. Moses, 2. 119; 4. 360. 
Nathaniel, one of the owners of 
Fryeburg, 4. 278, 278n, 288n; in 
the French war, 4. 21Sn ; wounded, 
4. 278n; called 'Squire Merrill, 4. 
279n; death of, 4. 279n. 
Samuel, settled at Buxton, 2. 139, 
143; came from Salisbury, 2. 139; 
at the battle of Bunker Hill, 2. 
139; death of 2. 189. 
Merrill's distillery, the site of Mun- 
joy's place of business, i. 202, 
202n. 
Merrimac, formerly a part of Narra- 
gansett township No. 1, 2. 145; 
population of, 2. 145; mentioned, 
2. 148, 150. 
river, boundary of Gorges' and 
Mason's grant, i. 35, 49, 79; 3-30; 
boundary of land claimed by 
Mass., I.' 100; 2. 00a-61a; its lati- 
tude ascertained, i. 100-101; the 
headwaters of, 1. 181 ; a boundary 
of Laconia, 2. 52a, 66; a boundary 
of Gorges' territory, 2. 54; a 
boundary of the Canadian town- 
ships, 2. 135n; boundary of the 
Narragansett townships, 2. 145; 
definition of, 4. 115, 192; men- 
tioned, I. 202, 344; 2. 239; 3. 430; 
4. 294; 5. 396; 6. 236, 237, 239, 
250, 252; 7. 262; 9. 42, 340, 343, 
349, 360, 366. 
Merritt, the Rev. Timothy, 2. 227; 4- 

878, 382. 
Merryconeag, see Merriconeag. 
Merrymeeting bay, headquarters of 
the Indians, 2. 167; called Quabar 



184 



MAIKE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Merry-meeting bay— continued. 

cook, 2. 204; 3. 312, 314; land on 
owned by Robert Temple, 2. 204; 
home of Alexander Thwoit, 2. 
205; a boundary of the Kennebec 
Puchase, 2. 277; Dr. Gardiner 
cleared farms near, 2. 283; top- 
ographical description of, 3. 312- 
313, 314; origin of the name, 3. 
313; a place of rendezvous, 3. 313; 
the Indian name of, 4. 109; a 
block-house at, 5. 71, 104; 8. 123, 
124; a seat of trade, 5. 78, 261; 
Scotch-Irish settle at, 6. 15; the 
Indians captured familes at, 6. 16; 
Indians destroyed property at, 8. 
115n, 284; Robert Temple had a 
settlement at, 8. 284; mentioned, 
I. 236n, 502, 548; 2. 194, 206, 279; 
3. 316, 317, 319, 329, 331, 332, 
333, 356, 369; 4. 103, 108, 331; 5. 
lix, 327, 330, 338; 6. 314; 7. 182, 
259; 8. Il4n, 226n, 238, 251, 252, 
266. 
Merry, Walter, a resident of Boston, 
I. 146; Little Chebeag conveyed 
to, I. 146. 
Merry's island, now called Chebeag, 

I. 146w. 
Meserve, Clement, biographical notice 
of, 3. 219. 
Daniel, 3. 219. 
Elisha, served in the war of the 

Revolution, 3. 203. 
John, 3. 219. 
Col. ISTathaniel, in the expedition to 

Louisburgh, 3. 219. 
Solomon, 3. 180; served in the war 
of the Revolution, 3. 203. 
Meskeemwee, 4. 106. 
Messamet, 3. 293. 
Messant, Ann, married to Edward 

Godfrey, 9. 301. 
Messerve, the Hon. Frederick G., 9. 

219. 
Metamiscontis, 4. 106. 
Metanawcook river, 4. 106. 
Metawamkeag, 4. 106. 

Metcalf, , of Winthrop, 4. 403. 

Methodism, the pioneer of in Maine, 

7. 229. 
Methodists, a preacher criticised, 4. 
302; a poor opinion of, 4. 307; the 
Rev. Paul Coifin's remarks upon, 
4. 334-335, 380-382; their first ap- 
pearance in Maine, 7. 226; John 
Wesley's letter to, 7. 226-227; 
Asbury and Cooke joint superin- 
tendents of, 7. 227; a genera] con- 
ferance summoned, 7. 227; bishop 
ordained, 7. 227; Readfield cir- 
cuit established, 7. 227 ; other cir- 
cuits, 7. 227-228; in Bath, 2. 227- 
228; 4. 331; in Buxton, 2. 142; in 
Carrytunk, 4. 368, 399; in Dover, 7. 
895; in Farmington, 4. 308, 333, 



364; in Hebron, 4. 388; in Liver- 
more, 4. 340, 362; in Lynn, 7. 227; 
in Minot, 2. 127, 130; in Mon- 
mouth, 4. 305 ; in New Gloucester, 

2. 158; in New Vineyard, 4. 311; 
in Norridgewock, 4. 370; in Paris, 
4. 338; in Readfield, 4. 306; in 
Richmond, 7. 413; in Scarboro, 

3. 165; in Sharon, 4. 306; in Win- 
throp, 4. 305; mentioned, 4-356, 
366, 370, 393, 395, 397, 401, 403; 5. 
Iv. 

Methuen, 2. 138; 4. 242n, 364. 
Metinnic island, 5. 385, 385». 
Metis river, 8. 20. 
Metxarmette Portage, 8. 101. 
Meuric, a mode of spelling Merrick 7. 
380. ' ' 

Mexican dollar, 6. 123. 

war, 9. 243. 
Mexicans, the, 6. 223. 
Mexico, the Indian langage dissimilar 
to that of the other nations, i. 
413n; early settled, 2. 20a; the 
success of the Spanish in, 2, 273- 
274; mentioned, 3. 291; 6. 119, 
121; 7. 248; 9. 243, 244, 245, 247. 
Meyne, province of the, supposed or- 
igin of the name of the province 
of Maine, 2. h%an\ 3. 3lw; 5. xxi, 
91, 92; 9.99. 
Mantonomo, killed, 2. 168. 
Meyrick, a former spelling of Merrick, 
7. 380. 
Sir Samuel Rush, 7. 381. 
Michaels island, i. 149n; now Peak's 

island, i. m, 145?i. 
Michaux, i. 506. 

Michelson, , of London, 9. 351. 

Michigan, 8. 58, 101, 105. 

Michmore, James, accused of being 

absent fromchurch, i. 189, 
Micmacs, friends of the Abenaquis, i, 
413; of the same confederacy as 
the Abenaquis, i. 414, 422; 7. 339; 
native of Nova Scotia, i. 414; 
their daring and courage, i.414; 
their words difl:erent from the 
Abenaquis, 1.422; a verb of con- 
jugated, I. 422-423; French pro- 
nunciation used, I. 424; lived in 
Acadia, 7. 101 /i; attached to the 
French, 7. 339, 340; attacked the 
Esquimaux, i. 339; their public 
and domestic life, 1.339-341; al- 
ways friendly toward the Aca- 
dians, 8. 144; mentioned, i. 27n; 
4. 96, 97, 192; 5.289; 6.208,211, 
212, 223, 224, 224n, 225, 241; 8. 
140, 145; see also the Souriquois. 
Middle river, 3. 179. 
states, the, preferred by the Scotch- 
Irish. 6. 23; Presbyterianism 
planted in, 6. 29. 
street, Portland, i. 246, 247, 249, 
808; 5. 443n; in Wiscasset, 4. 330. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



185 



Middleborough, 2. 114, 14§; 5. xln; 7. 

273. 
Middlesex county, 3. 176n. 

Middleton, Col. , 5. ii46-247. ' 

Middletown, Conn., 6. 47n; 9. 115. 
Maine, 4. 308, 309, 332, 337, 341, 364, 

394. 
R. I., 4. 269. 
Mifflin, Gov. Thomas, i. 531. 
Migliels, Dr. Jesse, 2. 128. 
Milburne, i. 504. 
Milf ord, 8. 454. 
Haven, 6. 26. 
Military, the, subordinate to the civil 

power, 7. 158. 
Militia, the, number of in Falmouth 
and Casco, i. 203; number of in 
Maine, i. 228; the pay of, i. 229^, 
Mill brook, 4. 217. 
cove, 2. 211. 

creek, 3. 101 ; 4. 217, 224, 225, 226. 
prison, 2. 248. 

river, 4. 217, 224, 326; 6.301,316; 7. 
826. 
Miller, Charles, sent to obtain a Ger- 
man pastor for Waldoboro, 5. 
408. 
Elizabeth, 4. 324. 
the Rev. Ebenezer, 4. 272. 
family, 6. 23. 
James, 4. 324. 
James jr., 4. 321. 
John, signed the petition to Charles 

II, I. 402. 
the Rev. John, 7. 220. 
Richard, signed the petition to 
Charles 11, i. 402. 

., complained of by the Indians, 

4. 136. 

, of Belfast, 7. 334. 

the Rev. , of Bath, 2. 223. 

Millet, David, an early settler of New 
Gloucester, 2. 153. 

, of Marblehead, 9. 179, 180, 181. 

Milliken, Abner, served in the war of 
the Revolution, 3. 204. 
Edward, served in the war of the 

Revolution, 3. 203. 
Edward M., son of John, 3. 218; 

called Justice Milliken, 3. 219. 
Isaac, served in the Continental 

Army, 3. 204. 
John, a house Wright, i. 214n; mar- 
ried Elizabeth Alger, i. 214w; 3. 
105, 218; in possession of the Al- 
ger estate, 3. 105; biographical 
notice of, 3. 218-219; mentioned, 
3. 166. 
John jr., 3. 218, 227. 
John, Alger, served in the war of 

the Revolution, 3. 203. 
Jonathan, 3. 201. 
Lemuel, served in the war of the 

Revolution, 3. 204. 
Capt. Mulberry, 3. 190. 
Nathaniel M., 3. 218, 



Samuel, son of John, 3. 218; lost at 
Louisburgh, 3. 172yi, 219. 

Milliken' s river, 3. 82. 
tavern, 3. 190. 

Millinoket lake, 4. 107. 

Million of acres purchase, the, i. 505. 

Mills, at Anson, 4. 397 ; at Barberry 
creek, i. 119; at Buckfield, 4.389; 
at Conick falls, 4. 350; at Capisic, 
I. 119; at Cape Elizabeth, i. 119- 
120; at Dresden, 2. 282; at Hal- 
lowell, 4-46; at the Presumpscot, 
1.119; atSaco, i.213; at Sayward, 

3. 128; at Scarborough, 3.22-23, 
167, 177; 4. 217; at Sebasticook, 

4. 317; at Seven Mile brook, 4. 
380; at Sheepscot, 9. 134; built by 
Col. William Yaughan, 8. 297, 301 ; 
erected at Agamenticus and Pis- 
cataqua, 9. 30891 ; to make bricks, 
4. 355; see also sawmills. 

James, of Sandwich, i. 209. 
James, presented for non-appear- 
ance at church, 3. 70-71 ; lived at 
Black Point, 3. 83. 
John, lived at Scarborough, i. 209; 
his children, i.209; his children 
presented for non-appearance at 
church, 3. 70-71; lived at Black 
Point, 3. 83. 
John, commissioner for Mass., 8. 89. 
John jr., lived in Boston, i. 209; 
married Joanna Oakman, i, 209, 
313n; presented for not appearing 
at church, 3. 70-71. 
Mary, presented for not appearing 

at church, 3. 70-71. 
Sarah, accused of living with George 
Garland, 1. 191; married Garland, 
I. 372-373, 377; whipped for Qua- 
kerism, 3. 70, 71, 154; presented 
for not paying the minister's sti- 
pend, 3. 154. 
Thomas, conveyed land to John and 
Nathaniel Cloice, i. 260; one of 
the first settlers of Wells, i. 362. 

Milns, Capt. , 9. 195. 

Miltiraore's funeral sermon cited, 6. 

16411. 
Milton, 2. 145; 4-272; 8. 177. 

John, 4.68; 6.27; 8.320. 
Minas, 8. 109, 126, 128, 129, 130, 131, 
132, 133, 134, 135, 137, 138, 139, 
142, 144, 146, 149. 
battle of, 8. 138, 139-141; articles 
of capitulation, 8. 141-142; dif- 
ferences in the account of, 8. 142- 
146. 
Mineralogy, study of limited, 6. 406- 
407; few articles on, 6. 407-408; 
lectures on established, 6. 407; 
Cleaveland's work on well re- 
ceived, 6. 408 ; two schools in the 
study of, 6. 408. 
Mineral point, 4. 235. 
Ministry, the, in Falmouth, 1. 161. 



186 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Minot, annals of, 2, 131-130; formerly 
a part of Bakerstown, 2. Ill; the 
first settlers in, 2. Ill, 112; set off 
from Poland, 2. 115 ; the first town 
meeting of, 2. 115; to build a 
meeting-house, 2. 116; ecclesias- 
tical council in, 2. 116, 119, 125; 
the parishes to be divided, 2. 117, 
119; to send delegates to Mass., 2. 
120, 121, 122; a Fourth of July 
oration in, 2. 122; representatives 
to the Mass. general court, 2. 122, 
124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129; statis- 
tics concerning, 2. 126-127; tax 
valuation of, 2. 129; topographical 
description of, 2. 130; mentioned, 
2, 113, 161, 163. 

George Kichards, one of the found- 
ers of the Massachusetts His- 
torical Society, 2. 11a; mentioned, 
6. 186n; 8. 223. 

James, received a mortgage from 
Col. N'oble, 8. 109-110. 

John, signed the treaty of 1717, 6. 
262; autograph of, 6. 262. 

Capt. John, in command of Fort 
Richmond, 8. 211?i; truck master, 
8. 211n, 284; judge of the court of 
common pleas, 8. 211 n.; his ac- 
count book, 8. 21 In, 212n: men- 
tioned, 3. 372; 8. 11771, 227, 228, 
241, 284. 

Mercy, daughter of Capt. John, mar- 
ried the Rev. John Wiswell, 8. 
21 In. 

Stephen, one of the Pejepscot Pro- 
prietors, 3. 321; 8. 110; signed 
the treaty of 1713, 6. 255; auto- 
graph of, 6. 255. 

William, his assistance acknowl- 
edged, g. 71. 

Capt. , in command at Pema- 

quid, I. 290. 

Col. , a Pejei)scot Proprietor, 6. 

15. 
Mint of the United States, the, estab- 
lished, 6. 136. 
Missilimakinack, same as Mackinaw, 

6. 276. 
Missionary Herald, the, 6. 427. 
Mississippi river, 4. 80, 85, 97, 114; 6. 
270, 272; 8.37; 9-246. 

valley, 9. 245. 
Missouri, 4. 115; 8.352. 

compromise, 8. 349, 365. 

river, 4. 114, 
Mitchell, Dr. Ammi R., 5. xviii. 

Sir Bartholomew, 7. I29n. 

Capt. Benjamin, 2. 182. 

Christopher, married Mary Brack- 
ett, I. 230n, 306; lived at Kittery, 
I. 230/1, 306; killed, i. 306; his 
widow died in captivity, i. 306. 

Daniel, taken prisoner by the In- 
dians, 2. 182. 

the Rev. David, preached at George- 
town, 2. 221. 



the Rev. David M., teacher at North 
Yarmouth, 8. 175. 

Elisha, 6. 407. 

Experience, 2. 175. 

Gregory, 6. 342. 

Jacob, 2. 121; selectman of N^orth 
Yarmouth, 2. 177; a descendant 
of Experience, 2. 177; built a 
grist mill, 2. 180. 

James M., served in the Continental 
Army, 2. 214. 

John, a French Neutral sent to 
Wells, 3. 176n; 6. 342. 

John, of Raymondtown, 4. 359, 386. 

John, surveyor, affidavit of, 8. 9-10; 
his map used in the treaty of 1784, 
8. 8, 11, 12, 23, 25, 99. 

Jonathan, 2. 213. 

Joshua, 2. 121. 

Mary, 6. 342. 

Michael, 9. 313n. 

Sabattis, jr., 7. 105. 

Seth, 2. 185. 

Solomon, taken prisoner by the In- 
dians. 2. 182. 

Thomas, 3. 117, 122. 

Deacon , 7. 237. 

Dr., one of the founders of the New 
York Historical Society, 2. lid. 

Justice , 7. 237. 

, of Black Point, killed, 3. 151. 

Mitchells, Horton, an early settler of 

New Gloucester, 2. 153. 
Mitten, see Mitton. 
Mitton, the name extinct in Maine, i. 
6Qn, 157; common in England, 
mil, 

Ann, received a grant of land from 
Cleeves, i. 117, 154, 205; a grand- 
daughter of Cleeves, i. 117; mar- 
ried Anthony Brackett, i. IIT^ 
154, 157, 205, 235; a daughter of 
Michael, 1. 157; mentioned, 1. 126. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Michael, 1. 
157, 260; 6. 131; married Thad- 
deus Clarke, i. 155, 157, 308; 6. 
131. 

Elizabeth, wife of Michael, con- 
veyed land to John Phillips, i. 
148, 149, 149n; married Har- 
vey, I. 158: died, i. 194; men- 
tioned, I. 157. 

Joan, I. 124. 

Martha, married John Graves, i. 
157. 

Mary, married Thomas Brackett, i. 
1.54, 157, 230n, 260, 306. 

Michael, leased Peaks' island, i. 
(j(>; 6. 131 ; married the only child 
of Cleeves, i. 66, 115, 157, 194, 
260; 6. 131; probably came over 
with Cleeves, i. 66; his son killed, 
I. 06, 219n,; his lease from 
Cleeves, i. 67, 123, 15^; purchased 
brandy, powder and shot from 
Winter, i. 72; his story of the 
Tritons, i. 77; 3. 89; a great 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



187 



fowler, I. 77, 158; a constable, i. 
88, 158; lived at Falmouth or 
Casco, I. 105, 114,384; signed the 
submission to Massachusetts, i. 
105, 385; Peaks island confirmed 
to, I. 115; land at Clark's Point 
conveyed to, i. 115; deed not re- 
corded, I. IIC; his house, i. 116; 
delivered the possession of the 
second grant to Tucker, i. 117; 
owned land near Ware creek, i. 
123; his descendants still in pos- 
session of his land, i. 124; con- 
sented to the agreement between 
Jordan and Tucker, i. 131; a 
misunderstanding with Cleeves, i. 
131; a witness against Joseph 
Phippen, i.. 131-h32; witness 
against Cleeves and Neal, i. 132; 
conveyed land to Jordan, i. 132, 
142; his daughter married An- 
thony Brackett, i. 154, 230n, 235; 
his daughter married Thaddeus 
Clark, I. 124, 155; his daughter 
married James Andrews, i. 305; 
his testimony concerning Robert 
Nash, I. 384; death of, i. 157, 
194; children of, i. 157; styled a 
gentleman, i. 157-158; character 
of, I. 158; mentioned, i. 76. 
Nathaniel, killed, i. mn, 219, 221, 
260; a grandson of Cleeves, 1.122, 
206; received a grant of land, i. 
122, 206; sold the same to Pows- 
land, I. 122, 206; his land in the 
possession of Anthony Brackett, 
I. 154; never married, i. 157; in 
1674 was under age, i. 206; his 
estate sold, i. 248; mentioned, i. 
121, 123. 
Sarah, married James Andrews, i. 

157, 305. 
, sheriff of Shrewsbury, anec- 
dote of, I. (}Qn. 
Moasham, the name of Bashabas' 

country, 2. 62; 7. 99. 
Moassons, the, 5;, 358, 359. 
Modern Universal History, the, cited, 
5. 199n, 231n, 242n, 282^, 291n, 
292n. 
Moges, the, i. 76. 
Moggerage, John, signed the petition 

to Charles 11, i. 402. 
Mohammedan principles, the, Ralle 

accused of partaking of, i . 444. 
Mohawks, the, submitted Dongan, 
5. 90; the Jesuits among, 5. 91; 
friendly to the English, 5. 256- 
257, 258, 268; induced to make 
peace with the French, 5. 269; 
fight the Penobscots, 6. 233; a 
terror to the eastern Indians, 6. 
233; mentioned, 6. 216; 7.7. 
Moheegs, the, 4. 128, 142. 
Mohegans, the, 3. 430, 440, 441; 6. 
2O811, 211, 212, 212w, 217; 7. lOln. 



Mohotiwormet, the Indian name of 

Robinhood, 2.233h; 4-232. 
Molasses, made in Maine, 4. 282. 
Molton, John, deposition of, 5. 65. 
Molues, La Costa des, 2. 76a. 
Molunkis river, 4. 107. 
Monahan island, 4. 106. 
Monahiggan, see Monhegan. 
Monan, definition of, 4. 190. 
Monanas, definition of, 4. 190. 
Monanis, 5. 161. 

Moncton, Col. , 8. 222/i, 245n, 246, 

263, 281n. 
Money, definition of, 6. 148. 
Monhegan, Gilbert and Popham at, i. 
29; 2. 27a; part of Rocroft's crew 
at, I. 32; 5. 163; fishermen and 
fishing stages at, i. 32; 2. 50a, 
192; 5. 155, 183, 185; 6. 283; 7. 
318,320; 8, 201; buildings prob- 
ably erected on, i. 32; 3. 9, 10; 
Gorges established a plantation 
on, I. 36; 2. 50a; 7.321-322; the 
property of Abraham Jennings, i. 
36, 56a; 5. 170, 185; sold to John 
Brown, i. 36; described, i.36; 5. 
161; 7. 135, 315; fishermen sailed 
for, I. 36; the people of met 
Thomas Elbridge, i. 37; Capt. 
John Smith at, 2. 34a; 5. 161; 7. 
210, 315; 9-304; granted to others 
before to Levett, 2. 49, 50a; 5. 
186; Shurt sent to take posses- 
sion of, 2- 5a; Capt. Dormer at, 
2. 31n; 5: 163; perhaps visited by 
Capt. Robert Davis, 3. 2947i; the 
Indian name of, 4. 106, 190; Pring 
near, 5. 153; Popham's colonists 
arrived at, 5- l''>7, 157n; 8.201; a 
place of rendezvous, 5. 157-158; 
examined by Capt. Davis, 5. 158; 
a rendezvous of Capt. Smith, 5. 
161; called Battles' Isle, 5. 162; a 
headquarters for ships, 5. 163; 
probably early occupied, 5. 163; 
Rocroft's crew the first to winter 
at, 5. 163; trade established at, 5. 
164; men left there, 5. 164; indi- 
cations of a settlement there in 
1624, 5. 164; granted to Levett, 5. 
168; plantation commenced by 
Jennings, 5. 170; sold to Aid- 
worth and Elbridge, 5. 171; the 
first written conveyance of real 
estate in New England, 5. 171 ; 
life at, 5. 171; its dissolution 
known abroad, 5. 171; goods at 
sold to Bradford and Winslow, 5. 
171-172, 172n; included in Pema- 
quid, 5. 181, 247; 7. 315, 320, ^21; 
settled before Plymouth, 5. 183; 
a busy place, 5. 194; the settlers 
from spread to the main land, 5. 
200; had no inhabitants in lfS5,. 
5. 219; eight men wrecked at, 5. 
224-225; the people of did mot 



188 



MAINE HISTOEIOAL SOCIETY. 



Monhegan — continued. 

swear allegience to the Duke of 
York, 5. 237; petitioned to Mass. 
for a government, 5. 289, 241; 
Kichard Oliver lived at, 5. 249; 
tax in 1674, 5. 249-250; discovered 
by Weymouth, 5. 311, 313, 319, 
346, 347, 348; 6. 294; 7.26, 263; 8. 
318, 319; called St. Georges, 5. 
811; Cadillac's account of, 6. 283; 
called Meniguen, 6. 283; a pond 
of fresh water in, 6. 295, 29on; 
seen by Champlain, 7. 263; called 
Le Nef, 7-263; called E. Mmetinic, 
7.315; a landmark for European 
voyagers, 7. 315; employment of 
Smith's men at, 7. 315; the Na- 
cheen at, 7. 320; Sir Richard 
Hawkins at, 7. 320; Gorges and 
Sutcliff sent an expedition to, 7. 
321 ; a new depot of trade opened 
at, 7. 322; leased to John Balling, 
8. 188; mentioned, i. 551; 2. 35a, 
84, 88, 238; 3. 298^; 4. 69; 5. 163, 
164, 185, 291n, 292m, 319, 385n; 6. 
298, 309, 314; 7. 132, 319, 328, 363; 
8.310; 9.78, 130. 

Monhegans, the, 5. ISdn. 

Monhiggin, island of, 5.219; see Mon- 
hegan. 

Monhiggon, see Monhegan. 

Monies, a corruption of McNish, 6. 7. 

Moniley, the Rev. William, 9. 371. 

Monjoy, see Munjoy. 

Monk, Gren. George, 9. 14. 

Monmouth, 3. 204; 4. 305, 355, 378, 
400, 403; 7. 283; 9. 171, 172, 174, 
200. 
Academy, 8. 174; 9. 174. 
battle of, 4. 284w. 

free grammar school building 
erected, 8. 174; grants to and 
funds of, 8. 174; teachers in, 8. 
174; graduates from, 8. 174. 

Monongahela river, 6. 100. 

Monroe, Abigail, 4. 391, 392. 
James, 5. xxxvii; 8. 414. 
Col. , 4. 284/1. 

Monseag bay, 2. 276; 9. 5. 
river, 4. 104. 

Monseignat, 7. Qln. 

Monsiocage falls, 5. 96. 

Monsweag bay, a boundary of the 
Kennebec Purchase, 2. 276; Sir 
William Phipps born near, 9. 5. 
river, 2. 236; 4. 104. 

Montagnaises, the, 6. 225. 

Montagrets, i. 288. 

Montague, Griffin, signed the petition 
to Cromwell, i. 395. 

Montawanskeag, 7. 10, IQn. 

Montcalm, Louis Joseph de, 7. 295. 

Montecuculi, 7. 42. 

Montgomery, a Scotch-Irish name, 6. 
19. 
Sir Hugh, 6. 6. 



Gen. Richard, letters from Arnold, 
I. 480-484, 487, 493, 497, 498, 517; 
Arnold received news from, i. 
482-483; Arnold awaited his ar- 
rival, I. 483, 490; anxious to hear 
from Arnold, i. 484; Arnold de- 
sired to hear from, i. 485, 493, 
497; joined Arnold, 1.498; death 
of, I. 519, 520, 522, 524; his troops 
at the Plains of Abraham, i. 521 ; 
attacked the enemy, i. 522; bio- 
graphical notice of, i. 528-529; 
Bristol ceded to, 6. 18; mentioned, 
4- 78. 
Monthly Anthology, the, 7. 414. 
Months, names of among the Hudson 
bay Indians, 6. 268; names of among 
the Abnaki,'6. 269. 
Monticello, 7. 241. 
Monticinicus, i. 551; 4. 177. 
Mont Mansell, near Mt. Desert, i. 26 ; 
Jesuits sent to, i. 26; a mission es- 
tablished at, I. 26-27, 26n; named 
by the English, i. 26w; a part of 
JN'orumbeagua, 8. 320. 
Montmorenci, 7. 391. 
Montowampate, 5^ 223. 
Montreal, the Superior of applied to 
for prayers for Rale, i. 443; Carle- 
ton reported at, i. 447; Arnold 
desired news from, 1.479; Arnold 
hoped to meet Schuyler at, i. 
480; in the hands of the Ameri- 
cans, I. 484, 485, 519, 528; Arnold 
sent to for clothing, i. 490; Capt. 
Napier escaped from, i. 490; bat- 
teaux expected from, i.492; Gen. 
Wooster likely to stay at, i. 493; 
surrendered, 1759, to the Ameri- 
cans, 3. 176; mentioned, i. 434; 
6. 75, 240; 7. 47, 62, 169, 234, 355; 
8. 105, 244,368; 9. 31, 273. 
railway, the, 8. 368, 369. 
Montressor, Capt. John, his route de- 
scribed by Ballard, i. 465-466; an 
officer in the engineers, i. 446; con- 
ducted an expedition into Maine, i. 
446; his journal fell into the hands 
of Arnold, i. 447; its present owner, 
I. 448; embarked from St. Egan, i. 
448; at the Chaudierfe, i. 448-449, 
466; at the Bron, i. 449; purchased 
boats, I. 449; crossed the Rapids 
des Diables, i. 449-450; at me 
Riviere de Famine, i.450; encamped 
at Riviere des Loupes, i. 450; at the 
brook, 1.451; entered a lake, i. 451- 
452; description of the lake, i. 452, 
453; viewed Onegnla, i. 452; near 
an old camp, i . 453 ; at the Penob- 
scot, I. 453-454; sent Indians to 
search the country, 1.454; left the 
river, i, 454; entered Lake Original, 
1.455; reached Rocky mountain, i. 
455, 456; at Farm island, i. 456; 
passed through the west outlet, i. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



189 



456-457; at the Arransoak, i. 457; 
repaired the canoes, i. 457; en- 
camped in the woods, i. 458; an- 
noyed by mosquitos, i. 458; passed 
Fourche, Devil's falls and Norridge- 
wock, I. 459; encamped near Nine 
Mile falls, i. 460; at Ticonnic falls 
and Fort Halifax, i. 460; at Dead 
river, i. 461, 462n; encamped at 
Third lake, i. 461; passed South 
Branch, i. 462; at Chain lakes, i. 
468; at Moosehead lake, i. 464; at 
Lake Megantic, i. 465; spoke dis- 
paragingly of Fort Halifax, 8. 239, 
273; mentioned, 8. 274; his journal 
cited, 4. 108; 5. xix. 
Monts Coupes, the same as Mount 
Desert, 6. 280. 
Deserts, L'Isle des, named by Cham- 
plain, 7. 252; mentioned, 7. 254, 
257; 8. 330; see Mount Desert. 
Montseag, 9. 133. 

bay, 2. 207. 
Montville, 4. 322, 351n; 6.316; 9. 81. 
Monument, Mass., 4. 270. 
Moody, Charles, 2. 122, 128. 
Daniel, settled at Black Point, 3. 

173, 219. 
David, 7. 284. 
Eleazer, 3. 234. 
Capt. George, 3. 173. 
the Eev. John, 4. 255, 256, 265, 267. 
Joseph, registrar, i. 555; mark on 
his cattle, 3. 144; suspected of 
being a Tory, 3. 199. 
the Kev. Joseph, i. 348; 8, 306. 
Joshua, settled at Black Point, 3. 

219. 
Moses S., preceptor of Farmington 

Academy, 8. 171. 
Nathan, 7. 284. 
Nathaniel, 3. 222. 
Samuel, signed the treaty of 1713, 

6. 256 ; autograph of, 6. 256. 
Samuel, preceptor of Dummer 
Academy, 6, 386; preceptor of 
Ilallowell Academy, 8. 161; pen 
and ink sketch of, 8. 161-162; 
preceptor of Berwick Academy, 
8. 162; mentioned, 4. 164, 166; 7. 
284. 
Capt. Samuel, purchased land of 
Pow^sland, i. 206; the same con- 
veyed to John Thomas, i. 206; 
purchased land of JohnMarston's 
estate, 1.246; owned James An- 
drews farm, i.305; mentioned, i. 
128n. 
the Rev. Samuel, ordained, 5. liv; 

death of, 5. liv. 
the Rev. Silas, 2. 142; 4. 273; 7. 220. 
William, first of the family in Scar- 
borough, 3. 219. 

Major , 3. 313-314. 

, of Boston, 9. 24. 

Moody ^s beach, i. 244n. 



Moon, the dependence of the Indians 
upon, 7. 344-346. 
the, built at Bath, 2. 209. 
Moore, Bridget, punished for com- 
plaining, 3. 57-58. 
Daniel, in the garrison at Black 

Point, I. 226n, 227?^; 3. 110. 
the Rev. Green B., preached in Bath, 

2. 228. 
Col. John, 4. 344, 345, 347, 367, 380, 

396, 397. 
Sir John, 8. 147. 

Richard, land at Cape Porpus grant- 
ed to, I. 97; in the garrison at 
Black Point, i. 227n; 3. 227/1. 
Theodosius, married the widow of 
Gendall, i. 147, 556; sent goods 
to George Bramhall, i. 556, 557; 
lived in Marshfield, i. 556n. 
the Rev. Thomas, 7. 220. 
Walter, 5. 40. 

William, amount of land granted 
to, 9. 378; accused Godfrey of de- 
taining his cow, 9. 384. 

Capt. , commanded the Marga- 

ritta, 2. 243; ordered the people 
of Machias to take down the lib- 
erty pole, 2. 243; killed, 2. 245. 
Moore's brook, origin of the name, 3. 

78. 
Moorena, 4. 157. 

Moorhead, the Rev. John, settled in 
Boston, 6. 12; died, 6. 165; men- 
tioned, 6. 11, 31, 36. 
Moose, abundant, i. 459. 
brook, 4. 116. 
island, 8. 15. 
lake, 4. 107, 345, .346. 
mountain, i. 466. 
point, 3. 295n. 
pond, 4. 345, 380. 
river, i. 466. 
Moosebec, definition of, 4. 190. 
Moosehead lake. Col. Montressor at, 
I. 455, 464; called Lake Orignal, 
I. 455; birch abundant at, i. 455; 
origin of the name, i. 455w; men- 
tioned, I. 455, 466; 4. 105, 108; 7. 
80w. 
Moosetuck, definition of, 4, 190 
Morals, low state of in Maine, 1. 158, 

160, 190-192. 
Morant, Philip, his History of Essex 

cited, 3. XV. 
Morattiggon, 5. 187. 
Moravians, the, not opposed to slavery, 

7. 214. 
More, Hannah, 7. 406. 
William, i. 402. 

Morehouse, , 8. 41, 42, 43. 

Morel, Capt. , 7. 249. 

Morgan, Gen. Daniel, to accompany 
Arnold, i. 600; to go ahead. and 
clear the road, i. 503; his charac- 
ter, I. 530; mentioned, 1.501,510, 
513, 518, 523, 524, 528. 



190 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Morgan. David, 7. 391. 

Francis, i. 167, Win. 

Jonatlian, his grammar published, 
8. 180. 

Joseph, I. 321. 

Robert, of Saco, i. Win, 

Eobert, of Sagadahoc, i. 167n. 

Mrs. Sarah, punished for assault, i. 
375. 
Morley House, 5. 440. 
Morocco, 8. 202. 

Morough, Dennis, sold land to An- 
thony Brackett, i. 249; married 
JanePenley, i. 313, 314; lived at 
Purpooduck, i. 313, 321; his son, 
I. 313. 
Morrell, John, signed the petition to 
Charles 11, i. 402. 

Mary, daughter of Peter, i. 313; 
married George Tuck, i. 313; 
lived at Falmouth, i. 313. 

Mary, wife of Peter, i. 313. 

Peter, purchased land of Thomas 
Mason, i. 246; taken prisoner at 
Falmouth, i. 302, 313; lived on 
India street, i. 313; land deeded 
to, I. 313; his family moved to 
Beverly, i. 313; child of, i. 313; 
lived on the Neck, i. 321. 

Robert, signed the petition to Brad- 
street, I. 283^; lived on the Neck, 

1. 321. 

the Rev. William, sent to Nev^ Eng- 
land, by the Plymouth company, 
2.4.5a; composed a Latin poem, 

2. 46a; disappointed, 2. 4:6an; 
appointed to superintend the 
churches, 6. 180. 

Morrer, Thomas, signed the petition 

to Massichusetts, 5. 240. 
Morrill, Governor Lot M., 8. 459. 

the Rev. Moses, 4. 242, 243, 244, 255, 
273. 

Samuel, of Boston, graduated from 
Bowdoin College, i. 340. 

the Rev. , of Biddeford, 2. 141. 

, of Falmouth, 3. 160n. 

Morris, Capt, an Indian, a terror to 
the settlers, 7. 326; killed, 7, 326; 
his son sought revenge, 7. 326. 

Thomas, i. 99; lived at Casco bay, 
I. 100^1, 114; consented to the 
agreement between Jordan and 
Tucker, i. 131. 

, of Seven Mile brook, 4. 367. 

Morrison family, the, 6. 14, 21. 
Morse, Charles H., 5. 276n, 391. 

E., teacher in Warren Academy, 8. 
172. 

Freeman H., his assistance acknowl- 
edged, 7. 364. 

Jonathan, 4. 362, 391, 392. 

William, 7-284; 8. 113n. 

Mrs. William, 8. 113n. 

-^-, of Methuen, 4. 364. 



Morss, Margaret, married Col. Joseph 

Coffin, 4. 241. 
Mortality in Maine, 4. 17-18; in Au- 
gusta, 5. 431-435. 
Mortimer, 5. xlv. 

Mortimore, Hepzibah, married Robert 
Lawrence, i. 257. ^ 

, married Hepzibah Munjoy, i. 

153, 257. 
Morton, James, 2. 221. 

the Rev. James, 8. 11 In. 

Nathaniel, the authority for the 
story of the bribing of the cap- 
tain of the Mayflower, 8. 200; 
came to Plymouth, 8. 200 ; a rela- 
tive of Gov. Bradford, 8. 200; his 
account of the plot, 8. 200-201; 
his New England cited, 8. 200, 
279. 

Thomas, the government opposed 
to, 2. 57a; blazoned the outrage 
in England, 2. 57a; an enemy of 
the Puritans, 2. 78a; his New 
England's Memorial cited, i. 36n, 
229n; 2. 42a)i, 68a, 78a, 79a; 3. 
34n, 317; 6. 179. 
Mosely, Ebenezer, 7. 367- 

the Rev. Elisha, preached in New 
Gloucester, 2. 153, 158; men- 
tioned, 2. 117, 119, 121, 125, 126. 

Capt. Samuel, 2. 133. 
Moses, Daniel, 3. 204. 

George, lived at Scottow hill, 3. 219. 

John, received a grant of land, i. 
115. 

Theodosius, 3. n3, 219. 
Mosier, Hugh, received a grant of 
land, I. 75, 115; moved down the 
river, 1. 75-76; first of the name 
in the state, i. 75n; died, i. 76; his 
son administered his estate, i. 76, 
189; lived at Casco bay, i. lOOn, 
114, 189n; submitted to Massa- 
chusetts, I. lOOn; mentioned, i. 
99, 123. 

James, administered his father's 
estate, i. 76, 189; lived at Free- 
port, I. 76; lived at Casco bay, i. 
236n. 

James, an early settler of Gorham, 
2. 148; born at Falmouth, 2. 143. 

John, son of Hugh, i. 76, 189n; 
lived at Freeport, i. 76; accused 
of breaking the Sabbath, i. 189; 
an assurety for his brother, i. 
189n; assurety for George Lewis, 
I. 191; lived at Casco bay, i. 
236n. 
Mosse, Tho., signed the petition to 

Charles 11, i. 402. 
Moss-house, built at Norridgewock, 

4. 380. 
Motherwell, Miss , taken captive 

by Indians, 2. 199. 
Motte, Sieur de la, 8. 324. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



191 



Moucliicke legamatch, definition of, 

5. 187, 187n. 
Mougrave, 2. 54; see Mulgrave. 
Moulgrave, 2. 54; see Mulgrave. 
Moulton, Daniel, an early settler of 
Scarboro, 3. 201, 219-220. 
John, settled at Blue Point, 3. 219, 

Capt. , headed a company to 

exterminate the Indians at Nor- 
ridgewock, 2. 197; 3- 1^^^ 31 3n; 
at Ticonic, 3. 197; gave orders not 
to kill Ralle, 3. 198. 
Mounds, few in New England, 6. 218. 
Mount Aid worth, 5. 153. 
Auburn, 7. 236. 
Cornwall, 9. 137n. 

Desert, called Pemetig, i. 26n, 430ri; 
7. 3, 27; called Mont Mansell, i. 
26; named by Champlain, i. 26n; 
7. 28, 252; a Jesuit mission es- 
tablished at, I. 26?i, 27, 430; 7. 28; 
the mission destroyed, i. 27; 5* 
178; 8. 330; captured by the Eng- 
lish, I. 27, 431 ; perhaps visited by 
Davis, 3. 294n; Capt. Argal at, 5. 
178; 8. 330; a cross set up to de- 
note English possession, 5. 179; 
French settled at, 6.3; the G-rand 
Design wrecked at, 6. 22; the 
passage to from Biguatus, 6. 114, 
115; Father Briand at, 6.208; land 
at granted to Mde. de Gregoir^, 6. 
275; Cadillac's account of, 6. 280; 
a landmark for navigators, 6. 280 ; 
called Mont Coupes, 6. 280; in 
possession of Du Monts, 7. 27; 
Capt. Thomas Perkins wrecked 
at, 8. 128; called St. Savior, 8. 
824; mentioned, 4. 108; 5. 327; 
6. 125, 282, 283, 336; 7- 63,253, 
254, 2.55, 264, 265; 8. 15, 319, 320, 
324, 330; see Monts Deserts, L'Isle 
des. 
Desert harbor, Cadillac's account 

of, 6. 280. 
Edgecomb, 3. 25. 
Holyoke, 4- ^^^2, 264. 
Hope, Maine, 7. 7. 
Hope, E. I., I. 210. 
Katahdin, i. 466; the Indian name 

of, 1.456; 4. 105. 
Mansell, see Mont Mansell. 
Niles, 5. 7T. 
Pleasant, 6. 294. 

Royal, 3. 383, 385; see Montreal. 
Vernon, Maine, 2. 285 ; 4. 306, 336. 
Vernon street, 9. 70. 
Vernon, Va., 4. 59, 60. 
Waldo, 9. ^1- 

Washington, death of Lizzie Bourne 
at, 8. 393; ascended by Darbey 
Field, 9. 209; compared to Sugar- 
loaf hill, 9. 211; first horse rid- 
den up, 9. 215; mentioned, i. 334. 
Mpuntain street, Quebec, i. 521. 
Mountfort street, i. 202. 



Mountforth, Mr. , 3. 433, 436, 437. 

Mountjoy, a common name in Eng- 
land, I. 153, 256n, 258; see Munjoy. 
Mourt's Relation cited, 5. 144, 164, 

Mousam mill, i. 268. 

river, formerly Cape Porpoise, i. 
353; Levett's account of, i. 353; 
the Indian name of the Kenne- 
bec, 4. 106; mentioned, 7. 116. 
Mowat, Capt. Henry, seized at Fal- 
mouth, 3. 197; dismantled Fort 
Pownall, 5. 386-387; declared his in- 
tention of destroying Falmouth, 5. 
439, 440, 443; had a long tour of 
duty on the coast, 5. 440>i; with 
Gov. Pownell in the expedition to 
Penobscot, 5. 440n; sent a letter to 
the officers of Falmouth, 5. 443; 
consented to suspend the destruc- 
tion of Falmouth, 5. 445-446; de- 
stroyed Falmouth, 7. 479; men- 
tioned, 2. 216; 5.44O; 6. 354; 7. 121, 
1:^3, 124,126. 
Mowbray, 5. xlv. 

Moxies, his wife entertained by An- 
dros, 5. 268; given ammunition, 5. 
268. 
Moxis, Caesar, 3. 380. 
Moxus, attacked the Storer garrison, 
7. 115-116; defeated, 7. 116; 
threatened to return, 7. 116. 
Augustin, signum of, 6. 261. 
Moxusson, CcBsar, 6. 259, 261. 
Mr., a title not prefixed to all names, 

8. 296. 
Msar'to, the Indian name of Venus, 

7. 343-344. 
Muddy river, 3. 313. 
Mudge, Elder Enoch, appointed to the 
Portland circuit, 7. 227 ; at Read- 
field, 7. 228; at Orrington, 7. 228; 
a member of the general court, 7. 
228; characteristics of, 7. 228. 

, commissioner, 8. 82, 84. 

Mudy, Daniel, 3. 173. 

see Moody. 
Mugg, chief of the Penobscots, i. 215, 
228, 229; 3. 108; Jocelyn attempted 
to treat with, i. 226; 3. 108; desired 
a peace, i. 228; went to Portsmouth, 
I. 228; sent to Boston, i. 228; con- 
sented to remain a hostage, i. 228; 
attacked Black Point, i. 229; 3. 112; 
killed, I. 229; 3- 112; took Jocelyn 
a prisoner, 3. 108; sent to arrange 
a peace, 3. Ill ; taken a prisoner, 3. 
112; his treachery, 3. 112; his death 
a relief to the English, 3. 112; com- 
plained of Capt. Lane, 3. 374; men- 
tioned, 3. 235. 
Muhlenberg, the Rev. Dr. William, 7. 

453. 
Mulford, Elias, married Mary Mason, 
2.234; 4.231. 
Maj?y, conveyed la^nd to David Car. 



192 



MAINE HISTOKTCAL SOCIETY. 



Mulford, Mary — continued. 

gill, 2. 234; 4. 231; a daughter of 
James Mason, 2. 234; married 
Elias Mulford, 2, 234; 4. 231. 
Mulgrave, the Earl of, 2. 54, 64n. 

Mulliken, , 7. 285. 

Munchausen, Baron, 5. 203. 
Munjoy, extinct as a family name, i. 
256; sometimes written Mount- 
joy, 2oQn; a common name in 
Devonshire, i. 258. 
Benjamin, i. i53n. 
George, lived in Falmouth, i. 121, 
153, 216; 5. 247; married Mary 
Phillips, I. 121, 153, 258; came 
from Boston and erected a frame 
house, I. 124, 166-167, 255: son- 
in-law of John Phillips, i. 124; 
signature of, 1. 125, 126; his prop- 
erty still held by his heirs, i. 126; 
his widow and son sold land to 
Thomas Cooper, 1. 129; purchased 
land of the Indians, i. 129; pur- 
chased land of Eobert Jordan, i. 
141-142; erected a stone house at 
Peak's island, 1. 149; became sole 
owner of House island, 1. 151; the 
title of same confirmed to his 
widow, I. 151; a man of energy 
and enterprise, i. 152; a son of 
John, I. 152, 258; admitted a free- 
man, I. 153, 258; his children, i. 
153, 256; visited Falmouth, 1. 153; 
purchased the Cleeves' home- 
stead, I. 153, 194; an associate, i. 
165, 170, 174; 2. 64a; 3-75; a 
commissioner, i. 164, 166, 175, 
376; 2. 233; 5. 236; purchased 
land of Sampson Penley, i. 166n\ 
held a county court, i. 170; lived 
at Casco, i. 177; Justice of the 
Peace, i. 177; signed the petition 
to the king, i. 180; his dislike to 
Mass. not understood, 1. 182; sold 
liquor, i. 182^1, 201, 259; bound to 
keep order, i. 182n; erected a 
prison, i. lS2n] powers invested 
in, I. 185, 376; a witness against 
Neale, i. 200; carried on trade at 
Fore river, 1.201-202; his house 
constructed for defense, i. 202; 
ascertained the eastern boundary 
of Maine, i. 202; his report and 
bill, I. 202; purchased land of 
Anthony Brackett, i. 204, 255, 
257; the same became the prop- 
erty of the Waldo heirs, i. 204; 
sold land to John Ingersoll, i. 
205; conveyed land to Thomas 
Cloice, I. 205, 255; his son John 
killed, I. 220; sent with provis- 
ions to Falmouth, i. 222, 255n; 
petitioned to the general court to 
pay his expenses, i. 222n; land 
granted to, i. 244; his widow 
married to Robert Lawrence, i. 



247, 313; last appearance of his 
name on the records, i. 255; 
named as a grantee to Danforth, 
I. 255; death of, i. 255; character 
of, 1.256; his estate, i. 256-257; 
had a farm at Presumpscot, i. 
257-258; born in Dover, i. 258; 
his title the basis of the Lawrence 
claim, I. 281, 313; deed from the 
Indians to, i. 553; assisted Pur- 
chase, 3. 322, 332; made a survey 
at Pemaquid, 5. 247; mentioned, 
I, 6Sn, 119, 254; 3. 322, 322n., 
George jr., sold land to Thomas 
Cooper, I. 129; born in Boston, i. 
153, 256; died in Braintree, i. 256; 
his children, i. 256. 
Gersham, i. 153n. 
Hepzebah, born in Boston, i. 153, 

256; married Mortimor, i. 

153, 257; nominated her own 
guardian, i. 257; Robert Lawrence 
her second husband, i. 247, 257; 
Stephen Cross her third husband, 
I. 257; died in Boston, i. 257. 
John, of England, i. 152, 258. 
John, son of George, i. 216; killed, 

I. 220, 221, 256. 
John, son of Josiah, i. 256. 
Josiah, son of George, born in Bos- 
ton, I. 153, 256; his children, i, 
256. 
Martha, daughter of Josiah, mar- 
ried John Pulling, i. 256. 
Mary, daughter of George, married 
John Palmer, i. 149/i, 153, 256; 
left no children, 1.256; baptized 
in Boston, i. 153^; her title to 
Pond island confirmed, i. 255. 
Mary, daughter of George jr., mar- 
ried Philip Thompson, i. 256. 
Mary, daughter of John, of Eng- 
land, married to John Saunders, 
I. 153, 256, 258. 
Mary, daughter of Josiah, married 

Capt. Thomas Hornby, i. 256. 
Mary, wife of George, a daughter 
of John Phillips, i. 61; claimed 
her father's land, i. 62; the same 
awarded to, i. 62; granted the 
house at Clapboard island, i. 146; 
her title to House island con- 
firmed, I. 151, 255; her land ap- 
propiiated by Danforth, i. 254; 
petitioned for redress, i. 254; the 
matter settled, i. 254-255 ; released 
her rights to Clay cove and other 
property, i. 255, 281-282; the con- 
siderations for the release, i . 255 ; 
mentioned, i. 63w, 257. 
Pelatiah, daughter of George, born 
in Boston, i. 153, 256; nominated 
her own guardian, i. 257. 
Philip, I. 153n. 

Susanna, married Gwynne, i. 

256. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



193 



title, the, i. 242. 
Munjoy's hill, the residence of George 
Munjoy, i. 256; troops quartered 
at, 1.298; Thaddeus Clarke prob- 
ably killed at, i. 299; Kobert Law- 
rence built a house on, i. 31^>; 
Capt. Mowatt captured at, 3. 197. 

island, now called Peaks' island, i. 
66, 145?i, 148; stone house erected 
on, I. 149; George Felt and others 
killed at, i. 222n, 225n; called 
House island, i. 226n; Mary Mun- 
joy' s title to confirmed, i, 255. 

Keck, former name of Portland, i. 
59; called Machigonne, 4. 105. 
Munnies, a corruption of McNish, 6. 7. 
Munroe, Abijah, 4. 362. 
Munson, Joseph, 3. 179, 180, 207, 220. 

Robert, 3. 173; biographical notice 
of, 3. 220. 

Stephen, 3. 220. 
Munsungun river, 4, 107. 
Murder trials, the first and second in 

Maine, 3. 16, 16n. 
Murdock, Beamish, his History of 

Nova Scotia cited, 7. 5, 52, 61, m^ 

67, 75, 76, 78, 82, 83; 8. 192, 330; 9. 

98, 99, 103, 110, 112. 
Murray, General James, i. 518. 

the Kev. John, married Susanna 
Lithgow, 5. 418, 423; 6. 164; 5. 
287; died, 5. 418; 6, 34, 167, 423; 
lived at Booth bay and Newbury- 
port, 5. 418; birth of, 6. 34, 157; 
came to New York, 6. 34; went 
to I^ennsylvania, 6.34, 157; formed 
a church at Boothbay, 6. 34, 157; 
moved to Newbnryport, 6. 34; 
educated in Edinburgh, 6. 157; 
next to Ireland, 6. 157; his labors 
at Boothbay, 6. 158-160; his char- 
acter, 6. 159, 160-161, 163; opposed 
Smith, 6. 160-161; his reply to 
Hinkley, 6. 161 ; Lis influence dur- 
ing the war of the Revolution, 6. 
161-164; a delegate to the Pro- 
vincial Congress, 6. 161-162; as 
an arbitrator, 6. 162; his house, 
6. 162; prevented the annoyance 
from British cruisers, 6. 162-163; 
his dignity, 6. 163; a reward of- 
fered for his apprehension, 6. 
163; his influence over a regi- 
ment, 6. 163-164; called Boston 
and Portsmouth, 6. 165; called to 
Newburyport, 6. 165, 166; his 
popularity and influence, 6. 166; 
long sickness, 6. 166-167; the 
charge relative to his licensure, 
6. 167-169; mentioned, 6. 19, 35, 
355; Memoir of, by the Rev. A. 
G. Vermilye, 6. 153-170. 

the Rev. John, a Universalist, 6. 166. 
^ Lindley, his grammar published, 8. 
180. 

Major , I. 527. 

13 



Miss , married J. D. Powell, 7. 

234. 

Muscataquid, i. 551. 

Muscle cove, George Felt lived near, 
I. 221. 

Muscongus, destroyed, 4. 223; a name 
of remote antiquity, 7. 295; a 
province of Pemaquid, 7. 295, 309, 
311; the commercial treasures of, 
7. 295-296; the rapid progress of, 
7. 311; granted to Beauchamp and 
Leverett, 9. 77; the extent and 
condition of the grant, 9. 77 ; fish- 
eries hastened the occupation of, 

7. 78; Leverett became the sole 
proprietor of, 7. 78; mentioned, 5. 
188n. 

grant, 4. 221 ; 9. 77 ; see Muscongus 
patent. 

island, purchased by John Brown, 
I. 36; mentioned, 4. 106; 5. 191. 

patent, owned by Samuel Waldo, 5, 
369n; sometimes called the Waldo 
patent, 5. 369n; granted to Beau- 
champ and Leverett, 6. 321; g. 
77; John Leverett became sole 
proprietor, 6. 321; 9.78; became 
the ten and later the thirty pro- 
prietors, 6. 221 ; mentioned, 4. 221 ; 

8. 298. 

river, boundary of the patent to 

Aldworth and Elbridge, i. 37; 

boundary of the Waldo patent, i. 

45; mentioned, 4. 218; 5. 191; 9. 

225, 226. 
Musical campaign, the, 8. 458^. 
Muskingun, definition of, 4, 115. 
Muskoncus, a name given to the New 

England coast, 5. 155. 
Musquashes, abundant, 4. 379, 380. 
Musquitoes, i. 458. 
Mussey, Thomas, signed the petition 

to Charles 11, i. 402. 
Myantonomo, killed, 2. 168. 
Myrameck river, 2. Qi5; see Merrimac 

river. 
Myrick, John, 3. 173. 
Mystic, Benedict Arnold at, i. 502. 
river, 7. 152n. 

Naconick falls, 4. 375. 

Nacheen, the sailed from Dartmouth, , 
7. 320; commanded by Brawnde, 
7. 320; at Monhegan, and Seguin, 
7. 320; had a large store of freight, 
7. 320 ; the tender wrecked, 7. 320; 
Hawkins took her fishing boats, 
7. 320; her voyage destroyed, 7. 
320. 

Nagasqua, an Indian, resident at Scar- 
boro, 3. 101. 

Nagiscoig, 3. 412.. 

Nagucawen, 6. 261. 

Naguscawit, 6. 258. 

Nahanadad, carried by Weymouth to 
England, 3. 297; 5. 169, 328;. met 



194 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Kahanadad— continued. 

by Raleigh Gilbert, 3- 297, 298; 5. 
159-160, 335; 7. 322; reached 
America with Capt. Hanam, 3. 
297; visited by Capt. Popham, 3. 
298; visited the colonists, 3. 303, 
807 ; a pilot for Capt. Pring, 5. 328, 
334, 349 ; 6. 297 ; married and be- 
came a sachem, 5-328; given to 
Popham, 5. 332; remained in 
America, 5. 334 ; met Skitwarroes, 
5.335, 349; 6. 297; probably the 
same as Tahanida, 5. 359, 359/i; 
mentioned, 5. 350. 
Nahant, the boundary of the grant to 

Brereton, 2. 46w. 
Nahumkeag, definition of, 4. 190. 
island, 2.279; 4. 107. 
river, 4. 107, 113; 8. 205n. 
Naktonas, 4. 155, 163. 
Namaaskaiike, 4. 189. 
Namaaskeag, derivation and definition 

of, 6. 190. 
Namaaskees auke, 4. 189. 
Names, given by Indians uncertain, 3. 
312; territorial indicate fluctuat- 
ing authority, 5. 242. 
Nampscoscoke, conveyed to John 

Wadleigh, i. 357, 358. 
Nanaadionit, i. 129. 
Nanrantsont k, former name of Nor- 
ridgewock, i. 437; 4- 95, 98; &. 
240; 7. 4, »^; Rale established at, i. 
437; 7. 83; the situation and a 
description of, i. 437; its distance 
from Quebec, i. 437; a church at, 
I. 437-438, 440, 442w; approach of 
the Amaligans to, i. 438; a depu- 
tation sent to Boston from, i. 440- 
441; address of the governor, i. 
441 ; the reply, i. 441-442; church 
built by the English, i. 442w; 
church destroyed by the English, 
I. 442-443 ; a name given to a part 
of the Kennebec, i. 456n; the 
principal residence of the Abna- 
kis, 4. 98; definition of, 4. 107, 
190-191; 6. 213; St. Castine at, 7. 
83. 
river, 6. 241. 
Nansct, Champlain at, 7. 262. 
Nantasket, i.309; 9.30. 

roads, 8. 119. 
Nantes, the Edict of, i. 276. 
Nantucket," Tristram Coffin moved to, 
4. 240; the Earl of Stirling's rights 
in sold to the Duke of York, 5. 2; 
New York commissioners to be 
sent to, 5. 35 ; French Neutrals at, 
6. 342 ; land titles in traced from 
the Earl of Sterling, 7. 144; men- 
tioned, 6. 76, 296. 
records, in the New York archives, 
5.2n. 

Napier, Capt. , at Quebec, i. 488, 

490; number of men on his vessel, 
I. 488; mentioned, i. 492, 498, 497. 



Naples, 6. 205. 

Napoleon, 8. 351, 493; 9. 164. 
Naquamke falls, 4. 112, 113. 
Naragove, 5. WQn. 
N'Arambeck'r, 8. 331. 
Narragansett bay, a boundary of 
Bashabas' territory, 7. 99. 
county, situation of, 2. 134. 
county, R. I., 5. lix. 
Indians, fled to Maine, i. 218; broke 
the treaty with the United Colo- 
nics, 2. 131-132; their fort de- 
scribed, 2. 132; attacked and cap- 
tured, 2. 132-133; sent a bundle of 
arrows to the Pilgrims, 8. 279; 
mentioned, 6. 212. 
townships, granted those who were 
engaged in the Narragansett war, 
2. 134-136; meeting of the grant- 
ees, 4. 242n; the History of, by 
Charles Coffin, 2. 131-150. 
Township Number One, the as- 
signes, 2. 138; 4. 242w; the pro- 
prietors met at Newbury falls, 2. 
138; called tiieir township Bux- 
ton, 2. 138; 4. 242, 243, 275n; a 
settlement commenced, 2. 138- 
139; early residents, 2. 139; topo- 
graphical description of, 2. 140; 
incorporated, 2. 141; 4. 245; the 
ministers of, 2. 141, 142; pat- 
riots, 2. 143; part of annexed to 
Standish, 2. 143; mentioned, 4. 
267, 273, 339, 393, 394; see Bux- 
ton. 
Township Number Two, 2. 143-144; 
the native towns of the grantees, 
2. 144; now Westminster. 
Township Number Three, the grant- 
ees, 2. 144; incorporated as Am- 
herst, 2. 144; called Soughegan 
West, 2. 144, 
Township Number Four, the grant- 
ees, 2. 145; its situation not pre- 
cisely known, 2. 145. 
Township Number Five, grantees, 
2. 145; called Soughegan West, 2. 
145; now Merrimac and Bedford, 
2. 145. 
Township Number Six, situation of, 
2. 145-146; grantees, 2. 146; now 
Templeton, 2. 146. 
Township Number Seven, surveyed, 
2. 146; boundaries of, 2. 146; 
grantees, 2. 146; incorporated as 
Gorham, 2. 146; see Gorham. 
war, 2. 135/1, 141, 144. 
Narraguagus river, 4. 107. 
Narrakamegock, 4. 250. 
Narrows, the, 2. 31. 
Narsborough, Sir John, 9. 19, 21. 
Nash, Jonathan, 2. 121. 
Robert, slandered the general court, 
1. 382 ; the shooting affair at Strat- 
ton's island, i. 882-384; lived in 
Boston, I. 383, 884; sold powder 
and rum, i. 383, 384. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



195 



, discovered the head of the 

Saco river, 9. 217, 218. 

Naskeag, 4. 107- 
pond, 4. 108; 7. 86. 

Nasket, 4. 108. 

Nason, Benjamin, signed the petition 
to Charles 11, i. 401. 
John, signed the petition to Charles 

II, I. 401, 402. 
John, of Buxton, 4. 244, 245. 
Reuben, preceptor of Uorham 
Academy, 8. KiS; born in Dover, 
8. 169; graduated from college, 8. 
169; an able teacher, 8. 169. 
Richard, elected military officer of 
Kittery, i. :M); signed the peti- 
tion to Charles 11, i. 401. 
Robert, 9. 346. 

Nason's mills, 2. 116, 163, 164. 

Nat, an Indian, 4. 290, 291. 

Natanis, last of the Norridgewocks, i. 
506; supposed to be a spy, i. 506; 
attempted capture of, 1.506-507; 
proved to be friendly, I..507; es- 
caped from the battle at Quebec, 
I. 524; mentioned, i. 515. 

Nathaniel, alias Baquabaret, 3. 412, 
414. 

Natick, derivation of the word, 4. 191. 

National Assembly of France, 6. 88. 

Natives shown in France, 5. 178; see 
Indians. 

Nattoonas, i. 425. 

NatuUack, 9. 213. 

Naudawissees, the, 6. 276. 

Naumkeag, now Salem, 1. 41, 68n; 
derivation and definition of, 4. 
190. 

Naunaun, 4. 135. 

Naunautooghijan, 4. 123, 128. 

Naunautookeau, 4. 140. 

Naunton, Sir Robert, 2. 33. 

Naurantsonak, 4. 107. 

-Nauseag, 2. 207. 

Nautican, 2. 31,* 70, 261. 

Navarre, 6. 117. 

Navarrete, M S., did much to rescue 
historical materials from loss, 2. 
7a-8a. 

Navy island, 9. 110. 

Neale, Daniel, his History of New 
England cited, 5. 182^, 199n, 282n. 
Francis, his wife a daughter of Mrs. 
Macworth, i. 70n, 128; lived in 
Falmouth, i. 105, 114, 197, 215; 
signed the submission to Mass., 
I. 101, 386; a commissioner, i. 
106, 159, 165, 166, 175, 197, 200n, 
388; 3. 23; received a tract of land 
from Mrs. Macworth, i. 128; site 
of his house, i. 128; moved to 
Salem, i. 128, 200n, 217; 3. 127n; 
died in Salem, i. 128n; his chil- 
dren, I. 128n, 200n; purchased 
land of the Indians, i. 129; sold 
the same to Phippen, 1. 129, 200n; 
consented to the agreement be- 



tween Jordan and Tucker, 1. 131; 
a witness against Cleeves, 1. 132; 
petitioned to the general court, i. 
144; deputy for Falmouth, i. 164; 
joined in the opposition to Mass., 

I. 170; presented for breach of 
of oath, I. 171; signed the peti- 
tion to the king, i. 180; attorney 
for Falmouth, i. 185; surety for 
Aligail Williams, i. 190; an asso- 
ciate, I. 197, 200; various accusa- 
tions against, i. 200; a leading 
man in Falmouth, i. 200; received 
land from Nathaniel Wharff, i. 
208; did not return to Falmouth, 
after the war. i. 250; contented 
in Salem, i. 250; sold his farm to 
Joseph Holmes, i. 250;i; his house 
burned, 3. 127; his deposition in 
in full, 3. 330-331. 

Francis jr., son of Francis, i. 200/i; 

a legatee of Jonas Bailie, i. 200n; 

died, I. 12Sn. 
John, his History of the Puritans 

cited, 6. 24. 
John signed the petition to Charles 

II, I. 402. 

Samuel, son of Francis, i. 128n, 
200)^; a legatee of Jonas Bailie, i. 
200n. 
Capt. Walter, his petition to the 
king, I. .53n; his labors in New 
England, i. 53n; his autograph, i. 
53; 5. 214; assisted Winter in 
ejecting Cleeves, i. 60; gave Cam- 
mock possession of his grant, i. 
47; 3- J 2, 13, 229; formerly set- 
tled Bradshaw, i. .53, 55, 533, 534; 
arrived in America, i.53ii; 2.68n; 
governor of Piscataqua, i. 53n, 
534; 2. 67, 68w,; 3. 12; returned 
to England, i. 53n, 00; 2. QSn; 
said to have had no power to 
grant land to Bradshaw, i. 534; 
attempted to reach Lake Cham- 
plain, 2. 67, 68ji; the cause of his 
failure. 2. 67-68; why he did not 
visit Winthrop, 2. 68n; gaveShurt 
formal possession of Pemaquid, 5. 
214; mentioned, 9. 308. 

Neander, Johann A. W., 7. 432. 

Nearegs, Thomas Fitz, 3. 69n. 

Neashawanak, 3. 349. 

Neck cove, the, g. 150. 

Necktauaewitt, 3. 413. 

Neck, the, of Falmouth, owned by 
Peter Bowdoin, i. 276, 318; busi- 
ness transferred to, i. 279; num- 
ber of families at, i. 286; John 
Carney lived at, i. 308; Thaddeus 
Clarke lived at, i. 308, 320; Isaac 
Davis lived near, i. 309; Jacob 
Freeze owned land on, i. 310, 330; 
Timothy Lindell purchased land 
on, I. 311 ; James Mariner owned 
land on, i. 313, 321; John 3kill- 
ings owned land on, i. 315; Capt. 



196 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Keck, the, of Falmouth — continued, 

Edward Tyng owned land on, i. 

315-316, 322; George Bramhall 

lived on, i. 319; Stephen Bonti- 

neau lived on, i. 319; home of 

Richard Broadridge, i. 319; Sil- 

vanus Davis lived on, i*. 320; 

home of George Burroughs, i. 

320; home of Thomas Cloice, i. 

320; home of Henry Harwood, i. 

320; John Jones lived on, i. 821; 

home of Robert Lawrence, i. 321; 

Peter Morrell lived at, i. 321; 

Robert Morrell lived at, i. 321 ; 

Francis Nichols lived at, i. 321; 

home of Francis Jefferies, i. 321; 

home of Joseph Hodgedon, i. 321 ; 

home of John Nicholson, i.322; 

home of Jonathan Orris, i. 322; 

home of John PaJmer, i. 322; 

home of William Pearce, i. 322; 

home of Richard Seacomb, i. 322; 

slaves held on, 7. 188, 249; men- 
tioned, 3. 140, 221; 4. 145^1 ; 6. 189n. 
the, of Sheepscot, 4. 211, 218, 224. 
Necodehaut, 2. 235. 
Neddock, definition of, 4. 107, 191. 
Needham, , granted land at Wells, 

1.340-341, 352; his name not on 

the records, i. 355. 
Mass , 2. 145. 
Neemoon, 4. 155, 163. 
ISTef, L'Isle de, named by Champlain, 

7. 263; now Monhegan, 7. 263. 
Negaasqua, deed to the Algers, 3. 27- 

28. 
ISTegas, 4. 108; 7. 61. 
Negroes, a kind of fish, 3. 92. 
Neguascag, see Neguasset. 
Neguaseag, home of Robinhood, 2. 

233w. 
Neguasset, 2. 190, 202, 207, 233n. 

falls, 2. 191. 
Negunquit, John Wadleigh owned 

land at, i. 357. 
Ne-heth-aw-a, the, lived at Hudson's 

bay, 6. 270; same as the Ochipa- 

was, 6. 270. 
Neibuhr, Barthold, George, 4. 90. 
Nekekowannock, definition and deri- 
vation of, 4. 190. 
Nele, Afete, 5. 88. 
Nelson family, 6. 21. 
Lord Horatio, 7. 404. 
John, sent wine to Pentagoet, 7. 

50; complained of Palmer and 

West, 7. 51 ; a prisoner in Quebec, 

7. 61; 8. 192n; sent a letter to 
Boston, 7. 61, 62; imprisoned in 
France, 7. 62; absent from home 
eleven years, 7, 62; 8. 192n; a Bos- 
ton merchant. 8. 189, 192n; a 
nephew of Sir Thomas Temple, 

8. 192n; an enemy of Andross, 8, 
192n; married a daughter of Sir 
John Temple, 6. 16; mentioned, 
5. 80; 7- 69. 



Mehitable, married Robert Temple, 

6. 16. 
Watkins & Co., sent a cargo to St. 
Castine, 8. 188, 189; cargo seized, 
8. 190; cargo released, 8. 191; 
John Nelson a member of the 
firm, 8. 192^. 

Nemmadgeen, 3. 412, 426, 427. 

Nepress, Lake, i. 508, 513. 

Neptonb^vett, 7. 8, 18. 

Neptune, Indian chief, 7. 8, 14, 18, 20, 
21, 22. 
John, 7. 105. 

Nequamkeag, 4. 107. 

Nequamkee river, 8. 207ti. 

Nequamkike, 4. 107; definition of, 4. 
.190; 8. 204/1 ; boundary of the 
Plymouth company, 8. 341. 
falls, 8. 204; now Taconic falls, 8. 
204n; mentioned, 2. 275; 8. 241. 

Nequasset, 4. 107, 252. 

Nesaqumbuit, 4. 155, 163. 

Nesket, 7, 86. 

Nesraith, James, 4. 324, 

Nessawakamighe, deliniton of, 6. 213; 
the village of, 6. 213. 

Netherland coinage, 6. 123n. 

Netherlands, the, 6. 96m; 7. 151. 

the king of the, 8. 45, 46, 49, 50; see 
Dutch king, the. 

Neutral island, formerly St. Croix, 6. 
175}^; a chapel erected on, 6. 175n; 
settled by Huguenots, 6. 175n; 
formerly Holy Cross. 7. 251; held 
by Capt. Plastiner, 7. 314; men- 
tioned, 6. 174n; 8. 317. 

Neutrals, the French, distribution of, 
3. 176w; 6. 339-343. 

Nevada, 9. 246. 

Neven, , 8. 329. 

Nevins, , his daughter the first 

child born in Bakers town, 2, 111. 

Newagen, early settled, 2. 86n; de- 
•scribed, 2. 86n. 

New Amsterdam, 7. 150. 
Bedford, 4. 25, 364. 
Boston, 2. 159; 8. 266; now Gray, 8. 

266. 
Brunswick, part of granted to Sir 
William Alexander, 7, 27 ; violated 
the treaty with the United States, 
8. 6«, 65-66, 73; mentioned, i. 79, 
410; 2. 20a; 4. 190; 6. 210, 236, 
273, 335, 362; 8. 7, 14, 15, 19, 26, 
29, 37, 38, 39, 40, 44, 45, 51, 52, 56, 
66, 69, 75, 78, 79, 81, 84, 85, 89, 
102, 103, 106, 317, 459; 9. 101. 

Newburgh, owned by Gen. Knox, 9. 
232. 

Newbury, home of Richard Dummer, 
1. 4571 ; home of John and Nathan- 
iel Danford, i. 323; people from 
settled in Limerick, i. 327; the 
churches of met in council at 
Wells, I. 348; Edward Greei^ieaf 
died in, i. 35 2n; Arnold's sick 
soldiers to be sent to, i, 469; Tris- 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



197 



tram Cofi&n erected a house in, 4. 
240; home of the Coffins, 4. 241; 
the Kev. Paul Coffin invited to 
preach in, 4. 250; mentioned, i. 
64n, 468; 2. 138; 3. 161, 180n, 219, 
220, 221, 314)1; 4. 235, 239/i, 240, 
242, 252, 261, 265, 267, 273, 298, 
299, 304, 331, 347, 351, 372, 397; 5. 
xxxii; 6. 58n, 383, 386, 406; 8. 481; 
9. 25; the History of, see Coffin. 

Academy, 4. 373. 

falls, 2. 138; 4. 242^. 

street, Bangor, 7. 6. 

William, gave the name to New- 
bury's point, 3. 142; a hunter, 3. 
142; biographical notice of, 3. 
220; mentioned, 3. 166. 
Kev^bury's point, named for William 
Newbury, 3. 142; called Pine 
point, 3. 220. 
Newburyport, the Eev. Jonathan 
Greenleaf born in, i. 351; James 
McCormic sent to, i. 467; Arnold 
at, I. 495, 502; an armed ship 
built at, 2. 247 ; Theophilus Brad- 
bury moved to, 5. 443n; Presby- 
terian church established at, 6. 
31-32; th-e Rev. John Murray at, 
6. 161, 163, 164-166; mentioned, 
I. 264, 501; 2. 250; 3- '^15; 4. 289n, 
298, 313; 5. 230, 418, 423; 6. 33, 
34, 153, 163, 165, 355, 362, 406; 7. 
227, 235, 368; 9. 142^^, 178, 181, 
182; the History of, see Smith, 
Mrs. E. Yale. 
New Casco, home of James Andrews, i. 
319; of Elisha Andrews, 1.319; of 
Ebenezer Davenport, i. 320; of 
Thomas Felt, i. 320; of Joseph 
Holmes, i.321; of Samuel Pike, 

1. 322; of William Rogers, i. 322; 
of John and Lewis Tucker, i. 322; 
of Nathaniel Wharff, i. 323; a boy 
taken prisoner at, 4. 155; slaves 
held at, 7. 214; mentioned, 4.332. 

Castle, formerly Great island, i. 
214; 6.189; Robert Jordan moved 
to, I. 214; 6. 189; Sarah Jordan 
resided at, i. 234n; home of Rob- 
ert Jordan jr., i. 235«; the fort 
at dismantled, i. 291 ; home of 
Lewis Tucker jr., i. 315; called 
Dartmouth, 2. 232; 4. 221; incor- 
porated, 2. 232; the Indian name 
of, 2. 232; land at granted to John 
Mason, 2. 232; the people of to 
relinquish their rights to the state, 

2. 292; home of James Robinson, 

3. 20^, 80; the Dutch attempted 
to settle near, 4. 218; so named 
by the commissioners, 4. 222 ; or- 
igin of the name, 4. 222; Stephen 
Calef claimed land in, 4. 230 ; the 
Rev. Alexander Boyd preached in, 
6. 33; the Rev. Robert Dunlap 
preached in, 7. 367; mentioned, 2. 
229, 234, 237; 3- 349; 4. 211, 331; 



5. xxi, 242; 6. 74, 156; 7. 186; 8. 
166, 167, 180, 295, 299, 301; 9- 160; 
see New Dartmouth. 

Castle, county of, 8. 320. 

Castle, Duke of, 6. 331, 327; 8. 308. 

Chester, 4. 295, 296. 
Newcomb, Joshua, 4. 373-374. 
New Damerille cove, i. 202; 2. 172. 

Dartmouth, a survey to be made at, 
I. 279; 5. 106; called New Castle, 2. 
232; 4. 221; 7. 57; petition of the 
people of, 5. 95-100; 7. 157; 
granted to settlers by Josslyn, 5. 
95, 96; boundaries of, 5. 95-96; 
desired a patent from Dongan, 5. 
97; disturbed by other claimants, 
5. 97-99; objected to Capt. Man- 
ning, 5. 99; desired a name for 
their town, 5. 99-100; Goddard in 
command of the fort in, 5. 106; 
Brockholes seized as a traitor in, 
5. 394; nearly destroyed, 5. 394, 
395; Indians at, 7.57; named, 8. 
186; mentioned, 2. 235, 236; 4. 
225, 231; 5. 58, 86, 87, 94; 8. 188. 

Durham, i. 328; 4. 304; 7.222. 
Newell, Samuel, 3. 332. 

Walter, i. 394. 
New England, characteristics of the 
early settlers of, i. 9; 9. 171-172 
so named by Capt. John Smith, i 
31; 2. 35a; 5. 162, 337; 7. 135 
Smith's proposed second voyage 
to, I. 31; 2. 36a; a strong impulse 
given to the colonization of, i. 33; 
the first permanent settlement in, 
I. 33; Long Island ordered to find 
four men to attend the governor 
of, 1 . 34 ; Capt. Robert Gorges gov- 
ernor of, I. S4n, 109; 6. 180; an 
increased intercourse with, i. 35; 
a proclamation to prevent abuses 
in, I. 35; lands in granted to Pur- 
chase and Way, i. 40n; Levett ob- 
tained a grant in, i. 42n; 2. 49a; 
Bonighton, Lewis and Vines went 
to, I. 44; Capt. Neale's labors in, 
I. 53w; Sir Ferdinando Gorges 
appointed governor of, i. 83; 2. 
53a ; the Lord Protector asked to 
assist Rigby in the settlement of, 
I. 97; Gorges interested in the 
colonization of, i. 109; 2. 65a; 
strictness and laxity in, i. 158; 
Joseph Dudley president of, i. 
273; Androsrf governor of, i. 274; 
5. 264-265; 7. 53; population of, 
in 1689, I. 286w; John Wheel- 
wright returned to, i. 344?i; Col. 
Thomas Temple a friend of, i. 
398; Samuel Maverick, a com- 
missioner of, I. 398; a letter on 
the affairs of, i. 398-399; com- 
missioners sent to, I. 399; 2. 63a; 
Abenakis expedition against, i. 
434; the governor of treated with 
the Indians, i. 434; the boundary 



198 



MAmE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



New England — continued. 

of moved by the conquest of 
Acadia, i. 435; the Indians in- 
flamed against, i. 435-486; pro- 
tected by Fort Halifax, i. 460; 
Gorges' grants in, i. 533; 2.51a; 
De Laet's map of, 2. 17a; a refuge 
for malefactors, 2. 26a ; John Smith 
wrote a description of, 2. 35a, 39a; 
unsuccessful attempt to give Eng- 
lish names to the territory of, 2. 
35a; failure of the second attempt 
to settle, 2. 39a; the influence of 
Massachusetts in, 2. 42aw; West 
appointed admiral of, 2. 43a; the 
Plymouth council attended to the 
affairs of, 2. 45a; Morrell's Latin 
poem on, 2. 46a; the geographical 
features of, but little understood, 
2. 51a; the charters of occasioned 
perplexity, 2. 51a-52a; the suc- 
cess of Massachusetts Bay and 
Plymouth colonies drew the at- 
tention of the people to, 2. 53a; 
a general government proposed 
for, 2. 53a; the reason why no 
government was established, 2. 
54a ; probability of Gorges going 
to, 2. 54a-55a; Gorges encouraged 
the settlement of, 2. 55a; the mind 
of Gorges temporarily turned 
against, 2. 57a; he exonerates the 
people from fanaticism, 2. 57a; 
Gorges accused of supporting dis- 
sent, 2. 58a; refugees from Hol- 
land in, 2. 41 ; the price of oxen 
in, 2. 50/1 ; conditions required of 
people going to, 2. 53; benefits 
derived from the colonization of, 

2. 61; defended, 2. 94; large fish- 
ing in, 2. 99^, 103, 104; 3. 9; 5. 
155; situation of the natives in, 2. 
167-168; the Pequods the most 
warlike tribe in, 2. 169; Cammock 
arrived in, 3. 12; Henry Jocelyn 
arrived in, 3. 34; settlements in 
named for places in England, 3. 
47-48; the first of the Libbys in, 

3. 68; Jocelyn' s valuable book 
ui)on, 3. 85; excited over the sur- 
render of Canada, 3. 177; propor- 
tion of deaths in, 4. 17; Hallow- 
ell to furnish liquors for, 4. 46; 
colonized by a people, 5. 148; 
Pemaquid to be attached to, 5. 
130; 7. 159; the origin of the 
principles of the United States, 7. 
149; various names given to the 
coast of, 5, 155, 155 ji, ]56n; length 
of the coast of, 5. ioQn; the first 
of her illustrious dead, 5. 158; 
the history of, early tinctured 
with Puritanism, 5. 160; the name 
of proposed by Cabot, 5. 162n; 
the coast of divided into three 
portions, 5. 169; the patentees, 5. 
169; land in purchased by Jen- 



nens and Sheffield, 5. 170; the first 
written conveyance of real estate 
in, 5. 171; the first mention of 
goats in the annals of, 5. 172/^; 
the coast of, given to DuMonts, 
5. 177; early settlements on the 
coast of, 5. 183; uncertain that 
John Pierce ever was in, 5. 184; 
John Brown's purchase of Pema- 
quid a memorable event in the 
annals of, 5. 186; John Brown 
sent over by Pierce and Jennens, 
5. 191 ; the first hostile fleet fitted 
out from, 5. 205; the first fiag of 
piracy on the coast of, 5. 205; 
alarmed by the cession of Acadia 
to France, 5. 215; would not have 
been what she is except for Laud, 
5. 217; an enemy to Episcopacy, 
5. 217; the political toast of, 5. 
217; ships prohibited from sailing 
to, 5. 222; number of people and 
ships that came in 1639, 5. 223; 
council orders relating to, 5. 223n; 
liberty a spontaneous growth in, 
5-228; enjoyed the friendship of 
the home government, 5. 231; 
Massachusetts engrossed the trade 
of, 5. 232, 232n; fears of her break- 
ing from English rule, 5. 245-247; 
Indian hostilities began in, 5. 250; 
ruled by Louis xiv, 5. 266; the 
soldiers of under Papist ofiicers, 
5. 269, 276 ; to be under the French, 
5. 273; her population thinned by 
her defensive policy, 5. 281; re- 
solved on war with the French, 5. 
281 ; her condition brought to the 
notice of the Lords of Trade, 5. 
296 ; naval stores sent to England, 
5. 298n; the grants of the Ply- 
mouth Company the basis of the 
settlements in, 5. 388; the most 
beautiful coast visited by early 
explorers, 5. 344, 345 ; colonization 
might have changed it Popham's 
colony had settled elsewhere, 5, 
352; the Scotch-Irish tried to set- 
tle in, 6. 10; not liked by the 
Scotch-Irish, 6.23; Congregation- 
alism fastened on, 6. 29; the Pres- 
byterians of merged into other 
sects, 6. 30, 31 ; Maine the strong- 
hold of Presbyterians in, 6. 32; 
the first Presbytery formed in, 6. 
36; the coast of early visited, 6. 
173, 174; service of the English 
church held in, 6. 175, 175n; the 
first established worship in, 6. 
176n; the first act of religious 
homage in, 6. 177; the Puritans 
not the common fathers of all, 6. 
179; the first established Episco- 
pal church in, 6. 180; base ambi- 
tion ruling in, 6. 187; only five 
nations of Indians in, 6. 211; the 
first squatters in, 7. 26; claimed 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



19^ 



by right of possession, 7. 26, 27; 
Popham's colony the first occu- 
pants of, 7. 27; hated James 11, 7. 
53, 54; Indignant at the depreda- 
tions of Andros in Maine, 7. 56, 
56n, 57n; first attempt to settle 
by right of possession, 7. 129; the 
consolidation of her colonies due 
to Maverick, 7. 150; to be consoh- 
dated under one government, 7. 
158; 8. 191; Andros appointed 
governor of, 7. 158; 8. 191; Pema- 
quid to be attached to, 7. 159; 
hated Andros, 7. 159; thre% early 
acts of man-stealing in, 7. 210; 
Boston the metropolis of, 7. 213; 
the first Freewill Baptists in, 7. 
222; first called New France, 7. 
247; movements made for the 
actual possession of, 7. 294; the 
discovery of Pemaquid an initial 
period of the history of, 7. 294; 
the first religious service in the 
English tongue on the main land, 

7. 302 ; soil of set apart for Eng- 
lish homes by civil and religious 
laws, 7. 302 ; JPemaquid one of the 
ten colonies of, 7. 308, 309 ; brought 
out of obscurity, 7. 309?^, 310; 
English principles first took root 
in, 7. 312; the St. Lawrence her 
northern boundary, 8. 23; Louis- 
burgh obnoxious to, 8. 116; re- 
ceived but little aid for the expe- 
dition to Louisburg, 8. 119; wheat 
scarce in, 8. 122, 123; alarmed by 
the sailing of the French fleet, 8. 
125; the charter from the Council 
the authority for all land titles in, 

8. 200; the last of the old forts 
in, 8. 289 ; dislike of Koman Catho- 
lics in, 8. 306; cliagriued at the 
return of territory to the French, 
8. 313; Parliament never estab- 
lished a custom-house in, 9. 46, 54; 
mentioned, i. 38n, 105, 106, 146, 
15431, 174, 176, 236, 264, 352, 385, 
400, 404, 500, 543, 552, 554; 2. 7, 8, 
29, 34, 37, 39, 42, 44, 44a, 45, 46, 66, 
67, 71, 76a, 78a, 79, 84, 98, 101, 
166, 182, 257, 258, 261, 262, 264, 
266, 267, 274; 3. 40, 76, 102, 112, 
leOn, 187, 230, 233, 248, 258, 318?i, 
319, 324, 325, 326, 328, 33:^, 333, 
336, 337, 339, 344, 348, 356, 362, 
364, 366, 373, 377, 380, 393, 395, 
396, 407, 411, 412, 416. 419, 421, 
422, 424, 445; 4. 79, 123, 145, 160, 
161, 164, 168, 218, 222, 335; 5. xxii, 
xxxvii, xbi, lii, 4, 6, 10, 23, 131, 
145, 176, 177, 183, 204, 208, 209, 
210, 216, 224, 231, 232yi, 237, 239, 
276w, 289, 303, 393, 397, 427; 6. 15, 
112, lis, 170, 172, 210, 211, 212, 213, 
214, 231, 232, 237, 238, 239, 242, 
243, 250, 257, 260, 273, 325, 326, 
327, 328, 329, 362, 367, 368, 385, 



394, 399, 427; 7. 5, 46, 53, 61, 68, 
101 Ji, 131, 133n, 139, 143, 149, 151, 
152, 155, 205, 227, 255n, 295, 304, 
310w; 7. 80, 116; 130, 144, 150, 184, 
273, 302, 303, 342, 349, 350, 361, 
372, 403, 404, 417, 479; 9. 11, 21, 
23>i, 27, 39, 46, 54, 55, 56, 65?i, 97, 
124, 130, 139, 159, 210, 225, 231, 
303, 304, 304n, 306, 311/1, 312, 3l3w, 
330, 331, 332, 332n, 338, 346, 350, 
352, 353, 356, 357, 359, 365, 368; 
Account of a Yoyage to, see Jos- 
selyn, John, and Levett, Capt. 
Christopher; Chronological His- 
tory of, see Prince, the Rev. 
Thomas; Description Concerning, 
see Gorges, Sir Ferdinando; Gen- 
eral History of, see Smith, Capt. 
John; Good News from, see Wins- 
low. 

England Council, see Plymouth 
Company. 

England Historical and Genealogical 
Kegister, the, cited, 5. 144, 199n, 
220, 223; 7. 135n, S'20n, 480, 481; 
8. 139, 207n, 402; 9. 91-92, 297n, 
314>i, 319n; mentioned, 5. 148n; 7. 
484; 8.386, 403, 405. 

England trials, cited, 5. 170n. 

England Weekly Journal, cited, 9. 3. 

England's Jonah Cast Up, the, cited, 
7. 140n. 

England's Memorial, see Morton, 
Thomas. 

England's Vindication, see Gardiner, 
Henry. 

English Canaan,see Morton, Thomas. 
Newfield, granite from, 1.325; home 
of the Rev. John Adams, i. 327; 
Freewill Baptists in, i. 328; men- 
tioned, 9. 238, 240. 
New Foundland, settled by the Eng- 
lish,!. 33; called Baccalloas, 2. 16a; 
Sir Humphrey Gilbert undertook 
a voyage to, 2. 19a; Capt. John 
Mason governor of, 2. 47, 48; dis- 
covered, 5. 148; 7. 26; the Aid- 
worths interested in the coloniza- 
tion of, 5. 149; compared to Pem- 
aquid bay, 5. 153; 7. 319, 320; 
early fishing at, 6. 173; called 
Prima Yista, 7. ^6; surrendered 
to the English, 7-83; a field of 
Indian wars, 7-339; mentioned, i. 
481, 517; 2. 29, 30, 36a; 3. 295, 
428; 5. 135; 6. 210, 216; 7. 134^, 
334; 8. 228n; 9-348. 

Foundland bank fishery, 8. 296. 

France, on DeLaet's map, 2. 17a; 
the Indian name of, 4. Ill; colo- 
nized by the government, 5. 148; 
Quebec the metropolis of, 5. 178; 
condition and population of, 1687, 
5.295-296; Jesuits scattered over, 
7. 58 ; named before New England, 
7. 247; the disputed ownership of, 
9. 102; the basis 9! thp clainoig, 9.. 



200 



MAINE HISTOKICAL SOCIETY. 



New France — continued. 

102; passed under the jurisdic- 
tion of France, 9. 110; mentioned, 
I. 413; 2. 17a, 20a; 3. 99; 6. 175n, 
208, 210, 212, 239; 7. 48, 58, 79, 92, 
249, 264, 266; 8. 350, 351; 9. 102. 

Newgate, g. 331. 

Newgeawanocke, in need of a minis- 
ter, I. 397. 

New Gloucester, Thomas Wharff died 
at, 1. 128n; Moses Greenleaf moved 
to, 1.352; home of Sarah Johnson, 

1. S52n; the territory granted to 
the people of Cape Ann and Glou- 
cester, 2. 151 ; terms of the grant, 

2. 152; first attempt to settle, 2. 
152; bounties offered to settlers, 2. 
152; fort built, 2. 152; the first 
settlers, 2. 153; incorporated, 2. 
154; population of, 2. 154, 181; 
first Indian corn raised in, 2. 155; 
the animals and soil of, 2. 156; 
vegetation of, 2. 156-157; relig- 
ious societies of, 2. 158; trouble 
with the Pejepscot claims, 2. 159; 
boundaries settled, 2. 159; lands 
regularly laid out, 2. 161-162; the 
most easterly settlement in 1760, 

4. 75; the Rev. Paul Coffin in, 4. 
355 ; a rich town, 4. 355-356 ; Free- 
will Baptist church in, 7. 222; 
common schools in, 8. 158; men- 
tioned, 2. 113, 115, 119, 122, 125, 
180; 4.378, 403; 5. xxxiv, xli; 7. 
220 ; an account of, by Isaac Par- 
sons, 2. 151-164. 

Hampshire, first settlement in, i. 
35, 36; 2. 48an, 52a, 19n; granted 
to Mass., I. 83; 2. 61a; the lakes 
of a roadway for Indians, i. 333; 
solicited the town to appoint a 
commission to settle the difficul- 
ties with Mass., i. 173; Massachu- 
setts' jurisdiction over annulled, 
1. 238 ; settled by men from Mass., 
2. 61a, 61a?i; willing to be under 
the jurisdiction of Mass., 2. 61a; 
7. 152; named by Capt. John Ma- 
son, 3. 31 ; sent soldiers to Louis- 
burgh, 3.219; shielded from grasp- 
ing Mass., 4. 70 ; people from set- 
tle in Maine, 4. 80, S'S, 84; letter to 
the council of from Gov. Dongan, 

5. 93-94; home of John Brown, 5. 
191; frequented by Frenchmen, 5. 
191n; Scotch-Irish settle in, 6. 12; 
Quakers driven from, 7. 220; sep- 
arated from Mass., 8. 295; John 
Cutt governor of, 8. 295; owned 
part of the Isle of Shoals, 9. 3l5?i; 
mentioned, i. 100, 154, 155, 241, 
315, 328, 340, 500, 501, 2. Ill, 114, 
145, 148, 188, 292; 3. 80, 162, 166, 
178, 179, 211, 217, 219, 315n, 321, 
324, 348, 362, 380, 382, 410, 412, 
416, 419, 421, 435, 442; 4. 75, 150, 
161, 163, 165, 166, 187, 189, 27Sw, 



280n, 281n, 283n, 289n, 233, 
313, 320, 321, 842; 5. xxiii, xxxiv, 
xxxvii, xli, xlviii, li, Ivn, Iviii, 93, 
274, 313; 6, 13, 32, 35, 36, 37, 57, 
58>2, 68, 79, 165, 109, 181, 182, 183, 
189, 207, 232, 235, 236, 241, 250, 
251, 256, 257, 373, 412; 6. 256; 7. 
59, 222, 227, 308/i, 419, 481; 8. 9, 
92, 11771, 119, 126, 128, 138, 160, 190, 
220, 225/1, 242, 294, 295, 296, 297, 
302, 305, 309, 310, 368, 450; 9. 181, 
182, 209, 239, 248; History of, see 
Belknap, Jeremy. 

Hampshire Historical Society, 4. 5 ; 
7. 484. 

Hampshire Provincial Papers, cited, 
9. 306m, 309n. 

Hampton Literary Institute, 9. 240. 

Harbor, John Brown at, i. S6; 2. 
50a, Sin; St. Castine at, 2. 240; 
destroyed, 4. 223, 253; petition of 
the inhabitants of, 5. 137; early 
named, 7. 133; included in Pema- 
quid, 7. 309, 322; trade founded 
at, 7. 322; mentioned, 2. 237; 5. 
20, 268, 326, 327; 7-65. 

Haven, 4. 264; 5. 253; 6. 57n, 413; 
9. 319, 367. 

Hillsboro, i. 501. 
Newichwanock, home of John Win- 
coll, I. 177; now Berwick, 2. 64a; 
definition and derivation of, 4. 
190; Quakers at, 7. 220. 

river, a boundary of the Province of 
Maine, 2. 70, 257, 258, 261; Henry 
Jocelyn settled on, 3. 35. 
Newington, 3. 209; 5. Ivn. 
New Ipswich, 4. 373. 

Ireland, American loyalists to settle 
in, 7. 201; originated in 1780, 7. 
201, 203; officers named for the 
government of, 7. 201; opposed 
by Wedderburn, 7. 201 ; territory 
to be so called, 7. 201, 202; terri- 
tory described, 7. 203-205; a rare 
book upon, 7. 205, 20(); men- 
tioned, 6. 354; Proposed Province 
of, by Joseph Williamson, 7. 199- 
206. 

Jersey, home of Capt. Ogden, 1. 
491; home of Aaron Burr, i. 497, 
500; the charter for given to the 
Duke of York, 5. 3; the Scotch- 
Irish settled in, 6. 9; Presbyterian 
churches established in, 6. 30; is- 
sued copper coinage, 136; passed 
under the English, 7. 154; fur- 
nished provisions for the expedi- 
tion to Quebec, 8. 119; mentioned, 
2. 274; 5. 6; 6. 412; 8. 152, 430; 9- 
182, 241. 

Jersey Historical Society, 4. 5 ; 5. 2n. 

Jerusalem church in Bath, 2. 228. 

Lights, the, in Providence, 4. 268. 

London, 2. 145; 7. 335, 432. 

London conference, 7. 228. 
Newman, John, signed the treaty of 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



201 



1713, 6. 256; his autograph, 6. 256. 
the Kev. John Henry, 8. 492. 
Matthew, 5. 192. 
the Rev. Samuel P., 8. i50. 

Capt. , his sloop captured, 3. 

345, 346. 

Prof. , 5. xlix. 

New Marblehead, 2. 159; 3. 171n. 
Newmarch, John, signed the petition 
of 1713, 6. 255; his autograph, 6. 
255. 
the Kev. John, settled in Kittery, 5. 
liv. 
Newmarket, 4. 265, 267; 6. 32. 
New Meadows, 2. 277; 3. 208. 

Meadows river, 2. 218, 220, 283; 3. 

315; 8. 226n, 238. 
Mexico, 9. 245, 246. 
Milford, 6. 56. 

Netherlands, on DeLaet's map, 2. 
17a; the troubles with the trade 
at, the cause of war, 7. 140; the 
reduction of, 7. 148; theory of the 
government of, 7. 150-151; Eng- 
lish laws easily engrafted on, 7. 
151; mentioned, 2. 76a; 7. 143; 8. 
184; 9.349. 
Orleans, 3. 267; 4. 10; 8. 223. 
Plymouth, settled, 5. 183; absorbed 
by Mass., 7. 152; the patent sent 
to, 9. 118, 121, 366; Peirce unsuc- 
cessful in sending supplies to, 9. 
121 ; the Anne sent to, 9. 121 ; had 
the custody of the patent, 9. 121- 
122; the patent lost arid found, 9. 
122; mentioned, 7. 25, 26, 195; 9. 
123, 124, 319; see Plymouth col- 
ony and Plymouth, Mass. 
Newport, i. 189n, 314; 2. 145; 3-204; 
4.269, 270; 5. Ixi, 355; 7. 405. 
Capt. Christopher, to transport a 
colony to Chesepeake bay, 3. 290; 
arrived at Jamestown, 5. 334. 
Mercury, the, 5. Ixi. 
mountain, 7. 63?i. 

the, arrived in New England, 5. 289; 
to lay off the River St. John, 5. 
289; surrendered to the French, 
2.240; 5. 134, 289, 289n, 290n, 7. 
63, 9. 43 ; pressed into the French 
service, 5. 290; 9. 43. 
New Portland, 4, 397. 
Newry, 6. 6. 

New Salisbury, 4. 296, 297, 307, 313, 
332. 
Scotland, 2. 48; 5. 6; 8. 184; 9. 103, 

105 ; see Nova Scotia. 
Sharon, incorporated, 4. 40; Paul 
Coffin in, 4. 306-307; Methotiists 
in, 4. 307; mentioned, 7. 277. 
News Letter, the, cited, 2. 136. 
New Somersetshire, former name of 
Maine, i. 65, 83; 2, 52a-53a; 3. 31; 
5. xxi; to be governed by Win- 
throp and five others, i. 66; bound- 
aries of, 66 ; Capt. William Gorges 
governor of, 2. 50n, 53a; 3. 31, 36; 



part of the records preserved, a. 
53a; the name changed, 3. 31; 
government organized, 3. 36; 
commissioners of, 3. 36; men- 
tioned, I. 543; 3. 13, 14. 
Newspaper, only one taken at Black 
Point, 3. 205; read from the meet- 
ing-house steps, 3. 205. 
Newtican, 2. 258. 

Newton, a name given to a part of 
Maine, i. 69w. 
England, 3. 6\)n. 
Mass., 2. 144; 9.308n. 

Ensign, , 8. 137, 139. 

Newtown, destroyed by the French, 5. 

394,395; mentioned, 5. 106, 127. 
New View of London, cited, 9. 57n. 
Vineyard, the Rev. Paul Coffin in, 
4. 310, 311, 396; settled by people 
from Martha's Vineyard, 4. 311; 
growth of. 4. 396; mentioned, 4. 
333, 336, 342, 343, 365, 397. 
York city, the Rev. Jonathan Green- 
leaf moved to, i. 352n; Washing- 
ton inaugurated in, 4. 53 ; Presby- 
terians in, 6. 30; mentioned, i. 
199n, 528, 529; 2. 31n, 79a, 248; 4. 
25, 2897? ; 5. 148. 149, 175, 177,178, 
440; 6. 157, 356, 368, 379, 407; 7. 
155n,286, 424, 440 ; 8. 483, 486 ; 9. 71. 
York colonial documents, 5. 256yi, 
257, 257^1, 2.58??, 259n, 265 /i, 269n, 
272n, 2S\n; g. lUn. 
York colonial manuscripts, 5. 11, 15, 
23, 24, 29, 31, 35, 40, 48, 59, 60, 70, 
73, 81, 95, 100, 101, 102, 104, 107, 
110, 111, 113, 120, 131n, 133, 137. 
York colonial records. 5. 1, 260n. 
York, colony and province of visited 
by the commissioners, 1. 174: Col. 
Nichols governor of, i. 182^1; An- 
dros governor of, 274, 289; 5. 394; 
7. 156; Andros returned from, i. 
290; entered by the French and 
Indians, 1.297; Plymouth colony 
almost annexed to, 2. 42a; Col. 
Dongan governor of, 4. 224; given 
to the Duke of York, 5. 3, 235; 
captured by the Dutch, 5. 3, 248; 
7. 156; restored to the English, 5. 
3; 7. 156; to send a sloop to Maine, 
5. 9; Andros endeavored to entice 
the refugees of Maine to, 5. 255; 
refugees said to have gone from 
Maine to, 5. 258; representatives 
sent to from Pemaquid, 5. 263; 
dissolved from the government of 
Pemaquid, 5. 265 ; in league with 
the Iroquois, 6. 281 ; Cadillac on 
the necessity of the capture of, 6. 
287; the revenues of to be used 
as a pension to the Earl of Stir- 
ling, 7. 144; changed to English 
rule quietly, 7. 151 ; paid but little 
attention to the government of the 
east, 7. 156; Andros a good gov- 
ernor of, 7. 159; government of 



^02 



MAINE HISTOKICAL SOCIETY. 



Kew York — continued. 

arbitrary, 7. 162; true year of the 
Kevolution in, 7. 162-163; loaned 
cannon to Kew England, 8. 119; 
divided into counties, 8. 186 ; men 
tioned, 4. 225, 226, 282; 5. 6, 8, 9, 
10, 14, 15, 17, 18, 20, 22, 23, 24, 25, 
28, 32, 39. 42, 44, 45, 47. 48, 58, 59, 
66, 67, 69, 70, 73, 75, 80, 81, 82, 83, 
92, 93, 95, 108, 109, 110, 111, 113, 
114, 118, 119, 121, 124, 125, 126, 
129, 131, 131n, 134, 135, 137, 231, 
260, 264, 326, 405, 407, 440; 6. 189, 
189n, 238, 276, 286, 288, 289; 7. 59, 
131, 140, 160, 308w; 8. 184, 186, 
190, 320. 

York council sent a sloop to bring 
settlers from Pemaquid, 7. 156, 
157 ; 8. 186 ; sent commissioners to 
Pemaquid, 8. 186. 

York Courier and Enquirer, 6. 81. 

York Daily Times, 7. 190n. 

York Historical Society, founded, 2. 
11a; members of, 2. 11a; first 
publication of, 2. llan; library of , 
2. lla-12a; 5. 387n; publications 
of cited, 2. 32, 49aw, 74; 7. 147, 
149, 150. 

York Literary and Theological Ke- 
view, 8. 486, 495, 495n, 498n. 

York Presbytery, 6. 157, 158. 

York, state of, troops at Quebec, i. 
521; the legislature had the rec- 
ords copied and published, 2. 10a; 
ship building, 4. 25, 26; the his- 
torical collections of, 5. 141 ; men- 
tioned, I. .500, 517, 529; 2. 234; 3. 
416; 4. 19, 25, 57, 60, 86, 344; 5. 
XX ; 6. 13, 31, 276; 7. 153, 154, 328, 
.^55, 487; 8. 32, 57, 80, 91, 100, 167, 
355, 416; 9. 159, 183. 

Yorkers, 6. 209. 
Niagara, 9. 185. 

expedition to, 8. 282n. 

falls, height of, 4. 282; mentioned, 
5. xlvi. 
Nicetus, 7. 343. 
Nichels, Capt. Alex., 6. 338. 
Nicholas, the, 3. 8Q. 
Nicknames given to the members of 

the Jordan family, i. 233n. 
Nicola's island, 7. 5. 
NiooUs, Mathias, sent to Pemaquid, 7. 
157. 

Col. Kichard, governor of New York, 
5-7; in the service of the Duke of 
York, 5. In; killed, 5. In; a monu- 
ment erected to his memory, 5. 
7/1 ; to take possession of the 
Duke's province; 7. 140, 140?i; 
mentiuned, 5. 246. 
Nichols, Capt. Alex., 5. 370, 370n, 374, 
379-381 ; 6. 338. 

Betsey, 4. 367. 

Dr. Charles H., 8. 356. 

Sir Edward, letters to from Edward 
Godfrey, 9. 356-359, 



Elizabeth, 4. 400. 

Francis, land granted to, i. 242, 248; 
signed the petition to Bradstreet, 
I. 283n; lived on the Neck, i. 321; 
mentioned, i. 249. 

Lieut. Francis, i. 500, 501, 528. 

Ichabod, 1. 11. 

Capt. Ichabod, 5. li; 6. 373. 

the Kev. Dr. Ichabod, third presi- 
dent of ^he Maine Historical So- 
ciety, 5. li; a son of Capt. Ichabod 
5. li; 6. 373; birth of, 5. li; 6. 373 
graduated from college, 5. li ; 6. 373 
a tutor in mathematics, 5. lii ; 6. 373 
studied theology, 5. lii; ordained^ 
4. 9; 5. lii; 6. .374; a colleague 
appointed for, 5. liii; an annuity 
for, 5. liv; degree conferred on by 
Dartmouth College, 5. Ivi; en- 
gaged in literary pursuits, 5. Ivi; 
his tastes and character, 5. Ivi- 
Ivii; married twice, 5. Ivii; vice 
president of Bowdoin College, 6. 
374; death of, 6. 356, 374, 382; 
mentioned, i. .326^; 4. 9; 5. xvii, 
Iv; 7. 408; 8.410. 

Col. Richard, commissioned to set- 
tle the dispute between Maine 
and Massachusetts, i. 173; ar- 
rived in Boston, i. 173; did not 
visit Maine, i. 182n; governor of 
New York, i. 182; mentioned, 5. 
32, 259. 

Robert, settled on the Presumpscot, 
I. 155, 1po6, 321; killed by Indians, 
1.213; 3. 104, 125; lived at Blue 
Point, 3-83. 

Robert, jr., lived at Blue Point, 3. 
83; moved to Marblehead, 3. 104. 

Susan, 4. 400. 

, of Starks, 4. 343, 344, 367, 400. 

Mrs. , of Starks, 4. 343. 

Nichols' river, 9. 133, 134, 137, 141, 148. 

rock, 7. 19. 
Nicholson, Gen. Sir Francis, com- 
manded the expedition against 
Port Royal, 7. 78; surrender to, 7. 
78, 79; mentioned, 6. 257; 8. 245n, 
279. 

John, lived at Falmouth, i. 215; 
signed the petition to Bradstreet, 
I. 283/1 ; brother-in-law of George 
Ingersoll, i. 322; lived on the 
Neck, I. 322. 

Robert, lived at Falmouth, i. 215; 
lived at Presumpscot, i. 321. 
Nickatous lake, 4. 108. 
Nickles, see Nichols. 
Nictumbouit, 4. 155, 163, 164. 
Nide, John, signed the petition to 

Massachusetts, 1672, 5. 240. 
Niger, the, i. 528. 
Nightingale, Florence, 4. 11. 

the Rev. J., his Beauties of England 
and Wales cited, 2, 77a. 

the, 5. 169. 
Nile, battle of the, 7. 404. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS, 



20a 



the Kev. Samuel, 4. 272. 

Nine Mile falls described, i. 459, 460; 
called Skowhegan, i. 459n. 

Nismes, 7. 410. 

Nitzsch, Karl Immanuel 7. 432. 

Noah, 5. 188. 

Noble, a, value of, i. 71. 
Col. Arthur, erected a fort at the 
Chops, 3. 314; 8. 123, 124; his 
daughter married William Lith- 
gow, 5. 417, 421 ; his memory neg- 
lected, 8. 109: the earliest mention 
of, 8. 109; gave a mortgage to 
James Minot, 8. 109, 110; a trader, 
8. 109, 117; the mortgage dis- 
charged, 8. 110; sold land to Mc- 
Lenichon, 8. 110; in the expedition 
against Louisburgh, 8. 110?^, 117, 
119, 122; site of his house, 8. 110, 
111,113, 114,286; an Episcopalian, 
8. 112n; birth of, 8. 114; came to 
America, 8. 114; commissioned 
lieutenant-colonel, 8. 115, 118; 
probably a tanner, 8. 117n; popu- 
lar and well known, 8. 117, 118, 
124; his men, 8. I19n; orders from 
Waldo, 8. 119, 120n, 121n; his peti- 
tion to Massachusetts, 8. 123, ^23)^; 
his garrison described, 8. 124; 
in command of the expedition 
against Deliarazy, 8. 127, 132, 135; 
his will executed, 8. 115, 127, 150; 
ship lost, 8. 128; at Annapolis, 8. 
128; started for Minas, 8. 129; at 
Grand Pre, 8. 130; at Minas, 8. 
130, 132; letter of, 8. 132, 133; im- 
practicable to go to Schegnecto, 8. 
133, 137; not to blame for lack of 
foresight, 8. 133, 134, 137; his 
quarters attacked, 8. 135, 140, 145; 
sustained his family motto, 8. 150; 
his probable age at the time of 
his death, 8. 150; items of his 
will, 8. 150; children of, 8. 150; 
value of his estate, 8. 151; his 
tragic death, 5. 421; 8. 109, 135, 
136, 138, 145, 146, 148; burial of, 
8. 147, 149; mentioned, 8. 136, 140, 
140n, 143, 145, 148, 153, 284, 285; 
Memoir of, by the Hon. William 
Gould, 8. 107-153. 
Arthur, jr., son of Col. Arthur, 8. 
150, 152; heir of Capt. James, 8. 
152; moved to Damariscotta, 8. 
152; large landholder, 8. 152; 
moved to Boston, 8. 152; death 
of, 8. 152; children of, 8. 152, 153; 
mentioned, 8. 120n. 
Edward, 8. 153. 

family, 8. 115; th*e crest of, 8. 150. 
Ensign Francis, killed, 8. 136, 140, 
140»i; burial of, 8. 147; mentioned, 
8, 146, 148, 150. 
Francis, son of Arthur jr., 8. 153. 
George, 8. 120n. 

James, executed the will of his 
brother Arthur, 8. 150; a wealthy- 



landholder, 8. 152; his heirs, 8* 
152; his will approved, 8. 152; 
died, 8. 152; mentioned, 8. 150, 

207n. 
James, of Boston, 8. 205?i, 300, 309, 

309^. 
Capt. James, son of Col. Arthur, 8. 
118; commissioned, 8. 118; died, 
8. 118, 152. 
Jane, married Thomas Capen, 8. 

152, 153; her children, 8. 153. 
Sarah, daughter of Col. Arthur, 5. 
417, 421; 8. 150, 285; married 
William Lithgow, 8. 150, 152, 153, 
285; date of her birth, 8. 285. 
Sarah, wife of Col. Arthur, 8. 151. 
the Rev. Seth, 7. 10, 13, 16. 
, 4. 315, 405. 

Nobleboro, people of ordered to re- 
linquish their rights to the state, 
2.292; ceded to Campbell, 6. 18; 
called Walpole, 6. 18; incorpo- 
rated, 8. 152; Arthur Noble a 
large landholder in, 8. 152; men- 
tioned, 4. 249n, 329; 8. 299. 

Noddles' island, John Jocelyn at, i. 
50; former home of Samuel Mav- 
erick, 1. 18271 ; 8. 145, 210; granted 
to Maverick, 7. 145n; conditions 
of the grant, 7. 145n; now East 
Boston, 7. 210; mentioned, 6. 17. 

No'gincoth, i. 358. 

Noithfield, 4. 263. 

Nol Mr. , 5- B9. 

Nolumbega, see Norumbega. 

Nonconformists, 6. 24, 285. 

Nonsuch creek, i. 278. 
farm, i. 232, 552; 3. 81, 209. 
point, I. 252, 308. 
river, 3. 81, 83>i, 142, 144, 151, 167, 

188, 213, 221. 
the, 9. 35, 53. 

Noodagaweramet, 4. 184. 

Nor, its use in the Indian language, 
8. 331. 

Norombega, the location of, i. 430n; 
2. 16a, 17a; 4. 107; 7. 98, ^^n, 99n; 
8. 319, 320, 331, 332; 9. 223; a 
name given to nearly the whole 
continent, 2. 16a, 76a; origin of 
the name, 2. 16a; 8. 331, 332; on 
De Laet's map, 2. 17a; its exist- 
ence denied by the French, 2. I7a; 
may have been Bashaba's capital, 
2. 18a; Champlain on, 4. 107; 7. 
252, 253 ; the French held posses- 
sion of territory under the name, 
5. xxi; a name given to the New 
England coast, 5. 155; supposed 
to have been Agguncia, 7. 99; sup- 
posed ruins of Arambeck, 7. 99;^; 
Champlain in charge of an expe- 
dition to, 7. 251, 252; mentioned 
by Milton, 8. 320; the first settle- 
ment of, 8. 320, 330; occupation 
of in the seventeenth century, 8. 
830; the name dropped, 8. 330, 



204 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Norombega — continued. 

331; Carigon's account of, 8. 332; 
Bangor situated in, g. 223; men- 
tioned, 4. 107; 5. 329; 6. 302; 8, 
319, 332; John E. Godfrey's ac- 
count of, 8. 315-332. 
rapids, 7. 96. 
river, 7. 253, 254, 257. 

Korangawook, 3. 357. 

Korcross, Nathaniel, 9. 318. 

Noreman, William, sold his rights in 
House island, i. 151; acknowl- 
edged his guilt of adultery, i. 
370; banished, i. 370. 

Norfolk, I. 89n, 547n. 

county, I. 100, 236; 9.361 
John, Duke of, his daughter mar- 
ried Sir Edward Gorges, i. 109. 

Norman sailors called the country 
Baccaloes, 2. 76a. 
see Noreman. 

Normandy, 7. 142n. 

Norridgewock, called Nanrantsouak, 
I. 437; 4. 95, 98, 107; 7. 5; Kale 
established at. 1.431; 8. 144; the 
situation and a description of, i. 
437; its distance from Quebec, i. 
437; the church at, i. 437, 438, 
440; 4. 348, 349; the Amalingans 
came to, i . 438 ; Montressor at, i . 
459; provisions stored at, 1.474; 
General Arnold at, 1.495; the last 
habitation of the whites in, i. 505 ; 
the Indian attacked at, 2. 196; 3. 
313n; 6. 239, 240; a force sent to, 
2. 150, 152; R^le killed at, 3. 152; 
the village laid waste, 3. 152; 
Richard Jaques wounded at, 3. 
313n; Harmon and Moulton at, 3. 
SlSn; the attack effectually sub- 
dued the Indians, 3. 313?i; the 
principal residence of the Abna 
Icis, 4. 98; date of Rule's visit to,. 
4. 98; the Rev. Paul Coffin in, 4. 
313; number of families in, 4. 313; 
the soil good, 4.348; definition of 
the word, 4. 379; the first moss- 
house at, 4. 380; monument to the 
Indians, 6. 208; poverty in, 7. 271, 
272; no fulled cloth made at, 7. 
271 ; population, 1788, 7. 271 ; pros- 
perous, 7. 273; incorporated, 7, 
288; common schools of, 8. 158; 
the Indian name of, 9. 266w; men- 
tioned I. 504, 510; 2. 168, 222, 275, 
286; 3. 357, 357n; 4* 103, 314, 321, 
337, 344, 345, 347, 369, 375, 393, 
397, 400; 5. lix, 427; 6. 234; 7. 168, 
175, 259, 285, 286, 287, 348, 377, 
405; 8. 123, 123?i, 230^233, 235. 
dialect, same as the Penobscot, i, 
414; best preserved, i. 414n, 415; 
its most remarkable property, i. 
415; a poetic vocabulary, i. 416; 
had no auxiliaries, i. 417; singu- 
larity in regard to the verb, i. 
417, 418; the verb, i. 418, 419; 



communications besides oral, i. 
420; vocabulary of, i. 420, 421; 
French pronunciation used, i. 424. 
Indians, the last of the race, i, 506; 
Bomazine the chief of, 2. 197; 5. 
284; particularly hostile to the 
whites, 2. 196 ; scattered and joined 
to the northern tribes, 2. 198; 6. 
17, 235; not at the Falmouth con- 
ference,3.383, 385, 386,387,389,390; 
the expulsion of, 4. 3 In; a branch 
of at Sandy river, 4. 31n; same 
as the Canibas, 6. 232, 234; loca- 
tion of, 6. 234; taught by Jesuits, 
6. 234; given to agriculture, 6. 
234, 235; instigated by Rasle, 6. 
235; an expedition sent against, 
6. 235; gave their consent to the 
settling of the Kennebec, 7. 168; 
opposed the building of the fort 
at Teuconic, 8. 225; signed a 
treaty with Shirley, 8. 225 ; men- 
tioned, I. 425; 2. 190; 3. 383, 397, 
399, 400, 401, 407, 410, 411, 412, 
413, 415, 416, 417, 422, 426, 427, 
445, 446; 4. 112, 145, 146, 147, 148, 
149, 150, 155, 161, 163, 164, 168, 
169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 175, 176, 
178, 179, 181, 182, 183, 184, 312; 

6. 192, 232, 250; 7. 63, 83, 175, 186; 
8. 204n, 220, 224, 225, 235, 237, 243. 

point, 4. 312, 348, 398, 400. 

river, a boundary of the Kennebec 
purchase, 2. 277. 

Statistics of, by William Allen, 7. 
288, 289. 
Norris, the Rev. William B., preached 

in Bath, 2. 228. 
North America, the coast opened to 
European enterprise, i. 25; the 
similarity and dissimilarity of the 
Indian dialects explained, i. 413n; 
Onegula, one of the highest 
mountains of, i. 452; Bashaba a 
ruler over the northern part of, 2. 
18a; early attempts to settle were 
unsuccessful, 2. 19a, 20a; an un- 
broken wilderness, 2. 20a ; Bristol 
merchants inclined to send an ex- 
pedition to, 2. 21a; Capt. Pring's 
voyage to, 2. 23a; Weymouth's 
voyage to, 2, 22a, 23a ; names -ap- 
plied to, 2. 76a; first general name 
of, 2. 76a; the Church of England 
in, 6. 174; called New France be- 
fore it was called New England, 

7, 247; mentioned, i. 404; 2, 7, 8, 
17a; 5. 282n; 6. 210, 242; 7. 129, 
227, 311; 8. 96, 125, 320; see also 
America. 

American Review cited, 5, 383n; 6. 

410. 
Northampton, 2. 145; 4. 136, 138, 262; 

5. xl, li; 6.238. 
Northamptonshire, 3. xvi. 
North Andover, 4. 297. 
Northaven islands, 5, 347. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



205 



Northboro, 4. 280n. 
North Boston, 2. 230; 9. 0, 65, 69. 
Carolina, i, 173/i; 2. 17a, 19a; 6. 67; 

9. 182. 
clmrcli, the, Boston, 9. 2, 22, 27. 
eastern boundary, 8. 347-349, 355, 
358, 364, 4.57, 478; History of, by 
the Hon. Israel Washburn, 8. 1- 
106. 
Northern bay, 6. 108. 
colony, 3. 290, 309, 383. 
Gibraltar, 4. 78. 

Yirginia Company, i. 33; see Ply- 
mouth Company. 
North family, tlie, 6. 21. 
Northfield, 4. 263, 264. 
North Hampton. N. H., 3. 315n; 6. 72x1. 
Hill, N. H., 9. 182. 

Col. John, in command at Fort 
George, 5. 370; an early civil 
magistrate, 5. 370%; a judge, 5. 
370n; death of, 5. 370r; sent with 
a force up the Kennebec river, 7. 
167, 178; to order off the French, 
8. 216; to find timber, 8. 220; men- 
tioned, 5. 373. 
Kingston. 2. 145. 
lake, 8, 15, 106. 
Land, 7. 133)2. 
Milford, 4. 3.54. 
mountain, 8. 129, 146, 149. 
Port, 4. 324, 326. 
Riding, 3. 48. 
river, 6. 211. 
street, Bath, 2. 204. 
North's History of Augusta cited, 8. 

275m, 278n. 
Northumberland, 6. 167. 
North Yirginia given to the Plymouth 
Company, i. 28; 7. 27; a colony 
sent to, 2. 27a; the grant to colo- 
nize depended on extending the 
Christian religion, 6. 176; coast of 
visited by Cabot, 7. 130; fisher- 
men in, 7. 130; mentioned, 2. 189; 
4. 68. 
Yirginia Company, a name given to 
the Plymouth Company, 5. 332n; 
formed, 5. 345; recognized only 
the Church of England, 6. 176; 
first attempt to settle, 7. 127; 
James i gave a charter to, 4. 221 ; 
j.'l29n; the grantees, 8. 129n; 
limits of, 8. 129n, 130n; see Coun- 
cil for Ruling and Governing New 
England, and Plymouth Com- 
pany. 
West territory, 6. 100. 
Wrentham, 6. 395, 396. 
Yarmouth, home of John Cousins, 
I, 85n, 99w; 3. 37; formerly West- 
custogo, I. 99x1, 151, 185n; 2. 167, 
172; home of Royal, i. 99n, 236xi; 
Nicholas White moved to, i. 151; 
home of George Felt, i. 156, 188; 
homfe of Moses Felt, 1. 156; home 
of John Mayne, i. 188; home of 



James Lane, i. 188; the settle- 
ment regulated by Gendall, i. 
231; Gendall killed at, i, 231; 3. 
83, 135; a new township, i. 241; 
Bartholomew Gedney speculated 
in lands at, i. 242 )i; to appoint a 
commissioner to try small cases, 

1. 267; GendalFs saw-mill in, i. 
269, 210n; not within the limits of 
Massachusetts, i. 270; Gedney' s 
saw-mill in, i. 210n; to send pris- 
oners to Fort Royal, i.271; land 
titles confirmed in, i. 272; troops 
sent to, I. 289; Benjamin Inger- 
soU moved to, i. 311; John York 
a trustee of, i. 318; home of John 
Holman, i. 321; home of the Rev. 
Francis Brown, i. 352^; home of 
James McCormick, i. 467; early 
town meetings in, 2. 166, 167, 173, 
177, 183; the first settlers of, 2. 
167, 171; desolated by King Phil- 
ip's war, 2. 171; incorporated, 2. 
172; the probable origin of the 
name, 2. 172; town to be laid out, 

2. 172, 173; destroyed by the sec- 
ond Indian war, 2. 174; tardy in 
resettling, 2. 174; saw-mills re- 
built, 2. 174; a committee in Bos- 
ton to have charge of the settle- 
ment, 2. 175; land apportioned to 
the settlers, 2. 175, 176, 178; meet- 
ing of the committee, 2. 175, 176; 
people not satisfied, 2. 176; names 
and character of the new settlers, 
2. 177; Gedney' s claim, 2. 179; 
granted land to Mitchell and Sea- 
bury, 2. 180; boundaries of, 2. 180; 
early and later improvements in, 
2. 181; depredations of the In- 
dians, 2. 182; in the Revolution, 
2. 183; desired to be separate from 
Massachusetts, 2. 184; meeting- 
house built, 2. 184, 185; clergy- 
men of, 2. 186-188; skirmish of 
the Indians at, 3. 135 ; 7. 57 ; French 
Neutrals sent to, 3. 176n; 6. 342; 
abandoned, 4. 73 ; now Harpswell, 
7. 221 ; friends at, 7. 221 ; home of 
J. D. Dummer, 7. 233, 234; men- 
tioned, I. 101/1, 114, 119, 150, 225n; 
2. 85n, 113, 115, 151, 160, 161, 162, 
227; 3. nin, 439; 4- 177, 332, 390; 
5. xviii, xlviii; 6. 4; 7. 220, 236, 
238, 272, 273, 277, 372; 8. 178, 180; 
History of, by Edward Russell, 2. 
165-168. 

Yarmouth Academy, chartered, 8. 
175; building built, 8. 175; pre- 
ceptors of, 8. 175. 

Yarmouth Records, i. 156n; 4. 229. 

Mr. , 1.472, 473, 502. 

Squire , of Augusta, 4. 306. 

Norton, 2. 145. 

Prof. Andrew, 7. 408. 

Mrs. Eleanor, married William 
Hooke, 2.50. 



206 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Norton — continued. 

Lieut.-Ool. Francis, his warlike 
achievements, 2. 48, 49, 50w; re- 
ceived a grant from Gorges, 2. 
48, 49; sailed from Bristol, 2. 49; 
doubt expressed of his having 
visited America, 2., 49n; date of 
his arrival, 2. 50n; attorney for 
Mrs. Mason, 2. 50*2; sold cattle in 
Boston, 2. bOn; his property at 
Saco, 2. 50n; settled at Charles- 
town, 2. 50n; a representative, 2. 
5071. 
George, married Jklary Foxwell, 3. 

21n. 
Henry, signed the petition to Crom- 
well, I. 894; a referee in the 
division of the Gorges and Mason 
grant, g. 309n; amount of land 
granted to, 9. 378; mentioned, 4. 
343; 9.375, 382. 
John, 9. SlSn 

Milford P., married Mary Eussell, 
2. 165; a judge, 2. 165; a commis- 
sioner, 8. 72. 
Capt. Walter, 2. 50; 9. 807, 309n, 
311n, SlSn, 366. 

Deacon , 4. 342, 343, 396. 

Mrs. , 4. 343. 

the Rev. , i. 397. 

Norton's Literary Letter, 7. 480. 

Norumbega, see JS'orambega. 

Norway, Maine, 2. 125; 4. 301, 337, 
338, 359, 860, 387. 

Norwegian exiles, 4. 86. 

Norwich, i. 313; 2. 145; 6. 36. 

Notch, the, discovered, 9. 217; a turn- 
pike, 9. 218; travel through, 9. 
218, 219; an Indian route, g. 219. 

Notices of the Powell family, by T. 
D.Powell, 7. 231-238. 

Nott, the Rev. Eliphalet, 8. 483, 485, 
503. 
the Rev. Samuel, 5. \vn. 

Nottingham, N. H., 4. 299. 

Nottinghamshire, 5. 246; 6. 179. 

Nourse, Dr. , married Miss Chand- 
ler, 9. 1^6. 

Nouvelle, the place from which Mon- 
tressor's expedition started, i.448. 

Nova Anglia, MorrelFs Latin poem, 
2. 46a. 
Francia, 2. 40; 8. 319; 9. 348. 
Scotia, Acadia restricted to, i. 28; 
granted to Sir William Alexander, 
1.33; 5.1, Iw; 6.336; 7.27; 9. 100; 
under the government of Massa- 
chusetts, I. 239; 8, 301; the Mic- 
macs natives of, 8. 414; first set- 
tled by the French, 2. 17a; given 
to Du Monts, 5. 177; ceded to 
France, 5. 243; the French en- 
gaged in fishing and trade on the 
coast of, 5. 325; supplied troops 
for Fort Frederick, 6. 18; Cham- 
plain at, 7. 250; the St. Lawrence 
the northern boundary of, 8. 23; 



Mascarene governor of, 8. 126; 
peopled by Acadians, 8. 126; the 
possession of obstinately con- 
tested, 8. 147; the French pre- 
pared to regain it, 8. 222; to be 
divided into baronies and par- 
ishes, 9. 100; yielded to Queen 
Anne, 9. Ill; mentioned, i. 27w, 
79, 551; 2. 65a, 114, 232, 245; 3. 
99, 179, 180, 379, 380, 382, 395, 
39T, 410, 412, 416, 419, 421, 422, 
435; 4. 96, 97, 98, 210; 5. 283n, 295, 
326, 427, 440; 6. 3n, 43, 98, 208, 
210, 212, 224, 225, 328; 7. 33, 70w, 
203, 261; 8. 6, 7, 10, 12, 13, 16, 17, 
21, 22, 25, 26, 125, 128, 135n, 138, 
143, 144, 220, 221, 223, 224, 22on, 
242, 244, 245?i, 246, 262, 264, 279, 
302, 311, 317, 319, 331; 9. 27, 35, 
101, 111, 348; see New Scotland; 
History of, see Murdock. 
Scotia archives, 8. 222n. 
Scotia expedition, soldiers in, 8. 127; 
commanded by Col. Noble, 8. 127. 
Scotia Gazette, extracts from, 7. 

121-126. 
Scotia, Memorials of the English 
and French Commission to. cited, 
1.28. 

Now and Then, by William Allen, 7. 
267-287. 

No well, Capt. Moses, to have charge 
of James McCormick, i. 467; let- 
ter to from Gen. Arnold, i. 467. 
Samuel, received a grant for Great 
Chebeag, i. 147, liSn; to inquire 
into the condition of Fort Loyal, 
I. 2Q6n. 
, 3-^'74, 375; 9. 25. 

Noyes, Belcher, 4. 113, 114; 8. 205n. 
the Rev. Jeremiah, preached in Gor- 

ham, 2. 147. 
Nicholas, 2. 115, 116. 
Oliver, one of the Pejepscot pro- 
prietors. 3. 321. 
Dr. , of Plymouth, 6. 15. 

Noyes' ferry, 4. 363. 

Nuberry, Thorn is, accused of uncivil 
carriage, i. 378; fined, i. 378. 

Nuctungas, signum of, 6. 258. 

Nudggumboit, 6. 260. 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society 
of Philadelphia, 7. 473, 484. 

Numposh, Capt. , in command of 

the Seconit Indians, i. 295. 

Nunanicut, gave a deed to George 
Munjoy, 1.553. 

Nutfleld, Scotch-Irish settled in, 6. 12; 
now Londonderry, 6. 12. 

Nutmea:s, said to grow in Maine, 5. 
352, 360. 

Nuttacke, a saw- mill at, i. 268. 

Nuwichawanick, derivation and defi- 
nition of, 4. 190; see Newichwan- 
nock. 
river, 4. 107. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



207 



Oak, abundant at Cape Elizabeth, 3. 
302,307; only fit for coffins, 7.283. 
hill, 3. 100, 162, 167. 
Oakes, Thomas, agent for Massachu- 
setts Bay Colony, 5. 276n, 277w, 
398. 
XJrian, 5. 247n. 

Oakham, the Rev. , 6. 37. 

Oakman, Elias, married Joanna Alger, 
I, 21 3)1 ; 3. 82; lived at Black 
Point, I. 209; 3. 76; his widow 
married John Mills, i. 209; site of 
his farm, 3. 76; lived at Milli- 
ken's river, 3. 82. 
Joanna, married John Mills, i. 209. 
Samuel, in the garrison at Black 
Point, I. 227n; 3. 110; submitted 
to the jurisdiction of Massachu- 
setts, I. 386; 3. 46: settled at 
Black Point, 3. 76; received a 
grant from Jocelyn, 3. 76; died, 
3. 76; father of Samuel jr., 3. 76; 
mentioned, 3. 232. 
Samuel jr., 3. 76. 
Tobias, deposition of, 3. 106n. 

Capt. , 4- '^05, 355. 

Oakman's island, 3. 76. 
Oaksman grove, 4. 355. 
Oaths, form of taken by councilors 
of Maine, i. 364; of the justices 
of peace of Cornwall, 5. 119-120. 
Oawasscoage river, boundary of the 
Indian deed to the x\lgers, 3. 27. 
Obias, Indian name of Dick Swash, 2. 

233n, 235. 
O'Brien, Dennis, 2. 245; 3. 220. 
family in the war of the Revolution, 

2. 242. 
Gideon, 2. 245; 3. 179, 180, 220. 
Jeremiah, son of Morris, 3. 179, 180, 

220. 
Capt. Jeremiali, in command of the 
Liberty, 2. 245, 246, 247; in com- 
mand at Scott's point, 2. 247; in 
command of the Hannibal, 2. 247; 
captured, 2. 248; escaped, 2. 248. 
John, son of Morris, 3. 220. 
Capt. John, his account of the 
O'Brien family, 2.242-249; lived 
at Machias, 2. 242; carried his gun 
to church, 2.244; led in the at- 
tack upon the Margaritta,, 2. 245; 
sent to Watertown, 2. 246, 247; 
on the Diligence, 2. 247; on the 
Hannibal, 2.247; in command of 
the Hibernia, 2. 248; captured the 
Gen. Pattison, 2. 248; mentioned, 
2.249; 4.351. 
Joseph, 2.245; 3. 220. 
the Rev. Michael C, his Gram- 
matical Sketch of the Ancient 
Abnakis, 9. 259-294. 
Moses, biographical notice of, 3. 
220; mentioned, 2. 243, 245, 246; 
3. 179, 180. 
William, on the Liberty, 2. 247; a 
son of Moses, 3. 220, 245. 



Obwobwannoraway, 3. 439. 
O'Callaghan, Edmund B., his Colonial 
History of New York cited, 7. 
144ii, 147/1, 155w; his New York 
Colonial Documents cited, 6. 240n, 
241n, 276; 7. 5n, 46n^ 46n, 47»i, 
48n, 49n, 56?i, 62^, 63n, 67n, 82n, 
83n, 92ri; 8. 185 xi, 187w, 189n, 
192n. 
Occum, 4. 271. 

Ocean House, the, Sullivan, 6. 126w. 
Ochipawas, 6. 270. 

Odell, , 8. 20. 

Odells, 9. 184. 

Officers in Arnold's expeditiim, i. 500, 

501n 
Ogden, Gen. Matthew, a messenger 
for Arnold, i. 488, 493, 500; to 
forward ammunition, i . 489 ; sent 
to Montreal for clothing, i. 492; 
wounded, i. 525; mentioned, i. 
515, 523. 
Ogicksando, 3. 428, 435, 4.39, 440. 
Ogilby, John, 7. 99n; 8. 331. 
Ogleby, James, in the Black Point 
garrison, i.227n; 3. 110; possibly 
a resident of Black Point, 3. 83. 
Oglethorpe, James Edward, 2. 74a; 4. 

4. 
Oguigueon, 7. 97. 

Ogunquit river, its outlet shifted, i. 
337; boundary of the grant to 
Hutchinson and Needham, i. 
340; mentioned, i. .341, 342, 343, 
344, .359, 360; 4. 108. 
Ohanumbames, 6. 261. 
Ohio, I. 501; 4. 13; 6. 100; 8. 80. 
river, i. 504, 530; 4. 80; 6. 100. 
Ohonoguaga, 4. 271. 
Ohonoguages, the, 4. 271. 
Oil-nuts, 4. 313. 
Oil-nut trees, 4. 317, 344. 
Oil sent to England, i. 57; 4. 23. 
Old Colony, the, now a part of Mass., 
2. 275. 
Fort, Augusta, 2. 282; Pentagoet, 

7. 37. 
Fort point, 5. 313. 
Oldham, John, received a grant from 
the Plymouth Company, i. 43, 79; 
2. 47; lived in Plymouth and 
Mass., I. 43; did not enter upon 
his grant, i . 44 ; killed off Block 
island, i. 44w; 2. 48n; his land 
grant conflicted with that of Mass., 
2. 47n; resided at Watertown, 2. 
48n; co-partner with Richard 
Vines, 2. 48w. 
Samuel, land granted to, 2. 284. 
Old Maddiver, nickname for Michael 
Maddiver, 3. 75. 
Orchard Beach, 7. 260. 
Pownelboro, 4. 15. 
Stuff, nickname of Dominicus Jor- 
dan, I. 233, 235n. 
South church, Boston, 3. 221w; 8. 
302; of HalloWell, 7.899. 



208 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Oldtown, 6. 205, 211, 224; 7. 6, 7, 9, 
10, lOn, 11, 12, 13, 79n, 89, 104; 
8. 363, 454. 
falls, 7. 20. 
Indians, i. 466. 

island, 7. 6, 10, 19, 22, 103, 104. 
Oleron, 7. 41, 67, 82. 
Oliphant, the Rev. David, declined 
becoming pastor at Wells, i. 349. 
Oliver, Andrew, 6. 15. 
Oapt. James, 2. 183. 
Joseph, in the Black Point garrison, 
I. 226n; 3. 110; lived at Black 
Point, 3. 86, 106; went to Capt. 
Scottow for assistance, 3. 106; at- 
tacked by Indians, 3. 106; deposi- 
tion of, 3. 106n; mentioned, 3. 
107, 126. 
Peter, his Puritan Commonwealth 

cited, 5. 177n, 299^. 
Richard, signed the petition to Mas- 
sachusetts, 5. 241; clerk of the 
county courts, 5. 249. 
Robert, signed the petition to Brad- 
street, I. 283n; lived at Falmouth, 
1.322. 
Thomas, graduated from Harvard 
College, 7. 201 ; to be the governor 
of New Ireland, 7. 201. 

Mr. , 8. 226, 227. 

, of Harvard College, 4. 268. 

Olney, the Rev. Gideon W., settled, in 

Gardiner, 7. 417. 
Omborowees, 3. 440. 
Omporowesk, 3. 412. 
One-armed Hunniwell, nickname of 

Roger Hunniwell, 3. 213. 
Onegnla, seen by Montressor, i. 452, 
453 ; one of the highest mountains 
in North America, i. 452; same 
as Bald mountain, i. 452/i; men- 
tioned, I. 456, 466; 4. 108. 
Ongueachonta, the upper part of the 
Kennebec, i. 456; mentioned, i. 
457, 458, 466. 
Ooneez, 4. 159. 
Openangas, the, same as the Penob- 

scots, 6.211, 212; 7. Win. 
Opinion of Richard West on the king's 
right to the woods of Maine, 2. 
265-268. 
Opinions of Eminent Lawyers, see 

Chalmers, George. 
Opparunwit, 2. 92. 
Orange county, 4. 33. 

the Prince of, 5. 273. 
Orangetown, 4. 339. 
Oranlsoak, the Indian name of the 

Kennebec river, 4. 103. 
Ordinaries, kept at Scarboro, 3. 78, 
79; favorite places for loafers, 
3. 142; ordered to be set up, 5, 
76. 
Oregon, 2. 274; 7. 464. 
Orient, L', 7. 335. 

Origin of Article viii, in the Constitu- 
tion of Maine, 7. 239-242. 



Original, the, i. 455, 455n, 456; 4. 108. 
Ormesby, Richard, a referee in the 
case of Cleeves, vs. Winter, i. 
74. 
Orono, an Indian sagamore, 4. 108; 7. 
8, 18. 
Maine, 8. 76, 453; 9.231. 
island, 7. 79^. 
Oronoke river, 5. 347. 
Orphan island, 7. 79, 80?i, 334. 
Orqueachanta mountains, 4. 108. 
Orr, a Scotch name, 6. 14. 
the Hon. Benjamin, corporate mem- 
ber of the Maine Historical So- 
ciety, I. 11; ancestry of, 6. oSn; 
birth of, 6. 58n; admitted to the 
bar, 6. 58n; death of, 6. 58^; mar- 
ried Elizabeth Tappan, 6. 58?i; 
graduated from college, 6. 57; 
practised at Topsham,'6. 57; per- 
sonal appearance, 6. 57, 58; mem- 
ber of Congress, 6. 58, 58^z ; moved 
to Brunswick, 6. 58; mentioned, 
4. 7; 5. XXV, xxvi, xxxix; 6. 41, 
372; 7,367; 8.410, 451. 
Daniel, came from Ireland, 6. oSn; 

father of the Hon. John, 6. 58w. 
the Hon. John, son of Daniel, 6. 58w; 
father of the Hon. Benjamin, 6. 
58n. 
Orr's island, the Indian name of, 4. 

110. 
Orrington, 7. 18, 228. 
Orris, Experience, i. 314. 
John, I. 314. 

Jonathan, a blacksmith, i. 247, 314; 
signed the petition to Bradstreet, 
I. 283«,; lived on India street, i. 
314; lived in Gloucester, i. 314; 
left no issue, i. 314; lived on the 
Neck, I. 322. 
Nathaniel, lived at Barnstable, i. 
314; heir of Jonathan, i. 314. 
Orsong, 7. 8, 14, 18, 22. 
Ortelius island, 2. 76a. 
Osborn, Capt. John, 8. 228, 261. 

T., 7. 188. 
Osgood, Abigail, daughter of James, 
4. 279w; married Gen. James W. 
Ripley, 4. 21dn. 
Ann, daughter of James, 4. 278w; 
married to Col. J. B. Osgood, 4. 
278n. 
Asa, 4. 283n. 
Benjamin, 4. 281. 
Col. Edward, 4. 265, 278/i. 
Elizabeth, daughter of Benjamin, 4. 

281. 
Elizabeth, daughter of Lieut. James, 
4. 279?i; married to Henry C. Bus- 
well, 4. 279n. 
Eliza L., 4. 280)1. 
Hannah, married Dr. Clement J. 

Adams, 4. 279n. 
Henry Young Brown, son of Col. J. 
B., 4. 2S0n; married Susan Osgood, 
4. 278n. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



209 



James, of Fryeburg, 4. 281, 283n, 
289. 

James, son of Lieut James, 4, 278n. 

James, son of Col. Joshua B., 4. 280w. 

Lieut, James, son of Samuel, mar- 
eied Abigail Adams, 4. 278ji; chil- 
dren of, 4, 278n. 

Jane, daughter of Lieut. James, 
married to Gilbert McMillan, 4. 
278n. 

Jean of Fryeburg, 4. 281. 

Col. J oshua B., date of his birth and 
death, 4. 280w; married Elizabeth 
Brown, 4. 2S0n; children of, 4. 
280n. 

Col. Joshua B., of Portland, mar- 
ried Ann Osgood, 4. 278>i-279n, 
280n, 283h- 

Mary, daughter of Lieut. James, 
married Stephen Chase, 4. 278n. 

Mary Sherburn, daughter of Col, 
Joshua B., married to the Rev. 
Samuel Osgood, 4. 280ti. 

Mehitable, daughter of Lieut. 
James, 4. 278n; married first to 
Gen. John McMillan, 4. 278n; 
second to the Hon. Judali Dana, 
4. 278n. 

Miriam Jean, 4. 281. 

Sally, 4. 270n. 

Samuel, one of the owners of Frye- 
burg, 4. 278, 278ii; in the French 
war, 4. 278n; left one son, 4. 278n; 
the descendants of, 278^; mar- 
ried Ann Webster, 4, 282; at 
Niagara,4. 282; with Major Rogers, 
4. 282; at Fort Du Quesne, 4. 282; 
mentioned, 4. 277, 288, 289, 

the Rev. Samuel, son of Lieut. 
James, 4. 278jz; married Mary S. 
Osgood, 4. 280^. 

Susan, daughter uf Lieut. James, 
4. 278 Ji; married to Henry Y. B. 
Osgood, 4. 278n. 

Susannah, wife of Samuel, 4. 281. 
Osron island, 7. 79. 
Ossipee, derivation and definition of, 
4. 191, 

hill, I, 333. 

mountain, i. 333; 4. 108. 

pond, I. 333-384. 

river, the Indians to be attacked at, 
I. 215; two rivers of the same 
name, i. 333; 4. 108. 
Ossipees, same as the Sokokis, 6. 235; 

mentioned, 2. 147; 3. 324. 
Ossoli, Margaret Fuller, 5. Ixii. 
Oswald, Eleazer, private secretary of 
Arnold, i. 500; mentioned, i. 494, 
523. 
Richard, to treat with the commis- 
sioners, 6. 87. 
Oswego, 8. 263. 
Otchebwe, the, 9. 290. 
Otis, Harrison Gray, 5. xxvi, xxxvii; 
7. 356, 357, 358, 460. 
James, 4. 145, 145n, 161, 164, 166. 
14 



James, orator and patriot, a town- 
ship offered to, 2. 282, 285; per- 
menently injured by John Robin- 
son, 9. 55w; relinquished judg- 
ment against his assailant, g. 55n; 
mentioned, 2. 204; 4, 164, 166: 7. 
414. 
James, teacher in Wisca-sset, 8. 171 ; 

in Hampden, 8. 171. 
John, son of Oliver, 6. 73; gradu- 
ated from college, 6. 73; a lawyer, 
and journalist at Hallowell, 6. 73; 
held public offices, 6. 73; twice 
married, 6. 73; death of, 6. 73; 
children of, 6, 73-74; mentioned, 
8. 89, 459. 
Joseph, 5, xxiii. 
Oliver, 6, 73. 
S. Allen, 4. 270, 

Col. , of Barnstable, 4. 271. 

Otisfield, 2. 125; 4. 301, 336, 338, 359, 

386, 387n. 
Otters, abundant at Carritunk, 4. 379; 
purchased by Capt. John Smith, 
5. 162. 
Otter skins, in trade, i. 64r^; 2. 34a. 
Ottoman, the Rev, Bartholomew, 
preached in Bath, 2. 228. 

Oulton, Capt. , 8. 2i2n. 

Ountaussoogoe, 4. 123, 125, 126, 130, 

132, 133, 136, 137. 
Outward Heron island, probably vis- 
ited by Popham's colonists, 3, 
294n. 
Oven's mouth, the, 9. 131, 137. 
Overset island, i. 145, 152. 
Overyssel, 6. 134. 

Ovid, Publius Naso, 5. xxx; 6. 363. 
Owascoag, the Indian name of Scar- 
borough, 3. 101; 4. 108. 
Owen, the Rev. John, 3. 116; 4.356; 7. 

448. 
Owenagungas, the, name given to the 

Abnakis, 6. 209. 
Owl's Head promontory, 4. 104; 5. 

340; 7.2.53, 490. 
Oxford county, i. 409; 5. xl, xH. 
England, 2. 77a, 145; 3. 284; 5. 150, 

152; 8.491,492, 493, 503. 
Maine, 4. 359n, 386; 5. xxiv. 
W. S., his Proceedings of the Eng- 
lish colony in Virginia cited, 9. 
303n. 
Oxen, the price of In New England, 2. 

50n. 
Oxygoudy river, 4. 108. 
Oyand, Nicholas, signed the petition 

to Mass., 5. 241. 
Oyster river, the Rev. John Buss. 
preached at, i. 346-347; now Dur- 
ham, I. 346; land at claimed by 
Silvanus Davis, 4. 230; mentioned, 
3. 439; 4. 327; 5. 285; 6. 301, 303; 
8. 298. 
shell deposits, 6. 345, 351, 361: 7; 

301; 8.297. 
Shell neck, 4. 232. 



210 



MAINIE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Oysters, abundant at Casco bay, i. 
181; in the Sheepscot river, 5. 
826n. 

Pacific ocean, i. 7; 3-30; 4.24, 72, 85; 

5.182; 9.225. 
Packard, Prof. Alplieus S., teacher in 
• Wiscasset Academy, 8. 173; men- 
tioned, 6. 856, 360, 361; 8. 176, 
389, 404; 405; Biography of the 
Hon. William Willis, 7. 473-486; 
History of Bunker Hill Monu- 
ment, 3. 241-269. 
the Rev. Charles, 8. 450. * 
Elijah, 5. 301. 

the Rev. Hezekiah, i. 11; 8. 180. 
Packard's Catechism, 4. 337. 
Paddishall, Richard, a coaster, 5, 237n; 
laid claim to land at Pemaquid, 5. 
237n; moved to Pemaquid, 5. 237/*; 
killed, 5. 237n. 
Paddishell's house, i. 202. 
island, 5. 237n. 

Paddleford, Judge, , 6. 60, 76n. 

Padua, I. 95n. 
Paegan, the, 6. 270. 

Pagan, , one of the committee to 

wait upon Capt. Mowat, 5. 445. 
Page, Dr. Benjamin, 6. 64n, 90. 
Caleb, 4. 225. 

Christopher, died at Stratton's is- 
land, 3. 76; a bachelor, 3. 76; in- 
ventory of his estate, 3. 76-77. 
David, one of the owners of Frye- 
burg, 4. 278, 278w; in the French 
war, 4. 278n; wounded, 4. 278n; a 
magistrate, 4. 279n; his grandson, 
4. 279n; mentioned, 4. 281, 283, 
338. 
Edmund, 4. 281, 338. 
Major Edward, 2. 206, 211, 213, 223. 
George, married Mary Edgecomb, 

3.25. 
Hannah, 2. 211. 
Increase, 7. 284. 
Capt. John, wounded at Palo Alto, 

4. 279n. 
John O., 7. 284. 
Lucretia, married to ^Thomas Bond, 

6. 64n. 
Mary, married John Ashton, 3. 82. 
Robert, 7. 287. 
Ruth, 4. 281. 
the Rev. Solomon, preached at Bath, 

2. 223. 
Thomas, lived at Purpooduck, i. 

322; a juryman, i. 535. 
William H., 7. 284. 

, innh older at Bath, 4. 331. 

Squire , of Readfield, 4. 306. 

Paincuit, same as Pemaquid, 6. 282; 
Cadillac's account of, 6. 282, 283; 
fort at captured, 6. 283; fort re- 
paired, 6. 283 ; see Pemaquid. 
Paine, Albert Ware, 8. 470; the Ter- 
ritorial History of Bangor, 9. 221- 
234. 



John, 7. 153n. 
the Hon. John T., 8. 398. 
Lemuel, graduated from college, 6. 
70; practised at Winslow, 6. 70; 
character and abilities, 6. 70. 
Richard, 5. 100. 
Thomas, signed the petition to 

Bradstreet, i. 283n. 
Thomas, 6. 356. 

the Rev. T. 0., surveyed the foun- 
dations of Fort Halifax, 7. 90n. 
8. 273, 274, 275, 278. 
Palace gate, Quebec, i. 519, 520, 521, 

523, 524. 
Palatinate of Durham, i. 400. 
Palatine county, 2. 257, 259, 260, 261, 

262, 263. 
Palermo, settled by the Kennebec 

purchasers, 2. 291. 
Palfrey, John G., 2. 260; his History 
of New England cited, 6. 107; 7. 
255n. 
Palgrave, Sir Francis, his Parliamen- 
tary Writs cited, 6. 140n. 
Palmer, 4. 261. 

Capt. Barnabas, 8. 402. 
Henry, 5. 40. 

John, three of the same name among 
the early residents of Maine, i. 
256n; 3, S2n. 
John, occupied Peak's island, 1. 149; 
married Mary Munjoy, i. 149n, 
153, 256w; signed the petition to 
Bradstreet, i. 283n; consulted 
with Major Church, i. 296; 
wounded at the battle of Fal- 
mouth, I. 29671; lived on the Neck, 

1. 322; signed the petition to 
Massachusetts, 5- 241. 

John, commissioner in the Duke's 
province, i. 256)i; 3. 82n; coun- 
selor of Gov. Andros, i. 256n; 3. 
82n; 8. 191; agent for James 11, 

2. 50; sent to Pemaquid, 5. 107, 
110; 8. 187-188; called judge and 
deputy governor, 8. 188; gave 
leases but not patents, 8. 188; col- 
lector of customs, 8. 188; letter 
to John West, 8. 189-191 ; impris- 
oned, 8. 191; wrote the vindica- 
tion of Andros, 8. 191-192; Ran- 
dolph's opinion of, 8. 191?i; men- 
tioned, 5. 118, 125, 128, 266, 266}U 
267; 8. 192, 193, 194; his Impar- 
tial Account of the State of New 
England cited, 8. 191. 

John, married Elizabeth Alger, i. 
213, 256n; 3.82; settled at Blue 
Point, 3. 82; moved to Boston, 3. 
82; commissioner for Sagadahoc, 
4. 224; his survey, 4. 225, 226, 226/i. 

John, lived at Falmouth, i. 256n; 3. 
82. 

Mary, owned Peak's island, i. 149. 

Richard, married Grace Bush, i . 198 ; 
e. 186. 

Thomas, 2.235; 3.380. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



211 



Palmer's island, now PeaVs island, i. 
66; mentioned, i. 145, 148, 149n, 
293n. 

Palmeston, Lord, allied to American 
families, 6. IT. 

Palo Alto, 4. 219n. 

Pamgockamocis lake, 4. 108. 

Pamnaonamske, same as Penobscot, 
8.3. 

Panagamsde, Indian settlement at, 6. 
240. 

Panahamsequet, same as Penobscot, 
7. 3, 67. 

Panamske, same as Penobscot, 7. 3; 
St. Castine at, 7. 83 ; Pere Lauver- 
jait at, 7. 83. 

Panaomske, same as Penobscot, 7. 3. 

Panaouamsde, same as Penobscot, 7. 
3. 

Panaouamske, 7. 76, 88, 89; same as 
Penobscot, 7. 3, 75. 

Panavanset liill, i. 456n, 466. 

Panawanske, 7. 6, 46. 

Panawanskek, same as Penobscot, 7. 
1, 3; definition of, 7. 7; the orig- 
inal, 7. 22. 

Pannasanbskek hill, i. 466. 

Pannawanbskek, the village of 6. 213; 
definition of, 6. 213. 

Pannaway, Capt. Levett at, 2. 79; Da- 
vid Thompson at, 2. 79. 

Panoplist, the, cited, 6. 395n. 

Panouamsd^, 7. 4. ^ 

Panouamske, the definition of, 7. 3; 
the village of, 7. 6. 

Panounais, 7. 257. 

Panouske, same as Penobscot, 7. 3. 

Panousque, same as Penobscot, 7. 3. 

Pantagouet river, 7. 4. 

Paper-mill, built by Fry, 3. 335; at 
Falmouth, 3. 336, 337. 

Papers Relating to Pemaquid,, edited 
by Dr. Franklin B. Hough, 5. 1- 
138. 

Papinachis, the, 6. 212. 

Papists, as ofBcers" of New England 
soldiers, 5. 269, 216n. 

Papoodin point, see Papooduck point. 

Papooduck point, home of John 
Wallis, I, 206, 207; definition of, 
1.207^1; account of, i. 207; garri- 
son at, 3. 1.38; see Purpooduck. 

Paquaharet, 6. 261. 

Paquakigs, the, 3. 358. 

Paragon, the, 5. 184; 9. 15, 121. 

Paraguay, i. 444. 

Parassowa, 3. 412. 

Paris, France, Les Carbot's Histoire 
published in, i. 26; Sir Ferdinan- 
- do Gorges in, i. 545; the archives 
of examined, 2. 10a; American 
residents in asked to contribute 
to the Bunker hill monument, 3. 
248; mentioned, i. 529; 3.291; 5. 
200; 6. 89, 117, 118n, 273, 275, 335, 
363,411; 8. 6, 9, 95, 96, 98, 278, 
492, 493; 9. 83, 99. 



Maine, home of Gov. Lincoln, i. 
409; Baptists and Methodists in, 
4. 338; mentioned, 2. 125; 4. 301, 
303, 336, 338, 339, 359, 360, 387, 
388, 389; 5. xli; 7. 28, 248, 249, 
410. 

Parish, Dr. , 6. 388, 393, 396, 397, 

399, 400. 
Park, Prof. E. A., 8. 485. 

row, N. Y., 9. 71. 

street, Portland, i. 248n; 6. 132, 133. 

street proprietary, 6. 133. 
Parker, Brazil, i. 368; 9. 338. 

Daniel, son of John jr., moved to 
Charlestown, i. 302; father of 
Isaac, I. 302. 

Mrs. Elizabeth, 4. 227. 
George, signed the petition to 
Cromwell, i.395; land granted to, 
9. 378; signed the petition to Mas- 
sachusetts, 9. 381. 

Isaac, son of John, i. 302; grand- 
father of Isaac, I. 302. 

Dr. Isaac, 7. 415. 

the Hon. Isaac, descendant of John, 
I. 302; chief justice, i. 302; 2. 
190; 6. 99w; lived at Casline, 6. 
99n; in Congress, 6. 99n; United 
States marshal, 6. 99n; moved to 
Portland, 6. 99n; death of, 6. 99n; 
mentioned, 5. xxxiv, xxxv; 7. 387. 

Prof. Ifeaac, 8. 413. 

James, i. 11; 4. 7. 

James, son of John, lived on the 
Kennebec, i. 114; killed, i. 301; 
3. 114; letter of cited, 9. 316. 

James, of North Yarmouth, 2. 175. 

John, birth of,, i. 302; came to 
Maine, i. 302; an island named 
for, I. 302; 3. 300n; died, 3. 301, 
302; lived on the Kennebec, 3. 
317 ; his sister married to Thomas 
Webber, 3. 317; punished Jane 
Ford, 3. 375; punished Richard 
Gibson, 3. 378, 379; testimony 
concerning Robert Nash, 3. 383, 
384; signed the petition to Crom- 
well, 3.394; purchased an island 
of the Indians, 3. 300n; signed 
the petition to Massachusetts, o. 
382. 

John, jr., birth of, i. 302; died, i. 
302; 3. 114; fled from Parker's 
island, i. 302; a son of John, i. 
302; a large landholder, i. 302; 
his descendants, i. 302; engaged 
in fishing, 2. 190, 192; settled on 
the Kennebec, 2. 190; purchased 
land of Damarine, 2. 190; sold 
part of Reskeagan, 2. 191; men- 
tioned, 2. 193, 194. 

Mary, married Thomas Webber, i. 
317; left a widow, i.*317; peti- 
tioned for a grant, i. 317; her 
children, i. 317. 

Michael, i. 531. 

Polly, 4. 863. 



212 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Parker — continued. 

Rlioda, preceptress at Gorham 
Academy, 8. 168. 

Robert, signed the petition to Mas- 
sachusetts, 5. 241. 

Samuel, 6. 364. 

Stephen, 3. 180. 

the Rev. Stephen, 8. 21 In. 

Thomas, captain of volunteers, 3. 
348; to go to Casco, 3. 348; letter 
from William Partridge, 3. 348; 
signed the petition of 1672 to 
Mass., 5. 240; mentioned, 2. 194. 

William, 2. 204; story of, 4. 294. 

Capt. , 5. 368. 

X)r _ — . 5, xviii. 

Major —^ — , of Winslow, 4. 400. 

, of Li verm ore, 4. 363, 391. 

, of Portsmouth, 4. 299. 

Mrs. , of Standish, 4. 340, 363. 

the Rev. , of Bath, 2.223; 4. 

262. 
Parker's island, the supposed site of 
Popham's colony, i. 29; 2.28a; 3. 
300n, 301n, named for John 
Parker, i.302; 3. 300yi; attacked, 
I. 302; number of families at in 
1670, 2. 193; evidence of settle- 
ments at, 3. SOln; called Eraska- 
heagan, 4. 105; settlement at de- 
stroyed, 4. 223; Gov.' Sullivan 
settled at, 6. 48; mentioned, 2. 
202. 

point, old fort at, 2. 171. 

Parkman, Francis, 7. 68, 255n; his 

Conspiracy of Pontiac cited, 6. 

263; his Old Regime cited, 7.43/t. 

Parks, Col. Gorham, 8. 4.54, 456, 459. 

Parliament declared the American 

colonies independent, 6. 335. 
Parmentier, 8. 332. 
Parnell, Wiiliam, purchased land of 

Samoset, 5. 188n. 
Parr, Dr. Samuel, 7. 407. 
Parragon, the, 5. 184; see Paragon, 

the. 
Parris, Albion K., corporate member 
of the Maine Historical Society, 
1. 11 ; president of the same, 1. 12; 
4.6; 5. xviii, xxxiv, xl; his house, 
I. 124; the youngest governor of 
Maine, 4, 6; birth of, 5. xl; ances- 
try of, 5. xln; entered Dartmouth 
College, 5. xli; in politics, 1.409; 
5. xlii; senator and associate jus- 
tice, 5. xliii; comptroller of the 
treasury, 5. xliv; mayor of Port- 
land, 5. xliv; character of, 5. xliv; 
death of 5. xliv; 6. 355, 373; mar- 
ried Sarah Whitman, 5. xlv; chil- 
dren of, 5. xlv; mentioned, i. 409; 
4. 9; 5. xvii, xxiii; 8. 28, 30, 31, 
170,410, 415, 457. 
Benjamin, son of Thomas 4th, 5, xln ; 
birth of, 5. xln; married Millicent 
Keith, 5. xln; children of, 5. xln; 
a teacher, 5. xln; death of, 5. xln 



John, son of Thomas, 5. xln ; of the 
Reformed church, 5. xln; father 
of Thomas 3d, 5. xln. 

Martin, son of Thomas 1st, 5. xln. 

Samuel, son of Benjamin, held pub- 
lic offices, 5. xl; father of Albion 
K., 5. xl, xln; death of, 5. xl; 
birth of, 5. xln; in the army, 5. 
xln; married Sarah Pratt, 5. xln. 

Samuel, son of Thomas 1st, 5. xln. 

Thomas 1st, of London, 5. xln. 

Thomas jr., son of Thomas 1st, 5. 
xln. 

Thomas 3d, son of John, 5. xln; 
settled at Long Island, 5. xln; 
first wife died, 5. xln; moved to 
Pembrook, 5. xln; married Miss 
Rogers, 5. xln; died, 5. xln; chil- 
dren of, xln. 

Thomas 4th, son of Thomas 3d, 
birth of, 5. xln; married Hannah 
Gannet, 5. xln; children of, 5. xln; 
death of, 5. xln. 
Parrott, John, his daughter married 
Philip Gammon, i.310; a fisher- 
man, I. 314; settled under Dan- 
forth, I. 314; children of, 1.314; 
lived at Purpooduck, i. .322. 

John, of Rowley, i. 314. 

M., 7. 68, 69. 

Mary, married Philip Gammon, i. 
314. 

Sarah, married John Green, i. 314. 

Timothy,, proprietor of Pemaquid, 
5.. 302. • 
Parry, Edward,, agent for the British 
navy, 2. ,216;, taken prisoner and 
exchanged, 2. 216; his character, 
2. 216; a letter of quoted, 2. 216- 
217. 
Parson, Phi., 5. 88. 
Parsonfield, Freewill Baptist church 

formed at, 7. 222. 
Parsons, the Rev. David, of Amherst, 
4. 264. 

family, the, 4. 255. 

Isaac, 2. 125; moved to New Glou- 
cester, 2. 154; improvements made 
by, 2. 155; his Account of New 
Gloucester, 2. 151-164. 

James, signed the treaty of 1717, 6. 
262; autograph of , 6. 262. 

the Rev. Jonathan, 4. 264, 267, 273; 
6. 31 , 34, 36, 164, 165, 165n, 169, 170. 

the Rev. Moses, 6. 386. 

Theophilus, 5. xxvi; 6. 69, 386; 7. 

215, 398; 8.397. 
Dr. Usher, corresponding member 
of the Maine Historical Society, 
6, 354; donation from, 6. 354; his 
Life of Pepperrell cited, 8. 117n, 
302. 312)1 ; 9-84. 

Judge , 3. 216; 5. xxxv. 

the Rev. , i. 502; 7. 235. 

Partridge, John, of Portsmouth, field 
marshal, 5. 399; deposition of, 5. 
399. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



213 



William, letter to Thomas Parker, 
3. 348; to Gov. Dudley, 3. 348. 

Partridges, abundant,. 4. 334. 

Party strife, bitter, i. 139, 141. 

Pascataquack, 5. 205; see Piseataqua. 

Pascatowal, 9. 366. 

Pascatoway, 2. 70; 5. 172. 
river, 2. 80. 

Pascodumoquonkeag, 4. 109; see Pas- 
samaquoddy. 

Paseodum, 4. 109. 

Pasquine, M., 7. 55n, 69. 

Passada, the nectar of the country, 3. 
91, 9ln, 

Passadumkeag, definition of, 4. 109; 
a place of rendezvous, 7. 4; a 
French fort at, 7. 4; fort de- 
stroyed, 7. 5. 
river, 8. 14. 

Passadumkee, 7. 10. 

Passagawassakeag river. Gen. Preble 
sent to, 5. 374; now Belfast har- 
bor, 5, 374n; 7. 334. 

Passagassawa-Keag river, 4. 109. 

Passaic, definition of, 4. 116. 

Passamacadie, definition of, i. 27n; 
now Passamaquoddy, i. 27. 

Passamaquoddy, definition of, 4. 109, 
116, 191; mentioned, i. 27; 2. 247; 
6. 102; 7.203; 8.330. 
bay, called Pesmo-codie, 2. 16an; 
Cadillac's account of, 6. 276; 
visited by Cham plain, 7. 251 ; men- 
tioned, 4. 109; 7. 348; 8. 7, 8, 9, 
11, 15, 02, 318, 320. 
district, 6. 359, 372. 
Indians, their language a dialect of 
the Abenaquis, i. 414; Komagne 
the first among, i. 445; same as 
the St. Johns, 5. 371; dwelt in 
four places, 6. 209; mentioned, i. 
421; 3. 357; 6. 211, 232; 9. ii94. 
river, 3. 346; 8.8,9, 12,319. 

Passeaumkeag, definition of, 4. 116. 

Passequeant, 8. 230. 

Passquataguess, 7. 10, lOn. 

Passy, 3.339; 8.96. 

Pastorates, the longest on record, 5. 
liv, Ivn. 

Patapsco, definition of, 4. 116. 

Patch, Benj., 4. 301, 338. 

Patents, of Henry iv to Du Monts, 5. 
309, 322, 325; to Aid worth and 
. Elbridge, 5. 207-214; their dis- 
tinction from charters, 5. 206, 207 ; 
a list of, granted in New England, 
9. 365-368. 

Paterramett, 3. 412. 

Pateshall, see Pattishall. 

Patriarch of the Indians, 6. 205. 

Patrick Town, 4. 352, 354. 

Pattee, Ezekiel, ensign of "Fort Hali- 
fax, 8. 275, 277; had a store in the 
fort, 8. 275, 275n. 

Patten, George F., 2. 212. 
Matthew, i. 322. 
Hathaniel, 4. 55. 



Pattens, Mr. , 7. 235. 

Patterson, Elizabeth, 4. 324. 
family, 6. 21. 
George, 4. 324. 
Robert, 4. 324. 

Capt. , 5. 377. 

Master , killed by the Indians, 

2. 32a. 

Pattishall, Richard, a juror, i. 188; 
lived at Casco bay, i. 236n; 
claimed land at Sheepscot, 2. 236; 
8. 193, 193-194; testimony against 
John Kelson, 5. 89; a justice of 
the peace, 5. 102, 113, 115, 117; 
his sloop used to carry away the 
Pemaquiders, 5. 272; arrested for 
smuggling, 8. 190, 192; a spy, 8. 
192; believed that St. Castine 
rightly held Pentagoet, 8. 192, 
192n; his character, 8. 194; enemy 
of Sellman, 8. 194; death of, 8. 
194n; mentioned, i. 202; 5.59, 67, 
86. 

Patuxet, 7. 26. 

Paucaunaumpoijte, 3. 440. 

Paugus, 4. 290, 291 ; slain, 6. 235. 

Pauling, Matthew, signed the petition 
to Bradstreet, i. 283n; married a 
daughter of John Wallis, 1.317; 
lived at Purpooduck, i. 317, 822. 

Paul's churchyard, 2. 75. 

Pauper, the first in Scarborough, 3. 
78. 

Pausagasewackeag river. 5. 374, 375. 

Pauterramew, 3. 413. 

Pawkunnawkuts, the, 6. 212. 

Pawtucket, 7. 152n. 

Pax ton, I. 531. 

Capt. , master of the Newport, 

5.289; to lay off the River St. 
John, 5. 289; brought the news 
of the surrender of Pemaquid, 9. 
43. 

Payne, Robert, preached in Wells, i. 
346. 
Thomas, lived at Black Point, 3. 83. 
William, 7. 153n. 

, brought a report concerning 

Gorges, i. 546. 

Payne's mills, 2. 112. 

Payson, Edward, preceptor at Port- 
land Academy, 8. 165. 
the Rev. Edward, i. 11, 12, 326n; 4. 
6, 89, 268; 5. lii, liii; 6. 377; 7. 372, 
408; 8.410. 
John L., married Frances Lithgow, 
5.422; 8.288. 

Peabody, George, compared to the 
early settlers, 7. 119. 

Peace Society, the, 2. 255, 256. 

Peadrick, John, lived at Falmouth, i. 
322. 

Peake, , alderman, 9. 351. 

Peak's island, leased to Mitton, 1.66; 
different names of, i. 66, 145n; 
within the ancient limits of Fal- 
mouth, 1. 145n; the origin of the 



/ \ 



214 



MAINE HISTOEICAL SOCIETY. 



Peak's island — continued. 

present name unknown, i. 145n; 
conveyed to Michael Mitton, i. 
115, 148w; confirmed by Gorges, 
1. 148; conveyed to John Phillips, 
1. 148-149, 157; stone house erect- 
ed on, 1. 149; lavrsuit concerning, 
I. 149, 149n; the present owners 
of, I. 149; Indians at, 1.293; men- 
tioned, I. 149n; 2. 85n. 

Peale, killed by Indians, 2. 147. 

Pearce, William, signed the petition 
to Bradstreet, i. 2SSn; lived on 
the JSTeck, i. 322; signed the pe- 
tition to Charles ii, i. 402. 
a mode of spelling Pierce, g. 122. 

Pearl shells, 
the, I. 528. 

Pearley, Jacob, 4. 365. 

Pearson, Prof. Eliphalet, 6. 390. 
George, goods stolen from, i. 1907i; 

see Peirson. 
Moses, purchased land of IngersoU, 

I. 246, 311. 
point, 5. 373. 
Thomas, 4. 350, 351. 
see also Pierson. 

Pearstown, a fort built at, 2. 149. 

Pease, Capt. Alex., 4. 328, 329, 342, 
395. 
Mrs. Warren, 4. 342. 

Pechipscott, 4. 367; see Pejepscot. 

Peck, Thomas, I. 322. 

Peckham, Sir George, his Western 
Planting cited, 5. lA8n. 

Ped-coke-gowak, 7. 301. 

Pedell, Antho., 5. 241. 

Pedgodagowake, Indian name 'of the 
Sheepscot county, 4. 109. 

Pedianskge, Marie, one of the wives 
of St. Castine, 7. 70, 71n, 75. 

Peenecooks, the, 3. 323, 324; see Pen- 
necooks. 

Peerez, 4. 155, 163. 

Peerpole, last of the Norridgewocks 
in Maine, 4. 3l7i; a Catholic, 4. 
Sin. 

Pegiguet, 8. 140. 

Pegwackit, 3. 379; 4. 109; now Con- 
way, g. 213. 

Pegwackits, the, 6. 261; same as the 
Sokokis, 6. 232, 235. 

Peimtegouet, 7. 252. 

Peirce, John, his relations to the Ply- 
mouth company a mystery, g. 117, 
118; a wealthy London mer- 
chant, g. 117; member of the 
Plymouth council, g. 117; received 
with others the Plymouth charter, 
9. 118; the council jointly inter- 
ested with, g. 119; patent changed, 
9. 119; this disliked by the colo- 
nists, 9. 119, 120; his associates did 
not purchase his interests, 9. 120; 
the council settled the trouble, 
9. 120; unsuccessful in sending 
supplies to New Plymouth, 9. 121 ; 



sent the patent to New Plymouth, 
9. 121; the nucleus of a rival 
colony, 9. 78, 123; sent the Ann 
to Plymouth, 9. 121 ; end of his 
direct communication with the 
colonists, 9. 121; in the Paragon, 
9. 121, 122; final settlement with 
his associates and heirs, 9. 121, 
122, 123, 124; low estimate of his 
character, g. 125; Memoir of, by 
John Johnston, g. 115-125; see 
Pierce, John. 

Richard, son of John, married the 
daughter of John Brown, g. 122; 
the claim of his heirs to Pema- 
quid, g. 123, 124. 
Peirson, George, recorder of North 
Yarmouth, 2. 173. 

see Pearson. 
Pejepscot, signification of the word, 
3. 319; 4. 108; home of Launce- 
lot Pierce, i'. 247 ; extent of coun- 
try so-called, 3. 316; Sir Christo- 
pher Gardiner at, 3. 317, 318; Pur- 
chase driven from, 3. 318; rich 
soil, 3. 318; early forest fire in, 3, 
318, 319; early forts in, 3. 319; 
grant to Richard Warton at, 3, 
325; Purchase a resident of, 3. 
329, 330, 331, 332, 333; the patent 
for, g. 367; mentioned, 3. 317, 
324/1, 329, 430, 433, 437, 438, 443, 
445; 5.395; 6. 183. 

claim, interfered with the boundary 
of New Gloucester, 2. 159. 

company, 8. 110, Ula; see Pejepscot 
pronrietors- 

falls, Thomas Purchase lived near, 
3. 317; visited by Capt. Gilbert, 5. 
335; mentioned, 3. 319, 321, 322, 
323, 443; 5.327. 

Papers cited, 3. 312n, 314n, 315?i, 
318^, 321n, 359. 

proprietors, controversy with Ken- 
nebec purchasers, i. 80n; 2. 277; 
acts of the Massachusetts legisla- 
ture concerning, 2. 277; purchased 
the estate of Richard Wharton, 3. 
321; land dispute with the Ply- 
mouth company, g. 200-202 ; men- 
tioned, 6. 15; 8. 110, Ilia. 

river, land near granted to Pur- 
chase and Way, i. 40, 80; home 
of Thomas Purchase near, i. 211; 
now Brunswick, i. 211; probably 
ascended by Popham, 3. 311; a 
thoroughfare to Canada, 3. 316; 
discharged more water than any 
other river, 3. 319; Indian name 
of, 3. 319; 4. Ill; early forts on, 
3. 319; end of, 3. 322; now the 
Androscoggin, 5. 323; visited by 
Weymouth, 5. 323; mentioned, 3. 
313, 314, 315, 316, 320w, 321, 324, 
333; 4. 108. 
Pelham, 2. 250; 4. 264; 6. 13, 31. 

Baron, 6. 331. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



215 



Presbytery, 6. 36. 

Peltry, an inducement for coloniza- 
tion, 5. 173. 

Pemadumcook lake, 4. 108. 

Pemaquid, definition of, 4- 1^8, 379; 
5. 181; 7.295. 
bay, Pring's expedition at, 5. 153. 
charter, 5. 142. 

colony or settlement of, a name of 
remote antiquity. 7. 295; ranked 
as a kingdom, 7. 295, 308, 311 ; the 
commercial treasures of, 7. 295- 
296; certificate relating to, i. 38n; 
the capital and foremost settle- 
ment in Maine, 5. 141, 174, 261n, 
299 ; 7. 132 ; early vistited by mar- 
iners, 5. 144, 168; 7- 293-294; 
united to Bristol, 5. 147, 153; pa- 
tentees of, 5. 149, 153; the dis- 
covery of an initial period in New 
England's history, 5. 157; 7. 294, 
311; location and extent of, 5. 
157n, 181, 200; 7- 293, 299, 308, 
309, 318-319; the history of full 
of interest and her past not yet 
unfolded, 5. 169; a bulwark of 
Protestantism, 5. 174, 178, 220, 
223; from a stronghold it dwin- 
dled to a hamlet, 5. 174, 178, 232, 
279, 293 ; suffered by the fortunes 
of war, 5. 178; date of the first 
permanent settlement not deter- 
mined, 5. 181; probably coeval 
with Plymouth, 5. 181, 184, 185; 
of twofold interest, 5. 201 ; charac- 
ter of the dwellings, 7. 316; har- 
bor of described, 2. 238; Pierce 
did not settle at, 2. 42n; a neu- 
(1603) tral ground. 5. 220; visited by 
Pring, 1603, 5. 152; Weymouth 

(1605) carried Indians from, 1605, 5. 
349; 7. 134, 293; described by 

Weymouth, 7. 293; separate from 
the province of Maine, 7. 310; sep- 
arate from Sagadahoc, 7. 313; first 
point of English colonization, 7. 

(1606) 309, 310; the locus in quo, 1606, 

(1607) 7. 311; the first entry, 1607, in 
the annals of, 5. 158-160; Fort 

St. George erected, 7. 298; one of 
the New England, 7. 308, 
308n, 309; Indians visited the 
new comers, 5. 159; 7. 134; friend- 
ly with the Indians, 7. 304; kept 
the Sabbath, 7. 304; Popham and 
Gilbert at, 5. 334-335, 348, 349; 6. 
297; 7. 134, 304, 315, 316; rapid 
developments of life and civiliza- 
tion in, 7. 311; frequently men- 
tioned as inhabited, 7. 134; early 
seat of trade, 7. 134, 311, 316, 318, 
319, 320; 9. 130; Monhegan and 
Damariscotta dependencies of, 7. 
315, 320, 322; the patent dis- 
covered, 7-315; half owner of Sag- 
adahoc, 7. 316-317; Plastrier 
(1609-10) captured off, 1609-10, 7. 314, 



316, 317; Capt. John Smith, 
(1614)1614, probably at, 5. 161; 7. 
315,316; called Johnstown, 5. 
162; number of ships that sailed 
(1615) to, 1615, 7. 319; John Pierce 
(1621) did establish, 1621, a settlement 
at, 5. 185; Pierce's settlement 
and Brown's purchase united, 5. 
185-186; but little fishing, 1623, 
(1623) done at, 2. 99; Samoset the sag- 
amore of, 5- 168, 186; Capt. 
Witheridge at, 5. 168; granted to 
Levett, 5. 168; in the possession 
of Witheridge, 5. 186; probable 
date of the arrival of Brown and 
(1623-24) Pierce, 162-3-24, 9. 124; land 
at granted to Bristol merchants, 

(1625) 1625, 2. 50a; John Brown de- 
scribed as living near, 2. 87n; 4. 

232; the claim of Brown and 
Pierce, 2.87; 5. 1B5, 186; 9. 122, 
123, 124, 1»^5 ; settled before Sheep- 
scot, 2. 237; the first deed of 

(1626) conveyance executed in Amer- 
ica, 1626, was executed at, 5. 
195; grant of land at to the 

(1628) Aldworths, 1628, 9- 367; larger 

(1629) in 1629 than Quebec, 5. 196; no 
discord at, 5. i97; fort built at, 

(1630) 1630, 5. 197; Shurt's plantation 
extended to, 5. 1^7, 197n, 199; 

in the territory of the Tarrantins, 
5. 198; called an old colony, 5. 

(1630) 198; visited by Allerton, 1630, 
5. 198-199; population of in 

(1631) 1631, 8. 185; an unlucky year 

(1632) in the annals of, 1632, 5. 203; 
disliked by the western colo- 
nists, 5. 203-204, 206; sent grain 
to the mill at Boston, 5. 204; 

robbed by the French, 5. 204- 

(1633)205; a pirate hovering near, 

1633, I. 42; 5-205; Aldworth's 

land near bequeathed to El- 

(1634) bridge, 1634, 2. 51a; 5- 226; 
population of in 1634, 5. 233; 
the boundary established be- 

(1635) tween Sheepscot, 1635, 4. 221; 
in danger from the French, 5. 

215; French claimed land at, 5. 
215; Mass. assisted the enemy of, 
5. 215-216; the Angel bound for, 
5. 216; shipwrecked, 5. 217-218; 
the seal of, 5. 218, 218n, 301, 304, 

(1638) 318; the father of Sir William 
Phipps, 1638, arrived at. 5. 223; 
9. 40; had all the outward signs 

(1639) of prosperity in 1639, 5. 223, 225 ; 

(1640) an agricultural, 1640, commu- 
nity, 5. 225; Thomas Elbridge, 

(1647) 1647, held a court at, 5. 226, 
(1659)227; Thomas Elbridge, 1659, 
lived at, 1. 138; 5- 154, 227, 237w; 
the proprietors not able to en- 
force their authority, 5. 228, 229- 
230; increased in trade, 5. 229; 
the channels of; trade directed 



216 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Pemaquid — continued. 

(1665) from, 1665, 5. 232, 2327i; un- 
favorable report concerning, 5. 
232, 232n; 7. 155; magistrates 

(1671) commissioned, 7. 155; surveyed, 
1671, by Munjoy, 5-247; Mon- 
hegan within the limits of, 5. 

(1672)247; Lovelace desired, 1672, a 

true state of the affairs of, 5. 7, 

247-248; petitioned to Mass. for a 

government, 5. 239, 240; 8. 186; 

solicitude concerning the relig- 

(1673) ion of, 5. 232, 248; population 
of, 1673, 5. 234; ecclesiastical 
tribunal of, 5. 236-237; Mass., 

(1674) 1674, took possesion of, 5. 3; 
8. 186; Mass. held a court at, 5. 
248, 249; 7. 156; tax of, 5. 250; 

(1676) the Indians prepared to attack, 
1676, 1. 224; Andros sent a force 

to, I. 330; 3. 114; 5. 394, 397; 
court held at, 5. 250^ captured, 4. 
73, 223; 5. 253; 7. 156; 8. 186; ac- 
cused of selling Indians into 

(1677) slavery, 5. 251; Jocelyn, 1677, 
lived at, i. 199n: 3. 65; hatches 

at claimed by Bowditch and Du- 
val, 5. 9, 11, 23; the possession of 
considered, 5. 15; letter to from 
Brockholst, 5. 16-18; to be the 
only trading place, 5. 18, 19, 36, 
37; the sale of liquors .restricted, 
5. 19, 22; Knapton to be in com- 
mand at, 5. 17, 19; laws concern- 
ing trade at, 5. 19-23, 35, 36, 43, 
259, 260; 8. 186; Andros sent a 
sloop to convey refugees to New 
York, 5.258; 7. 157; 8. 186; sol- 
diers sent there only to perish, 5. 
269, 271; custom house at, 5. 330; 
7. 157; 8. 186; timbers sent to 
build a fort at, 5. 259; efficient 
measures adopted for the set- 

(1678) tlement of, 5. 261-262; orders 
of 1678, relating to, 5. 32, 33, 35; 

Davidson and White purchased 

the Elbridge estate in, 5. 230; 
(1680) Jordan, 1680, a justice for, i. 

235 n; fishermen to yearly re- 
new their engagements, 5. 35; 

Francis Skinner in command at, 
(1681J 1681, 5. 45-46; Dungan sent 

commissioners to, 1683, 4. 224; 
petions to Dungan, 5. 70-72, 81- 
88; Thomas Sharp in command 
at, 5. 73; Alexander Woodrop sub- 
collector, 5. 74-75; instructions 
for the settlement, 5. 75-81; 6. 
191; fault found tvith the com- 
mander, 5. 83; refused to ac- 
knowledge the government sent 
by the king, 5. 26»3; sent a repre- 
sentative to New York, 5. 263; at- 
tempt made to induce immigrar 
tion, 5. 264; to be a part of Corn- 
wall county, 5. 4; to send one 
member to the assembly, 5. 4; 



passes for vessels from 1681 to 
1685, 5. 135-136; blockhouse 
(1684) erected at, 1684, 5. 104; quit- 
rents to be collected, 5. 105; an- 
nexed to the New England gov- 

(1686) ernment, 1686, 5. i, 130-131; 7. 
159; Capt. Palmer sent to give 

out patents at, 5. 107, 110, 111; 8. 
187-188; James Graham licensed 
to tnke up land, 5. 108; Thomas 
Smith licensed to take up land, 5. 
109; Thomas Cooper licensed to 
take up land, 5. 109-110; guns and 
ammunition transferred to the 
government of New England, 5. 
265, 279w; dissolved from New 
York, 5. 265; the annexation fo 
Boston advised, 5. 265; really 
ruled by Louis xiv, 5. 266; Jolm 
West in charge at, 8. 189; the Stu- 
I art rule intolerable, 8. 195; a 

(1687) natural alliance with M ass., 1687, 
5. 266; a force Sent to, i. 290; 

(1688) Brockholst in command at, 1688, 
I. 290; 5.394; forces withdrawn, 

I. 291; captured by French and 
Indians, i. 291, 439; 5. 272, 394; 
6. 283; 8. 1.59; remonstrance 
against the surrender to Mass., 5. 
132; visited by Andros and Ran- 
dolph, 5. 267; 7. 54; the colonists 
squeezed dry, 5. 267; settlers 
denied grants, 5. 267-268; Andros' 
villainy at, 5. 268-271; 7. 37; 
called Jamestown, 5. 271 ; troops 
fled from, 5. 271; left to the ene- 
my, 5. 272; Andros built a sloop 
at, 5. 279; the settlers Episco- 
palians, 6. 191 ; St. Castine's 
goods taken at, 7. 55; Thomas 

(1689) Gyles, 1689, killed at, 3. 314n, 
355; troops at assured of their 

pay, 5. 276, 276n; the forlorn hope 

of Protestantism, 5. 278; feared 

the results of Andros' treachery 

and the hatred of the Jesuits, 

(1690)5.278; 7. .37; Gov. Phipps, 1690, 

erected a fort at, 7. 62; guns 

delivered to the New York gov- 

(1691) ernment, 1691, 5. 278; French 
did not attack, 7. 62; Major 

(1692) Church, 1692, at, 2. 196; 5. 330 
331; Gov. Phipps at, 5. 282 

fort built at in 1692, 2. 239; 5 
282, 282n; 6. 283; 7. 159; 9.41-42 
a check to the French for four 
years, 2.239; 6. 283; marked for 
destruction, 2. 240; petition to 
New York, 7. 132n ; population 

(1693) and trade in 1693, 2. 240; rumor 
of an attack, 5. 283; treaty of 
peace at, 5. 283; Indian pris- 

(1694) oners at, 1694, to be questioned, 
5. 284, 285, 287; Mr. Pike the 

minister at, 5. 284; the Indians 
pretended they desired peace, 5. 
284-285; truce of thirty days, 5. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



217 



288; French prepared to capture, 
5. 289; Chubb in command, 5. 
290; Fhipps purchased land at, 
(1696)9. 79; preparations, 1696, for 
the capture, 2. 240; report of 
capture, 5. 134; attacked by Iber- 
ville, 5. 290; captured, 5. 291, 293, 
7.66; 9. 43; end of the ancient 
settlement, 5. 294; now Bristol, 
(1700) 5. 294, 302; the treaty of, 1700, 
Kyswick did not bring peace to, 
5. 295; the curse of the Stuarts 
still rested on, 5. 295; Mass. ad- 
vised to rebuild the fort at, 5. 296; 
foundations of the fort remained 
entire, 5. 297; a deserted spot, 5, 
297; why England desired the 
resettling of, 5-298; Shurt's dy- 
ing words, 5. 299; never ceded 
(1726) to France, 7. 136: Indians de- 
sired a, 1726, trading-house at, 

3. 384; Yaughan's hamlet in, 

(1728) 1728. 8. 296; Dunbar sent as 

(1729) governor of, 1729, 8.296; the 
seat of Dunbar's government 

(1730) at, 1730, 6. 18; the Scotch-Irish 
invited to settle, 6. 18; Dunbar 

built a house at, 6. 20; the Rev. 

Robert Rutherford invited to 

preach at, 6. 33, 35 ; people from 

(1740) Ireland settled in, 1740, 6. 22; 

the records of destroyed, 1748, 

4. 228; informed of the ap- 
(1755) proach of the Indians, 1755, 7. 

177; a garrison maintained at, 
(1759) 1759, 2. 241 ; Fort Frederick at, 

5. 366)2; 6. 18; lime brought 
from, 8. 212n; a picturesque spot, 
2. 241; Cadillac's account of, 6. 
282-283; remains of the settle- 
ment at, 7. 133, 135, 309; a lan- 
guid exotic, 7. 316; dates of the 
erection of the forts at, 9. 43n-44n ; 
mentioned, 2. .35a, 49a, 50a, 88; 3. 
355, 369, 377, 378, SS8; 4. 14, 69, 
75, 106, 219, 233; 5. xxi, 9, 13, 15, 
27, 29, 30, 33, 38, 40, 41, 48,58, 6Q, 
68, 69, 70, 71, 73, 86, 90, 92, 94, 
104, 111, 131n, 135, 136, 137, 138, 
186, 191^, 249, 252, 261, 281, 292n, 
303, 328, 346, 359n; 6. 146, 189, 
297, 370; 7. 36, 63, 143, 169, 307, 
322, 363; 8. 184, 244n, 297, 310; 9. 
42n, 43, 48; An Historical Review 
of, by J. Wingate Thornton, 5. 
139-304; The countv of under the 
Stuarts, by H. W. Richardson, 8. 
181-195; The Relation of to our 
Colonial History, by F. B. Hough, 
7. 127-164: see also Paincuit. 

falls, 5. 191. 

harbor, 7. 133. 

manuscripts, discovered by R. K. 

Sewall, 8. 183n. 
neck, John Brown acquired the title 

to, 7. 135. 
papers, edited by F. B. Hough, 5. 



1-138; cited, 5. 264, 265; 6. 189, 
191; 7. 156, 157, 159; 8. 184, 187, 
188, 192, 194. 
patent. Judge Williamson on, 5. 207 ; 
part of the territory of given to 
Sir William Alexander, 4. 221. 
peninsular, 5. 181, 303. 
point, granted to Aldworth and El- 
bridge, I. 80; granted to John 
Brown, 2. 50a; 7. 135; home of 
John Brown, 2. 87n; mentioned, 
I. 36; 2. 238, 238n; 5. 326, 327. 
proprietors, controversy with Ken- 
nebec purchasers, 2. 277; the 
company formed, 5. 230; Thomas 
Drown the lirst clerk of, 5. 231 ; 
names of the early members, 5. 
301, 302; the Records of, 5. 304. 
river, visited by Levett, i.34n; land 
on granted to Sir William Alex- 
ander, I. 34, 79??, 81; 4. 221; set- 
tlement on, I. 36; John Brown 
purchased land on, i. 36; land on 
granted to Aldworth and Elbridge, 
I. 36, 37; boundary of Mason's 
grant, i. 81; Indians captured at 
carried to England, i. 109; a sur- 
vey to be made at, i. 279; Wey- 
mouth at, 2. 17; 3. 287; Bashaba 
lived near, 2. 62; claimed as the 
boundary of the Kennebec pur- 
chase, 2. 276; visited by Gilbert 
and Popham, 3. 297, 298; 5. 159; 
6. 314; boundary of the grant to 
the Duke of York, 5. 234; an In- 
dian village on, 5.335; boundary 
of Norumbega, 8. 319, 320; visited 
by Virginia fishermen, 8. 326; 
mentioned, i. 202, 551; 2. 232; 3. 
303; 4. 96, 231, 329; 5. 6, 156, 156n, 
157m, 200, 209, 250, 349, 350; 7. 95; 
8. 317. 

Pemaquiders, the, 5. 237, 248, 263. 

Pemaquina, same as Pemaquid, 4. 108. 

Pemaquyd, same as Pemaquid, 5. 70. 

Pematig, the Indian name of Mt. De- 
sert, I. 26, 430; 7. 3, 27; visited by 
Jesuits, I. 430; DuMonts in pos- 
session of, 7. 27; 8. 321 ; Capt. Ar- 
gall at, 8. 326; mentioned, 8. 324. 

Pembrook, England, 7. 380. 

Mass., 2. 145; 4.272; 6.41, 76; 5. xln. 

Pemcuit, 7. 309; see Pemaquid. 

Pemetegoit, see Pematig. 

Pemkuit, definition of, 7. 341 ; fort at 
captured, 7. 341. 

Pemmayquid, 5. 162; see Pemaquid. 

Pemoquid, 5. 168; see Pemaquid. 

Pemptegonet river, 7. 99n. 

Pemquit, 7. 293, 306. 

Pemy-Quid, 5. 4; see Pemaquid. 

Penaquida, a name given to the coast 
of New England, 5. 155. 

Penawauskek, i. 466; 6. 4. 

Pendleton, Capt. Brian, lived at Saco, 
1. 197, 221n; an associate, i. 197; 
a letter of cited, i. 217, 221?i; to 



218 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Pendleton, Capt. Brian— continued, 
lay out the boundary of Wells, i. 
361; mentioned, 3. 117, 120, 121, 
122; 9.364. 

Penecook, 6. 250. 

Penhallow, John, signed the treaty of 
1718, 6. 256; of 1717, 6. 261; auto- 
graph of, 6.256,261; mentioned, 

2. 202. 

Samuel, sold land to Harmon, 3. 
212; mentioned, 3. 166, 362. 

Samuel, his Indian Wars cited, 5. 
298, 299. 

Capt. Z , held a conference with the 
Indians at Arrowsic, 7. 83 ; letter 
to the governor of Mass., 8. 114w- 
115w; mentioned, 8. 284. 

peninsula, the dispute concerning 

it, 3. 300^, 301n; see Point Popham. 

Peniquit, 8. 188, 321 ; see Pematig. 

Penjejawock river, the, 4. 108; 7. 7, 13. 

Peniey, Dorcas, married Hugh Will- 

cott, I. 314. 

Jane, married Dennis Morough, i. 
313, 314, 

Mary, married Edward Bailey, i. 
314; a widow, i. 314. 

Pachel, widow of Sampson, i. 314. 

Sampson, lived at Falmouth, 1. 112, 
114, 180n; signed the submission 
to Mass., I. 112; date of his arri- 
val unknown, i. 113; received 
land from Eobert Jordan, i. 130; 
consented to the agreement be- 
tween Jordan and Tucker, i. 131; 
petitioned to the general court, i. 
144; his right to House island, i. 
151; conveyed land to George 
Munjoy, i. 166n; keeper of the 
jail, I. 167; released Morgan, i. 
167; lived near Long creek, i. 206; 
lived near Fore river, i. 216; his 
daughter married Dennis Mo- 
rough, I. 313; returned to Fal- 
mouth, I. 314; date of his death 
unknown, i. 314; his widow, i. 
314; his children, i. 314; lived at 
Purpooduck, i. 322. 
Pennacook, see Pennecook. 
Pennatuckets, the, 6. 236. 
Pennecook, derivation and meaning 
of, 4. 193; now Concord, 4. 278w; 
mentioned, 2. 146; 4.289; 6.250. 

falls, 3. 323-324; 4. 108, 109. 
Pennecooks, the, settled near Penne- 
cook falls, 3. 323-324; moved from 
New Hampshire, 3. 324; had in- 
tercourse with the northern tribes, 

3. 324; location of, 6, 236; tribes 
that held fealty to, 3. 236; dispo- 
sition of, 6. 236; moved to Can- 
ada, 6. 236, 238; not in King Phil- 
ip's war, 6. 237; land near Quebec 
granted to, 6. 238; mentioned, 6. 
232. 

Pennefeather, Baron, married Miss 
Derby, 7. 409. 



Pennemaquam, 4. 109. 

Penner, Richard, 2. 260. 

Pennsylvania, soldiers from accom- 
pany Arnold, i. 500, 513, 531; 
Macclenaghan moved to, 3. 275n; 
Scotch-Irish settled in, 6. 9, 10, 16; 
the name given to the whole of 
New England, 6. 327-328; gave 
provisions for the expedition 
against Louisburg, 8. 119; men- 
tioned, I. 503, 519, 530; 2. 74a; 4. 
282; 5. xxxvii, 132, 404, 407; 6. 7, 
22, 31, 33, 96n, 99, 100, 330; 7. 221, 
355, 466; 8. 80, llOw, 304, 425, 444. 
Historical Society, 7. 484. 
journal, 5. 3«7n. 

Pennycook, the Eev. Paul Coffin in, 4. 
338; number of families in, 4. 338; 
now Rumford, 4. 338n; rich soil, 
4. 339; mentioned, 4. 304, 337. 

Penobsceag, ) the Indian name of the 

Penobscook, j Penobscot river, i. 
39. 

Penobscot, different ways of spelling, 
7. 3; used to denote a region, i. 
4Sln. 
Vincent Bigot at, i. 434; Pere 
Thury at, i. 435 ; the sagamore of, 
3. 102; an Aidian town, 5. 156n, 
157n, 371; the Plymouth Colony 
established a trading post at, 6. 
109; 7. 29; Col. Temple resided 
at, 6. 110; restored to the French, 

6. 110; associated with the name 
of prominent adventurers, 6. 110; 
beaver trade ^ brisk, 7. Ill; Cas- 
tine's settlement at destroyed, 7. 
113; Gov. Pownell took formal 
possession of, 7. 113; coins found 
near, 6. 114; the original village, 

7. 22; various names of, 7. 25; 
Father Biard at, 7. 25; various 
owners of, 7-25; a prominent 
place, 7. 25; the claim of the 
French to no better than that of 
the English, 7. 29; the Pilgrims 
did not ask for a charter to, 7. 29 ; 
the company of undertakers 
formed, 7. 29-30; Edward Ashley 
in charge of the affairs at, 7. 30; 
A Her ton diverted the trade from, 
7. 31; business at prosperous, 7. 
31; robbed by the French, 7.32; 
the business of the Plymouth 
Company brought to a close, 7. 
33 ; the Great Hope sent to, 7. 35 ; 
the expedition frustrated, 7. 36; 
hope of regaining given up, 7. 37; 
St. Castine moved to, 7. 46; called 
Panaouamske, 7. 75; number of 
warriors at, 7. 92; described by 
John Calf, 7. 203-204; the Eng- 
lish name of Norumbega, 8. 331 ; 
called Plantation No. 3, 9. 159; in- 
cluded in Castine, 9. 159-160; 
mentioned, 2. 240; 3. 862, 373, 374, 

386, 394, 396, 428; 4. 325, 344, 350, 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



219 



352; 5, 215, 290, 319-320, 328, 427; 
6. 108, 126; 7. 168, 175; 8. 235, 309; 
9. 87, 93, 159, 161; Ancient Pe- 
nobscot, by the Hon. John E. 
Godfrey, 7. 1-22, 103-104; see 
also Pentagoet. 

bar, the, 8. 470, 476. 

bay, a boundary of the Waldo pa- 
tent, I. 45; visited by Martin 
Pring, 2. 21a; 5. 153; 8. 26; Capt. 
Challong to meet Harmon and 
Pring at, 2. 23a; called Belfast 
bay, 4. 324; Capt. Argal wrecked 
at, 5. 178; Gov. Pownell embarked 
for, 5. 375; Champlain at, 6. 109; 
8. 318; Capt. John Smith at, 6. 
109; only seen by Weymouth, 6. 
317; described by Champlain, 7. 
253; mentioned, i.528; 4.104, 108; 

5. 313, 329, 346, 347, 368, 384n; 6. 
232, 302, 311; 7. 29, 101, 263, 265; 
8.22, 25, 318; g. 81, 90. 

circuit. 7. 228. 

county, 6. 107; 8. 51, 317, 319, 320, 
432; 9. 77. 

expedition, 5. 440n; 8. 246n, 283n. 

falls, a place of rendezvous, 7. 4, 5; 
a French fort at, 7. 4. 

harbor, 7. 35. 

hills, 5. 312, 313. 

river, attempt to settle a mission 
on, I. 26, 430; the French driven 
from the mouth of, i. 27; ex- 
plored by Pring, i. 28; a bound- 
ary of the French territory, i. 28; 

6. 1, Sn; 8. 317; Capt. John Smith 
at, 1.31; 2. 34a; 7. 3; a trading 
post established at, i. 39; the In- 
dian and the French name of, i. 
39; 7. 7; land at granted to Beau- 
champ and Leverett, i. 79; St. 
Castine and Thury lived near, i. 
287; Jesuits at, i.430; Montressor 
at, I. 453, 466; compared to the 
Chaudiere, i. 453; described, i. 
454; called Pentegoet, 2. 17a; 4. 
107, 108, 282; 8.3-4; Norumbega 
supposed to be situated on, 2. 17a; 
the capital of Bashaba situated 
on, 2. 18a, 28a; 7. 95; supposed 
to have been explored by Wey- 
mouth, 2. 17, 22a; 5.311,312,345- 
346, 347, 348, 350; 7. 3, 27; the 
Tarrantines dwelt near, 2. 32a; a 
frontier, 4. 80; names of the trib- 
utaries of, 4. 106; settlements on, 
4. 318; Allerton's traders at, 5. 
204; not explored by Weymouth, 
5.338; 6.293,294,315,317-318; 7; 
256; fort built on, 5. 365, 365n, 
376, 386 (see Fort Pownell); the 
first permanent settlement on, 5. 
370n; Capt. Mowat in the expedi- 
tion to, 440i?; claimed as a bound- 
ary of the Waldo Patent, 6. 20; 
supposed to be Penobscot harbor, 
6. 298; certificate of Pownell's 



taking possession of, 6. 333-338; 
to be the easterly boundary of the 
United States, 6. 335 ; explored by 
Gilbert, 7.3; a place of rendez- 
vous, 7. 4; called Penawanskek, 
7. 7; described, 7. 7; the Indian'^ 
claims at recognized, 7.7, 9; In- 
dians released their claims, 7. 18, 
19-21 ; proposed to have a trading 
house at, 7. 61 ; Champlain at, 7- 
96 ; the first ascent of , 7- 255-256 ; 
French fort at captured by the 
English, 7. 340; destroyed by the 
Dutch, 7. 340; cause of the cap- 
ture, 7. 341 ; claimed by the French 
as their western boundary, 8. 188; 
the avenue from Canada to the 
ocean, 9. 87; Gen, Waldo desired 
a fort on, 9. 87; mentioned, i. 33, 
6Sn, 77n, 147, 288, 452, 456, 513; 2. 
35a, 72a, 292; 3. 132, 177, 294n, 
296, 303, 308; 4. 11, 14, 72, 78, 96, 
108, 379; 5. xx, xxi, 205, 229, 283^ 
312, 313, 326, 337, 350, 375, 377n, 
382n, 385; 6. 32, 210, 232, 240, 250, 
253, 275, 297, 302, 303, 309, 315, 
317, 336, 337, 354, .360, 363, 370, 
400, 401 ; 7. 12, 29, 79,98, 201, 202, 
204, 255^, 256, 329, 333, 341, 354; 
8. 21, 22, 25, 26, 31, 66, 118, 215, 
246ji, 318, 319, 331, 332,363; 9.41, 
77, 90, 91, 92, 151, 161, 162, 223, 
224, 225, 226, 231, 298; The Pil- 
grims at the, by John E. Godfrey, 
7. 23-37. 
the siege of cited, 7. 203. 
valley, 8.478; 9. 90. 
waters, the first battle on, 7. 36. 
Penobscots, the, at war with the Eng- 
lish, I. 215; commanders of, i. 
215; sachems of, 1.228; Mugg a 
prime minister of , 1.229; Cheber- 
rina the sagamore of, i. 281n; the 
number of, 1.288; 5.381w; 7.103; 
joined by the French, 7. 291 ; their 
language a dialect of the Abena- 
quis, 7. 414; same as the Nor- 
ridgewocks, 7. 414; preserved the 
purity of their language, 7. 415; 
used belts as treaties, 7. 425 ; M. 
Romagne a priest among, 7. 445- 
446; signed the treaty of 1725, 3. 
152; destroyed the fort at Pema- 
quid, 5. 272'; led by a Jesuit, 5. 
272; same as the Openangos, 6. 
211-212; an influential tribe, §. 
232; the country occupied by, 6. 
232, 233, 233-234; 7. 101; still oc- 
cupy their ancient abode, 7. 233; 
definition of the name, 7, 233; 
part of their history a blank, 7. 
233; fight the Mohawks, 7. 233; 
probably traded with the Ply- 
mouth colony, 7. 234; called the 
Machias, 7. 234; now the Sy- 
bayks, 7. 234 ; on Old town Island, 
7. 6; held a confere»ce witl^ the 



220 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Penobscots, the— continued. 

whites near Bangor, 7. 7; descen- 
dants from the Tarratines, 7. 100; 
condition of, 7. 103-104; adopted 
the dress of civilization, 7. 103; 
attempt to establish a school 
among, 7. 103-104; officers among, 
7. 105; mentioned, i. 42 J, 
424, 425; 2. 169; 3-357,360,380, 
382, 386, 387, 388, 389, 390, 392, 
895, 403, 405, 407, 408, 409, 410, 
412, 413, 415, 416, 417, 418, 420, 
422, 424, 425, 426, 427, 437, 441, 
445, 446; 4. 103, 146, 147, 148, 150, 
155, 161, 164, 168, 169, 170, 172, 
175, 176, 179, 182, 183, 184; 5. 283, 
328, 371; 6. 205, 211, 212, 232, 261; 
7. 11, 12, 63, 86, 88, 175, 186; 8. 
215, 220, 225, 235, 331; 9. 79, 
294. 

Penobskeag river, 4. 108; see Penob- 
scot river. 

Penouamske, a spelling of Penobscot, 
7. 3, 5, 

Penshurst, g. 298n. 

Pentagoet, the French name of Penob- 
scot. I, 39; 4. 108; 6. 282; 7, 3, 4 
the true Norumbega, 2.17a; 8. 331 
well known to the French, 6. 109 
on Champlain's map, 109; English 
attempts to settle at, 6. 281; Ca- 
dillac's account of, 6. 282; D'Aul- 
nay took possession of, 7, 33; 
Grandfontain at, 7. 46; St. Cas- 
tine had a trading post at 7. 47 ; 
wines sent to and seized 7. 50; 
Palmer and West in possession of, 
7. 50; a fort wanted at 7. 52; 
Tliurey at, 7. 58; D' Iberville at 7. 
63; Alden traded at, 7. 6Q; the in- 
habitants of, 7. 70n, 7 In; now 
Castine, 7. 79; Major Livingstone 
at, 7. 79; St. Castine the rightful 
owner of, 8. 192, 192w; Du Monts 
at, 8. 321; fort erected by D'Aul- 
nay at 8, 330; grant to La Tour 
at 9. 112; mentioned, 5. 385, 385n; 
7. 25, 26, 33, 71n, 82, 84, 86; 8. 188, 
319, 324, 330; 9. 112n; see also 
Penobscot, 
river, 4. 107; 6. 240; 7. 3, 4; 8. 330, 
331; see Penobscot river. 

Pentaquevette, the French name of 
Penobscot, i. 39; 6. 108. 

Pentecost, now Booth Bay, 5.292n; 6. 
310. 
harbor, named and visited by Wey- 
mouth, 5. 314, 338; 6. 295, 310; 
now Townsend Harbor or Booth 
Bay, 5.314, .338; Weymouth pro- 
posed to remain at, 5. 318, 323, 327 
329 ; * location of, 6. 294 ; a cross 
set up at, 6. 295, 296; four pas- 
sages to, 6. 296; not the Kennebec 
river, 6. 297; not Booth Bay, 6. 
298; must be St. George's Island 
harbor, 6. 298; visited by Gilbert, 



6. 314; mentioned, 5. 319, 323, 
324; 6. 298, 299, 302, 311, 316, 
river, 6. 312. 

Pentooskeag, 5. 385. 

Pepperell, Andrew, son of Sir Wil- 
liam, birth of, 9. 83; to marry 
Hannah Waldo, 9. 83, 85; death 
of, 9. 85. 
family, 5. lix, 
the firm of, 7. 213, 214. 
Lady, 7. 214. 

Sir William, how he belonged to 
Maine, 4. 75; did not petition for 
reduced taxation, 4. 197, 205; a 
slave owner, 7, 213, 214; lived in 
baronial style, 7. 214; received 
orders to capture Louisburg, 8. 
116, 11771; 9-82; his popularity, 9. 
116, 117n; hesitated in accepting 
the orders, 9. 116-117; dispatches 
to Shirley, 9. 119n, 120, 120n; cre- 
ated a baron, 9, 308 ; not a true 
friend of Col. Yaughan, 9. 308- 
309; presented at court, 9. 83; an 
extensive land holder, 9. 83 ; coin- 
cidences in his life and that of 
Gen. Waldo, 9. 83; mentioned, 2. 
186; 3,171^,217,411; 4-257; 6. 
15; 7. 170; 8. 115, 116, 119, 120, 
120n, 121, 122, 245n, 294, 306, 307, 
308,309; 9.87, 91. 

Pepperellboro, the Rev. John Fair- 
field preached in, 4. 243; slaves 
held in, 7. 214; now Saco, 7. 214; 
mentioned, 4. 299. 

Pepys, Samuel, value of his diary, 9. 
11. 

Pequakett, the Indians at to be at- 
tacked, I. 215; derivation and 
definition of, 4. 116, 191, 275/1; the 
first to winter there, 4. 283n; 
sometimes spelled Piggwackett, 
4. 275n; same as Fryeburg, 4. 
275?i; number of Indians killed at, 
4. 290; mentioned, 3. 324; 4. 109, 
277, 287n; 6.250,260; see Pigg- 
wackett. 

Pequakett, battle of, 3. 153; 4. 290- 
292, 

Pequaket pond, 2. 161 ; 4. 116. 

Pequakets, the, origin of the name, 4. 
275n; retired to the head of the 
Connecticut river, 4. 275 w; a ter- 
ror to the whites, 9. 212; subdued 
by Lovewell, 9, 212; mentioned, 
3. 324, 358; 4. H^, 146, 148, 155, 
158, 159; 6.232; 9. 212. 

Pequanquan-ke, 4. 191. 

Pequaret, 6. 257. 

Pequawket, see Pequaket. 

Pequod war, soldiers in granted land 
in Maine, 2. 135; date of, 2. 135ti. 

Pequods, the, a most warlike tribe, 2. 
169; attacked, 169-170; destroyed, 
2. 170; 7. 152;] of the Mohegan 
nation, 6. 212. 

Perches, Thomas, i. 550. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



221 



Perepole, last of the Androscoggins, 
2. 112; the deposition of, 3. H33; 
his mark, 3. 883; his home, 4. 332. 
Perham, Lemuel, 7. 277. 
Periaga, the, 9. 15. 
Perkins, Elizabeth, married Israel 
Wildes, 8. 387. 
James, 2, 116. 
Nathan, 4. 56. 
Simeon, 2. 127. 

Susanna, married to Edward Emer- 
son, 8. 389. 
Thomas, Esq., married Anna Pow- 
ell, 7. 2Un. 

Capt. Thomas, at the seige of 
Louisburg, 3. 173; 8. 128, 132; 
shipwrecked, 8. 128, 138. 
Thomas H., 3. 245, 246, 251, 255. 
Perley, Nathaniel, son of the Rev. 
Samuel, 4. 340; practised at Hal- 
lo well, 6. 62; graduated from 
Harvard College, 6. 62; anecdotes 
and characteristics of, 6. 62-63. 
the Rev. Samuel, preached in Gray 
and Seabrook, 6. 35 ; death of, 6. 
35; mentioned, 4. 340; 6. 32, 36, 
37. 
Perquimans county, home of Govern- 
or Arch dale, i. 173. 
Perrin case, the, 6. 50. 

Perrot, M. , former governor of 

Montreal, 7. 48; his character, 7. 
48; disturbed St. Castine, 7. 48, 
49; governor of Acadia, 7. 48; St. 
Castine complained of, 7. 49-50; 
letter to the French minister, 7. 
51 ; deprived of his office, 7. 51 ; 
trading on the coast, 7. 51 ; robbed, 
7, 51; in France, 7. 51; not a 
friend of St. Castine, 7. 52. 
Perry, 6. 209. 

John, death of his children, i. 333. 
Roger, 3. 16^. 

Deacon , of Wareham, 4. 270. 

Perse, John, 9. 382. 
Peruvians, the, 6. 223. 
Pescadonet, same as Piscataway, 6. 
283; Cadillac's account of, 6. 283- 
284. 
Pesiquid, 8. 146: now Windsor, 8. 145. 
Pesmocady bay, Cadillac's account of, 
6. 279; same as Passamaquoddy 
bay, 2. Q2an; 6* 279>^. 
Pesumsca falls, i, 543. 

river, i. 65, 68; see Presumpscot. 
Peter, a friendly Indian, 2. 132. 
Peteremenit, Paul, 3. 380. 
Peters, the Rev. Hugh, 9. 330, 331, 351, 

359. 
Peterson, John, 2. 202, 220. 

Nicholas, 5. 240. 
Petipas, Jaques, 7. 61, 62. , 
Petit Monahans, 4. 190. 
Petitions, of Edward Godfrey to the 
Massachusetts general court, i. 
140, 143, 390-391; to Cromwell, i. 
104, 392-394; to Charles 11, i.240, 



400-401; 2. 129; of the people of 
New Dartmouth, 5. 95, 100; of 
the people of New Harbor, 5. 137- 
138; of the people of Pemaquid 
to Gov. Dongan, 5. 70-72, 81-88; 
to Gov. Andros, i. 272. 

Pettengill, Edward, 2. 202. 

Pettit, M., 7. 49. 

Petuaquine, same as Pemaquid, 5. 6; 
8. 184. 

Phelps, John, 3. 114. 

Phial, see Fayal. 

Phildon, 6. 147. 

Philadelphia, a boundary of Acadia, 

1. 25; a boundary of the Ply- 
mouth Company's charter, i.32; 
trade with Asia, 4. 24; the first 
Prebyterian church in, 6. 30; men- 
tioned, I. 528; 4. 25; 5-407,408; 
6. 99, 157, 158, 168, 328, 407; 7. 
286, 3.55, 356, 396, 398, 400, 402, 
413, 473w, 484; 8, 389; 9. 182. 

Association, formed to promote 
American manufactures, 4. 58. 

Philosophical Society, 6. 216^. 

Presbytery, 6. 30, 167. 
Philbrick, Hannah, married John 
Gushing, 6. 47 rt. 

Capt. Jonathan, cured herrings, 4. 
317 ; had a sawmill at Sebasticook, 

4. 317; married Weld, 4. 317; 

mentioned, 4. 350. 

Miss , 4. 315, 317. 

Philbrook, Job, taken prisoner, 2. 206; 
returned to Bath, 2. 206. 

Jonathan, moved to Bath, 2. 205; 
engaged in shipbuilding, 2. 208, 
209; mentioned, 2. 206, 211, 212. 

Jonathan jr., 2. 208, 212. 

Deacon Joshua, 2. 205, 206, 211, 
212, 223. 
Philip II, of Spain, 9. 3.32. 

IV, of Spain, 6. 120, 120yi, 121. 

of Greece, 6. 147. 

called Metacomet, sent emissaries 
to induce the Indians of Maine to 
engage in the war, 2. 196; 3. 102, 
103; killed, 2. 196; 7.2.56; planned 
to exterminate the English, 3. 
105; received assistance from Al- 
bany, 5. 257. 

an Indian living near Bakerstown, 

2. 112. 

Philips, Anderson, proprietor at Pem- 
aquid, 5. 302. 

Henry, proprietor at Pemaquid, 5. 
302. 

Joanna, proprietor at Pemaquid, 5. 
302. 

Capt. John, proprietor at Pemaquid, 

5. 302- 

John, a proprietor at Pemaquid, 5. 

302. 
Phillips, Abigail, daughter of William, 

married Josiah Quincy jr., 7. 234. 
academy, 7. 407, 474; 8. 159, 483. 
Andrew, 9. 67n. 



221 



MAINE HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. 



Phillips— continued. 

Bridget, married John Sandford, 4. 
411 ; second wife of Major William, 
4. 411 ; mother of Sandford, 4. 411 ; 
her children, 4. 411; letter to Ed- 
ward Rishworth, 4, 413. 

cart path, 9. 154. 

family, 2. lt)5. 

George & Co., 4. 56. 

Gore, the Rev. Paul Coffin in, 4. 
387; granted to Lieut-Gov. Phil- 
lips, 4. 387ti; now a part of Otis- 
field, 4. 387n; mentioned, 4. 302, 
303, 337, 338, 359. 

Hezekiah, 3. 166. 

John of Boston, his daughter mar- 
ried George Munjoy, i. 121, 153, 
258; died, i. 121, 156^; Peak's 
island conveyed to, i. 148-149; 
gave the island to Mary Munjoy, 
I. 149?i, 157, 255; purchased land 
of Mitton's estate, i. 248; men- 
tioned, I. 119, 124, 153, 

John, of Falmouth, Cleeves con- 
veyed land to, I. 62, 119, 124, 315; 
the land claimed by his daugter, 
I. 62; lived in Falmouth, i. 105, 
114, 121, 123, 215; signed the sub- 
mission to Mass., I, 105, 386; pur- 
chased land of Francis Small, i. 
119; a mill wright, i. 119, 123, 
141; a Welshman, i. 119; estab- 
lished a mill, I. 119; moved to 
Kittery, 1, 121, 217; died without 
issue, I. 121; covenant made with 
Jordan, i. 131; sued by Cleeves, 
I. 138; verdict in his favor, 1. 138; 
lived with a woman not his wife, 
I. 144; sold land to George Felt, 
I. 156n; accused of felony, i. 166; 
signed the petition to the king, i. 
180; lived in Charlestown, i. 248; 
did not return to^ Falmouth, i. 
250; magistrate, 2. 63a; men- 
tioned, 2. 170, 260, 204. 

John, a chaplain, 6. 338. 

Col. John, 9. 40ti, 63, 67, 92. 

the Rev. John, of Lynn, 5. 370, 370n. 

Jonathan, purchased a township in 
Maine, 7. 354. 

Mary, married George Munjoy, i, 
121, 258. 

Kathaniel, 2. 259, 260, 260n. 

regiment, 7. 224. 

Walter, lived at Sheepscot, 2. 233; 
commenced the Sheepscot rec- 
ords, 4, 210; comraisioned by the 
Duke of York, 4. 210 ; at John 
Mason's house, 4. 210; fled to 
Charlestown, 4. 210; died, 4. 210; 
sworn fealty to the Duke of York, 
4. 221 ; his house, 4. 221 ; conveyed 
land to Chiistopher Tappan, 4. 
232; mentioned, 2. 234, 235; 4. 
228,229,230,231, 232; 5. 65; 8. 
188n; 9. 134, 151. 

Wendell, 8. 443. 



William, married Abigail Brown- 
field, 7. 234; purchased a town- 
ship in Maine, 7. 354. 

William, of Saco, complained of the 
authority of the town over his 
property, i. 142; the controversy 
settled, I. 142; lived at Saco, i. 
143, 177, 185, 230; purchased land 
near the Saco river, 2. 2Q0n; em- 
powered to administer oaths, 3. 
52; mentioned, 3. 28. 

Capt. Willam, an associate, i. 170; 
a justice of the peace, i. 177, 185, 
190; to be a sergeant major, i. 
377. 

Major William, his mills destroyed, 

1. 213; to pay a bushel of corn 
annually to the Indians, i . 230 ; a 
councelor, i. 376; married Bridget 
Sandford, 4. 411 ; a vintner, 4. 411 ; 
moved to Saco, 4. 411, 413; large 
land holder, 4. 411 ; moved to Bos- 
ton, 4. 411; died, 4. 411; his gar- 
rison attacked by Indians, 3. 104; 
signed the petition to Mass., 5. 
240. 

Linut.-Gov. William, grant to, 4. 
SSln 

Capt. , in command of the sloop 

running between Boston and Fal- 
mouth, I. 278. 

Col. , sent to make a treaty with 

the Indians, 5. 288. 

Major , quartermaster, 8. 132, 

133, 134. 

the Rev. , of Boston. 5. 384/i; g. 

92. 
Philpot Lane, 9. 351. 
Phinney, Col. Edmund, engaged in 
the Indian war, 2. 149; at the 
seige of Boston, 2. 149, 196; a 
representative to the Mass. legis- 
lature, 2. 149; death of, 2. 149; 
a favorite, 2. 149 ; a leader of the 
whigs, 2. 150; his regiment the 
first to enter Boston, 3. 196; or- 
dered to Ticonderoga, 3. 196w,; 
mentioned, 3. 189, 190, 208. 

James, 2. 148 

Capt. John, at the lay ordination of 
Mr. Townsend, 2. 147; first set- 
tler of Gorham, 2. 146, 148; ;moved 
to Falmouth, 2. 148; children of, 

2. 148, 149, 

Mary Gorham, daughter of Capt. 
John, the first child born in Gor- 
ham, 2. 148; married Irish, 

2. 148. 

Molly, taken prisoner, 3. 316. 
Phippen, called Fitzpen, i. 113n; 
name still known in Cornwall, i. 
113n, 

David, son of Joseph, i. 113n; set- 
tled at Hingham, i. 113n; made a 
freeman, i. llSrt; died, i. Il3w; 
purchased land of Felt, Neale and 
Williams, i. 129, 200ii; lived at 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



223 



Salem, i. 200n; at Purpooduck, 
I. 322, 

Elizabeth, 1. 113. 

family, 1, 2S4n. 

George, resided at Falmouth, i. 180n. 

Joseph, lived at Falmouth, i. 112, 
113, 114, 180n; 3. 72, T2n; signed 
the submisson to Mass., i. 112; 
came from Boston, i. 113; pur- 
chased land of Cleeves, i. 113; 
lived at Hingham, i. 113w; mar- 
ried Dorcas Wood, i. 11 3w; his 
children, i. 113; died, 1. 113; Jor- 
dan conveyed land to, 1. 130; con- 
sented to the agreement between 
Jordan and Tucker, i. 131; ac- 
cused of breeding a disturbance, 
I. 131-132; petitioned Mass. to 
settle the controversy between 
Cleeves and Jordan, 1. 141 ; a man 
of strife and contention, i. 144; 
disposed of House island, by 
Sampson Penley, i. 151; moved 
to Purpooduck, i. 151, 322; con- 
stable of Falmouth, i.* 165; in fa- 
vor of the jurisdiction of Mass., i. 
170; lived near Long Creek, i. 
206; lived near Fore river, i. 216; 
a resident of Blue Point, 3. 72, 
72w; presented for abuse, 3. 72-73, 
73n; gave a bond, 3. 73; cause of 
the quarrel, 3. 73; trouble with 
Foxwell, 3. 75. 

Joseph jr., son of Joseph, i. llSn. 

Mary, daughter of Joseph, i. 113?i; 
married George Munjoy, i. 153. 

Samuel, son of Joseph, i. 113n. 

Sarah, daughter of Joseph, i. 113n. 
Phippeny, same as Phippen, 3. 72. 
Phips, Ann, sister of Sir William, 9. 
63. 

Danforth, 9. 69 70. 

David, son of Spencer, 9. 68; grad- 
uated from Harvard College, 9. 
68; lived in Cambridge, 9. 68; be- 
came a Tory, 9. 68; moved to 
England and his estate confiscat- 
ed; 6. 68; death of, 9. 68. 

Elizabeth, 9. 68. 

James, father of Sir William, 2. 239; 
9. 4; settled at Pemaquid, 2. 239; 
a gunsmith, 5. 223; 9. 4-5. 

James jr., son of James, 9. 63, 64. 

Col. John, 9. 40, 63; bequest in Sir 
William's will, 9. 63, 64; peti- 
tioned for a Canada grant, 9. 64. 

Lady Mary, suspected of witchcraft, 
9. 38; signed the warrant to re- 
lease a prisoner, 9.38; bequest in 
her husband's will, 9-63; married 
to Peter Sargent, 9. 64, 6Q ; Spen- 
cer Phips her heir, 9. 64; pur- 
chased real estate in Boston, 9. 
■ 64; mentioned, 9. 22, 24, 57, 67n. 

Mary Margaret, sister of Sir Wil- 
liam, 9. 63. 

Samuel, 4. 228. 



Capt. Samuel, 2. 175. 

Sarah, 9. 68. 

Spencer, signed the treaty of 1713, 
6. 254; autograph of, 6. 254; form- 
erly David Bennet, 8. 269; at the 
head of the government, 8. 269; 
9. 67; letter to from Capt. Lith- 
gow, 8. 269; beqest in Sir William 
Phips' will, 9. 63; heir of Lady 
Phips, 9. 64; lived in his aunt's 
house, 9. 67; a son of Bebecca 
Spencer, 9. 67; birth of, 9. 67; 
adopted by Sir William Phips, 9. 
67 ; graduated f rom^Iarvard Col- 
lege, 9. 67; held public offices, 9. 
67; death of, 9. 68; guardian for 
his minor children, 9. 68; sold his 
land rights at Pemaquid, 9. 79; 
mentioned, 4. 145, 161, 164, 108; 

8. 131, 258, 267. 

William, son of Spencer, 9. 68. 

Sir William, accompanied to Cana- 
da by Matthew Alger, i. 214; ex- 
changed Capt. Davis for a French- 
man, 1.301; visited Falmouth, i. 
303; 3. 137; the birth and birth- 
place of, 2. 65a, 207, 230, 239; 4. 
215, 216; 5. 224, 281 ; 9. 4; a ship- 
carpenter, 2. 230; 5. 224; moved 
to Boston, 2. 230; 9. 6; his opinion 
of his own destiny, 2. 230; 9. 8-9, 
65; married Mrs. Hull, 2.230; 4. 
216; 9.6; found a Spanish wreck, 
2. 230, 2301^; place of his residence, 
2. 230, 231 ; built a ship for Boston 
parties, 2. 231 ; 9. 7, 134; his house 
described, 2. 231; built a fort at 
Pemaquid, 2. 239; 5. 282; 7. 62, 
159; 9. 40-41, 42, 44w; his name 
feared by the Indians, 2. 239; 
went to England, 2. 240; died ih 
London, 2. 240; buried at Wool- 
noth, 2. 240; governor of the pro- 
vince of Massachusetts bay, 2. 65a; 

9. 34, 57^; sent Capt. Church to 
Maine, 2. 196; 5. 330; purchased 
a lading of lumber, 4. 216, 217; 
carried the people to Boston, 4. 
217, 223; 9. 7; embarrassed, 4. 217; 
his father a gunsmith, 5. 223; 9. 
4-5 ; one of twenty-six children, 5. 
223; 9. 5; learned to read in Bos- 
ton, 5. 224; 9.6; summoned Fron- 
tenac to surrender, 5. 272-273; the 
answer, 5. 273; refused a treason- 
able offer from James 11, 5. 281 ; 
proposed the reduction of Cana- 
da, 5. 281 at Pemaquid under 
royal instructions, 5. 282; early 
works upon his life, 9. 2, 3; the 
reason of his success, 9. 5-6; 
adopted Spencer Bennett, 9. 7; 
voyage to the Bahamas, 9. 9, 10, 
57 ; went to England, 9. 9 ; in com- 
mand of the Algier Kose, 9. 11; 
probably assisted by the Duke of 
York, 9. 11 ; quelled a mutiny, 9. 



224 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Phips, Sir William — continued. 

12-13; sailed for Hispaniola, g. 13; 
sccessful search for treasure, g. 
13; sailed for England, g. 13; 
powerful friends interested in, g. 
14; invented liis own instruments, 
g. 15; his method of search, g. 15; 
his success, g. 15-17, 52; trouble 
with his men, g. 17-18; arrived at 
London, g. 18, 52; the value of 
his part of the voyage, g. 18; 
knighted, g. 18-19, 57n; wanted 
in the naVy, g. 19, 22; second vis- 
it to thdfcBahamas, g. 19, 21; de- 
sired to return to New England, 
g. 21; in sympathy with the Puri- 
tans, g. 22; appointed high sher- 
iff, g. 22, 23; returned to Boston, 
g. 22, 23; fears of his becoming 
an Episcopalian, g. 23n, 24; near 
assassination, g. 24; went to Eng- 
land, g. 24; built his house, g. 24, 
25, 64-65; returned to Boston, g. 
26; offered the governorship by 
James ii, g. 26; joined the church, 
g. 27; comments on his lack of 
education, g. 27-28; in command 
of the Six Friends, g. 28; offered 
to go to Nova Scotia, g. 29; cap- 
tured Port Royal, g. 29; arrived 
at Boston, g. 30; a member of the 
council, g. 30; the French gov- 
ernor complained of, g. 30n; be- 
fore Quebec, g. 31; exchanged 
prisoners, g. 31-32; retired, g. 31, 
32; loss of a ship, g. 32, 33; at 
Boston, g. 32-33; endeavored to 
sustain the paper currency, g. 33; 
desired a second expedition to 
Canada, g. 33-34, 52; appointed 
governor, g. 34, 57n; the journal 
of his Canadian expedition lost, 
g. 34)^; arrived in Boston, g. 35; 
a time of storm and trouble, g. 
35-39; opposed the witchcraft de- 
lusion, g. 36-37, 37n,; his course 
commended, g. 37; interest in the 
French and Indian war, g, 39; his 
valuable knowledge, g. 39-40; 
made many voyages to the coast 
of Maine, g. 40, 40n; owned a 
yacht, g. 40^; treaty with the In- 
dians, g. 42; a barrier against the 
French, g. 42-43; troubled with 
political parties, g. 44; not a weak 
governor, g. 44, 46; non-residents 
disqualified, g. 45-46, 47 ; opposed 
by Brenton and Dudley, g. 46, 48, 
53; cause of his being called to 
England, g. 48, 53; legally a na- 
val officer, g. 48; ordered Brenton 
to stop interfering, g. 49; com- 
plained of, g. 49; held the respect 
of his officers, g. 50; his flag, g. 
50,50n; summoned to Whitehall, 
g. 51; never returned to Mass., g. 
52; his reception in England, g. 



52 ; chastised Capt. Short, g. 52 ; 
charged with corruption, g. 54; 
gave a bond, g. 54; his defense, g. 
54; his friends expected his re- 
turn, g.54, 55n,; sick, g. 55; death, 
g. 2, 3, 56, 61 n; burial, g. 56; fu- 
neral, g. 56, 56?i, 57 ; character of, 
g. 5-6, 9, 12, 18, 44, 46, 58-62; hife 
estate, g. 40n, 62, 65?^, 6Gn ; monu- 
ment to, g. bin; his arms, g. bin; 
his monument destroyed, g. 57- 
59 ; his will, g. 63-64 ; will proved 
and executed, g, 64 his wife 
married to Peter Sargent, g. 64, 
6Q; his mother alive when he 
died, g. 64; house described, g. 
65, ijS; his predictions equal to 
witchcraft, g. 65; left no children, 
g. 66 ; later residents of his house, 
g. 68; a supposed portrait of, g. 
69-70; authenticated portrait, g. 
70-72 ; purchased land at Modack- 
awando, g. 79; mentioned, 3. 105; 
4. 170; 5. xxi; 6. 252; 8. 269; g. 57; 
Memoir of by William Gould, g. 
1-72; Life of, see Mather, Cotton. 

Phips' cove, g. 135, 136, 154. 
funeral ticket, g. 57. 
place, g. 69. 
point, 2. 207; g. 5. 

Phipsburgh, incororated, 2.207; com- 
prised in the Kennebec Purchase, 
2.277; mentioned, 1.502^; 2.218; 
3. 273; 5. lix, 415, 423; 6. 164; 8. 
152, 284. 
saw-pit, g. 150. 
shipyard, g. 5. 

Phyps, Elizabeth, of Sheepscott river, 
5.57. 

Pickerel, abundant, 4. 318. 

Pickering, John, his notes on Jona- 
than Edwards cited, 6. 208 ^i, 212n, 
S4Sn; notes on Rasle's Diction- 
ary cited, I. 412n; 4. 95, 96, 97; 6. 
216u; g. 262, 262n. 
Lieut. , 8. 136, 140?i. 

Pickerings, the, 4. 255. 

Picqwaket, former name of Frye- 
burg, I. 333: see Pequakett. 

Pidgin, the Rev. William, called to 
preach at Minot, 2. 120; installed, 
2. 121 ; separated from the church, 
2. 123. 

Piedmont, 7. 32. 

Pier, an Indian, 3. 380, 440; see Pier- 
pole. 

Pierce, Andrew Martin, 6. 412. 

Charles, his prolific family, 7. 288. 

Franklin, 8. 349, 366, 459, 

Isaac, of Boston, i. 315; a tailor, i. 

315; married Grace Tucker, i. 315. 

John, received a grant from the 

Plymouth Company, i. 38 ?i, 39w; 

4. 218; 5-183; 8.201; settled at 

Broad bay, 1. 38n; 4. 218; 5. 183; 

a London merchant, 2. 42a7i; 4. 

218; held the charter of the Ply- 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



225 



mouth colony in trust, 2, 42an; 
did not settle at Pemaquid, 2, 42n; 
obtained the charter for the Ply- 
mouth colony, 2. 42n; friendly to 
the Indians, 4, 218; sold the char- 
ter of the Plymouth colony, 5, 
183-184; held the grant in his own 
name, 5. 184, 186; possible date 
of his coming, 5. 184-185; uncer- 
tain that he ever visited New Eng- 
land, 5. 184, 184n; died in poverty, 
5. 184 w, 186; probably commenced 
a plantation at Pemaquid, 5. 185; 
united his grant with Brown's 
purchase, 5, 185-186; defrauded 
the Plymouth colony, 5. 186; his 
opinion of Weston's men, 5, 196/1 ; 
see also Peirce, John. 

John, of Manchester, 4. 231 ; depo- 
sition of, 4. 231-232, 

Josiah, I. 326?i. 

Josiah, jr., 6, 354. 

Launcelot, lived near Pejepscot, i. 

247?i; married Stevens, 247n; 

his son, 247n, 

Lewis, 8. iii. 

Luther, 4. 345, 346, 347, 369, 398. 

Nancy, married Charles Freeman, i. 
S26n, 

Richard, 5. 277. 

the Rev. Thomas, preached at Scar- 
borough, 3. 161, 162ii; ordained at 
Newburyport, 3. 161; 6, 33; birth 
and death of, 3. 161; graduated 
from Harvard College, 3. 161. 

William, purchased land of Samuel 
Webber, i. 247n; moved to Mil- 
ton, 247n. 

the Rev. Dr. , of Brookline, 5. 

xlvi. 

Judge, , 6. 355. 

, of Anson, 4. 367. 

Pierpole, 3. Si2n; see also Pier. 
Pierre, 3. 412. 
Pierresougck, 3. 412. 
Pierson, the Rev. Daniel, 7. 226. 

Moses, 4. 164, 166. 

see also Pearson. 
Pigeons, abundant, 4. 328, 362. 
Piggwacket, remarks on the fight at, 
by the Rev. Paul Coffin, 4. 290- 
292; see Pequakett. 
Pike, the Hon. Frederick O., 8. 474. 

the Rev. James, 4, 265, 267. 

Mary, married David Coffin, 4. 241. 

Moses, lived at Sheepscott, 2. 233; 
swore fealty to the Duke of York, 
4. 221. 

Richard, lived at Falmouth, i. 215; 
gave the alarm of the approach of 
the Indians, i. 219-220; lived at 
Muscle cove, i. 219n; his son a 
master-mariner, i. 219w. 

Robert, 5. 399. 

Samuel, son of Richard, i. 219m; a 
master mariner, i. 219n; signed 

15 



the petition to Gov. Bradstreet, i. 
283n; an ensign and commission- 
er of Falmouth, i. 284; lived at 
New Casco, i. 322. 
Gen, Z, M., 9. 185. 

the Rev. , of Pemaquid, 5. 284, 

Pilgrim Fathers, the chronicles of, 

see Young, Alexander. 
Pilgrims, the, courage and spirit of, 
2. 31a; setttled at Plymouth 2. 
41a, 275; had no legal right to the 
soil, 2. 42an; not hindered by In- 
dians, 2. 271; obtained a grant 
from the Plymouth Council, 2. 
274-275; visited by Samoset, 5. 
144, 187; 6. 109; made a treaty 
with Massasoit, 5. 187; their 
policy with Indians, are of fair- 
ness, 5. 198; the first to meet the 
Arbella, 5. 199; the character of 
7, 25-26; the first squatters of 
New Ei^gland, 7. 26; never asked 
for a charter to the Penobscot, 7. 
29; obtained a charter for the 
Kennebec territory, 7. 29; first 
occupied the Penobscot, 7. 29; 
under heavy liabilities, 7. 29; 
formed the company of under- 
takers, 7. 29-30; Edward Ashley 
forced upon, 7. 30; did not regard 
the treaty of St. Germain, 7. 33. 
brought this business to a close, 
7. 33; frustrated at Penobscot, 7. 
36; last vestages of their fort, 7, 
37; accepted a patent to land on 
the Hudson; 8. 200; mentioned, 
2. 166, 269; 3. 29; 4. 71, 218; 5. 
164, 194, 196; 6. 122, 161, 179, 361, 
368; 7. 131, 262; 8. 289; 9. 224, 
305; at the Penobscot, by the 
Hon. John E. Godfrey, 7. 23-37. 
Pillsbury, Jonathan, moved to Scar- 
borough, 3. 220. 

Joseph, moved to Scarborough, 3. 
220; served in the war of the Rev- 
olution, 3. 203, 220. 

William, born in England, 3. 220; 
died at Newbury, 3. 220. 
Pinchon, Maj. John, i. 266m, 267n: 7. 

153n. 
Pine abundant, 3, 299, 302, 318. 

Charles, moved to Scarborough, 3. 
139-140, 140^, 182; gave the name 
to Pine point, 3. 142; a brave man 
and a hunter, 3. 142; a bitter ene- 
my of the Indians, 3. 144; daring 
encounter with the Indians, 3. 
144-145. 

creek, 3. 68. 

Grace, 3. 182. 

Hill, 4. 283n. 

Mary, married William Deariiftg, 3.,. 
182n. 

point, now Filling point, 2. 171; 
named for Charles Pine, 3. 142;, 
called Newbury's point, 3. 220. . 



826 



MAINE HISTOKICAL SOCIETY. 



Pine — continued, 
timber, valuable to send to Europe, 
8. 296 ; certain kinds reserved for 
the nay^, 8. 297. 
tree currency, found at Castine, 6. 
118-119; described, 6. 118; very 
rare, 6. 118-119, the coinage of 
forbidden, 6. 119, 119n; sent to 
England as a curiosity, 6. 119; 
story of and Charles ii, 6. 119; 
mentioned, 6. 135, 136, 137. 
shilling, 6. 135, 136, 137. 
threepence, 6. 135, 136, 137. 

Pine-apples, anecdote of Jocelyn, 3. 
90; grew in Maine, 3. 307. ' 

Pine's bridge, Col. Green killed at, i. 
230. 

Pinkhams, the, 9. 214-215. 

Pilmaces, one built at Sagadahoc, 3. 
301, 308; one called the Virginia, 
3. 308; sent with corn from Pema- 
quid to Boston, 5. 204; one be- 
longing to the Castle William, 8. 
229n. 

Pintard, John, 2. 112. 

Pipe stave, i. 57, 536, 551 ; 2. 98; 4. 23. 

Piracy, the first flag of raised in New 
England, 5. 205. 

Pirates, one hovering near Pemaquid, 
I. 42; headed by Dixy Bull, 5. 
205; vessel fitted out to capture, 
5. 205-206; the age of, 9. 10; see 
sea rover. 

Piscataqua, Gorges gave only a part 
of his attention to, i. 36; Edward 
Godfrey at, i. 46n, 47n; 9. 305, 
306; Cammock at, i. 47; 3. 12; 
sawmill sent to, i. 47; 9. 308n; 
Capt. Keale at, i. 52ii; 2. 68n; 
Henry Jocelyn at, i. 52n, 62; 3. 
34; Neale governor of, i. 53n; a 
lion killed at, i. 76; 3-89; gov- 
erned by a written agreement, i. 
85; Nicholas Frost constable of, 
I. 88; assessed, i. 94, 368 2. 48an; 
William Bracket sent to, i. 155n; 
Carr and Maverick arrived at, i. 
173; Eobert Jordan moved to, i. 
217; Anthony Brackett and his 
family escaped to, i. 224; John 
Skillings' family moved to, i. 315; 
3. 223; settlers of required to 
bring their children to be bap- 
tized, 1.354, 360; Capt.Neale had 
power to only grant land in, i. 
534; one of the first settlements 
in New Hampshire, 2. 4San; -not 
abandoned, 2. 4San; Capt. Gorges 
in, 2. 48a; first settled by church- 
men, 2. 61an; later by non-con- 
formists, 2. 61 an; neglected after 
the death of Mason, 3. 35; Miigg 
captured at, 3. Ill ; home of Capt. 
Wannerton, 4. 90, 90*1 ; Gov. Dud- 
ley at, 3. 343; treaty of, 3. 362, 
S66, 373.; 5. 2T; deiivation and 
definition of the name, 4. 191 ; a 



sloop to be sent to from New 
York, 5. 9; called Pescadonet, 6. 
283; Cadillac's account of, 6.283- 
284; Gov. Andros at, 7. 54; the 
house at in the care of Godfrey, 
9. 306n; mentioned, i. 546,530; 2. 
35a, 50, 50a, 52a, 67, 68w, 235; 3. 
21w, 89, 362, 379, 414; 4. 157; 5. 
198, 203, 204, 205, 206, 214, 224, 
225, 229, 251; 6. 146, 235; 8. 298; 
9. 308, 326, 342. 

bridge lottery, 8. 164. 

harbor, 2. 257-258, 261. 

river, visited by Levett, i. 34, 42n; 
2. 48a; a settlement commenced 
on the bank of, i. 35; grant to 
Gorges and Mason on, i. 49-50 
boundary of Gorges' patent, 1.8I, 
86; 2. 52a; 3-31; boundary of the 
Mass. purchase of Gorges, i. 239; 
land on owned by Geo. Munjoy, 

1. 257; visited by Robert Gorges, 

2. 45a; the settlements on the 
first in New Hampshire, 2. 52a; 
a boundary of the grant to Mason, 

2. 52a: 3. 31; fishing stages at, 3. 
9 ; boundary of the grant to Cam- 
mock, 3. 12; settlers sent to the 

3. 30-31; mentioned, i. 89, 100, 
147, 158, 214, 232, 366,405; 2.273; 

4. 14, 73, 96, 108; 5. xxi, 298; 6, 
236; 7. 109; 8. 184, 294, 892; 9. 
309n, 354, 360, 365. 

Piscataquauke, derivation and defi- 
nition of, 4. 191. 

Piscataquis county, 7. 10a, 894, 895; 
8. 317. 
river, see Piscataqua river. 

Piscattaway, see Piscataqua. 

Pitch, sent to England, 5. 298n. 

Pitchard, Capt. John, committed out- 
rages on Joseph Dabadis, 7. 86. 

Pitkin, William, 9. 29. 

Pitt, William, 6. 89. 

Pittaurisquanne, 6. 259. 

Pitts, Adam, tried for the murder of 
Paul Chadwick, 7. 387. 
James, 8. 209n, 214n. 

Pittsboro, now Gardiner, 6, 47; Ro- 
land Cushing settled in, 6. 47. 

Pittsburgh, 4. 282%. 

Pittsfield, 5. xlvi. 

Pittston, Dr. Gardiner commenced a 
settlement at, 2. 283; Gardiner 
separated from, 7. 410; mentioned, 
1.406,502; 2.284; 4.107,305,854, 
355, 400; 7.405,418. 

Placentia, 3. 428; 7, 134m. 

Plain Dealing or Newes from Ne^ 
England, see Lechford, Thomas. 

Plains of Abraham, i. 518, 520; 5. 176; 
8. 246n. 
the, of Veazie, 7, 6. 

Plaisted, Elisha, 3. 166. 
Roger, an associate, i. 170, 107; 
lived at Kittery, i. 197;sigi!MWi the 
petition to Cromwell, i. 395. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



227 



Samuel, signed the treaty of 1713, 

6. 256; autograph, of, 6. 256. 
Mrs. Samuel, routed a force of 

twenty Indians, 3. 174-1 75. 
Tho., signed the treaty of 1714, 6. 
258; autograph of, 6.258. 

Plaistrier, Capt. , captured by the 

English, 7,293/1, 314; in command 
at St. Croix, 7. 314; held Neutral 
island, 7. 314; embarked to cap- 
ture Sagadahoc, 7. 314, 316-317; 
probably met by the Gift of God, 

7. 317. 

Planks sent to England, 5. 298n. 

Plantaganet, 5. xlv. 

Plantation No. 3, now Penobscot, 9. 

159. 
office, Whitehall, 3. 329. 
the first name of Broomfield, 5. 283n; 

first officers of, 5. 283n; see 

Broomfield. 
Plato, a negro, 8. 301, 30l7i. 
Plattsburgh, N. Y., 9. 183, 184. 
Pleasant cove, meeting-house built at, 

8. Ilia, 11 In; Presbyterians at, 8. 
llln, 112n; controversy concern- 
ing the meeting-house, 8. llln- 
113n; site of the meeting-house, 
8. 112n, 113n; mentioned, 8. 109, 
110, 117, 119n, 151, 286, 287- 

cove, home of Thomas Gyles, 3-314; 
Indian name of, 4. 110; block- 
house erected at, 5. 367ii; dwelling 
place of Indians, 6. 209; men- 
tioned, 2. 140; 4. 169; 6. 211, 322; 
7. 348, 349. 

point manufacturing company, 2. 
141. 

pond, 4. 289, 289yi. 

river, 2. 244. 
Plough Patent, the, extent of, i. 45, 
80; 3. 32; why so named, i.45; 3. 
32; the patent lost, i. 45n; pat- 
entees, 1 . 45w ; purchased by Rig- 
by, I. 67, 546; 3. 32; granted to 
John Dy and others, i. 80; 3. 32; 
not visited by the owners, 3. S2. 

the, brought the first company to 
Lygonia, i. 45; 3.32. 
Plummer. Aaron, biographical notice 
of, 3/221, 

Benjamin, his deposition, cited, 6. 
20. 

Francis, 3. 221. 

Joseph, 3. 221. 

Moses, 3. 221. 

William, 3. 221. 

Gov. William, 5. xxxvii. 

the Rev. , of Penobscot, 9. 163. 

Plummer' s neck, 3. 144. 

point, 3. 100. 
Plutarch, 4. 90; 6. 148; 8. 335. 
Plymouth Colclnial Charter found, 2. 
42n; described, 2. 42n. 

colony, see Plymouth Mass. 

Company of Mass.,. the county 
claimed by, 2. 269; i. lix; a name 



frequently given to the Kennebec 
Purchasers; 2. 276, 277; employed 
John Jones as a surveyor, 4. 43; 
incorporated, 5. lix; regular meet- 
ings of, from 1749 to 1816, 5. lix; 
the affairs of controlled by Dr. 
Gardiner, 5. Ix; forts erected by 
their influence, 5. Ix; induced 
Germans to settle at Dresden, 5. 
Ix; 8. 213, 214; erected buildings 
in Lincoln county, 5. Ix; 8. 209n; 
Robert Temple became a partner 
in 6. 15; 8. 220n; said to hold 
land in Matchbiguatus, 6. 107; 
established a trading post at Pe- 
nobscot, 6. 109; .robbed by the 
French, 6. 109-110; attempted to 
drive out the French, 6. 110; 
Robert Temple's letter to, 6. 14- 
15; built a house on the Kenne- 
bec, 7. 52, 168, 175, 195; 8. 207n; 
the settlers harassed, 8. 355 ; Dr. 
Gardiner purchased land of, 7. 405 ; 
the records of, 8. 123; had a map 
of the Kennebec river made, 8, 
123-124, 124n; disturbed by squat- 
ters, 8. 206; the heirs of held a 
meeting, 8. 206-207, 207n, 208, 
208n; erected blockhouses, 8. 
207n; made provisions for a goal, 
8. 209n; Samuel Goodwin the 
agent of, 8. 212; Peter Wills in 
the employ of, 8. 21 3n; first town- 
ship laid out, 8. 213-214; Fort 
Shirley built, 8. 214; hindered by 
Indians, 8. 215; petitioned the 
general court to build a fort, 8. 
215; to build a magazine, 8. 217- 
218, 219, 235, 240; an influential 
body of men 8. 218-219; the seal 
of, 8. 219n; continually in litiga- 
tion, 8. 2l9n; London agent, 8. 
219n; Gov. Shirley a stockhold- 
er in, 8. 221, 222n; Fort Halifax 
built to further their interests, 8. 
223; the Winslow family inter- 
ested in, 8. 223 ; Jabez Fox sur- 
veyor for, 8. 225n; the committee 
of at Falmouth, 8. 226n, 228; Gen. 
Winslow a surveyor for, 8. 282^1 ; 
tracts granted to Winslow, 8. 288; 
the grant to, 8. 341; 9. 367; sold 
out, 8. 342; unsettled land dis- 

' putes with the Pejepscot proprie- 
tors, 9. 200-202; part of their ter- 
ritory within the grant to Beau- 
champ and Levitt, 9. 227-228; 
Thomas Davis to set off the dis- 
puted territory, 9. 228, 229; men- 
tioned, 4, 351; 8. 113, 113/1, 282, 
300, 341; 9. 81, 23L 

Company of England and Plymouth 
Council formed, 3. 289; "5. 332, 837; 
received a charter, i. 28; sent out 
an expedition under Popham and 
Gilbert, i. 29; 2. 189; sent out 
fishing vessels, i. 30, 32; 5..336; 



228 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Plymouth Company — continued. 

sent Richard Hawkins to America, 
I. 32; received a new charter, i. 
32; boundaries of, 1.32-33; pat- 
entees, 1.33; part of their terri- 
tory within the grant to Sir Wil- 
liam Alexander, i.34, 347i; a proc- 
lamation to prevent disorder ob- 
tained, I. 35; gave a grant to Gor- 
ges and Mason, i, 35; gave a 
grant to Aldsworth and Elbridge, 
1.36-37; 5.200; 7. 135; grant to 
John Pierce, i. 38n, 39n; 4. 218; 

5. 183; grant to Way and Pur- 
chase, 1 . 40n, 80n ; gave a charter 
to the Massachusetts Company, i. 
40; grants to Oldham, Vines, 
Lewis and Bonington, i. 43-44; 
grant to John Dy, i. 45; grants to 
Godfrey, i. 46; gave Black Point 
to Cammock, i. 47; grant to 
Goodyear and Trelawny, i. 48, 52; 

6. 137-138; reason for giving this 
grant, i. 48; gave grants of the 
territory to others which was al- 
ready given to Gorges and Ma- 
son, 1. 49; surrendered their char- 
ter, I. 78, 79, 82, 97; 7. 143; given 
governmental powers, i. 78; 5. 
206-207 ; gave a patent to Sir Wil- 
liam Alexander, i. 79; 8. 143; held 
a meeting at Whitehall, i. 81; 
their grievances, 1.81-82; the ter- 
ritory divided, i. 82; 5. 2n, 169; 
urged the king to revoke the 
Mass. charter, i. 83; Sir Ferdi- 
nando Gorges the only member 
of undiscouraged, 2.32a; gave up 
the idea of colonizing, 2, 33a; 
gave a charter to the Plymouth 
colony, 2, 41a; 8, 143; the extent 
of their grant, 4, 221; 5, 2; the 
company broken up, 4. 221 ; held a 
monopoly of the fishing, 5, 169, 
215 ; assailed by Sir Edmund Coke, 
5. 169; James i, at a meeting of, 
5. 169; sold land to Jennens and 
ShefBeld, 5. 170, 185; Edward 
Rocroft in their employ, 5. 179n; 
licensed Bennett to fish, 5. 186n; 
originated through the influence 
of Popham and Gorges, 5. 332, 
337; preparations for colonizing, 
5. 332 ; called the North Virginia 
Company, 5. 332n; sent out two 
expeditions, 5. 333-334; discour- 
aged by Chalonge's failure, 5. 334 ; 
encouraged by Capt. Pring's re- 
port,5,334;sent out alarger colony, 
5. 334; as energetic as the London 
Company, 5. 334; discouraged by 
the Sagadahoc failure, 5.336, 338, 
353; given a more extended char- 
ter, 5, 336-337 ; name changed to 
the Council for Ruling and Plant- 
ing, 5. 337, 338; their grants the 
basis of the settlements in New 



England, 5. 338; supposed to as- 
sist the English church, 6. 183; 
grant to Beaucamp and Leverett, 

6. 321; 9. 77; territory granted to 
in the second charter, 7. 27; John 
Pierce a member of, 9. 117; men- 
tioned, I. 28. 32, 34, 35, 40, 43, 45, 
78, 81; 2. 7, 66a; 7.27; 9-223; rec- 
ords of cited, 5. 167n, 168^1, 186n; 

7. 313?^, 315; see also Council for 
Planting, Ruling and Governing 
Kew England. 

County, 2. 172; 4. 146. 

England, a company of adventurers 
of procure a charter, i . 28 ; Pop- 
ham and Gilbert sailed from, i. 
29, 32; 2. 27a; 3-290; 5.157a; 6. 
176; 7. 311, 288; the home of 
Abraham Jennings, i. ?>6; home 
of Goodyear and Trelawny, i. 
46, 48, 52, 56, 62; 4. 23; 5. 170w; 
Cleeves and Winter came from, 
I. 55, 194n; the wife of Winter 
lived in, i. 73; Sir Ferdinand 
Gorges lived in, i.l09; 2.67a, 71a; 

5. 157; Martin, Mayor of, 5.207; 
interested in fishing, 2. 20a; tlie 
best harbor to sail from, 2. 35a- 
36a; Capt. John Smith sailed 
2 . 36a; ship returned to, 2. 38a; 
Weymouth arrived at, 2. 17; 5. 
157; Capt. Dormer at, 2. 30; Wil- 
liam Gorges a lieutenant at, 3. 
49; Popham' s second colony 
sailed from, 3. 293; mentioned, 
1.534; 2.31a, 32a, 40a, 42n, 145, 
266; 3.2^9; 5, xlw, 169, 171, 351; 

6. 15; 7. 319, 364; 8, 202; 9. 223, 
365, 367. 

Mass., the colony and town of named, 
1,33; the first permanent settle 
ment in New England, i.33; the 
governor of to be one of Gorges 
counselors, i. 34?i; a patent 
sought for, I. 38-39; established 
a trading post on the Kennebec, 
1.39,40,44; 2, 192; 5. 168; 7. 26; 

8. 201-202, 203; procured a new 
charter, i, 44; 2. 41a; extent of 
the grant to, i. 44; carried on 
trade with the natives, i.44; sold 
the title, I. 44; the settlement 
commenced, I. 50; 2.275; success 
of their trading house, i. 55; re- 
ceived a grant on the Kennebec, 
I. 79; 2. 200, 203; 8. 203, 205; 
Bradford's grant transferred, i. 
79; 2. 275; governed by a written 
agreement, i. 85; came for re- 
ligious freedom, i. 102; home of 
George Lewis, i. 113n; home of 
Robert Thornton, i. 146; people 
from settled in Maine, 1. 161 ; out- 
break of King Philip's war in, i. 
210; Major Church in, i. 292; 
friendly Indians from go to 
Maine, i. 304n; Bramhall moved 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



229 



to, 1.808; Edward Preston moved 
to, 1.354; had no legal right to 
the territory they settled in, i. 
A2an; two charters granted, to i. 
42an; the charters compared, i. 
42an; extent of territory granted 
to, I. 42an,; almost annexed to 
New York, i. 42an; opposed to 
being annexed to Mass. bay col- 
ony, I. 42an; Slaughter wrongly 
accused of meddling in the attairs 
of, I. 42an; notified of the arrival 
of Robert Gorges, i. 43a, 44a; 
assisted by London merchants, i. 
44a ; assisted the colony of Gorges, 
I. 46a; John Pierce and Sir Fer- 
dinand Gorges obtained the char- 
ter for, I. 42a; 2. 55a; 5. 183-184; 
assessed, 5. 48an; the success of 
drew the attention of the English, 
5. 53a; Robert Gorges at, 2. 43; 
settled by the permission of 
Gorges, 2. 42; under the jurisdic- 
tion of Mass., 2. 65; too highly 
praised, 2. 99; people from did 
not settle at Yarmouth, 2. 175; 
claimed jurisdiction over the 
Kennebec, 2. 193; commissioned 
Thomas Prince to establish a 
government, 2. 193-194; orders 
for the government, 2. 194-195; 
supposed site of their trading 
post, 2. 200; gave a deed to the 
Kennebec purchasers, 2. 202, 203, 
276 ; obtained Indian deeds to the 
territory, 2. 275 ; extent of country 
claimed, 2. 275; built forts and 
endeavored to govern, 2. 275; mo- 
nopolized the fishing, 2. 275; 
leased the country, 2. 276; Henry 
Jocelyn moved to 3. 109 ; attacked 
by Indians, 4. 222 ; the Gen. Ar- 
nold wrecked off, 4. 310; had fish- 
ing vessels at Cape Ann and Pem- 
aquid, 5. 168; tenants of John 
Pierce, 5. 184; defrauded by 
Pierce, 5. 186; the first acknowl- 
edgment of a deed in, 5. 195; 
D'Aulney an enemy of 5. 215; 7. 
34; appealed to Mass., for assist- 
fl,nce, 5. 215; 7. 34, 36, 37; proba- 
bly traded with the Penobscots, 
6. 234; brought their Penobscot 
business to a close, 7. 33; Mass. 
refused to assist, 7. 37; relin- 
quished all hope of regaining 
their post, 7. 37; no direct evi- 
dence of slaves being held in, 7. 
210; made coasting trips, 8. 201; 
cargoes of fish sent from, 8. 202 ; 
ship captured, 8. 202; sent Stan- 
dish as their agent to England, 8. 
202^203; sent AUerton as agent, 
8. 203; Wiswell theirjagent, 9- 26; 
vigorously prosecuted the fishing 
business, g. 78 ; the relations with 
John Pierce a mystery, 9. 117; 



treated the patent with'Icoolness, 
9. 118-119 ; disgusted with Pierce's 
deed poll, 9. 120; mentioned, i. 
39n, 261 ; 2. 31a, 74a, 77, 101, 133, 
146, 168, 175, 194; 3. 178, 189, 281; 
4. 16, 71, 159,218, 271,361; 5-144, 
163, 164, 171, 181, 185, 187, 194, 
198, 251; 6. 109, 111, 161, 179; 7. 
131,247, 190>i, 308n, 310; 8. 199, 
200, 279, 2Sln, 320; 9. 29, 41, 44, 
319; the History of, see Bradford, 
Gov. William. 
Fort on the Penobscot, captured by 

D'Aulnay, 5. 215. 
Partners, 7. 30, 31, 178; see Under- 
takers, the company of. 
Patent, lost and found, 9. 122; de- 
signedly concealed, 9. 122, 125; 
mentioned, 4. 233; 8. 166, 223, 233. 
rock, 6. 173, 178; 9.225. 
Pnjejewock, the, 4. 108. 
Poak, Joseph, sold land to Paul 

Thompson, 3. 225. 
Pocahontas, 9. 303. 
Pochmart, Philemon, conveyed land 

to John Wadleigh, i. 358. 
Poetry, published in Maine, 8. 180. 
Point Aux Trembles, i. 487, 490, 491, 
492, 493, 494, 496, 497, 498, 519. 
Bagaduce, 6. 107. 
Boleyne, 9. 318yi. 
de Peres, i. 448. 
Halifax, 4. 350. 

Levi, canoes at destroyed, i. 481; 
Arnold at, i. 482, 483, 484; men- 
tioned, I. 479, 490, 495, 516, 517, 
518, 520^. 
of rocks, I. 124, 248w. 
Popham. named, 3. 285, .SOln; sup- 
posed site of Popham' s colony, 3. 
301)2. 
Precinct, 8. 173. 
the, Wiscasset, 4. 331. 
Wasaumkeag, 5. 383'. 
Poissards, the, 7. 460. 
Pojepscot, the, a part of the Andros- 

coggin,^ I. 40n. 
Polan, an enemy of the whites, 9. 212 ; 

killed, 9. 212-213. 
Poland, formerly a part of Bakers- 
town, 2. Ill; Moses Emery lived 
in, 2. 112; incorporated, 2. 115; 
the Rev. Jonathan Scott moved 
to, 2. 115; mentioned, 2. 116, 157, 
161, 162, 163; 4- 301, 304, 360; the 
annals of, 2. 111-130. 
Polls, Joseph, 7. 104. 
Political strife, bitter, i. 142; 7. 355- 

356. 
Polk, James K., 7. 469; 9- 243, 244, 

245, 246. 
Pollard, Jonathan, signed the treaty 
of 1713, 6. 255; the autograph of, 
6. 255. 
Moses, 4. 362. 

Major , 2. 125. 

Polls in Scarborough, 3. 177. 



230 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Polluck, 3. 97. 

Polo, Marco, 2. 76. 

Polonius, I. 413. 

Polwhele's Devonshire cited, 5. llOn. 

Pombomcou, Philip de, 7. 70, 71w, 75. 

Pomfret, 2. 145. 

Pomroy, the Rev. Thaddeus, preached 

in Gorliam, 2. 147-148. 
Pond cove, i. 278. 
island, former name of Peak's is- 
land, I. 145yi; the title of Mary 
Munjoy to confirmed, i.25o; men- 
tioned, I. 149w; 9. 130. 
island light, 8. 345. 
town, 2. 285. 
Ponguongamook, 4. 108. 
Ponobscut, 3. 362; see Penobscot. 
Pons, Antoinette de, 8. 322. 
Pool, Samuel, 2. 113, 12.1 
the, Saco, 2. S3n. 
William, 7. 284. 
Poor, Daniel, 8. 413. 
Gen. Enoch, 4. 284n. 
John A., 6. 361; 9. 70; his address 
at the Popham celebration cited, 
I. 29w; his Memoir of the Hon. 
Reuel Williams cited, 8. 335-385; 
his Vindication of Gorges cited, 
7. 99. 

Miss , married Gen. Joseph 

Frye, 4. 284w. 
Pooran, chief of the St. Francis In- 
diums, 4. 147. 
Pope, Alexandex', cited, 5. xxx. 
Richard, i. 322. 

the, his bull gave America to Spain, 
7. 296; defied by England, 7. 296. 
Popham celebration, the, i. 29n; 7. 
426. 
colony, on the bank of the Kenne- 
bec, 2. 189, 190; 5. 335; 7. 27; re- 
• turned to England, 2. 189; 5. 336; 
cruelty to the Indians, 2. 190; 
Belknap's opinion of the site of, 

3. .300n; the exact site of uncer- 
tain, 3. 312; 4. 69; perhaps at 
Stage island, 4. 69; not Puritans, 

4. 69; remained about a year, 5. 
835; found no trace of former 
visitors, 6. 297; established at the 
mouth of the river, 5. 297; came 
to the Penobscot river, 6. 314; 
found the cross set up by Wey- 
mouth, 6. 297, 314; knew where 
to come, 6. 314; the religious ser- 
vices of, 8. llSn; mentioned, i. 
29; 5. 338, 349, 350; 7.3, 127; 8. 
320, 403. 

expedition, emigration growing out 
of, 7. 308; mentioned, 5. 333; 7. 
210, 317. 

Sir Francis, sent out fishing vessels, 
1. 30; 2. 33a; a son of Sir John, 2. 
29a; 7.307, 313; proposed to send 
a second expedition to America, 
2.29a-30a; unsuccessful in his at- 
tempts at colonization, 2. 23 ; one 



of his ships found by Capt. Johil 
Smith, 5. 161; letters patent 
granted to, 7. 307; persistent in 
settling and trading, 7. 313, 315, 
315n, 321; offended with Gilbert 
and Popham, 7. 315, 317; sent out 
a ship under Capt. Williams, 7. 
316; the Gift of God his flag ship, 
7. 317; his influence, 7.318,321; 
founder of the trade at ^N'ew Har- 
bor, 7. 322; mentioned, 6. 176n; 
7. 129w, 295, 307, 321, 322. 

Capt. George, in command of the 
colony, I. 29; 2. 27a; 5. 334; 6. 
176; brother of Sir John, 2. 27a; 
a letter of cited, 2. 28a; attempted 
to visit Bashaba, 2. 28a-29a; death 
of 2. 30a, 189; 3. 308, 309; 5. 158, 
336, 352; 6. 178, 303, 307; at the 
Kennebec river, 2. 189; his re- 
mains taken to England, 2. 190; 
in command of the Gift of God, 
3.291-292; 5-351; visited Pema- 
quid, 3. 298; 5. 159, 335; visited 
the Sagadahoc, 3. 300, 311, 322; 
5. 317; president of the colony, 3. 
301; visited by Indians, 5. 144; 
built a fort at Sagadahoc, 5. 156%; 
found Kahanada married and a 
sachem, 5. 328, 3.35; 7. 322; did 
not know of the Kennebec inland 
river, 5. 338; sailed from Ply- 
mouth, 5. 351 ; letter to James i, 
5. 357-360; named St. Georges 
island, 6.297; said that Weymouth 
had visited the islands, 6. 297; 
found no trace of former visitors, 
6.297; colony established at the 
mouth of the river, 6. 297 ; aided 
by the directions of Rosier and 
Waymouth, 6. 297, 305 ; moved to 
the Kennebec, 6. 297, 304; over 
estimated the distances, 6. 304; 
induced to settle on the Kennebec 
through Pring's report, 6. 305; 
mentioned, 5. 248, 322, 348, 355; 
7. 115, 297, 298, 302, 303, 309, 310; 
9. 302. 

Sir John, father of Sir Francis, i. 
30; sent out an expedition under 
Capts. Hanham and Pring, 2, 19, 
23a; manifesto concerning, 2.2San ; 
at the zenith of his power, 2. 24a; 
falsely accused of alacrity in sen- 
tencing Raleigh, 2. 24a-25a; ad- 
dress to Raleigh, 2. 25a; resided 
at Wellington, 2. 25a; Aubrey's 
opinion of 2. 25a; his hospitality, 
2. 25a; Lloyd's sneering remark, 
2. 26tt; enlisted some of the first 
people of England in colonization, 
2. 20, 27a ; brother of Capt. George 
2. 27a; death of, 2.29a, 77a; 3. 
290; 4. 69; as a messenger, 2. 69a; 
confined by Essex, 2. 70a; re- 
leased by Gorges, 2. 71a; his 
tomb described, 2. 77a; birth- 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS* 



231 



place of, 2. 11a; educated at Ox- 
ford, 2. 77a; Ms house used as a 
garrison, 2. 77a; a patron of Wel- 
lington, 2. 77a; Ms character, 2. 
77a, 78a; sent Pring on an expe- 
dition, 2. 19; sent Capt. Popham 
Qn an expedition, 2. 20-21; Ms 
death disheartened the company, 
2. 22; 5. 351; prepared a ship to 
€arry settlers to the Sagadahoc 
river, 3. 290; ship captured, 3. 
|91; settlers made slaves of, 8. 
291; not disheartened, 3. 291; 
$ent out the Gift of God and the 
Mary and John, 3. 291-292; 5- 
3^3; locality of Ms settlement, 3. 
2^6, 300m, 301n; received reports 
from the colonists, 3. 308; several 
voyages made in the charge of, 5. 
isf ; relied on the mines for the 
support of the colony, 5. 173 ; be- 
eaine part owner of the posses- 
si o|ns of Arundell and Southamp- 
toi|i, 5. 331-332; received two of 
Weymouth's captives, 3. 332; one 
of the originators of the Plymouth 
Company, 5-332; chief manager 
of the Plymouth Company, 5. 337; 
mentioned, 2. 19, 189; 4- ^S; 5. 
154, 158n, 344,345; 9-302. 
Memorial volume, cited, i. 88n,; 7. 
134n, 135n. 
Popham's town, 7. 303; by Rufus K. 

Sewall, 7. 291-322. 
Popkin, John Snelling, 6. 390. 
Popple, , name signed to Whar- 
ton's patent, 3. 321, 329. 
Population, of Biddeford, 1790, 5. 
xxiv; of Falmouth, 1764, 7. 214; 
of FrankUn county, 4. 33 ; of Hal- 
lo well, 1794, 7. 383-384; of Ken- 
nebec county, 4. 33; of Maine 
from 1784 to 1860, 7. 269; in 1792, 
5. XXV ; of Norridgewock, 1840, 
1850, 1860, 7. 288; of Pemaquid, 
1630, 5. 233; of 1631, 8. 185; of 
1673, 5. 234; of Pownalboro, 1764, 
7. 216; of St. Gorges, 1631, 8. 185"; 
of Sagadahoc, 1631, 8. 185; of 
Sheepscott, 1631, 1665, 1707, 8. 
185; of York, 1764, 7. 214; see 
also Inhabitants. 
Porley, Nathaniel, 7. 284. 
Port au Monton, Du Monts at, 7. 250. 
au Prince, 2. 247. 
aux Isles, 7. 261. 
de la Plata, 9- 13, 15. 
La Tour, 9. 109. 
Portage lake, i. 466. 
Porter, Dr. Aaron, married Paulina 
King, 3- 214. 
Benjamin, 7. 357. 
Col. Essekiel, 4. 394. 
James, teacher in Belfast Academy, 

8. 172. 
the Rev. Nathaniel, 4. 250, 256, 304; 
g. Ivn. 



Major , of Farmington, 4. 308. 

, of Windham, 7. 235. 

Porterfield, Charles, i. 500. 
Portland, Greenleaf's map of Maine 
published in, i. 5; Freeman's edi- 
tion of Smith's Journal published 
in, I. 5; the Maine Historical 
Society held its meetings in, i. 
12, 15; formerly a part of Fal- 
mouth, I. 21, 6S; foundation of 
laid by Cleeves, i. 46, 60; 6. 131; 
Cleeves and Tucker settled at, i, 
59; the Indian name of, i- 59, 59n; 
site of the first house in, i. 63m; 
Isaac Parker resided in, i. 302; 6. 
99n; the first of the York family 
in, I. 318; granite in, i. 325; lum- 
ber transported to, i. 330-331 ; the 
general court of the state of Maine 
met at, 2. 124; the market town 
of Minot, 2. 130; destroyed in the 
war of the Revolution, 2. 1^62; 
census of 1791, 3- 84n, 129, 210; 
tonnage of, 1820, 4. 25; manufac- 
tures in, 4. 27 ; a part of called 
Matchegon, 6. 109n; coins found 
in, 6. 129; Elder Jesse Lee 
preached in, 7. 227 ; destroyed by 
fire, 7. 478; visited by the Prince 
of Wales, 7. 479; the Maine His- 
torical Society moved to, 8. iii, 
iv; but three of the natives of in 
1800, educated at college, 8. 158; 
common schools in, 8. 158; state 
capital moved from, 8. 345; men- 
tioned, I. 129w, 242, 248, 264, 325/1, 
326n, 333, 408. 409, 528; 2. 85n, 
148, 150, 163, 165, 184, 218; 4-9, 
19, 24, 45, 86, 105, 145n, 249n, 250n, 
279n, 289n, 337, 339, 355, 386; 5. 
xxiv, XXV, XXX, xxxii, xxxiv, 
xxxviii, xli, xlii, xliv, xlv, li, lii^ 
Ivn, Ixvi, 186, 327, 403, 419, 422, 
439, 450n; 6. 11, 34, 41, 160, 185, 
189, 189^, 192, 194, 200, 357, 366, 
369, 371, 372, 373, 374, 413,433; 7. 
19, 59, 214, 219, 220, 221, 273, 283, 
285, 363, 372, 408, 417, 469, 470, 
474, 475, 477, 479, 482, 484; 8. 42, 
47, 49, 52, 70, 167, 173, 179, 224, 
226n, 368, 369, 376, 389, 396, 411, 
417, 420, 421, 439, 446, 474, 505; 9. 
69, 76, 123, 172, 176, 218, 219, 247; 
see under Casco and Falmouth, 
academy, the Hon. William Willis 
interested in, 7. 476;. incorporated 
8. 165; land granted to, 8. 165; 
funds raised for, 8. 165; precept- 
ors of, 8. 165, 169; number of pu- 
pils of, 8. 165; girls admitted, 8. 
165; sold, 8. 166; income devoted 
to other purposes, 8. 166. 
Advertiser, 5. 292n; 8. 59. 
circuit, 7. 227. 
Company's Works, i. 63n. 
harbor, Levett attempted to settle 
on an island in, i. 51»i; 2. 85n. 



232 



MAmE HISTORICAL SOCIETT. 



Portland — continued. 

island,former name of Bang's island, 
I. 146n, 150; owned by James An- 
drews, ji. 150; sold to John Rouse, 
I. 150. 
Natural History Society, 6. 361 ; 8. 

166, 420; 
N. Y., 7. 487. 
packet, the, 4. 327. 
Public Library, 7.484; 8.166. 
sound, I. 144. 
Portledge, 4. 239. 

Portneuf, , head of the expedition 

against Falmouth, 7. 59; his gross 
perfidy, 7. 60; negligence of, 7. 
118. 
Port of Pemaquid, now New Harbor, 
7. 322. 
Rossignol, Du Monts at, 7. 250; now 

Liverpool, 7. 250. 
Royal, former name of Annapolis, 
I. 26; 7. 27; a colony established 
at, 1, 26; Pontrincourt interested 
in, I. 26; 8. 821; Les Carbot's ac- 
count of, 8. 26; Jesuits sent to 8. 
26; 8. 322; Biard and Masse in, 
I. '2Cm, 429; occupied by the 
French, i. 27, 33; the French 
driven from, i. 27; 5. 281; Bien- 
court needed at, 5. 428; a second 
and independent settlement pro- 
posed, 5. 429; Argall committed 
ravages at, 5.431; 8. 330; Mem- 
berton moved to, 1.431-432; Du 
Monts to move his colony to, 
(1606)7- ^"7, 263; settlement to be 
abandoned, 7. 264; settlers re- 
turned to, 7. 264; ineffectual at- 
tempts at explanation, 7. 265; La 
Tour at, 9. 98, 108 ; Biencourt at, 
g. 98; St. Castine had a trading 
house at, 7. 47; Capt. de Hable- 
(1613) ville at, 1613, 8. 323; an unsuc- 
(1707) cessful expedition, 1707, sent 
against 7. 76; a second unsuc- 
cessful expedition, 7. 77, 78; a 
(1710) third expedition, 1710, 7. 78; in 
a poor shape for defense, 7. 78; 
surrendered, 7. 78-79; articles of 
capitulation sent to Quebec, 7. 79; 
Yandreuil mortified, 7. 81 ; the 
recapture proposed but aban- 
doned, 7. 82-83; in the hands of 
(1713) the English, 1713, 7. 83; cap- 
tured by Sir William Phips, 9. 
29 ; the plunder from sold in Bos- 
ton, 9. 30/1 ; a Scotch colony at, 
9. 102; condition of the Scotch, 9. 
100; mentioned 3. 347; 6.208,241, 
280; 7. 28, 48, 49, 56, 57, 69, 71w, 
76, 251, 264, 314; 8. 140, 245n, 279; 
9. 102. 
Tolouse, 8. 140. 
Porto Rico, 2. 18. 

Portsmouth, England, 2. 52a. 50; 5. 
169; 9. 34/1. 
N. H., Greenleafs Ecclesiastical 



Sketches published in, i. 5; be- 
ginning of the settlement of, i. 
35; Richard Tucker resided at, i, 
64n; part of called Greenland, 1. 
154; home of Nathaniel Fryer, i. 
227, 230; visited by Mugg to sue 
for peace, i. 228; hume of Jolm 
Hill, I. 230n, 306; Robert Jordan 
died at, i. 232, 552; home of Ellas 
Stileman, i. 233; Sarah Jordan 
lived at, i. 234n; home of George 
Bramhall, i. 241, 556; refugees 
from Maine arrived at, i. 303n; 

3. 138; home of Philip Gammon, 
I. 310; Anthony Libbee moved 
to, I. .321 ; the church of met in 
council at Wells, i. 348; former 
home of William Hancock, 2. 139; 
on Hubbard's map, 5. 261w; an 
Episcopal church establislied at, 
6. 181; Indian treaty at, 6. 250, 
257; Robert Hallowell collector 
at, 7. 404; Major Yaughan emi- 
igrated to, 8. 294; the Cutts set- 
tled at, 8. 295; formerly called 
the Bank, 8. 295; drew the busi- 
ness from York, 8. 391 ; Edward 
Godfrey near, 9. 306 ; mentioned, 
I. 106, 1.54n, 310; 2. 122, 255; 3. 
165, 209, 211, 212, 219, 223, 226, 
321, 348; 4. 273, 299; 5. li, 399; 6, 
165, 189, 200, 322, 373, 413; 7-235; 
8. 128, 295, 296, 297-298, 303, 304, 
307; 9- 23, 24, 217, 306w; annals 
of, see Adams, Nathaniel. 

R. L, 1.259; 5-269. 
Portugal, fish trade with, i. 56; the 
benefits derived by from coloni- 
zation, 2. 59; occupied Brazil and 
the East Indies, 2. 59; claimed 
the right of possession of the 
coast of Maine, 7. 296; mentioned, 

4. 24; 6. 122; 7. 137w, 144n, 415, 
474; 9.245, 246. 

Portuguese, the, early fished on the 
banks of Newfoundland, 6. 173; 
mentioned, 8. 319, 332. 
coinage, found at Castine, 6. 122. 
Posattuckauke, definition of, 4. 191. 
Postleth wait's dictionarv, cited, 5. 

417. 
Post-office, the first in Scarborough, 

3. 205. 
Potatoes, introduced by the Scotch- 
Irish, 5. 14. 
Potomac river, 4. 114; 8. 356. 
Potter, C. E., on the language of the 
Abnaquis, 4. 185-193. 
the Rev. Horatio, 8. 483. 
John, 6. 67. 

Deacon , of Ipswich, 4. 354. 

Judge , 6. 41, 236. 

Mrs. , of Poland, 4. 360. 

, 5. xxxix, 37. 

Potter's mills, 2. 192, 218. 
Potts, 2. 171. 
Richard, a juror, 1. 188; an assurety 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



233 



for Nathaniel Cloyes, 1.190; his 

wife and children taken prisoners, 

I. 225; lived at Casco bay, i.236n. 

Potum, Charles, indicted for being 

disorderly and idle, i. 379. 
Pougohwaken lake, 4. 108. 
Pouseland, [ former modes of spelling 
Pouselin, j Powsland, i. 205n. 
Poutrineourt, Sienr Jean de, a com- 
panion of Du Mont, I. 26; 7. 249; 
sent his son home for supplies, i. 
26; made a settlement at Port 
Eoyal, I. 428, 5. 178; Biard and 
Masse forced upon him, i. 428; 
his character, i. 429; returned to 
France, 7. 251, 322; 9. 98; back to 
• New France, 7. 264; received a 
grant from Du Monts, 8. 321 ; 
grant confirmed, 8. 321 ; his ardor 
abated, 8. 322; his colony in his 
son's care, 8. 322; accompanied 
by La Tour, 9. 98; Catholic, 9. 98; 
death of, 9. 98; mentioned, 7. 46, 
252. 
Povey, Thomas, 9. 333, 352, 355. 
Powav^, Memberton revered as one, i. 

431. 
Powder, the wars in Europe raised 

the price of, 3. 432-433. 
Powell, Ann, daughter of John, mar- 
ried Clarke, 7. 234; death of, 

7. 234. 
Ann, mother of Jeremiah Dummer, 

7. 233. 
Anna, daughter of William D., mar- 
ried Thomas Perkins, 7. 234?i. 
family, notices of by T. D. Powell, 

7. 231-238. 
Jeremiah D., son of John, birth of, 
7. 233 ; parents of, 7. 233 ; a justice, 
7. 233; a representative, 7. 283; 
Lieutenant-Colonel under Waldo, 
7. 233 ; lived at North Yarmouth, 
7. 233-234, 238; married Sarah 
Bromfield, 7.234, 238; death of, 7. 
238. 
John, land granted to, i. 243; a 
commissioner, 2. 175; lived in 
Boston, 1.175; moved to North 
Yarmouth, i. 175; built a saw- 
mill, I. 181. 
John 2d, father of Jeremiah D., 
death of, 7. 233; children of, 7. 
234; secretary of Leiut.-Gov. 
Dummer, 7. 233, 234n. 
John 3d, son of John, married Miss 
Tallmadge, 7. 234; a loyalist, 7. 
234; went to England, 7. 234; 
children of, 7. 234. 
Susan, daughter of John, married 

Symmes, 7. 235, 235n, 936. 

Susan, daughter of William D., mar- 
ried Jonathan Mason, 7. 234^1. 
T. D., notices of the Powell family. 

7. 231-238. 
William D., son of John, lived in 
Boston, 7. 234; married Mary 



Bromfield, 7.234; children of, 7. 
234n; extracts from his journal, 
7. 235-237. 
William D.. son of John 3d, edu- 
cated in Mass., 7. 234; married 
Miss Murray, 7. 234; went to Eng- 
land, 7. 234; governor of Upper 
Canada, 7. 234; death of, 7. 234%. 
Powers, Isaac, 4. 364. 
Walter, 8. 51, 55. 

the Rev. , of Penobscot, 4. 330, 

344. 

, 4. 383. 

Pownal, 2. 125; 8.266. 
Pownalborough, now Dresden, i. 502; 
2. 279; 4. 43; 5. Ix; 6. 67; Ar- 
nold's troops at, I. 502; home of 
John Jones, 4. 43 ; incorporated, 
4. 78; origin of the name, 4. 78; 
first house in, 4. 331 ; the shire- 
town of Lincoln county, 6. 43; 
county buildings erected at, 6. 
43-44; the Hon. William Cushing 
settled in, 6. 44-45; lioland Cush- 
ing practiced in, 6. 4^n ; John 
Gardiner moved to, 6.49; called 
Frankfort, 6. 196; population in 
1764; 7. 215; slaves held in, 7. 215; 
the Rev. William McLenichon at, 
8. llOn; town-house built, 8. 113n; 
the west parish of, 8. 173; the Rev. 
Mr. Bailey in, 8. 268%; mentioned, 
2. 214; 4. 15, 45, 330, 345, 354; 6. 
50, 159, 197; 7- 275, 286, 406; 8. 
209n, 288. 
Pownall, Gov. Thomas, held parley 
with the Indians, 5. 369-373; the 
spot he selected for a fort, 5, 383, 
383n accompanied by Mowatt in 
the expedition to Penobscot, 440n; 
took formal possession of Penob- 
scot, 6. 113; 7. 6; 9. 87; his cer- 
tificate of taking posssesion of 
Penobscot, 6. 333-338; buried a 
lead plate in the river, 6. 336, 337, 
338; the possession of the Penob- 
scot of great value to Maine, , 6. 
336; the place where he lauded, 

7. 6; Gen. Waldo in his expedi- 
tion, 9. 87 ; laid claim to the pres- 
ent site of Bangor, 9. 224; men- 
tioned, 5. 383; 6. 363; 7. 9, 16; 8. 
245n, 246?i, 283^1; 9- ^0, 81, 91; on 
the Indian title deeds, 5. 193; his 
speech of Feb. 1, 1759, cited, 5. 
365n; his speech of July 6, 1759, 
cited, 5. 386; his journal of a voy- 
age from Boston to the Penob- 
scot river, in full, 5. 363-387; the 
same cited, 6. 113/i, 336; 9. his 
topographical description of the 
British Provinces, cited, 5. 385n; 

8. 198n. 

Powsland, Richard, purchased land of 
Nathaniel Mitton, i. 122, 206; 
lived in Falmouth, i. 205, 206; 
his son conveyed land to Samuel 



234 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Powsland, Richard — continued. 

Moody, I. 206; lived at Capisic, 
I. 216, 322; purchased land of 
Mrs, Harvey, i. 248; lent money 
to the town, 323. 
Samuel, i. 206n. 
Pov^sley, former spelling of Powsland, 

I, 20571. 
Powys, 7. 380. 

Pratt, Charles, master mason of Bun- 
ker Hill Monument, 3. 266. 
Pratt, Sir Charles, 6. 49. 
Joseph, 4. 55. 
Josiah, 4, 360. 

P., teacher at Saco academy, 8. 175. 
Phineas, teacher at Warren acade- 
my, 8. 172, 
Sarah, married Samuel Parris, 5. 
xln. 
Praussoway, 3. 412. 
Preaching considered needless, 4. 361. 
Preble, Abraham, lived at Agamenti- 
cus, I. 94n; invested with magis- 
tratical powers, i. 107; laid out 
the line between Saco and Scar- 
borough, I, 111; presided at the 
court held at York, i. 159; held 
held court at Scarborough, i. 163; 
an associate, 1. 164, 165; treas- 
urer, I. 164; biographical notice 
of, I, 164w; his estate adminis- 
tered by his widow, i. 164m; coun- 
selor, I. IMn; a representative, i. 
267; a magistrate, i. 367; assist- 
ant I. 368; treasurer of York, i. 
S71; commissioner, i. 389; signed 
the petition to Cromwell, i. 395; 
a referee in the Foxwell and 
Phippen quarrel, 3-73; amount 
of land granted to, 9. 378 ; men- 
tioned, 3, 49. 
Abraham, jr., i. 164n; 9. 382. 
Benjamin, son of Abraham, i. 164n; 

father of Brigadier, i. 164n. 
Commodore Edward, son of Gen. 
Jedediah, 8. 246n; married Mary 
Beering, 5. 419, 422; one of the 
committee to wait on Capt. Mow- 
att, 5. 445. 
family, 4. 89; 8. 245n. 
Admiral George H., 8. 246/i. 
Harriet, married Stephen Thatcher, 

6. 359. 

Brigadier Jedediah, owned Bangs 
island, i. 150n; a son of Abraham, 
I. 164n; to make returns to Gov. 
Pownall, 5. 366; in command of 
Port Pownall, 5. S66n, 386 ; ordered 
to the Passagawasskeg, 5. 374, 
375 ; in command at Fort Halifax, 

7. 178, 179; 8. 245; biographical 
notice of, 8. 245n; recruited men 
for the expedition to Fort Beau- 
eejour, 8. 246; mentioned, 3-222; 

5. 367, 370, 373, 374, 378, 379, 381; 

6. 338; 8. 230, 231. 

John, son of Jedediah, 5. 886; in 



command at Fort Preble, 5. 386; 
witnessed Pownall' s certificate, 6. 
338; mentioned, 5. 369, 369w, 372. 

Judith, administered her husband's 
estate, i. 164n. 

Mary, wife of Edward, 5. 419; death 
of, 5. 419n. 

street, i. 249. 

William Pitt, corporate member of 
the Maine Historical Society, i. 
11; a descendant of Abraham, i. 
164; purchased land of J. H. In- 
graham, 6. 133; sold land to Judge 
Mellen, 6. 133; death of, 6. 355, 
373; mentioned, 4. 9; 5. xliii; 6. 
73, 359; 8. 47, 48, 56, 57, 89, 347, 
359, 414, 459. 

Col. , 5. 372. 

, of Bath, 3. 277; his child 

killed, 2. 199. 
Precaute, an Indian town, 5. 156n. 
Precious metals, one of the induce- 
ments for colonization, 5. 173. 
Prentiss, Dr. Caleb, 2. 125. 

the Rev. John, 5. xxiii. 

Henry, his assistance acknowledged, 
7. 92n. 

Rebecca, daughter of the Rev. John, 
married the Rev. John Mellen, 5. 
xxiii. 

, of Rustfield, 4. 338. 

Presbyterian Church, the, first in 
Boston, 6. 12; changed to other 
denominations, 6. 12; the first in 
the United States, 6, 29; in Phil- 
adelphia, 6. 157. 
Presbyterianism, date of its origin, 6. 
24; James i, subscribed to the 
creed, 6. 25; compared to Episco- 
paliauism, 6. 25-26, 27; cause of its 
origin, 6. 29; planted in the Mid- 
dle States, 6. 29 ; the first in the 
United States, 6. 29-30; cause of 
the decline, 6. 170; in ISTew Eng- 
land, 1. 1-37. 
Presbyterians, at Boothbay, 6. 19, 34, 
156; at Bristol, 6. 160; at Bruns- 
wick, 6. 33; at Cape Elizabeth, 3. 
275n; at Georgetown, 2. 220; 3. 
274m; 6. 32; 8. Uln, 112n; at 
Londondery, 6. 31; at ISTewbury- 
port, 6.31-32, 164; at New Castle, 
6. 33; at Pleasant cove, 8. lllw; 
at Richmond, 7-413; at Worces- 
ter, 6. 31; settled in Ireland, 6. 6, 
8; improved the country, 6. 8; 
quarrel with the Congregational- 
ists, 6. 13; first church at Bally- 
carry, 6. 27; not harmonious, 6. 
27; classes of, 6.28; number of 
in Ireland in 1734, 6. 28; did not 
flourish in England, 6. 28; re- 
tained their purity in America, 6, 
28-29 ; number of in Maine, 6. 30 ; 
merged into other denominations, 
6. 29, 30-31; Maine a stronghold 
for, 6. 32; the first Presbytery 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS, 



235 



formed, 6. 36; last meeting held 
by, 6. 37; Benjamin Franklin on,, 
3. 339-340; mentioned, 6. 10, 170; 
7. 219. 
Presbytery, of Boston, 6. 13, 156; of 
Philadelphia, 6. 30; of the East- 
ward, 6. 168, 169. 
Prescott, Col. Benjamin, 2. 146. 
Gate, I. 521. 
William, 6. 364. 
Col. William, 3. 262. 

Dr. , married Miss Clark, 

5. xviii; 9. 176. 
President and council's relation, 

cited, 5. 163. 
Press, the, a pinion of knowledge, 8. 

179. 
Preston, England, i. 355yi. 
Maine, i. 354, 359. 
Edward, i. 354. 
John S., 8. 353. 
Presumpscot, the settlement so small 
that it needed no civil authority, 
I. 85; home of Augustin John, i. 
244n, 320; Robert Greason lived 
at, I. 320; Peter Housing lived at, 
1.320; home of Robert Nichols, 
I. 321; mentioned, 2. 148. 
falls, 4. 110. 

river, Squidrayset the sachem of the 
tribe on the, i . 41 ; claimed as the 
northern boundary of the Tre- 
lawny grant, i. 48; claimed as 
the original Casco River, i. 49; 
Cleeves and Tucker commenced 
a settlement on, i. 68; a bridge 
built over, i. 69; Macworth's 
grant on, i. 70; mills erected on, 
1.119,210,269-270; land on sold 
to Phillips, I. 119; Indians sold 
land on i. 129; Jordan desired to 
extend his possessions to, i. 130; 
John Wakely settled on, i. 154, 
212; early settlers on, i. 156; 
Peter Housing owned land near, 
I. 190n; Richard Martin lived 
near i. 207; families on, i. 215, 
286 ; land near conveyed to Isaac 
and Thomas Jones, i. 259; a road 
laid out to, I. 279; James An- 
drews lived near, i.'305, 308; 
Ebenezer Davenport lived near, 

1 . 308 ; land at conveyed to Thomas 
Cloyce and John Gustin, i. 310, 
310n; Lewis and John Tucker 
lived near, i. 315; a boundary of 
the Narragansett Township No. 
vii, 2. 146; boundary of Gorham, 

2. 146, 148; mentioned, i. 42, 65n, 
68, 76, 114, 118, 120, 121, 123, 128, 
140, 153, 221, 298; 2. 85n, 138, 140, 
162; 3. 336; 4. 108, 110, 111; 6. 
210. 

Presumskeak, see Presumpscot. 
Price, a corruption of Ap Rice, 6. 7. 

the Rev. Ebenezer, 4. 324, 330. 

Bz^kiel, 4. 169, 184, < 



Richard, 3. 340. 
Dr. , 4. 17. 

, 8. 241. 

Prices of liquor, beaver, etc., i. 71. 
Pride, John, signed the petition of 

1672, 5. 240. 
Prient, a mulatto, 7. 193. 
Priestly, Joseph, 7. 382. 
Prima Vista, same as New Foundland, 

7.26. 
Primitive inhabitants fast dwindling 
away, 1.8; refused to adopt the 
manners of civilization, i. 8; see 
Indians. 
Primrose, the 5. 135. 
Prince and Haywood, i. 491. 
Benjamin, 2. 175. 

Charles, gave name to New Eng- 
land, 7. 135. 
county, 7. 227. 
Edward's Island, 7. 27; 8. 135; 9. 

101. 
George, 6. 309, 356, 360; his voyage 
of Capt. Waymouth to the coast 
of Maine, 6. 291-306; 7. 134n. 
John, his worthies of Devonshire, 

cited, 4. 239. 
of Orange, 9. 26, 31, 47. 
of Wales, 7. 479. 
Society, 9. 101, 111. 
the Rev. Thomas, to establish a 
government on the Kennebec, 2. 
193-194; 7. 36; Dr. Belknap, edu- 
cated under, 8. 302; his chrono- 
logical history of New England, 
cited, I. 25, 27, 29, 32, 33, 34, 35, 
36, 40, 41, 44, 45, 54, 79?i; 2. 42an, 
24w, 32, 7971, 99; 3-9; 5- l^l^r 163n, 
204, 206n, 310w; 6. I78ti, I79w; 7. 
99, 304n; his introduction to Mar 
son's History of the Pequod War, 
cited, I. 25. 
Walker, 7. 153n. 
Prince's point, 2. 171. 
Princeton, 6. 35. 
college, 6. 412 ; a stronghold of Pres- 
byterianism, 6. 29. 
Principal, i.450. 
Pringle, married Dorcas Willcot, i. 

314. 
Pring, Capt. Martin, successfully ex- 
plored the coast of Maine, i. 28; 
2. 21a, 22a; 5-334; 8. 133-134; 
commander of an expedition to 
America, 2. 19, 21a, 23a; 5. 152, 
351; inPenobs3ot bay, 2.21a; 7. 
26; gave names to the coast, 2. 
21a; carried a load of sassafras to 
England, 2. 22a; 5. 334 to meet 
Challonge, 2. 23a;. manifesto con- 
cerning 23a7i; accompanied by 
D€hamda, 2. 21; 5. 328; 6. 297, 
captured by the Spanish, 3. 291; 
his course to be followed by Chal- 
longe, 5. 383 ; in command of the 
second colony sent out, 5. 333-384 ; 
did not meet Challonge, 5. 334; 



236 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Pring, Oapt. Martin — continued. 

left Nahanda, 5. 334; gave a fa- 
vorable report of the country, '5. 
334; discovered the Kennebec, 6. 
297; visited the Fox Islands, 7. 
26; mentioned, 5. 156, 177, 195, 
195^, 6. 305; 7. 255n; 9. 302. 
Prison, at Falmouth, dilapidated, i. 
166; anew one to be erected, i. 
166-167, 18271 ; Fort Loyal to be 
used as one, i. 270-271. 
ships, 6.368; 9.179. 
Prissillah, the, at Boston with Ger- 
man settlers, 8. 223. 
Privateers, see Arnold, the. 
Privy Council, the, 5. 276, 276n; 9.49. 
Probate office, Boston, 9. 63, 65. 
Proctor, Jonas, 9. 204. 
Samuel, married Susannah Bcackett, 
I. 236n, 306. 

Lieut. , 7. 325, 326. 

Professional schools in Maine, 8. 177. 
Profonde, La, sent to capture Fort 
William Henry, 7. 63 ; commanded 
by De Bonaventure, 7. 63. 
Proprietors of Scarborough, 3. 130. 

of the Kennebec Purchase, 5. lix, Ix. 
Prospect, 5. 377w; 6. 200; 8. 110. 

harbor, 5. 378n. 
Protestant Episcopal Church, the His- 
tory of, by the Rev. Edward Bal- 
lard, 6. 171-202. 
Episcopal Missionary Society, 6. 201. 
Protestantism, Pemaquid a bulwark 
of, 5. 174, 278; the Jesuits jealous 
of, 7. 58. 
Protestants, came from France to 
America, 4. 78; came from Ger- 
many, 4. 78; came from Ireland, 
6. 5, 10; mentioned, 9. 98, 99. 103. 
Proud, Robert, History of Pemaquid, 

cited, 5. 10. 
Prout, Ebenezer, 3. 221. 
Elizabeth, 3. 221. 
family, 3. 221n. 

family manuscript cited, 3. I73n. 
Joseph, 3^221; a letter of cited, i. 
293ii; owned Scottow hill, 3. 219; 
a commissary, 3. 173, 235; orders 
to, 3. 235-236; a son of Timothy, 
3. 221. 
Lydia, 3. 221, 221n; married Capt. 

Timothy McDaniel, 3. 218. 
Mary, married Alexander Kirkwood, 
3. 216, 221; a daughtei of Timo- 
thy, 3. 221, 221n. 
Timothy, claimed land at Sheep- 
scot, 2. 236; purchased the Scot- 
tow estate, 2. 237n; his daughter 
married Capt. Alex. Kirkwood, 3. 
216; his daughter married Capt. 
Timothy McDaniel, 3. 218; pur- 
chased Cammock point, 3. 221; 
married Lydia Savage, 3. 221; a 
biographical notice of, 3. 221. 
Timothy, jr., 3. 221, 221n. 
Prout' s neck, purchased by Timothy 



Prout, 2. 237w; formerly Black 
Point, 9. 209-210; mentioned, 3. 
215; 9.210. 

Provender, J., 2. 173. 

Providence, a thriving town, 4. 268^; 
four sects in, 4. 268; Thomas Bur- 
gess settled in, 7. 430; Thomas M. 
Burgess, mayor of, 7. 430 ; men- 
tioned, 2. 145; 5. 440; 6. 354; 7. 
429, 432. 
island of, 9. 16, 49. 

Province house, former residence of 
Peter Sargeant, 9. 67 ; burned, g. 
87. 
of New Somersetshire, former name 

of Maine, i. 64. 
of the Duke of York, 5. xx, xxi. 
road, the, 3. 167. 

Provincial Congress, 2. 212, 213, 216, 
243, 246; 6. 48n, 162; 7.7, 9. 
Council of Maine, 2. 50. 

Provost, Sir George, 9. 195, 198, 199. 

Prudence, , of Stark, 4. 312. 

Prudent, , of Stark, 4. 312. 

Prussia, 5. 407. 

Pruyn, the Hon. John Y. L., 5. 2ji. 

Psalm of Life, the, quoted, 5. Ixviii. 

Ptolmy, Claudius, 2. 17a. 

Public house, opened in Falmouth, i, 
258-259; see Ordinaries. 

Puck, 3. 92. 

Puckanumbamet, 8. 212n. 

Pudding, Jack, 2. 233, 234, 236; 4. 
219, 231. 

Puddington, George, lived at Aga- 
menticus, i. 364; his wife indict- 
ed, I. 364; to receive ten pounds 
from George Burdett, i. 366; a 
deputy, I. 367. 
John, I. 267; signed the petition to 
Charles 11, 1.402; married Martha 
Munjoy, i. 256. 
Mary, iadicted, i. 364; to make a 
public confession, i. 365. 

Puddlestone island, 3. 361, 370. 

Pullin, Richard, married Elinor Brack- 
ett, I. 306. 

Pulpooduck, definition of, i. 207n; see 
Purpooduck. 

Pumgustuk river, the, 2. 178. 

Pumpkin island, visited by the Pop- 
ham colonists, 3. 294?i. 

Pumpkins, as a consideration in the 
purchase of land, 2. 190. 

Puncheon, , married Joanna Edge- 
comb, 3. 25. 

Punishments, inflicted on the early 
colonists, 1. 185 ; 2. 185 ; 3. 57, 57yi, 
135; see also cage, ducking stool, 
gauntelope, stocks and whipping 
post. 

Purchase, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Thomas, i. 40. 
Elizabeth, widow of Thomas, 3, 
320/1 ; married John Blaney, i.40; 
3. 320rt. 
Jane, daughter of Thomas, i. 40. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



237 



Samuel, his Pilgrimage cited, 2. 17a, 
28a, 30a, 32, 76a, 189; 3- 284, 285; 
5. 153, 155, 156, 157, 164, 165, 169, 
310; 6. 173m; 7. 99, 101, 102, 133, 
134, 135; 9.302. 
Thomas, his widow married John 
Blaney, i.40; 3. 320n; children of, 
I. 40; the place of his settlement, 
I. 40, 80, 236w; 3* '^1^, 317, 320; 
the extent of his i)urchase, i . 40n, 
80n; 3. 312-315; conveyed his 
land to the Massachusetts Com- 
pany, I. 40n; 3. 317; date of the 
grant to, i. SOn; at the first court 
held in Maine, i. 84; lived at Pe 
jepscot, I. 211; 3. 329, 330, 331, 
332, 333; his house robbed, i. 211 ; 
accused of injury to the Indians, 
I. 211; a commissioner, i. 364; 3. 
36 ; ordered to appear before the 
council, 1 . 546 ; sold land to Thomas 
Stevens, 3. 315; received a grant 
from the king and the council of 
Plymouth, 3. 316, 325, 326, 330, 
331; the existence of the patent 
doubted, 3. 316; the patent recog- 
nized, 3. 316-317; his business, 3. 
317, 329; his house and the patent 
burned, 3. 317, 330; built a stone 
. house, 3.317, 320; the first settler 
in the neighborhood, 3. 817; 
Christopher Lawson in his em- 
ploy, 3. 317, 329; acknowledged 
the jurisdiction of Mass., 3. 317; 
a magistrate, 3-317, 330, 332; sold 
land to various settlers, 3. 317; 
Sir Christopher Gardiner lived 
with, 3- 317-318, 818^; driven from 
Pejepscot, 3. 318; returned for a 
short time, 3. 318; went to Bos- 
ton and then to England, 3. 318, 
832; married Mary Grace, 3. SlSn; 
annoyed by a trading post, 3. 322, 
332; his claim more than the Pe- 
jepscot settlement, 3. S2An; era- 
ployed John Riding, 3. 329;' had 
trouble with Clarke and Lake, 3. 
830; mentioned, i. 550; 2. 194; 9. 
310. 
Thomas jr., i. 40. 

Purinton, , 8. 363. 

Puritan commonwealth, the, held a 
court at Pemaquid, 5, 248; the 
history of, see Oliver Peter. 
Puritanism, not general in Maine, 4., 
70 ; tinctured the early history of 
New England, s^ 160; leavened 
the English mind, 5. 227; the 
cause of the growth of New Eng- 
land, 5. 227; preserved both the 
Englands from the French, 5. 273; 
date of its origin, 6. 24. 
Puritans, excited, over the idea of a 
general government of New Eng- 
land, 2. 54a ; those bound for New 
England met by Sir F. Gorges, 
a. 54a; indebted to Gorges for 



assistance, 55a; in New Hamp- 
shire, 2. 61an; Maine objected to 
being ruled by, 2. 62an; disliked 
by Morton and Gardiner, 2. 78a; 
the character of, 2. 270-271 ; over- 
w^helmed the settlers of Maine, 5. 
xxii; their** reason for governing 
Maine, 5. 234; the influence of 
progressive, 5. 237; involved in 
expense during King Philip's 
war, 5. 255; promptly sent help 
to the east, 5. 255; opposed the 
carrying of fugitives from Maiije 
to New York, 5. 255-256; their 
traders disturb Pemaquid, 5. 264; 
cause of the name, 6. 24; adhered 
to Calvin, 6. 24; not the common 
fathers of New England, 6. 179; 
mentioned, 4. 80; 5. 141, 175, 233, 
236, 238, 263, 265; 6. 176n, 178, 
184, 185, 361; 7. 415; 8.. 205, 438; 
9. 22, 214n, 315n, 320, 323. 
Purpooduck, the original name and 
definition of, 1. 112, 297w; 4. 116; 
land at sold to Phippen, i. 113; 
the Stanfords resided at, i. 113, 
251n, 322 ; Joseph Phippen moved, 
to, 1. 151, 322; the inhabitants of, 
I. 216, 286, 303; home of John 
Wallis, I. 220/1, 251, 323; Joel 
Madefer, lived at, i. 25 In, 321; 
Robert Haines lived at, i. 251n, 
320; Ingersoll built a grist mill 
at, I. 269; abandoned by the gar- 
rison, I. 303; home of Jacob and 
Lawrence Davis, i. 309, 320; 
home of JohnParrott, i. 310, .322; 
home of Philip Gammon, i. 310, 
820; home of Dennis Morough, i. 
313, 321; home of Matthew Paul- 
ing, I. 317, 322; home of John 
Lane, 1.317, 321; home of Tbomas 
Walter, i. 317, 323; home of Hen- 
ry Bailey, 1.319; home of Philip 
LeBretton, i. 319; home of John 
Brown (sen.) i. 319, 320; home of 
John Edwards, i. 320; home of 
Jacob Freeze, i. 320; home of 
John Harris, i. 321; home of John 
Holman, i. 321 ; home of William 
James, i. 321; home of Thomas 
Loveitt, I. 321; home of Joseph 
Morgan, I. 321; home of Thomas 
Page, I. 322; home of Sampson 
Penley, i. 322; home of David 
Phippen, 1.322; home of Leonard 
l&lew.,' 1. 322;. home of Clement 
Swett, I. 322; home of Ralph 
Turner, 1.322; home of Benjam- 
in Wallis, I. 323; home of Josiali 
Wallis, I. 323.; 3^ 140; home of 
Nathaniel White, i. 323; home 
of Thomas Wallis, i. 3-23; home 
of Michael Webber- i, .324; home 
of Josiah White, i! 823; home of 
Zachariah White, i. 323; attacked 
by Indians, 1703, 3. 140; only one 



238 



MAINE HISTOEICAL SOCIETY. 



Purpooduck — continued. 

house there in 1717, 3. 227; a part 
of Cape Elizabeth, 4. 108 ; see also 
Papooduck. '* 

point, the original name for Spring 
point, I. 112n; home of John 
Wallis, I. 206, 316; a road laid 
out to, I. 278; Major Church an- 
chored off, 1.308; called Papoo- 
duck point, which see. 
Purrington, Humphrey, 2. 208. 
James, lived at Casco bay, i. 236n. 

Pusey, , 8. 492. 

Putnam, Jasper, signed the petition 
to Charles 11, i. 402. 
Jesse, 3. 246. 

Gen. Rufus, letter of on Shay's re- 
bellion, 2. 250-254; deceived, 2. 
253; at the battle of Bunker Hill, 
3. 262; as an agent to treat with 
the Indians, 7. 8. 
Samuel, 6. 364. 
the, burned, 7, 126. 

, teacher at Belfast academy, 8. 

172. 
Pynchon, Col. John, to negotiate a 
treaty with the Marquas, 5. 278. 

, cited, 5. 206n. 

Pyrenees, the, 6. 110; 7. 41, 41n. 
Pyrrhus, 6. 148. 

Quabacook, Indian name of Merry- 
meeting bay, 2. 204; 3. 312, 314, 
333; 4. 109. 

Quabeag bay, 4. 109. 

Quack, the name given to an island 
by Levett, i. 151n; the definition 
of uncertain, i. 150n-151n. 
called York by Levett, i. 42, 149n; 

2.84, 85n, 88; 5. 188. 
a, practicing in 1796, 4. 319. 

Quahaug, a species of clam, i. 151n. 

Quakerism, the only instance of pun- 
ishment for in Maine, 3. 71; a 
Fast Day kept to prevent the 
spread of, 7. 221. 

Quakers, Edward Hutchinson opposed 
the punishment of, i. 342n; or- 
dered to obey the laws, i. 398- 
399; not to be hung, i. 399; none 
in Minot, 2. 130; whipped, 3. 154; 
driven from New Hampshire, 7. 
220; in Berwick, 7. 220; in Boston, 
6. 285 ; in Eliot, 7. 221 ; in Maine, 

3. 154; in Providence, 4. 268; in 
Khode Island, 6. 288 ; mentioned, 

4. 351 ; 7. 220, 221 ; see Friends. 

Qualebeenewes, 6. 253. 

Quampeagan, definition of, 4. 109. 

Quamphegan, a sawmill at, i. 269. 

Quamscook pond, 4. 109. 

Quantabacook pond, 4. 109. 

Quantin, , a Jesuit sent to Amer- 
ica, I. 429; see Quentin. 

Quarterly Register, cited, 8. 176. 

Quatre Bras, 4. 10. 

Quebec, manuscripts of the Jesuits 



taken to, i. 412; the distance of 
from ISTorridgewock, i. 437; the 
minister at Nanrantsonoke to be 
sent to, I. 441; visited by Indians, 
I. 441 ; Rale pressed to retire to 
ff)r safety, i. 444; settled by the 
French, 2. 67; Frontenac in com- 
mand at, 2.240; colonial prisoners 
sent to, I. 301; 3. 137; 6. 191; 7. 
60; Peerpole made a religious 
pilgrimage to, 4. 31n; John Jones 
escaped to, 4. 43 ; the capture of 
opened the woods of Maine to the 
emigrant, 4. 75; the northern 
Gibralter, 4. 78; called Kebec, 4. 
105; definition of, 4. 105; foun- 
dations laid by Champlain, 5. 178; 
the metropolis of 'New France, 5. 
178; the scene of the decision be- 
tween two nations and two prin- 
ciples, 5. 178; captured by David 
Kirk, 5. 196; 9. 102; smaller in 
1629 than Pemaquid, 5. 196; an 
unsuccessful attack upon, 5. 281 ; 
9. 28, 30, 34n, 86; St. Castine at, 
6. Ill; the Indians early learned 
the way to, 6, 236; probably sup- 
plied the Indians with arms, 6. 
236-237; land near granted to the 
Pennacooks, 6. 238; closely con- 
nected to Indian settlements, 6. 
240; Wonnolancet moved to, 6. 
237; William Groton at the siege 
of, 6. 368; Madockawando a fre- 
quent visitor at, 7. 44; all the 
councils held at, 8.215; Fronte-1| 
nac summoned, 1690, to surrender, 
9. 31 ; the seat of French power, 

(1754) 1754, 8. 222; the congress of 
1759, 3. 176; surrendered to the 

(1759) English, 1759, 2. 241 ; 4. 75, 241 ; 

6. 242; 7. 295; by the fall of 

France lost her dominion over 

Maine, 7. 248; Arnold in com- 

(1775) mand of the 1775 expedition 
against, i. 447, 470; seen from 
the Chaudiere, i. 449; but few 
regulars at, i. 477, 517; Arnold 
desired news from, i.479; frigates 
at, I. 480, 481, 482, 483, 488, 492, 
493; the people apprised of Ar- 
nold's approach, i.481; the peo- 
ple of not opposed to Arnold, i. 
484, 489; the people in confusion, 
I. 485-497; Arnold demanded the 
surrender of, i. 486-487; number 
of troops in, 1.488; Arnold re- 
tired from, 1.488; Arnold confi- 
dent of his success, i. 491, 494; 
Arnold's folly the cause of his 
failure, i. 517; the capture not in 
the end important, i. 517; re- 
inforced by Carleton, i. 519; the 
first man to fall at, i. 519; the 
prisoners at paroled, i. 527; the 
English government desired di- 
rect communication with Halifax, 



INDEX TO COLLECTIOKS. 



239 



8. 18, 19; mentioned, i. 448, 469, 
470, 472, 478, 507n, 515n, 516, 528, 
529, 530, 531; 2. 168, 182, 199; 5. 
178ri, 289, 325^1; 6. 212, 275, 276, 
282; 7. 48, 49, 58, 62, 69, 71n, 79, 
80, 169, 175, 193, 256, 259, 389, 390, 
391,415; 8. 14, 19, 93, 104, 147n, 
192n, 235, 239, 244, 271; 9- 43, 102, 
198, 199, 200, 224. 
the district of, 8. 349. 
the province of, 8. 22, 23, 26. 
Queen Anne' s War, the proportion of 
the population diminished during 
4. 74; trade extinct during, 4. 74; 
mentioned, 2. 241 ; 3, 140, 144. 
Mab, 3. 92. 

Regent, i. 428; see Marie de Medci. 
street, owners of lots bound by, i. 
247; now Congress street, 247, 
249. 
Queenstown, 9. 186. 

Quentin, Pere, , came to America, 

I. 412 ; 8. 323; carried to Virginia, 
8. 329; with Argall on his second 
expedition, 8. 330. 
Quequaroomanit, 3. 362. 
Querenebuit, 3. 362, 371. 
Quibban, 2. 145. 
Quibiquesson river, 5. 156n, 157n; 7. 

99. 
Quimby, Moses, 6. 355, 373. 
Qaincy, 3. I6O71, 254, 255. 

Edmund, at Georgetown, 3. 361; 
signed the treaty of 1713, 6. 253; 
autograph of, 6. 253. 
Eliza Susan, 7. 231. 
Hall, 3. 268, 

Josiah, 2. 11a; 4. 6; 5. Ixii; 8. 451. 
Hon. Josiah, of Grafton county, 9. 

240. 
Josiah, jr., married Abigail Phillips, 
7. 234; death of, 7. 235; his son, 

7. 235m. 
Josiah, 3d, 7. 235n. 

Quinibequy river, Champlain, at, 7. 

255, 257, 259; called the Slieep- 

scott, 7. 257. 
Quinnawus, 6. 258. 
Quinoise, 3. 412, 428, 435, 439, 440. 
Quincius, 4. 172, 174, 176, 177, 181, 184; 

8. 211n; 

Quint, Mrs, , of N. Vineyard, 4. 

397. 
Quirebooset, 6. 258. 
Quoag, the Indian name for Quahaug, 

I. 151n. 
Quoddy, name, given to Acadia, 2. 16a. 

Indians, the, 4. 192. 
Quo warranto, i. 238; 9. 311, 320, 340. 

^abskine, Jacob, lived at Blue Point, 

3.83. 
Bagged piountain, 6. 294. 
Railroad, the first in the United States, 

3. 254. 
Railway questions became political 

<|u#stio]i&, 8. 306. 



Rainbow, the, at Townsend, 6. 162. 
Raines, Ellen, indicted for slander, 9. 
383. 
Capt. Francis, an associate, i. 197; 
lived at York, 1. 197; chosen lieu- 
tenant of York, I. 371, 373; a 
grand juryman, i. 371; resigned 
his captaincy, 1. 374; fined for 
presuming to act as midwife, i. 
380 ; signed the petition to Crom- 
well, I. 395; his wife fined for 
slander, 9.383; mentioned, i. 396; 
9. 381. 
Raines, Nathaniel, signed the^ peti- 
tion to Charles 11, i. 402. 

Rainsford, , 9. 32. 

Rale, see Ralle. 
Raleigh, N. C, 2. 74a. 
Sir Walter, unsuccessful at coloni- 
zation, 2. 19a; a valuable result 
from his attempts, 2. 19a; Pop- 
ham and his sentence, 2. 24a, 25a; 
how tried, 2. 24a; Coke's brutal 
conduct, 2. 25a; a relative of 
Champernoun, 2. 63a«,; an enemy 
of Essex, 2. 6Sa; advised Gorges 
to abandon Essex, 2. 68a; propri- 
etor of the whole coast of Ameri- 
ca, 5. 152; mentioned, 2. 74; 4. 
68; 5.344,345; 9.301; Life of, 
see Harrison, J. Morrison. 

Ralleau, Sieur , with Champlain, 

7. 250; sent as agent to France, 2. 
251; returned to America, 2. 264. 
Ralle, Sabastian, variety of ways of 
spelling his name, i. 412n; killed 
by Jacques, i. 412w, 442; 2. 198; 
3. 152, 313n; 4. 74; 6. 17, 235, 239; 
7. 86; identified in the relations 
between the natives, i. 436; a re- 
markable character, i. 436-437, 
443, 444, 445; his abode at Nan- 
rantsouk, i. 437; 7. 83; 8, 144; a 
dictator of his fiock, i. 438; 5. 
299 ; 8. 144 ; feared the approach 
of the Amalingans, i. 438; his ad- 
dress to his people, i. 438-439; 
sent a message to the Amalin- 
gans, 1.440; visited the Amalin- 
gans, I. 440; his mode of life, i. 
442 ; attended the Indians in .all 
their expeditions, I. 442; buried, 
I. 443; his grave, i. 511; endeav- 
ored to prolong the Indian war, 2. 
197; his papers captured, 2. 197; 
fired on the English troops, 2. 
198; a force sent to capture, 3. 
150; his papers disclosed his in- 
tentions, 3. 150; an incendiary of 
mischief, 3. 314; letter to Gov. 
Dummer, 3. 370; date of his com- 
ing to Norridgewock, 4,. 98; his 
remarks upon the Indian lan- 
guage, 2. 98; his knowledge of 
Indian trails, 5. 325n; among the 
Illinois, 6. 217; instigated the In- 
dians against the English, 6. %M; 



240 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Ealle, Sabastian — continued. 

alarmed at the influence of tiie 
English, 7. 83; at the Arrowsic 
Inilian conference, 7. 83-84; let- 
ters of cited, 6. 212, 213, 217, 218, 
220; mentioned, i. 420; 4. 95, 110; 
6. 207, 211, 225, 240; 7. 58; 9. 259; 
his dictionary of the Indian lan- 
guage, in Harvard College, 4. 95 ; 
published, 4. 95; editor of 4. 95; 
described, 4. 96 ; Humboldt, urged 
the publication of, 6. 208; ex- 
tracts from, 4. 100; cited, i. 414n, 
418/1, 442, 466; 2. IQan; 4. 99, 104; 
6. 21Sn, 215, 215?i; 9. 262, 264, 
266n, 268, 274, 277, 278, 285, 286, 
287, 288, 291, 294. 
Ram island, within the limits of an- 
cient Falmouth, i. 145; owned by 
James Andrews, 1. 146?2, 150; sold 
to John Rouse, i. 150. 
Raman ascho, consented to the deed 
to John Wadleigh, i. 357, 385; 
paid for her quitclaim, i. 358. 
Ramassoc river, 5. 156n, 157n. 

Ramelin, Capt. •, 5. 368. 

Ramsay, Dr. Alex., 8. 164, 179. 
Ramsdell, Joseph, killed, i. 302; his 
scalp taken from the enemy, i. 
304. 
Ramusio, G. B., 8. 332. 
Rand, the Rev. Asa, preached in Gor- 
ham, 2. 147. 
Joshua, 4. 364. 
the Rev. William, 4. 272. 
Randall, Benjamin, 4. 397; 6. 355. 
Elder Benjamin, of New Durham, 
first to openly preach the doc- 
trines of the Freewill Baptists, 7. 
222. 
the Hon. Benjamin, 6. 373. 
James, signed the petition to Gov. 
Bradstreet, i. 283n; lived at Fal- 
mouth, I. 322; signed the petition 
to Charles 11, i. 402. 
John, signed the petition to Gov. 
Bradstreet, i. 283w; lived at Fal- 
mouth, I.. 322. 
Margery, divorced, i. 370. 
Phineas, 4. 347, 348, 368. 

the Rev. , 4. 312, 316. 

Randolph town, 2. 187. 
Edmund, 8. 12. 

Edward, visited Pemaquid, 5. 267; 
quarreled with Andros, 5. 207; let 
out a few true words, 5. 267-268; 
in a Boston gaol, 5. 21bn; hated 
by the colonists, 8. 191n; his opin- 
ion of Palmer and West, 8. 191n; 
mentioned, 7. 56, 69; a letter of 
cited, 5. 267, 268n; his report 
cited, 5. 256J1, 275n. 
John, 5, xxxvii. 
Rangers, Les Isles, 7. 257. 
Ransford, David, 5, 57. 
Rantoul, Robert jr., 8. 443. 
Rapid des Diables, i. 449-450. 



Rappahannoc, 6. 30. 

Rashby, John, 5. 33, 34, 40. 

Rasle, see Ralle. 

Raspberries, abundant, 3. 293; 5. 158. 

Raspices, 5. 158. 

Ratcliff, 3. 287; 5. 311. 
the Rev. Robert. 9. 23?i. 

Ratisbon, 6. 327. 

Rattlesnake brook, 4. 289, 289n. 

Raudot, M. , 6. 276; 7. 80, 81, 82. 

Rawson, Edward, letter to Godfrey, i. 
101 ; paper warfare with Godfrey, 
4.340-342; 9.320; mentioned, 1. 
391, 395; 2. 260; 5-241, 

Raye, Caleb, 4. 224; 5. 57, 100, 102; 7. 
5571. 

Raymond, John, 3. 330. 

Raymond town, 4. 301, 308, 337, 359, 
385, 386, 403. 

Raynal, Abbe , his history of the 

British Dominions in North Amer- 
ica, cited, 5. 298n; 7- 45, 46. 

Raynes, Joshua, a shipbuilder, 2. 209; 
served in the war of the revolu- 
tion, 2. 214. 

Raynes, see Raines. 

Raynol, Capt. Nicholas, 5. 236. 

Razilli, Isaac de, governor of Acadia, 
6, 109; 7. 33; built a fort at La 
Have, 7. 33; took possession of 
the country, 7. 33; subordinate 
officers of, 7. 33; death of, 6. 110. 

Reach, incorporated, 2. 217. 

Readfield, formerly a part of Pond 
Town, 2. 285; number of Baptists 
in, 4. 306; the Rev. Paul Coffin 
in, 4. 306 ; Elder Mudge in, 7. 282, 
mentioned, 2. 285 ; 4. 339 ; 7. 280, 
287. 

Readfield circuit, 4. 370; 7. 227. 

Read field corner, 4. 36. 

Reading, I. 244n; 2.144; 5. xxiii; g. 
328n. 
Elinor, i. 236n. 
the Deanery of, 2. 257/i. 
Thomas, his daughter married 
Henry Donnell, i. 148, 309; died, 
I. 148; his witlow lived at Casco 
bay, I. 236w; he lived at Saco, 
1. 309; moved to York, i. 309. 

Read, , 4. 308. 

Read, see Reed. 

Real, value of a, 6. 120n. 

Reckes, 9. 330>i. 

Recollet friars, 9. 109. 

Recompense island, a name given to 
Great Chebeag, i. 147; origin of 
the name, 1. 148n. 

Record, Dominicus, 2. 117. 

, of Buckfield Mills, 4. 360. 

Office, London, 9. 352, 365. 

Records, a reason for their being lost, 
8. 296; of Falmouth destroyed by 
the Indians, 4. 229; thought to 
have been carried to Canada, 4. 
230; of Maine, the condition of, i. 
303; of Mass. bay colony, 2. 46; 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



241 



of Korth Yarmouth, destroyed, 4. 
229; of the council of New Eng- 
land, g. llOn; of the eastern land 
claims, 4. 209; of the Mercer's 
company, 9. o05n; of the Pema- 
quid propietors, 5. 301; of Tre- 
lawny, thought to be destroyed, 
I. 49%; of York, extracts from, i. 
363-391. 
Redbank, Col. Green at, i, 529. 
Red cedars, i, 510. 

Redding, Richard, 5. 37, 39, 41, 237n. 
Reding, John, his deposition in full, 
3,329-330; employed by Purchase, 
3. 329. 
Thomas, lived at Cousin's river, 
2. 171. 
Redington, Asa, jr., 8. 168, 287. 
Redknap, J., signed the treaty of 1713, 

6. 253; signature of, 6. 253. 
Redwood, Abraham, 4. 269. 
Reed, Andrew, 6. 156, 158, 162, 163. 
Col. Isaac G., lived at Waldobor- 
ough, 6. 76, 369; graduated from 
Harvard College, 6. 76; his char- 
acter, 6. 76-77; commissioned a 
colonel, 6. 77 ; held public offices, 
6, 77; died, 6, 77. 
Sarah, married Stephen Coffin, 4. 

240n. 
William, 3. 334. 

, purchased land of Codman, 6. 

132; sold the same to John May, 
6. 133, 

, of Middleton, 4. 308, 341, 364, 

394. 

, of N^orth Yarmouth, 2. 181. 

Mrs. , of Middleton, 4. 394. 

Reedstown, 4. 394. 

Reformed Church, the, 5. xlrt; 6. I76n. 

German Church, 5, 404, 405. 
Regicides, the, g. 330. 
Rehoboth, i. 316; 2. 145; 4. 269. 
Reid family, 6. 14. 

Dr. , 6. 27. 

Relations des Jesuits, cited, 7, 97n, 

98, 101; 8, 325. 
Relics, found at Sheepscott farms, 9. 

140, 140h. 
Religious condition of Maine, i. 161. 
denominations of Maine, 7. 217-229; 
services held by early voyagers, 6. 
175, 175»i, 176ti; 7. 302; the first 
established in New England, 6. 
176>i. 
worship in the South, 1803, 7. 413. 
Remarks on old coins found at Port- 
land and Richmond's island, 6. 
127-151; on the fight at Pigg- 
wacket, 4. 290-292; on the Indian 
language, i. 412-427; on the voy- 
age of Capt Weymouth, 5, 307- 

Bemick, Kathaniel. 4. 206. 
BemiioLgton, Jonathan, signed the 

treaty of 1713, 6. 254: Autograph 

of, 6. 254. 

Id 



Remuck, Christian, signed the petition 
to Charles 11, i. 401. 

Remuneration, for the commander at 
Fort Loyal, i. 265-266, 268; of 
clergymen, i. 262, 346, 347, 397; 
2. 114, 118, 221, 223, 224; 3, 155, 
158, 159, 161, 274, 276; 4. 244-245, 
247-248 ; of schoolmasters, 3. 168. 

Renauld, Jean, 7, 70, 70n. 

Renolds, William, signed the petition 
to Cromwell, i. 394, 

Renolds, see Reynolds. 

Report of Lincoln county commis- 
sioners, 5. 154ji, 198?i; of the 
Mass. commissioners on Pema- 
quid, I. 36. 

Representatives from Falmouth, i. 
274; in Maine, i. 267. 

Reskeagan island, owned by John 
Parker, 2. 190, 192; owned in part 
by Thomas Webber, 2. 191 ; men- 
tioned, 2, 202, 207; 4. 109. 

Restigouche, the, 8. 21, 25. 

Retail dealers, licensed, i, 201, 279. 

Retz, the Rev. Augustus, f.b.b., set- 
tled at Waldoborough, 5. 404- 
405, 407; lived in Pennsylvania, 5. 
404; death of, 5-405,407-408; a 
monument erected to, 5. 411. 

Revere House, the, 7. 470. 

Reversby, John, his Memoirs and 
Travels cited, 7. 145n. 

Revolution in New England Justified, 
the, cited, 5. 169, 268, 269; 7, 56. 
war of the, men from Bath who 
served in, 2. 214; the O'Brien 
family in, 2. 242; a war of feeling, 
2. 242 ; the first English naval of- 
ficer killed in, 2. 245 ; the news of 
an all absorbing topic, 3. 205; sol- 
diers of Maine who served in, 3. 
203, 204, 220, 225; scarcely im- 
peded the progress of Maine, 4. 
78; Samuel Pan-is served in, 5. 
xl ; Gen. William Lithgow served 
in, 6. 52; 8. 287; the influence of 
the Rev. John Murray during, 6. 
161-164; William Groton served 
in, 6. 368; John Cleaveland served 
in, 6. 384; acts that led to it, 7, 
161-162; the true year of in New 
York, 7. 162-163 ; began in coloni- 
al poverty, 7. 163 ; the country in 
a poor condition at the end of, 7. 
353 ; Robert Lithgow served in, 8.. 
287; Lemuel Cook served in, 9.. 
159; William Hutchings served 
in, g. 159-161; the last New Eng-. 
land pensioner of, g. 159, 164; the 
last New York pensioner of, %,^ 
159 ; Capt. Joseph Chandler served 
in, g. 169; Gen. John ChandleE' 
served in, g. 170, 17S; mentibnud, 
a. 215, 279, 286, 293, 204; 4.43, m, 
222, 224, 248, 284?i, 288nj 5, UT,. 
275,386,418; 6. 10,. 46, ^8^,107 
118, 233, 242, 354, ^:ff29i,M9\: 



242 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Revolution, war of tlie — continued. 
430, 487; 8. 95, 117, 287, 302, 350, 
413; 9.239. 
Revolutionary army, 6. 355 ; 8. 412. 
Rewenawando, 3. 357. 
Reynolds, William, a commissioner, 

2. 233, 234; see Renolds. 
Rhenish Prussia, 5. 407. 
Rhine, the, 6. 322. 

Rhode island, John Coe moved to, i. 
154n; William Hutchinson died 
in, I. 341n, 342?i; troops from 
Bath sent to, 2. 214; shielded from 
the grasp of Mass., 4. 70; an asy- 
lum for the persecuted, ,4. 71-72; 
impressed with the ideas of the 
early settlers, 4. 72 ; called Rode- 
illant, 6. 288; Cadillac's account 
of, 6. 288; a place of retreat for 
pirates, 6. 288; Cadillac desired 
to destroy the colony, 6. 288-289; 
mentioned, i. 259, 260n, 314, 500, 
501?i; 2. 4271, 134, 292; 3. 276, 416; 
4. 67, 233, 267, 269, 270, 411; 5. 
Ixi; 6. 56m, 354; 7. 154, 161, 308n, 
328, 335, 404, 419, 429, 430; 8. 127, 
128, 132, 138, 190/1, 191; 9.46, 248; 
the annals of mentioned, 5. 141. 

Island Historical Society, 4, 5. 
Rial, the, introduced, 6. 149; value 

of, 6. 149. 
Rice, Benjamin, served in the war of 
the Revolution, 3. 204. 

Elizabeth, married John G. Coffin, 
4. 249n. 

Francis, 8. 51. 

Gideon, 3. 204. 

Mrs. Henry, 7. 152, 207n. 

the Rev. Jacob, biographical notice 
of, 4. 280n. 

James, served in the war of the 
Revolution, 3. 204. 

Dr. Jesse, 2. 114, 11.5, 120, 122. 

Capt. John, head of the company 
to go to Cambridge, 3. 196; letter 
to Dr. Southgate, 3. 196, 197; 
served in the war of the Rev- 
olution, 3. 203. 

Lemuel, served in the war of the 
Revolution, 3. 204. 

Richard D., 4. 316, 330; 6. 62; 8. 
473; 9. 176, 243. 

Thomas, signed the petition to 
Charles 11, i. 401. 

Thomas, of Bath, 2. 218. 

Dr. Thomas, 8. 8. 

the Hon. Thomas, son, of Richard, 
6. 62; built of 6. 62n; practiced 
at Winslow, 6. 62, 62w; graduated 
from Harvard College, 6. 62w; 
member of Congress, 6. 62, 62)i; 
death of, 6. 62, 62 n,; mentioned, 
4, 15, 16; 8. 160, 207n. 
Rich, Ezekiel, 4. 302. 

Obadiah, his catalogue of books re- 
lating to America, cited, 2. viii. 

Samuel, 3. 180. 



Richard i, 6. 151. 

Ill, I. 66m; 4. 91. 
Richards, Henry, 7. 212. 

John, purchased Arrowsic island, 2. 
.191-192; sold the same to Clarke 
and Lake, 2. 192; mentioned, 2. 
194; 3.332. 

John, attorney for William Bing- 
ham, 7. 153/1, 356, 357. 

Joseph, served in the war of the 
Revolution, 3. 204. 
Richardson, Gen. Alford, 8. 178. 

the Rev. Gideon, graduated from 
Harvard College, i. 340; minister 
at Wells, I. 340, 348; died, i. 348, 
349. 

H. W., the Pemaquid county under 
the Stuarts, 8. 181-195. 

William, 2. 209. 

elder Zebadial, 225. 

Lieut. , in command of the 

friendly Indians, 3. 113; killed, 3. 
114. 

, of Jay, 4. 363. 

Mrs. , of Wiscasset, 4. 330. 

Richelieu, Cardinal, Armand Jean du 

Plessis, 9. 100. 
Richman's island now Richmond's 

island, i. 41n. 
Richmond village, 3. 274, 383, 384, 434. 

Virginia, 7. 413; 8. 436. 

the Duke of, i. 41, ^^w^ 2. 54. 

John, did not own Richmond's is- 
land, I. 41)1 ; sold powder to Win- 
ter, I. 72n. 

island, Bagnall settled at i. 41, 51, 
80n, 118, 202; 3. 10; 6. 137; for- 
merly a part of Falmouth, i. 41, 
145; the origin of the name un- 
certain, I. 41/?; owned by Robert 
Jordan, i. 41/i, 177, 232, 235; 3. 
74; Black Will killed at, i. 42-43; 
discovery of coins and a ring at, 
i.43n,, 51n; 5. 174n; 6. 129, 151, 
143-144; the position of, i. 51-52; 
6. 137; described, 1.52, 551; Rich- 
ard Gibson at, i. 52; 6. 180; a 
church probably established at, 
I. .52; 6. 138, 181; Bagnall had no 
title to, I. 52; granted to Trelaw- 
ny and Goodyear, i. 52, 5. 170; 
6. 137-138, 181; 7.364; ships built 
at, I. 54, 55, 56; fish cured at, i. 
55; 4. 23; the business at pursued 
with activity, i. 56, 72, 202, 280; 
4. 23; 6. 138; the trade at declined 
for want of capital, i. 57, 279; 6. 
138; deserted, I..57; 5. 174; Joce- 
lyn at, i. 77; 3. 90; probably gov- 
erned by Winter, I. 85; included 
in Lygonia, i. 97; Bagnall mur- 
dered at, I. 118; to pay taxes to 
Falmouth, i, 152; attacked by the 
Indians, i. 227, 303n; the attack 
the last near Falmouth, 1. 228; 
inventory of Trelawny's goods at, 
I. 538-540; court set at, i. 536; 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



243 



Jordan a magistrate for, 2. 64a; 
home of John Winter, 3. 14; 6. 
138; fishing business at broken 
up, 3. 74; vessel captured at, 3. 
iii; Trelawny had an extensive 
business at, 4. 23; early an im- 
portant post, 5. 174; 7. 260; ship- 
ping at, 5. 174; trade with Europe, 

5. 174; only a solitary farmhouse 
remaining at, 5. 174; the outrage 
at, 5. 206; wiiy the settlement 
was not assisted by Mass., 5. 206; 

6. 138; mentioned, i. 59, 71, 76, 
104, 151, 234^, 324. 384; 3. lln, 
45, 138, 182; 4. 158; 5. 42, 224; 7. 
304; 9. 130, 367. 

the, owned by Trelawny, i. 41, 41 n; 
used for trading, I. 41n; built, i. 
54; 6.138: sent with merchandise 
to England, i. 57, 536, 537, 6. 138; 
employed at Richmond's island, 
I. 56; arrived in America, i. 234n 
value of her cargo, 4. 23. 
, 8. 241. 

Ricker, the Rev. George, 2. 123, 127, 
129. 
, of Buckfield, 4. 390. 

Ridclef, the Rev. ., 4. 330. 

Rider, John, signed the petition to 
the king, i. 180; lived at Back 
cove, I. 216, 322. 

Rider, Phineas, purchased land of 
Cleeves, 1. 121 ; lived at Falmouth, 
1. 123, 188, 216; desired Mass. to 
settle the controversy between 
Cleeves and Jordan, i. 141; his 
land in the possession of An- 
thony Bracket, i. 154; signed the 
petition to the king, i. 180; a 
juror, I. 188; executed Thomas 
Skilling's will, i. 194; a commis- 
sioner, I. 200; did not return to 
Falmouth after the Indian war, i. 
250; mentioned, i. 123. 

Rigby, Alexander, in possession of 
Winter harbor, i.46; a deed from, 
I. 65n; deed to Cleeves, i. 67, 145; 
purchased Ligonia, i, 90; ap- 
pointed Cleeves as his deputy, i. 
90, 115; 3. 32, 40; his party' tri- 
umphant, I. 92; Cleeves and 
Tucker supported his title, i. 95; 
the decision in his favor the result 
of politics, I. 96; his patent ^not 
sustained, i. 96; his patent de- 
clared valid by the commissioners, 
I. 96; 3, 40; Cleeves made grants 
in his favor, i. 97; offices held by, 
I. 97n; petitioned the Lord Pro- 
tector for aid, i. 97n; death of, i. 
99; 3.32-33,41; 4. 70; grant ac- 
cepted by Baker and Knight, i. 
355-356 ; his patent not the foun- 
dation of subsequent action, i. 
356-357; his patent not from the 
king, I. 546; his authority denied, 
I. 648, 549, 550; the leaders of his 



opposers, i. 549; purchased the 
Plough Patent, i. 546; 3. 32; a 
member of the long parliament, 
3. 32; 4. 69; land claimed by, 3. 
32; succeeded in his claim, 3. 32; 
established a government, 3. 32, 
41; bequeathed the province to 
his son, 3. 41-42; a rival of Gor- 
ges, 4. 69; an Episcopalian. 4. 69; 
in possession of Dye's patent, 3. 
32; 5. xxi; gave the name to 
Lygonia, 5. xxi; mentioned, i.93, 
99, 115, 146, 535; 3. 22, 26, 42, 67, 
77, 83, 317, 331, 332. 
claim, the, 3. 32; 9. 309. 
Edward, son of Alexander, i. 99, 
103; petiLioned to the Lord Pro- 
tector, I. 97n; gave a second 
grant to Cleeves, i. 117; received 
the province of Lygonia from his 
father, 3. 42; Cleeves entered a 
complaint against, 3, 42, 73; men- 
tioned, 9. 346. 

Riggot, Christopher, lived at Black 
Point, 3. 83. 

Riggs, Ann, married Nathaniel 
WharfE, i. 209. 
Jeremiah, purchased land of the 
Rev, Thomas Smith, i, 205; his 
daughter married John Jones, i. 
206. 
Thomas, i. 209. 
, of Bath, 2. 191. 

Riley, Ashbel, 4. 56. 
Justice, 4. 56. 

Ring, a, found at Richmond's island, 
6, 143-145. 
David, Served in the war of the 
Revolution, 2. 214; kept the inn 
at Black point, 3. 221, 222; bio- 
graphical notice of, 3. 221-223; 
mentioned, 2. 213; 3. 159. 

Rio de Janeiro, 8. 459. 

Rio Grande, the, 5. 320, 347. 

Ripley. Gen. Eleazer W., practiced 
law, 6.65; commissioned colonel, 
6. 6d; wounded in the war of 1812, 
6. 65; held public offices, 6.65-66; 
in Louisiana, 6. Q6; commissioned 
brigadier-general, 6. 66; received 
a gold medal at, 6. 66; graduated 
from Dartmouth college, 6. 66n; 
death of, 66, 66n: mentioned, 6. 
70. 
Gen. James W., married Abigail Os- 
good, 4. 279n. 

Ripplesmere hundred, the, a. 257. 

Rishworth, Edward, deposition taken 
by, I. 64n; invested with magis- 
tratical powers, i. 107; laid out 
the line between Falmouth and 
Scarborough, i. Ill; recorder of 
York county, i. 126n; married a 
daughter of the Rev. John Wheel- 
wright, I. 127; signature of, i;^ 
127; held a court at Ydrk, 1. 159. 
resided at York, i. 163, 177, 185; 



244 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Risliworth, Edward— continued. 

held a court at Scarborough, i. 
163, 170; 3.49; probably a deputy 
for Falmouth and Scarborough, 
I. 163; an associate, i. 164, 165, 
170; a commissioner, i. 175, 380, 
387, 389; a justice of the peace, i. 
177, 185; action brought against 
I. 185-186; to appeal to the com- 
missioners, I. 186; as a recorder, 
I. 267, 371, 376, 389, 553; to sur- 
vey Wells, I. 342; did not reside 
in Wells a long time, i. 343; con- 
veyed land to John Wheelwright, 
I. 344; accepted the title of Gor- 
ges, I. 385; a counselor, i. 369, 
376; sued Greene for debt, i. 375; 
signed the petition to Cromwell, 
I. 395; letter to Gov. Endicott, i. 
896-397; attested to the oath of 
Jordan, i. 538, 541; a magistrate 
for Gorges, 2. 63a; a representa- 
tive to the general court, 3. 49; 
to administer oaths, 3. 56; a ref- 
eree in the quarrel between Fox- 
well and Phippen, 3. 73; letter 
from Bridget Vhillips, 4. 413; 
mentioned, i. 137, 222n, 381; 3. 
229, 230, 235; 4« 411; 9. 375, 376, 
382. 
Kising Sun, the, built at Bath, 2. 209.. 
Eissallien, the, i, 492, 493. 
Ristigouche, the, 8. 21, 25.. 
Ritchie, Andrew, 5. li. 
River Aux Canards, 8. 142. 

de Famine, i. 450. 

Des Loups, I. 466, 450, 451, 530; 8. 
5. 

Etschemin, i. 448, 450. 

Lamper, 4. 265. 

Megantic, i. 164, 464n, 465. 

Moose, I. 456. 

Mountains, 4. 263. 

of Boston, 6. 284. 

Canada, 2. 66, 67; 5- 6, 144n; 8. 184; 
see River St. Lawrence. 

of the New Lands, now the St. Law- 
rence, I. 288. 

Pentagoet, 7. 70. 

Raab, 7. 42. 

Restigouche, 8. 21, 25. 

St. Charles, i. 519, 521, 523, 524. 

St. Francis, 8. 5, 101, 104. 

St. John, called Oxygoudy, 4- 108; 
La Tour established at, 6. 110; 
Indian village on, 7. 5 ; mentioned, 
I. 448; 5. 288; 6. 250, 252, 253, 279, 

St. George, boundary between the 
English and the French, 6. 282; 
Cadillac's account of, 6. 282. 

St. Lawrence, a boundary of Acadia, 
1. 25n; Bu Monts interested in 
the trade on, i. 26; a boundary of 
Alexander's grant, i. 79; called 
the River of the New Lands, i. 
288; the Abenaquis settled on, i. 
449; 7. 4; crossed by Arnold, i. 



484, 487, 490; a boundary of the 
grant to the Plymouth Company, 
2. 274; the boundary of New Eng- 
land and Nova Scotia, 8. 23 ; men- 
tioned, I. 34, 448, 456, 480 481, 
482, 520, 523; 2. 206"; 4- "73, 86, 
105; 5.298; 6. 207, 232, 236, 240, 
242; 7. 49n, 249, 256, 259, 266; 8. 
4, 5, 6, 17, 19, 21, 22, 23, 25, 26, 48, 
66, 72, 100, 215, 302, 349; 9. 34/i; 
see River of Canada. 
Yerte, 6. 236. 
Tare, 2. 172. 
Rives, the Hon. W. C, 8. 97, 98, 424. 
Roach, John, i. 45n. 
Roades, C, 5. 25, 27, 28. 

John, 5. 30. 
Roads, not laid out in 1653, i. 165; 
surveys to be made to have 
(1653) roads laid out, i. 279; laid out 
at Cape Elizabeth, i. 278; one 
described, i. 278; laid out in 
Scarborough, i. 278; in Capisic 
and Stroud water, i. 278-279; to 
the Presumpscot, i. 279; condition 
of, I. 279; to be laid out, 3. 128; 
8. 31; an old road still in exist- 
ence, 3. 129; the oldest in Maine, 
9. 142, 151: from Cushnoc to 
(1745) Fort Halifax, 1745, 8. 235-236; 
(1768) in 1768, 4. 277; condition of in 
(1777, 1799) 1777, 4- 258n; in 1799, 7. 
(1803)273; in Gardiner, 1803, 5. Ixv- 

Ixvi. 
Roanoke, 3. 288. 

Robb, Dr. James, 6. 275, 361-362; Ex- 
tracts from the Memoir of Cad- 
illac, 6. 273-289. 
Robbins, Augustus C, 4. 51; on 
American manufactures, 4. 53-61. 
Chandler, 6. 371; 7- 284; 8. 172. 
the Rev. Charles, 4. 271. 
Edward, 5. 241. 
Edward H., 7. 19. 
Jonathan, killed, 4- 287. 
Josiah, 4. 328. 
the Rev. Nathaniel, 4. 272. 
the Rev. Samuel, 2. 226. 

Judge , 8. 339. 

Robe, Rev. M., 4. 276. 
Roberts, Abraham, 3. 77. 
Amos M., 8. 455. 

Axel, served in the French war, 3. 
• 173; married Margaret Knight, 3. 

216. 
Edward, 2. 234. 

Giles, lived at Black Point, i. 95; 
supported the title of Gorges, i. 
95; consented to the agreement 
between Jordan and Tucker, i. 
131; land granted to, 3* 77; chil- 
dren of, 3. 77: his will, 3. 77. 
Job, settled at Buxton, 2. 139. 
Lord, 9. 358. 
William, married a daughter of 

John Merrick, 7. 381, 387. 
, 3. 236. 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



245 



Robertson, the Rev. , of Liver- 
more, 4. 340. 
Robie, Joseph, 2. It9. 

the Rev. , 4- 276, 359, 386, 

387. 
Robinhood, a commander of the An- 
droscoggins, i,215; sold land to 
Thomas Stevens, 2. 178, 179; 3. 
316; sold land to John Parker, 2. 
189; sold land to Edward Buter- 
man and John Brown, 2. 190; 4. 
232; 5. 224; his Indian name, 2. 
190, 233n; 4. 232; his tribe un- 
known, 2. 191; his place of resi- 
dence, 2. 191, 233?^; claimed ex- 
tensive domains, 2. 191; sold land 
to John Richards, 2. 191-192; sold 
land to G-utch, 2. 193, 203,^205; 
sold land to John Mason, 2. 232; 
9. 1.S3; his deed to Mason given 
in full, 2. 238-234; sold land to 
John Davis, 2. 235; sold land to 
John Tucker, 2. 236; 4. 219, 231; 
sold land to Thomas Cleeves, 2. 
236; sold land to Thomas and 
York, 3. 315; mentioned, 2.235, 
236. 
coye, 2. 191. 

Robins, , married Elizabeth Bow- 

doin, I. 277. 
Robinson, Brient, 2. 212. 
Crusoe, 5. 167. 
Mrs. Edward, 4. 59. 
Prances, lived at Saco, i. 91, 94n, 
95n; a magistrate, 1.367; a juror, 
I. 535; opposed Rigby, i. 549; 
mentioned, i. 91, 94, 343. 
Howard S., 7. 284. 
James, lived at Black point, i. 187; 
tried for murder, i. 187; 3. 71; ac- 
quitted, 1. 187-188; 3- "71, 80; mar- 
ried Lucretia Foxwell, 3. 20n, 80; 
moved to Newcastle, 3. 20n, 80; 
his children, 3. 20n, 80. 
John, permanently injured James 

Otis, 9, 55n. 
Lieut. John, 6. 24, 338. 
Joshua, 4. 390. 
Kilburn, 7. 470. 
the Rev. Otis, 4. 391; 7. 225. 
Philip, 7. 284. 
Stephen, 4, 388. 

Capt. Thomas, lived near the point 
of rocks, I. 248n; purchased land 
of Richard Codman, 6. 132. 
Sir Thomas, 8. 220, 229n. 

Deacon, , 4. 390, 

Ensign, , 4. 388. 

, 5. 374; 7. 432. 

Robinson's point, land near purchased 
by Peter Bowdoin, i. 276; land 
near owned by Capt. Edward 
Tyng, 1.316; mentioned, 1.248. 
wharf, 1. 124, 127, 156. 
Boby, Thomas, signed the petition to 
Bradstreet, i. 2837i; lived at Fal- 
, mouth, I. 322 



Rochefoucault, Frangois A. F. Due de, 

4. 218. 
Rochelle, early home of Peter Bow- 
doin, I. 276; fish sent to, 1.551; 
Capt. John Smith at, 2. 38a. 
Rochester, 2. 145; 4. 270, 294. 
diocese, 9. 298. 
records, 9. 298, 369. 
Rochford hall, 3. xv. 

hundred, 3. xv. 
Rockamecook, 3. 333. 
Rockingham county deeds, cited, i, 

64:71. 

Rockland, 5. 347; 6. 96n, 358, 359. 
Gazette, 7. 489n, 490n. 

Rock off the coast, the Cadillac's ac- 
count of, 6. 279-280 ; same as Seal 
island, 6. 279n. 

Rocky Hill, land at granted to John 
Wallis, 1.251. 
mountains, the, i. 455, 455n, 466; 2. 
274. 

Rockwood, Abby A., married the 
Hon. Edward Kent, 8. 461. 
the Rev. Otis, 8. 461. 

Rocomeco, early settlement at, 2. 167; 
Capt. Bean, a prisoner at, 3. 333^1 ; 
now Newcomecook, 4. 379 ; men- 
tioned, 4. 109, 362; see Ronameno, 
point, 4. 341 ; owned by Austin and 
Livermore, 4. 340 ; called Meroco- 
mecook, 4. 390; watermelons 
grown at, 4. 340; Indians at, 4. 
340. 

Roxcrof t, Edward, sent out by Gorges, 

1, 32; 2. 29; captured a French 
bark, i.82; 5. 179n; mutiny among 
his crew, i. 32, in Virginia, i. 32; 

2. 29, 30; killed, 2. 29, 31; left a 
part of his crew at Sagadahoc 
river, 5. 163; his crew carried to 
England, 5. 164. 

Rod island, 5. 89. 

Rodd's Catalogue of Books and Man- 
uscripts, cited, 5. 440. 
Rodeillant, Cadillac's account of, 6, 

288-289. 
Rodolph II, 2. 77a. 

Roe, Anthony, in the garrison at 
Black Point, i. 227n; 3. 110; lived 
at Black Point, 3. 83; signed the 
petition to Charles 11, 3. 129. 
Matthew, 3. 70. 

Rolfe, , 9. 351. 

Rogers, Alice, married Henry Crown, 
I. 208. 
Edward, 7. 129n. 
George, punished for adultery, i, 

370. 
John, signed the treaty of 1714, 6. 

258; autograph of, 6. 258. 
John, son of Thomas, 3. 207i. 
the Rev. John, 5. liv. 
the Hon. Jonathan P., 8. 76, 363, 

433, 453. 
Nathaniel, signed the treaty of 1713, 
6. 255 ; autograph of, 6. 235. 



246 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Eogers — continaed. 
Peter, 3. 324n. 

Kebecca, married first Joseph 
Trickey, i.208; second .Down- 
ing, 1.208. 
Richard, signed the petition to 

Charles 11, i. 402. 
Richard, son of Thomas, 3. 20n. 
Major Robert, 4. 43, 21Sn, 282; 6. 
242; his journal, cited, 4. 282J^; 6. 
242 
Sarah, i. 333. 
Thomas, married Esther Foxwell, 

3. 20)r, children of, 3. 20n. 
William, received a bequest from 
Mrs. Macworth, i. 70n; married 
the widow of Nathaniel Whartt', 
I. 208; his children, i. 208; ap- 
praised Geo. Munjoy's estate, i. 
256; gave a bond for Seacomb, i. 
259; signed the petition to Brad- 
street, 1 . 283n ; lived ^ at New Cas- 
co, I. 322; signed the petition to 
Charles 11, i. 402. 

, of Saco, 3. 120. 

, married Thomas Parris, 5.x1?t. 

Rogers' Rangers, 4. 278, 288n. 

Rolfe, John,"jr., 4. 344. 

Rollings, Nathaniel, 8. 299, 300, 311. 

Romagne, M. , priest among the 

Indians of Maine, i. 445-446. 
Roman Catholic Church, the, 6.205; 
8. 321, 496, 497, 498, 499. 
Catholic priests, at Frankfort, 3. 
273; came from Augusta, 3. 273; 
attempted to proselyte, 3. 273; 6. 
194-195; instigated the Indians 
against the English, 4. 74. 
Catholics, none in Minot, 2. 130. 
Romance in history, 8. 277. 
Rome 6. 147; 8.503. 
Roon, Fr., 7. 142n. 

Rose, Dr. , 5. xviii. 

the, 6. 112; 7.54, 55w, 56n. 
Daniel, corporate member of the 
Maine Historical Society, 1. 11, 12. 

Rosebrook, Capt. , 9. 214. 

Rosier, James, prepared an account 
of the coast of Maine, i. 28; 5. 
310; overestimated the tides, 6. 
304; said to have written his nar- 
rative to mislead voyagers, 6. 
304-305; his narrative* truthful, 
6. 306; his narrative published, 5. 
332; cited, 2. 76a; 5. 310, 322, 345; 
6, 175, 176, 177, 293, 294, 295-296, 
297, 299, 300, 304, 305, 310, 311, 
312, 314, 315, 317, 318; 7. $iln. 
Rosignal, Capt. , his cargo confis- 
cated by Du Monts, 5. 174n. 
Rosin, sent to England, 5, 298n. 
Ross, Ann, wife of James, i. 191, 314; 
a witness against George Lewis, 
1. 191 ; mother of James jr., i. 314. 
James, settled at Back cove, 1. 155- 
156, S22; a witness against Robert 
Jordan, i. 172; resided at Fal- 



mouth, I. ISOn, 216, 230, 314; ac- 
cused of bad behavior, i. 191; a 
constable, i. 219; taken prisoner, 
I. 219, 302 ; his wife taken prisoner, 
I. 221 ; married Ann Lewis, i. 261, 
314; moved to Boston, i. 302; 
father of James jr., i. 314. 
James jr., son of James, i. 314; 
birth of, I. 314; a shoemaker, i. 
314; lived at Back cove, i.314; in 
captivity, i.314; lived at Salem, 
i;3l4. 
John, a shoemaker, i. 191; lived at 

Back cove, i. 191. 
Capt. , 3. 222. 

Roswick, 5. 126. 
island, 5. 125-129. 

Rotterdam, 2. 280. 

Rouameuo, an Indian village, 3.323; 
headquarters of the Androscog- 
gins, 3. 323; a chapel and priest 
at, 3. 323; fort at destroyed by 
Col. Church, 3. 323; Capt. Bean a 
prisoner at, 3. 323n; see Rocomeco. 

Round lake, 8. 15, 106. 

marsh, Thomas .Cloice settled near, 
1.205; Richard Powsland settled 
near, i. 205, 206; a road near, i. 
278-279; mentioned, i. 241. 

Rousack, I. 502. 

Rouse, John, of Marshfield, purchased 
Bangs' island, i. 150; sold the 
same to John Brown, i. 150. 

Rouse's point, 8. 32, 48, 57, 91. 

Row, Abraham, 4. 369, 
Anthony, signed the petition to 

Charles 11, 1.402. 
Giles, killed at Falmouth, i. 295w. 
Kitty, 4. 369. 

Rowden, John, 5. 62, 104. 

Rowe, Richard, 9. 318n. 

Rowell, George P., 9. 71- 
Jacob, 4. 322, 323. 

Rowley, Maine, i. 314; 2. 138, 141. 
Mass., 3. 213, 275; 4. 242/i, 321, 322; 
6. 383, 384, 385; 8. 269; 9. 67. 

Rowsick, 3. 374. 

Roxbury, i. 154, 256, 264, 530; 2. 145; 
3. 355; 4. 268, 272; 6. 477i; 8. 264; 
9. 37, 62n, 65, 89, 233; the history 
of cited, 8. 122n. 

Royal African Companv, the Duke 
of York, interested in, 7. 139; in- 
corporated, 7. 139n; the slave 
trade a leading feature of 7. I39n. 
commissioners, the, 5. 2.35, 236, 238, 
248; 7. 154, 155; the report of, 
cited, 5. 228». 
Exchange Coffee House, 8. 207-208, 
209m, 21071. 

Royall, the Hon. Isaac, 7. 481 ; a son 
of William, jr., i. 289n; moved 
to Antiqua, 290n; died, 290n. 
Isaac, son of the Hon. Isaac, i 
290n; a councilor, i.290w; lived a. 
Medford, i. 290w; became a tor> 
I. 290n; went to England, i. 290w; 



INDEX TO COLLECTIONS. 



247 



died, I. 290n; endowed a profes- 
sorship, I. 290n. 
John, lived at Casco bay, i. 236?i; a 
trustee for North Yarmouth, i. 
272; 2. 173; received land from 
his father, i. 280n; to take care 
of his mother, i. 289n; married 
Eliza Dodd, i. 289n; his children, 
I. 289w; captured by Indians, i. 
289, 290n; ransomed by Castine, 
I. 289; 7. 58, 68; his house garri- 
soned, I, 290n; mentioned, 2. 174. 
Phebe, wife of William, to be cared 

for by her sons, i. 289n. 
William, a member of the Ligonia 
assembly, i. 99; resided at West- 
custogo, I. 99n; at Casco bay, i. 
114, 23()n; consented to the agree- 
ment between Jordan and Tuck- 
er, I. 181, 535, 540, 541; the first 
of his family in America, 289n; 
purchased land of Gorges, i. 289^; 
a cooper and cleaver, i. 289n; an 
associate, i. 289n; conveyed land 
to his sons, i. 289n; his children, 
I. 289n; his house garrisoned, i. 
290n; signed the petition to Mass. 
I. 550; a resident of North Yar- 
mouth, 2, 171; his daughter mar- 
ried Amos Stevens, 2. 171, 173. 
William, jr., lived at Casco bay, i. 
236w; received land from his 
father, i. 289n; to take care of 
his mother, i. 289n; father of 
Isaac, I. 289w; his daughter mar- 
ried Amos Stevens, i. 290n. 

Royall's river, James Cousin's and 
William Royall lived near, i. 114; 
Gendairs saw-mill near, i. 269, 
270^,; 2. 181; Gedney's saw-mill 
at, I. 270n; stockade at, i. 289; 7. 
57; now Westcustogo, i. 289w; 
part of called Pumgustuk, 2. 167; 
named for William Royall, 2. 171 ; 
mentioned, i. 85n, 175, 185, 342, 
844, 355, 396; 2. 157, 159, 161, 175; 
7.58. 

Royalls, the, 5. lix. 

Ruck, Thomas, his daughter married 
the Rev. George Burroughs, i. 
263. 
Thomas, a proprietor at Pemaquid, 
5. 302. 

l^udder, the, Rev. , 7. 456. 

Buggies family, 5. lix. 

John, I. 12. 
/ Joseph, 2. 145. 

Rule and misrule of the English in 
America, see Haliburton. 

Rum, called kill-devil, i. 77: 3- 90; 
brought to Maine, 3. 98. 

Rumford, 4. 108, 338n; 8. 368. 
Falls, 4. 109, 

Rumney, 9. 239. 

Rump Parliament, the, 9. 32*, 325. 

Bunnell's brook, 4. 277. 
Job, signed the petition to Brad- 



street, 1 . 283n ; lived at Falmouth, 

I. 322. 

Rusk, John, one of the Pejepscot pro- 
prietors, 3. 321. 
Russell, Chambers, 4. 168. 
Edward, corresponding secretary of 
the Maine Historical Society, i, 

II, 12; 4. 6; birth of, 2. 165; death 
of, 2. 165; married, 2. 165; chil- 
dren of, 2. 165; his character, 2. 
166; his tastes, 2. 166; his History 
of North Yarmouth, 2. 165-188; 7. 
235, 236. 

family, i. 110; 2. 66a. 
James, his title to Long Island con- 
firmed, I. 148; conveyed the is- 
land to John Smith, i. 148. 
Margaret, married Charles N. Cogs- 
well, 2. 105. 
Mary, married M. P. Norton, 2. 165. 

Nathaniel P., 3. 269; 8. 444. 
Richard, of Boston, purchased Hog 

island, i. 148; speaker, 9. 377. 
W. S., his Pilgrims' Memorials 
cited, 8. 203. 

, of Canaan, 4. 371, 379. 

, of Carritunk, 4. 399. 

Russia, 6. 354. 

Rust, Jonathan, 4. 303, 307, 338, 389. 
Rustfield, owned by John Rust, 4. 303 ; 
mills at, 4. 303 ; rich grass at, 4. 
303; incorporated with Norway, 
4. 338; mentioned, 4. 301, 303, 
336, 338. 
Rutherford, the Rev. Robert, preached 
at Georgetown, 2. 221; came to 
America with the Scotch-Irish, 6. 
19 ; preached at Brunswick, Pem- 
aquid and Thomaston, 6. 33, 35; 
died, 6. 33. 

the Rev. , of Warren, 4. 326. 

Rutherford's island, 7. 63. 

Rutland, 2. 143, 250, 253; 4. 264; 8. 

413. 
Ryall, Samuel, wounded, 5. 120. 
Ryder, see Rider. 
Rye, 3. 211. 

Ryer, Christopher, 5. 88. 
Ryswick, peace of, 6. 126; 8. 349. 

Saaroon, 3. 412. 

Saawerramett, 3. 412. 

Sabadis, see Sabattis. 

Sabadock pond, i. 182. 

Sabasticook river, i. 504; 4. 110; 7.. 
168, 175; see Sebasticook. 

Sabattis, definition of, 4. 192. 
pilot of Arnold's army, i. 507n, 510, 
515; attempted to kill McKenzie, 
1.517-518; lived in Bakerstown, 
2. 112; chief of the Androscog- 
gins, 4. 110; conversed with the 
Rev. Paul Coffin, 4. 379; had a 
good knowledge of the English 
and French languages, 4. 379; 
mentioned, 3. 862, 412, 439; 4- 
174; 6. 261. 



248 



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETT. 



Sabattis — continued. 

pond, its outlet, 3. 321 ; the Indian 
road to Canada, 3. 322 ; a trading- 
house at, 3. 322; mentioned, 3. 
316; 4.110. 
river, outlet of Sabattis pond, 3. 
321~.322; probably visited by Pop- 
ham and Weymouth, 3.322; vis- 
ited by Gilbert, 5. 335; mentioned, 
3. 316. 

Sabbath, laws in regard to, i. 187; 6. 
184; actions brought for the 
breaking of, i. 189; 3. 126. 
day pond, origin of the name, 2. 
159-160. 

Sabine, Lorenzo, 5.382^; his account 
of the Penobscot Indians, cited, 
6. 232, 234; his American Loyal- 
ists, cited, 5. 228; his article on 
Public Lands, 5. 229, on the In- 
fluence of Mass. over Maine, 5. 
228-229, 229n; his report on the 
Principal Fisheries of the Ameri- 
can Seas, cited, 5. 145, 199, 229. 

Sabino, Indian name of Hunnewell's 
point, I. 29n; the intentions of 
those who came to, 7. 130-131; 
value attached to, 7. 131-132; for- 
tified, 7. 298, 312; how formed, 7. 
299 ; a place of aboriginal impor- 
tance, 7. 299-301 ; visited by Seba- 
noa, 7. 301 ; the Gift of God at, 
7. 301, 312 ; English principles took 
root at, 7.312; 8.349; mentioned, 
3.305; 7. 306. 
island, 3. 301. 

Sable island, 7. 250. 

Salousit, 4. 151. 

Sacadahoag, ) 

Sacadehoc, > see Sagadahoc. 

Sacadyhocke, ) 

Sacarabig falls, 4. 110. 

Sacarappy